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Yeaniva Sinnah

1095

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

I want to attend medical school and become an anesthesiologist. I know the process of medical school is demanding and strenuous but I have already taken the steps to further my education by choosing to graduate a year early from High School. I am passionate about learning and challenging my brain and I don't believe in taking the easy way out of life. I want my success to be a testament to the rewards of hard work and determination.

Education

Desert Edge High School

High School
2021 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Majors of interest:

    • Human Biology
    • Medicine
    • Chemistry
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      Sports

      Track & Field

      Varsity
      2021 – Present3 years

      Basketball

      Junior Varsity
      2021 – 20221 year

      Arts

      • Marching Band

        Music
        2021 – 2022

      Public services

      • Volunteering

        Victory Community Church — Program organizer, guest greeter, videographer
        2022 – Present

      Future Interests

      Advocacy

      Volunteering

      Philanthropy

      Entrepreneurship

      Overcoming Adversity - Jack Terry Memorial Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, in my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. Similar to Jack Terry, I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease and the only way through adversity is to get up again and again. As an immigrant, I understand the struggle of moving and having your whole life changed. Mr. Terry's story inspires me to keep going because tough times should only push us to work harder, to go that extra mile. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose is inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. As the eldest sibling, I've always found myself being a caretaker, finding the best way to ease the pain of the people around me. Anesthesia has always been fascinating to me, it's astonishing how a seemingly simple process takes away so many people's pain so they will be able to receive the help they need from medical professionals. My career will benefit the science field and in turn, I will benefit my community. My education will benefit my community through the act of being. Throughout my life, I have been inspired by the women all around me. From my mother, my Black teachers in middle school, all the way to the bus drivers I've had. All these educated women, knowingly or unknowingly, have shown me resilience, just by being, and I draw inspiration from them. Furthering my education not only honors their impact on my life but also inspires me to create an impact on another black girl's life. I want little girls to see my accomplishments and say, " I can do that too, I can be just like her" because they can. I will also use my education to promote these efforts financially, by donating to organizations just like this scholarship, I want to be a part of a legacy of Black female leaders, doctors, entrepreneurs... succeeders.
      William Griggs Memorial Scholarship for Science and Math
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose is inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. As the eldest sibling, I've always found myself being a caretaker, finding the best way to ease the pain of the people around me. Anesthesia has always been fascinating to me, it's astonishing how a seemingly simple process takes away so many people's pain so they will be able to receive the help they need from medical professionals. My career will benefit the science field and in turn, I will benefit my community. My education will benefit my community through the act of being. Throughout my life, I have been inspired by the women all around me. From my mother, my Black teachers in middle school, all the way to the bus drivers I've had. All these educated women, knowingly or unknowingly, have shown me resilience, just by being, and I draw inspiration from them. Furthering my education not only honors their impact on my life but also inspires me to create an impact on another black girl's life. I want little girls to see my accomplishments and say, " I can do that too, I can be just like her" because they can. I will also use my education to promote these efforts financially, by donating to organizations just like this scholarship, I want to be a part of a legacy of Black female leaders, doctors, entrepreneurs... succeeders.
      William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and I wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. This scholarship will not only benefit me academically but professionally, and personally. The burden of paying for tuition fees, books, and classes will be lifted, and with this freedom, I will be able to afford mentorship programs and professional internships, creating connections to assist me through the challenging journey of the medical profession. I will be moving across the country to attend Howard University and the financial burden on my parents is already heightened. Personally, with this scholarship, I will be able to attend college with my head held high, in full confidence, it would serve as a reminder of the importance of perseverance and determination in achieving my goals.
      Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and I wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. This scholarship will not only benefit me academically but professionally, and personally. The burden of paying for tuition fees, books, and classes will be lifted, and with this freedom, I will be able to afford mentorship programs and professional internships, creating connections to assist me through the challenging journey of the medical profession. I will be moving across the country to attend Howard University and the financial burden on my parents is already heightened. Personally, with this scholarship, I will be able to attend college with my head held high, in full confidence, it would serve as a reminder of the importance of perseverance and determination in achieving my goals. My education will benefit my community through the act of being. Throughout my life, I have been inspired by the women all around me. From my mother, my Black teachers in middle school, all the way to the bus drivers I've had. All these educated women, knowingly or unknowingly, have shown me resilience, just by being, and I draw inspiration from them. Furthering my education not only honors their impact on my life but also inspires me to create an impact on another black girl's life. I want little girls to see my accomplishments and say, " I can do that too, I can be just like her" because they can. I will also use my education to promote these efforts financially, by donating to organizations just like this scholarship, I want to be a part of a legacy of Black female leaders, doctors, entrepreneurs... succeeders.
      New Beginnings Immigrant Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old and I am from Goodyear Arizona. My whole life I've had to adapt or change. My core memories are centered around moving, my family moved from Sierra Leone to Arizona when I was four years old. That was a huge change, I don't remember much of it, but what I do remember is the struggle. My mother struggled with Post Partum Depression alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep our little family in a one-bedroom apartment. I remember the food banks, I hated being in those buildings, watching my parents create meals from donated food in cardboard boxes. The food banks were like lost and founds, steadily collected items redistributed to those in need, except, food wasn't always stable. We didn't have much and life was always fluctuating, but through it all, one thing stayed constant, I learned. I learned through life experiences, I learned through school, and I was always fed with knowledge, education has always been an anchor in my life. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and I wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. My education will benefit my community through the act of being. Throughout my life, I have been inspired by the women all around me. From my mother, my Black teachers in middle school, all the way to the bus drivers I've had. All these educated women, knowingly or unknowingly, have shown me resilience, just by being, and I draw inspiration from them. Furthering my education not only honors their impact on my life but also inspires me to create an impact on another black girl's life. I want little girls to see my accomplishments and say, " I can do that too, I can be just like her" because they can. I will also use my education to promote these efforts financially, by donating to organizations just like this scholarship, I want to be a part of a legacy of Black female leaders, doctors, entrepreneurs... succeeders.
      Jiang Amel STEM Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old and I am from Goodyear Arizona. My whole life I've had to adapt or change. My core memories are centered around moving, my family moved from Sierra Leone to Arizona when I was four years old. That was a huge change, I don't remember much of it, but what I do remember is the struggle. My mother struggled with Post Partum Depression alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep our little family in a one-bedroom apartment. I remember the food banks, I hated being in those buildings, watching my parents create meals from donated food in cardboard boxes. The food banks were like lost and founds, steadily collected items redistributed to those in need, except, food wasn't always stable. We didn't have much and life was always fluctuating, but through it all, one thing stayed constant, I learned. I learned through life experiences, I learned through school, and I was always fed with knowledge, education has always been an anchor in my life. My career goal is to become an Anesthesiologist. Currently, my goal is to graduate High School and get my associate's degree before entering college in the Fall of 2024, through dual enrollment. I have come a long way to reach my goals, I decided to graduate from High School a year early. I felt dormant in High School and I wanted something more to challenge myself because I don't believe in just getting by in life, my parents have instilled in me, the importance of honest, hard work. We all need a purpose, something to keep us going, and my purpose inspiring myself every day, and through that, I will be able to inspire the people around me. My education will benefit my community through the act of being. Throughout my life, I have been inspired by the women all around me. From my mother, my Black teachers in middle school, all the way to the bus drivers I've had. All these educated women, knowingly or unknowingly, have shown me resilience, just by being, and I draw inspiration from them. Furthering my education not only honors their impact on my life but also inspires me to create an impact on another black girl's life. I want little girls to see my accomplishments and say, " I can do that too, I can be just like her" because they can. I will also use my education to promote these efforts financially, by donating to organizations just like this scholarship, I want to be a part of a legacy of Black female leaders, doctors, entrepreneurs... succeeders.
      Maxwell Tuan Nguyen Memorial Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. It's been 13 years since my family immigrated to Arizona, and a lot has changed. Both my parents are registered nurses, I have three more siblings, and we are all thriving. Despite all the changes, my parents never gave up on their dreams, and that is the driving factor of my ambition. They have instilled in me, the importance of hard work, and from a young age, I knew what I wanted. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. Anesthesia is one of the most important parts of a medical procedure and anesthesiologists usually don't get as much credit and praise as surgeons because they are in the background. I want to help people through their toughest procedures and make it as painless as possible. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. I plan on expanding my practice to my home country, Sierra Leone, and Africa, and service people who may not have funds for life-threatening procedures. I want to help bring the best doctors to the least privileged places. This journey I’m on is not only about me being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.
