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Yazmin Wilson

6765

Bold Points

48x

Nominee

2x

Finalist

Bio

Hello! My name is Yazmin. I am a focused scholar that has a passion for learning and working to meet my full potential. I am determined to be a positive role model and contributor to society as I plan to become a Black female Engineer. Only 2% of Engineers are Black Women. I am passionate about the representation of Black Women in STEM fields so I am working towards doing my part to change that! I am in the Science and Technology program with a concentration in Engineering at Charles Herbert Flowers High School. I serve as the President of my school's National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) chapter. I am also involved in Girl Scouts and numerous honor societies. During my free time, I enjoy dancing and watching thriller movies with my family.

Education

Charles Herbert Flowers High

High School
2018 - 2022
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Electromechanical Engineering
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 1360
      SAT
    • 1250
      PSAT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Engineering

    • Dream career goals:

      I want to lead the way and one day be able to have a lasting impact on young Black girls of the next generation so that one day they too will become Engineers. I want to inspire young Black girls and be that familiar face In the Engineering field

    • Intern

      Capitol Technology University
      2021 – Present3 years

    Sports

    Kung Fu

    Club
    2014 – 20173 years

    Cricket

    Club
    2013 – 20152 years

    Awards

    • Best Batter

    Basketball

    Varsity
    2016 – 20182 years

    Awards

    • 2018 PGCPS Scholar Athlete Award Winner

    Research

    • Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians

      Capitol Technology University — Lead Researcher
      2021 – Present
    • Engineering, General

      Bright Schools — Researcher
      2016 – 2017

    Arts

    • Charles Herbert Flowers High School

      Architecture
      2019 – Present
    • Walker Mill Middle School

      Orchestra
      2015 – 2018

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Girl Scouts — Canned Food Drive Organizer
      2018 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Prince George’s County Public Schools — I served as an American Ambassador throughout the Chinese-American Student-Exchange Program.
      2016 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      Ivy Community Charities — I was responsible with helping high schoolers select their homecoming dress and take pictures of them wearing it,
      2019 – 2019

