Patrick Stanley Memorial Scholarship

Funded by
Stanley Stanley
Learn more about the Donor
$500
1 winner every year
Awarded
Winner
1
Finalists
5
Next Application Deadline
Mar 19, 2022
Next Winners Announced
Apr 20, 2022
Education Level
Graduate, Undergraduate
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Eligibility Requirements
Education Level:
Must be an undergraduate or graduate student
Path:
Must be a non-traditional student returning to school after a gap
Age:
Must be at least twenty-five years old
Education Level:
Path:
Age:
Must be an undergraduate or graduate student
Must be a non-traditional student returning to school after a gap
Must be at least twenty-five years old

Patrick Stanley was a father and a lifelong learner who was passionate about education and passed away too soon.

Patrick was a non-traditional student who finished his Bachelor’s degree at age 28, went back to school and earned his Master’s at the age of 52. At the time of his death at the age of 55, Patrick was applying for Ph.D. programs. 

This scholarship seeks to honor the life of Patrick Stanley and his love of learning by supporting a non-traditional student who is returning to school after a break in their education. 

Any undergraduate or graduate student who is at least 25 years old and is returning to school after a gap in their education may apply for this scholarship. 

To apply, submit an essay or a short video describing your academic history and your motivation to continue your education.

Published October 14, 2021
$500
1 winner every year
Awarded
Winner
1
Finalists
5
Next Application Deadline
Mar 19, 2022
Next Winners Announced
Apr 20, 2022
Education Level
Graduate, Undergraduate
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Essay Topic

Please submit an essay or a video describing your academic history and your motivation to continue schooling. 

400–600 words

Winning Application

Cindy Chen
Columbia University in the City of New YorkNew York, NY
After reading the book “Automating Inequality” by Virginia Eubanks a few years ago, I couldn’t sleep. The book details how minorities, women, and low-income Americans are disproportionately impacted by artificial intelligence (AI) that increasingly dictate decisions around healthcare, court sentencing, and access to social services. I felt I needed to do something about this issue. I believed that if AI continues to expand into public services, it should make the process fairer and more inclusive for marginalized individuals like my low-income family and neighbors. Likewise, having volunteered with a research center at my alma mater that focuses on violence against women and children, my concerns for how AI might further marginalize women facing domestic violence deeply resonated with me. In doing more research, I realized that the emerging field of “algorithmic accountability,” which is the practice of auditing algorithms and holding its developers responsible for their decision-making results, was the right path for my career at the intersection of data science and social good. My path into STEM has been meandering. In my undergrad, I studied a unique multidisciplinary program called "Arts & Science" that allowed me to take an assortment of courses like math, French, philosophy, and physics. I was interested in many subjects but didn't know what I wanted to do as a career. I eventually became intrigued with the idea of business regulation, but since I didn't understand what drove business decisions, I transferred schools in 2013 and pursued a two-year undergraduate business program. Through my business education, I fell in love with business analytics: the ability to unravel and solve complex problems using data. However, I always lamented discovering my interest in coding in my last semester of my final year of college. When I graduated in 2015, I worked in various roles in analytics though I always wished I had a stronger command of quantitative skills and knowledge, and had always hoped to someday return to the field of regulation. Accordingly, I began my Master of Arts in Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences (QMSS) at Columbia University in September 2021. Through this unique, interdisciplinary data science degree, I will study applied statistics, computer science, mathematics, and quantitative public policy. I am confident that my quantitative coursework will not only develop my ability to understand the latest techniques in automation, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, but also critique these approaches for their effectiveness in eliminating and considering bias. Likewise, my policy electives will contextualize the impact my quantitative skills could make in my career in algorithmic accountability. That way, I can draft sound policy, adequately critique regulations no matter how technical they may be, and ultimately protect marginalized populations who have the most to lose from automated decision-making. After all, when someone’s access to public housing, Medicaid coverage, or wait time for medical treatment hinges on automated decision-making mechanisms widely reported to make errors or show unintentional bias, these concerns are worth addressing. My experience growing up in a low-income household humanizes the people who disproportionately feel the effects of these errors. My graduate education will ensure that I can adequately help my community become more inclusive and equal for all people.

FAQ

When is the scholarship application deadline?

The application deadline is Mar 19, 2022. Winners will be announced on Apr 20, 2022.

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