Katelynn Berry Memorial Scholarship

Funded by
Carmell Mattison and Hank Berry
Learn more about the Donor
$4,525
1st winner$2,263
2nd winner$2,263
Awarded
Winners
2
Finalists
4
Application Deadline
May 20, 2022
Winners Announced
Jun 20, 2022
Education Level
High School
2
Contributions
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Eligibility Requirements
Education Level:
High school senior
State:
Montana or Minnesota
Background:
Mental illness diagnosis (students with schizophrenia preferred)
Education Level:
State:
Background:
High school senior
Montana or Minnesota
Mental illness diagnosis (students with schizophrenia preferred)

Katelynn Berry passed away too soon at the age of twenty-six after a tough battle with mental illness.

Mental illnesses and prescribed medication affect a student’s energy level, concentration, and can hamper their ability to remain gainfully employed while attending school. A mental health disorder, one that affects a person’s psychological well-being is hard enough to deal with for many on a daily basis outside of school. However, having a mental disorder while attending college and trying to remain employed to support your education can sometimes be an overwhelming experience.

This scholarship aims to honor Katelynn Berry’s life by spreading awareness about the serious threat posed by mental illnesses and its impact on one’s ability to attend college and obtain a degree.

Any high school senior in Montana or Minnesota who has been diagnosed with a mental illness may apply for this scholarship, but applicants with schizophrenia are preferred. One winner will be selected from Montana and one from Minnesota.

To apply, tell us how mental illness has affected you, your family, and your education goals as well as what steps you’ve taken to work on living with your mental illness.  

Published February 19, 2022
$4,525
1st winner$2,263
2nd winner$2,263
Awarded
Winners
2
Finalists
4
Application Deadline
May 20, 2022
Winners Announced
Jun 20, 2022
Education Level
High School
2
Contributions
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Essay Topic

How has your mental illness impacted you, your family, and your educational aspirations?  What initiative have you taken to work on positively living with your mental illness?

400–600 words

Winning Applications

Colby Jelliff
East Grand Forks Senior HighEast Grand Forks, MN
I have a long history of anxiety and throughout the years I have learned to deal. Anxiety is not new to my family so adapting was not a hardship especially with a supportive family. What I had to learn was to let go and learn I cannot control everything. This has always been an issue for me but one of the lasting memories of my panic attack was over collage tuition. I have always known I was going to be okay. My mom was able to make enough for the both of us to be comfortable. As I got older I got to see her anxiety come out over money and the cost of things and relishing I wouldn’t be able to afford college was hard. I had a major panic attack that I had not had for 3 years. Suddenly everything was out of control. Plans and dreams seemed out of touch and I lost so much confidence. We had to go to my grandparents and have them explain to me that there are some funds set aside for me by them to just help with the anxiety. I didn’t want to cause my family any hardship. My head space wasn’t helping. I am also the type who doesn’t want people to see them any other way but okay. If I cry it is not in front of anyone even my mom who I am the closest too. Time and time again my family has asked me too open up just a little and the only thing I feel comfortable opening up with is anger. What has made me angry today? My family now expects it. Who upset Colby today? It doesn’t make me feel any better but I have learned to open up a bit more than that, however it’s slow going. It due to these reasons I am so excited to go to college. That just brings back the anxiety of taking advantage of my family. I feel worse again. The only way I have learned to cope is by making myself cry sometimes to feel better. I lay in bed and watch a video or listen to a song that gets my eyes watery and I think of the stress and let the water world flow. This more than likely not a great coping mechanism but it is non harmful to myself or others and makes me feel better, lighter afterwards. I don’t believe my family and I have ever learned to deal with my mental illness or there’s but we have all learned to cope in our own ways and except each other for who we are. Try to leave each other be on bad days, and listen and support on the days where it’s needed.
Caleb Baxter
Fairview High SchoolSidney, MT
I have severe clinical depression with anxiety side effects, along with severe ADHD. These mental illnesses have impacted me in negative ways all my life. As far as I can remember my ADHD has been a problem in the classroom. I can never focus and every prescription I was prescribed never did much for me, they just made me feel worse and didn't help. My ADHD has been a problem since I was in 1st grade when I was diagnosed after the teacher rudely told my parents I have ADHD and need to be treated. She was right but that didn't mean she had to tell my parents that I needed to go to the doctor because "there was something seriously wrong with that boy's head". That teacher was terrible to me just because I had ADHD and made no effort to try and help me. She only ever excluded me and punished me for acting "out of line". I've been prescribed meds for my ADHD, but none of them ever worked. I've learned to live with my ADHD rather than trying to supress it. I embrace it rather than dread it, and its been great to me. I've learned alot about ADHD in the past years and how to almost use it to my advantage. I embrace the certain way my brain does things like putting off work until the last minute. Or even needing downtime between activities or just being forgetful. Putting off work is probably the hardest part for me (ontop of being forgetful), but what I've been doing is preparing myself for when I end up doing my work last minute, so its not as painful and goes alot faster. Even if that includes doing 99% of the work before last minute only to wait until the deadline is minutes away to finish. It gets stressful sometimes, but I manage. Now, my depression didn't present itself completely until I moved from Missoula, MT to Fairview, MT in 5th grade. Since then I've noticed myself become distant when things upset me or I cause problems for people. I'm a very indecisive person already so the depression has never been nice about my decision-making. I'm constantly belittling myself for mistakes that I shouldn't get so upset over. I also blame myself for things that are out of my control. I've attemped to combat this by doing a sort of self-coaching thing that I've found helps somewhat. If I find myself depressed I'll stop whatever I'm doing and do something that I enjoy or enjoyed doing even if i'm all burnt out from my depression. I'll talk to myself and write myself little notes that are possitive affirmations for myself to read later. It really helps flip my mood. Lastly, I have taken initiative by going to therapy and talking to my parents about what's going on in my head. This has helped greatly by helping me cope with these feelings in healthy ways. It took me some time to get comfortable with talking to my therapist about things. Over time it's been extremely helpful as she helps me with everything that I'm willing to share with her.

FAQ

When is the scholarship application deadline?

The application deadline is May 20, 2022. Winners will be announced on Jun 20, 2022.

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