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Pandemic's Box Scholarship
    The pandemic forced me to spend a lot of time at home. In the beginning, I used this time to take naps, scroll on TikTok, and take more naps. I loved it because it gave me a much needed break from everything. A few months into quarantine, I realized that I could take this opportunity to begin preparing for college since I was a rising junior. I enrolled myself in virtual SAT prep courses and spent most of my time studying. Doing this helped me earn the score I wanted. I also attended a virtual African American studies course at Bowie State University. I did this not only to challenge myself by taking a college course, but also to learn more about my history. Sitting at home during the pandemic also gave me a lot of time to apply for scholarships such as this one. This helps me earn the necessary funds I need to attend an HBCU and become an electrical engineer. I aspire to become a black female engineer so I can inspire young girls in the future to pursue STEM careers. In a way, my efforts during the pandemic brought me a step closer to that goal.
    Next Young Leaders Program Scholarship
    This past school year, I decided that I wanted to be more involved. With the pandemic going on, opportunities were limited, but thankfully, I was able to join my school’s National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) organization. During the first meeting, our sponsor informed us that she needed students to apply for the leadership positions within the organization since the seniors that had previously occupied those positions had graduated. At the time, I didn't think much of this because, initially, it didn’t make sense for me to apply for a leadership position when I had just joined the organization 5 minutes prior. After the meeting, I gave it some thought and said “why not?”. My mom has always told me to be a leader, so I forced myself to apply. I wanted to start small, though, so rather than applying to be president or vice-president, I applied to be the treasurer. Soon enough, I was treasurer of the organization. I took the job of being on the organization’s executive board very seriously, unfortunately, a lot more seriously than the other members of the board. In order to pick up their slack, oftentimes, I did their jobs in addition to my own. This included leading meetings when the president and vice-president were absent, taking notes in those meetings that I lead, recruiting new members, and brainstorming fundraising ideas. My sponsor noticed this and promoted me to be the president of the organization, which I am currently. This leadership experience has taught me that leadership is about being responsible and accountable. Leaders are responsible for not only getting things done, but also encouraging others to do the same. A leader is the person who stays on top of their responsibilities and holds themselves and others accountable to do so. Leaders have to make sure that they are helping the people that they lead by providing guidance or just simply leading by example. For example, whenever any members of the organization needed help, I was there to assist them in the best way possible. I may not have always had all of the answers, but I tried my best. I learned many things during my leadership experience that will definitely help me in the future after college. I learned how to effectively communicate with people. This was especially challenging this year due to everything being virtual and not being able to talk to people face-to-face. Knowing your audience is important to knowing how to convey a message. As president, I had to speak to many different types of people. I soon learned that communicating with students is a little different than communicating with adults. Knowing this will help me better express myself in the future. I also learned how to manage my time better. Sometimes, many things have to get done in a short period of time, but that is not an excuse to not do them. Being a leader helped me explore ways to get everything done while keeping my mental health in check. I came to the realization that 1) Breaks are necessary, but not for too long and 2) Procrastination leads to stress. Using what I’ve learned will no doubt help me excel in my future career. Leaders are the most important people in this world. While it may be on a smaller scale, I am grateful and proud of myself that I am able to be a leader within my school community. I plan to continue to be a leader throughout my life, whether it be by occupying a leadership position, or simply by helping others succeed.
    Bold Moments No-Essay Scholarship
    In 2017, I decided to join my middle school basketball team. I joined for two reasons. 1) To make more friends and 2) To get a nice jacket that the school gave all the basketball players. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that decision would lead me to be awarded the 2018 Prince George's County Public Schools Scholar Athlete Award. This taught me that hard work pays off and that recognition can come from unexpected places. Somebody is always watching.
    Liz's Bee Kind Scholarship
    Transitioning from middle school to high school has its challenges. My high school has over 2,000 students so it was even more difficult to navigate through it all. As the quiet, incoming freshman that I was, this was overwhelming at times. One of the most stress-inducing parts of it all was trying to find a place to sit in the lunchroom. On my first day of high school, I was assigned to C Lunch. When I entered the lunchroom, there were at least 500 students in there, many of them were scary upperclassmen in my freshmen eyes. My very first thought was "Where am I going to sit?" Most of the tables I saw were full and even if they weren't, I was too shy to sit at a table with someone I didn't know. None of my middle school friends were assigned to C Lunch so I was out of luck. After walking around the lunchroom for five minutes, grasping and looking down at my phone for comfort, I finally found an empty table. Initially, I was relieved, but once I sat down I realized that I must look lame sitting at a table all by myself. There was not much I could do about this though so I continued to look down at my phone. One of my classmates saw me and called me over to her table with her and her friends. I was reluctant at first because I did not know the people at that table and I had started to become comfortable with sitting alone. Nonetheless, she insisted I come sit with them so I did. This was one of the best decisions I made because everyone at that table soon became my friend and that girl is still one of my best friends to this day. From that point on, they always welcomed me at their table. Some people may consider what she did not a big deal, but it meant a lot to me. She made me feel a lot more comfortable in a room of chaos. I was able to repay her the next year. We were both invited to a party that consisted of many of my middle school friends who she did not know. At the party, I introduced her to my friends as she introduced me to hers a year prior. I also made sure to include her in our conversations. She thanked me and told me that I made her more comfortable in a room of chaos.