      A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. Throughout elementary school, I was in the gifted program, and I loved it. I loved the projects we did, the small groups, and the conversations with people who I thought were just like me. When I got to middle school, there were no gifted programs, and the lack of that challenge changed me. I became dull, I felt like a robot, doing the same thing every day. I had been doing everything “normal”, up until 8th grade when I got the opportunity to join the “FastTrack Program”. If you got chosen, you would be able to join a 9th-grade Algebra 1 class and earn high school credits. It was pretty scary but I took the chance and I excelled, I ended the class with an “A”. Through the COVID period with bad wifi and poor learning environments, I pushed through and challenged myself. Before the 8th-grade year was over, there was another opportunity to take a Geometry class, I knew this would be hard because I was only in 8th grade, taking on a Sophmore level class. A lot of my peers decided they’d stop at Algebra 1, but I wanted more, so I kept going. I passed the class and I felt the most accomplished in my entire life, I thought I was done. After a couple of months, I quickly realized high school would be just like middle school. I needed a challenge, something more! So I decided to graduate from high school a year early. I put in the hard work and I want to continue to push the bar higher and challenge myself. I got accepted to the Honors Society and that same month I talked to my counselor about early graduation. I got all the checks off and the approvals and I was set. I applied to EMCC and I did the required summer class. I’m currently enrolled in an English 102 class and I am constantly pushing myself to continue because I’m doing this for myself and the people I love. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. This journey I’m on is not only about me being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.
      Rose Ifebigh Memorial Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six years old and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. I didn't fit in most of Elementary school because of my accent, my parent's accents, the way my clothes smelled, and the way my hair was braided in the signature "pineapple style". Throughout elementary school, I was in the gifted program, and I loved it. I loved the projects we did, the small groups, and the conversations with people who I thought were just like me. When I got to middle school, there were no gifted programs and a lack of academic challenge. I lost my spark up until 8th grade when I earned an opportunity to be in the "FastTrack Program". I was hesitant at first but my parents gave me the push I needed to face my fears and excel. One amazing perk of being from an African home or any immigrant family is the drive that is instilled in us children from a young age. It's usually shown in the form of tough love but my parents have always said, "We brought you to this country to succeed", and that has been my mantra my whole life. I know that no matter what happens, I have someone rooting for me, someone depending on my success. Whether it be my family back home, my teacher, or one of my parent's co-workers who I've never met before(my parents never fail to fill them in on all my accomplishments) I know I have a backbone and a community anticipating that I prosper. I decided to graduate from high school a year early. I put in the hard work and I want to continue to push the bar higher and challenge myself. I got accepted to the Honors Society and that same month I talked to my counselor about early graduation. I got all the checks off and the approvals and I was set. I applied to EMCC and I did the required summer class. I’m currently enrolled in an English 102 class and I am constantly pushing myself to continue because I’m doing this for myself and the people I love. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. This journey I’m on is not only about being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.
      Hester Richardson Powell Memorial Service Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told "Do not open the front door for anybody”. I learned life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. Throughout elementary school, I was in the gifted program, and I loved it. I loved the projects we did, the small groups, and the conversations with people who I thought were just like me. When I got to middle school, there were no gifted programs, and the lack of that challenge changed me. I became dull, I felt like a robot, doing the same thing every day. I had been doing everything “normal”, up until 8th grade when I got the opportunity to join the “FastTrack Program”. If you got chosen, you would be able to join a 9th-grade Algebra 1 class and earn high school credits. It was pretty scary but I took the chance and I excelled, I ended the class with an “A”. Through the COVID period with bad wifi and poor learning environments, I pushed through and challenged myself. Before the 8th-grade year was over, there was another opportunity to take a Geometry class, I knew this would be hard because I was only in 8th grade, taking on a Sophmore level class. A lot of my peers decided they’d stop at Algebra 1, but I wanted more, so I kept going. I passed the class and I felt the most accomplished in my entire life, I thought I was done. After a couple of months, I quickly realized high school would be just like middle school. I needed a challenge, something more! So I decided to graduate from high school a year early. I put in the hard work and I want to continue to push the bar higher and challenge myself. I got accepted to the Honors Society and that same month I talked to my counselor about early graduation. I got all the checks off and the approvals and I was set. I applied to EMCC and I did the required summer class. I’m currently enrolled in an English 102 class and I am constantly pushing myself to continue because I’m doing this for myself and the people I love. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. This journey I’m on is not only about me being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.
      Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only place I knew since we moved to this strange country. I learned what Postpartum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told to not “open the front door for anybody”. I learned: that life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. Throughout elementary school, I was in the gifted program, and I loved it. I loved the projects we did, the small groups, and the conversations with people who I thought were just like me. When I got to middle school, there were no gifted programs, and the lack of that challenge changed me. I became dull, I felt like a robot, doing the same thing every day. I had been doing everything “normal”, up until 8th grade when I got the opportunity to join the “FastTrack Program”. If you got chosen, you would be able to join a 9th-grade Algebra 1 class and earn high school credits. It was pretty scary but I took the chance and I excelled, I ended the class with an “A”. Through the COVID period with bad wifi and poor learning environments, I pushed through and challenged myself. Before the 8th-grade year was over, there was another opportunity to take a Geometry class, I knew this would be hard because I was only in 8th grade, taking on a Sophmore level class. A lot of my peers decided they’d stop at Algebra 1, but I wanted more, so I kept going. I passed the class and I felt the most accomplished in my entire life, I thought I was done. After a couple of months, I quickly realized high school would be just like middle school. I needed a challenge, something more! So I decided to graduate from high school a year early. I put in the hard work and I want to continue to push the bar higher and challenge myself. I got accepted to the Honors Society and that same month I talked to my counselor about early graduation. I got all the checks off and the approvals and I was set. I applied to EMCC and I did the required summer class. I’m currently enrolled in an English 102 class and I am constantly pushing myself to continue because I’m doing this for myself and the people I love. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. This journey I’m on is not only about me being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.
      Marian Haley Memorial Scholarship
      My name is Yeaniva Sinnah, I am 16 years old, and I was born in Sierra Leone, West Africa. I am the first daughter of immigrant parents. Coming to America, I learned everything, In my house I’m “the genius” because of how much I know about the world, about little things nobody notices. I had to start paying attention to the little things from an early age. I learned that we had to move from a house to an apartment because we were no longer welcome in the only home I knew when we moved to this strange country. I learned what Post Partum Depression is when I was six and my mother would struggle with my baby sisters alone because my father had to work double shifts to keep us in our one-bedroom apartment. I learned that a food bank wasn’t just for the homeless. I learned responsibility when my parents left me to watch my little sisters, I was told to not “open the front door for anybody”. I learned: that life will never be fair, but through great hardship comes ease. Throughout elementary school, I was in the gifted program, and I loved it. I loved the projects we did, the small groups, and the conversations with people who I thought were just like me. When I got to middle school, there were no gifted programs, and the lack of that challenge changed me. I became dull, I felt like a robot, doing the same thing every day. I had been doing everything “normal”, up until 8th grade when I got the opportunity to join the “FastTrack Program”. If you got chosen, you would be able to join a 9th-grade Algebra 1 class and earn high school credits. It was pretty scary but I took the chance and I excelled, I ended the class with an “A”. Through the COVID period with bad wifi and poor learning environments, I pushed through and challenged myself. Before the 8th-grade year was over, there was another opportunity to take a Geometry class, I knew this would be hard because I was only in 8th grade, taking on a Sophmore level class. A lot of my peers decided they’d stop at Algebra 1, but I wanted more, so I kept going. I passed the class and I felt the most accomplished in my entire life, I thought I was done. After a couple of months, I quickly realized high school would be just like middle school. I needed a challenge, something more! So I decided to graduate from high school a year early. I put in the hard work and I want to continue to push the bar higher and challenge myself. I got accepted to the Honors Society and that same month I talked to my counselor about early graduation. I got all the checks off and the approvals and I was set. I applied to EMCC and I did the required summer class. I’m currently enrolled in an English 102 class and I am constantly pushing myself to continue because I’m doing this for myself and the people I love. I want to major in Biology and become an Anesthesiologist. Education means everything to me, I've built my whole life on education, it's all I know. I want to impact the world by showing other girls that they can succeed, no matter their situations. This journey I’m on is not only about me being honest with myself, but it’s about the struggle I’ve witnessed all around me, My success, my life, is an ode to love.