    Fleming Law College Scholarship
    My smartphone is my life. Now, I know that may sound a little dramatic, but it's the truth. My smartphone is the first thing I pick up when I wake up and the last thing I put down before I go to sleep. I average about 16 hours of screen time per day. My phone is always in my hand and when it's not, I have mini heart attacks. Some may say I'm attached. I'll own up to that 100%. People, usually those of older generations, see this as a major problem. Some even blame every problem imaginable on smartphones. For example, one time I told my parents that I had a stomach ache. They replied, "It's because you're always on that phone." Nonetheless, I love my smartphone. It allows me to connect with the outside world. This is even more important today as we are in a pandemic so there aren't many opportunities to socialize and stay connected in person. My smartphone keeps me up to date on global news, the newest trends, and most importantly, what my friends ate for breakfast. During the virtual school day, I use my smartphone as a personal tutor because it has every answer. it has helped me maintain a 4.37 GPA. I used my smartphone to find and apply for this scholarship. As you can see, smartphones are important to me. Not only are they used for entertainment, but they also help with important things such as this. I will admit, though, smartphones can be a distraction. I've often found myself scrolling through my smartphone instead of paying attention to a lecture. This has cost me some quiz grades. My smartphone is also a great procrastination enhancer. Sometimes I use my smartphone instead of completing an assignment. I've probably checked my smartphone about 5 times so far while writing this essay. I love my smartphone, but I do know when to put it down when it's most important: on the road. I never use or even look at my smartphone while I'm driving. I am aware of the dangerous risks of doing so and do not want to lose my life over a text. Smartphones are great devices, but they can be the difference between life or death. I'm sure many people of my generation feel the same as I do about smartphones. Maybe one day I will be able to go less than 16 hours of the day using it. Until then, let me check this text rea quick.
    Black Engineering Leaders Grant
    As I am currently reaching the end of my junior year in high school, I feel as though there is so much that needs to be done, yet not enough time to do it. Preparing to go to college is my number 1 priority right now and I'm sure it will continue to be at the top of my To Do List until I arrive on an HBCU campus in the fall of 2022. There are so many things I need to do in order to reach one of my biggest life goals: becoming a Black woman Engineer. At my high school, I am in the Science & Technology program with a focus of Engineering. I've always loved math and science so engineering is a perfect fit for me. I plan to major in either Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering in college. Furthermore, I will pursue a career in that field. Although my interest in math and science was an important factor in deciding this, representation is just as important of a factor. Only 5% of Engineers in the United States are Black, with only 2% being Black women. Studies show that this is because there is a lack of representation and role models in the Engineering field for young Black girls. I want to lead the way and one day be able to have a lasting impact on young Black girls of the next generation so that one day they too will become Engineers. I want to inspire young Black girls and be that familiar face In the Engineering field. As a student right now, I rarely see Black women Engineers. Whenever I attend Engineering workshops and forums, the speakers are almost always men. I want this to be different for girls in 10-20 years. Seeing a face like theirs may encourage them to enter the Engineering field. They may think, "Well if she can do it, I can too!" and that is absolutely right. I am passionate about increasing Black women's representation in not only Engineering fields, but all other STEM fields as well. In order to meet this long-term goal, I recognize that meeting short-term ones are important. This includes doing well in school, which I am succeeding at. I currently hold a 4.37 GPA, excelling in all of my Engineering courses at that. I also participate in many extra-curricular activities, including the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), in which I am president of my school's chapter. I actively serve my community as I have accumulated more than 70 hours of service. I feel as though all of this is important in order to be accepted into college so that I can further my Engineering education. During my senior year, I will have an internship working in Engineering labs. I am doing this so that I am able to get more hands-on experience than I do inside the classroom. I will also use this opportunity to network and speak to current Engineering professionals. Gaining knowledge from people that have traveled the path that I am on will help me reach my destination. While my interest in math and science brought my attention to Engineering, my goals within the field are much bigger. I will become a Black woman Engineer. I will inspire the next generation of Black girls to pursue not only Engineering careers, but STEM careers too. It all starts now, as a Black girl in high school wanting change.
    Brandon Zylstra Road Less Traveled Scholarship
    I was the quiet kid. I was the kid that sat alone in class, struggled to find a place to sit in the cafeteria, and dreaded having to find a partner for group assignments. Socializing with people had always been a challenge for me. In seventh grade, I wanted to change this, so I decided to try out for the middle school basketball team. The basketball players were always the most popular in school. They were never alone and never quiet. While I did not have the intention of becoming popular, I did expect to make some friends and step out of my comfort zone. At the time, I was a decent basketball player, but I feared this would not be enough to make the team. Other students had better relationships with the coaches since they were not quiet kids and they often conversed with them. Regardless, I went to tryouts - of course sitting alone and not talking to any of the other players. Surprisingly, I made the team. As everyone was crowded around the gym door looking at the posted sheet of players who made the team I heard, "Wow, Yazmin made the team?". Due to my quiet reputation, I was least expected to do so. Throughout the season, I barely talked to my teammates, but being on the team led to more people around the school talking to me. Over the year, I became less quiet and more confident. I continued playing basketball during my eighth grade as it developed into a passion of mine. By then, I had a good group of friends and was no longer the quietest kid. At the end of each year, my county holds a "Board Awards". Shockingly, I was nominated to receive the "Scholar Athlete of the Year" Award. I ended up beating the odds, winning the award over every other student athlete in the county. I went from being the quiet kid that somehow made the basketball team to being recognized as the scholar athlete of the year. In high school, I retired from basketball and joined the Science and Technology program. My passion for basketball transitioned into a passion for engineering. I've always loved math and science so engineering is a perfect fit for me. I plan to major in either Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering at an HBCU. Although my interest in math and science was an important factor in deciding this, representation is a just as important factor. Only 5% of Engineers in the United States are Black, with only 2% being Black women. Studies show that this is because there is a lack of representation and role models in the Engineering field for young Black girls. I want to lead the way and one day be able to have a lasting impact on young Black girls of the next generation so that one day they will too become Engineers. In order to meet this long-term goal, I recognize that meeting short-term ones are important. This includes doing well in school, which I am succeeding at. I currently hold a 4.37 GPA, excelling in all of my Engineering courses at that. I also participate in many extra-curricular activities, including the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), in which I am president of my school's chapter. I am passionate about Engineering and Black women's representation in STEM fields. Therefore, I will become a Black woman Engineer and inspire the next generation of Black girls to pursue not only Engineering careers, but STEM careers too. It all starts now, as a junior in high school, writing scholarship essays.
    Impact Scholarship for Black Students
    I am anxious. As I am currently reaching the end of my junior year in high school, I feel as though there is so much that needs to be done, yet not enough time to do it. Preparing to go to college is my number 1 priority and I'm sure it will continue to be at the top of my To Do List until I arrive on campus in the fall of 2022. Until then, I plan to continue to work on the first biggest goal of my life thus far: earning enough scholarships to cover the cost of attending a HBCU. I know that receiving scholarships is hard enough, but earning a full ride to any university seems nearly impossible. Many times I've found myself sitting back and thinking, "Why me...why would a university choose me for a scholarship?", There are so many other candidates. This leaves me feeling uneasy and sometimes even discouraged. Nonetheless, as I sit here writing this scholarship essay, I am proud that I am determined enough to do so. At my high school, I am in the Science & Technology program with a focus of Engineering. I've always loved math and science so engineering is a perfect fit for me. I plan to major in either Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering in college. Furthermore, I will purse a career in that field. Although my interest in math and science was an important factor in deciding this, representation is a just as important factor. Only 5% of Engineers in the United States are Black, with only 2% being Black women. Studies show that this is because there is a lack of representation and role models in the Engineering field for young Black girls. I want to lead the way and one day be able to have a lasting impact on young Black girls of the next generation so that one day they will become Engineers. I am confident in my ability to do this and I'm very excited. In order to meet this long-term goal, I recognize that meeting short-term ones are important. This includes doing well in school, which I am succeeding at. I currently hold a 4.37 GPA, excelling in all of my Engineering courses at that. I also participate in many extra-curricular activities, including the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), in which I am president of my school's chapter. I actively serve my community as I have accumulated more than 70 hours of service. I feel as though all of this is important in order to earn scholarships as well as getting accepted into a HBCU so I will continue to do this. Yes, I am anxious about my future, as most high school students are, but I am determined to make it how I want it to be. I will attend an HBCU. I will become a Black woman Engineer. I will inspire the next generation of Black girls to pursue not only Engineering careers, but STEM careers too. It all starts now, as a junior in high school, writing scholarship essays.