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Victoria Monroe

1975

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Bio

17 | Schreyer Honors Scholar at Penn State | Aspiring LEED Architect | Fair Funding and Civil Rights Activist

Education

Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Architecture and Related Services, Other
  • Minors:
    • Sociology
    • Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other

Delaware County Community College

Technical bootcamp
2019 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities
  • GPA:
    4

Penn Wood High School

High School
2018 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Architecture
    • Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD
  • Minors:
    • Spanish Language and Literature
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Architecture
    • Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other
    • Criminology
    • Sociology
    • Political Science and Government
    • Sustainability Studies
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Architecture & Planning

    • Dream career goals:

      Company founder and Drafter

      Sports

      Dancing

      Intramural
      2013 – 20207 years

      Softball

      Varsity
      2017 – 20203 years

      Basketball

      Junior Varsity
      2019 – 20201 year

      Volleyball

      Varsity
      2016 – Present8 years

      Awards

      • Most Vauable Player
      • Undefeated

      Research

      • Sustainability Studies

        The Pennsylvania State University — Sole Researcher
        2021 – Present

      Arts

      • Penn Wood High School Music Program

        Music
        Multiple
        2019 – Present
      • Independent

        Graphic Art
        N/A
        2015 – 2020
      • Independent

        Drawing
        N/A
        2015 – Present
      • Ms. Carols Center for Dance

        Dance
        Multiple
        2013 – 2020
      • Penn Wood High School Theatre Program

        Acting
        Fame
        2018 – Present

      Public services

      • Advocacy

        Delaware County Youth Education Alliance — Voter registration manager
        2020 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Independent — Provider
        2020 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Delaware County Youth Education Alliance — Organizer
        2020 – Present
      • Advocacy

        Independent — Leader and Speaker
        2020 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Independent — Volunteer
        2020 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Independent — Student teacher
        2016 – Present

      Future Interests

      Advocacy

      Volunteering

      Philanthropy

      Entrepreneurship

      Bold Deep Thinking Scholarship
      I think the biggest problem the world is facing is universal fairness because, in this world, it does not exist. The concept of fairness has many layers that need to be taken into account before it is used for any conversation, one of them being equity. Equity, differing from equality, is the ability to access equal opportunities. Because of prejudices like racism, homophobia, xenophobia, and ableism, equity cannot be attained. This is extremely significant within education. A large portion of inequity from the education system is funding. The lack of funding for education in lower income neighborhoods strips opportunities for intelligent students that deserve equal, if not more, opportunities than their higher-income counterparts. Transferring from a private school to a public school, I realized the hard work and determination it takes to be recognized by the nation as smart. I realized the strength and innovation needed to create something when you lack the resources. I realized without the opportunities that should be equally accessible for all, I had to use my mind to create pathways to success. Without opportunities that are accessible for all, fairness our education system cannot exist. Although saying we can never achieve equity is a pessimistic perspective, it is reality. I have been taught, as a black person, that the world will never be fair to you if you stay true to yourself. However, I was also taught to never let fairness dictate your life. I believe, to fight towards equity, we need to teach our youth grit and perseverance. If you work hard, if you never quit, if you pursue what you are meant to do, you will be unstoppable, no matter the obstacle. This mindset pushes me to be a better person for me and others as well.
      WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
      “Use your feet to stand your ground, use your words to spark a revolution” Those were words I told my peers who were as tired as I was. My community needed their voices heard, and I did everything in my power to ensure it. During the summer, there was another tragic black death due to police ignorance. George Floyd, a 46-year-old father of five, was murdered. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, he called out to his mother in pain while his life was drained from his body. Derek Chauvin, sworn by the federal law to protect every citizen, murdered with little consequence. The tragedy woke up America. It broadcasted the pain Black Americans felt for over 400 years. We marched and screamed that we required change. Yet, the government only sees our skin two ways: a slave or a weapon. We were tormented by the people who gave us the right to protest. I saw my people risking their lives to ensure our future is the best. When George Floyd passed, I felt in my heart my community had to speak up and be a part of the movement. It started with an impulsive, explicit Instagram post resenting the justice system that doesn't believe my life matters. Then my friend said two words that set me off: “Do it.” I asked my peers what they wanted to see, hear, and how to represent us. I wanted to make sure it was not only my voice, but the whole community's. Then I contacted my local government officials. Surprisingly, the police department reached out to me before I could. The chief of police was devastated by George Floyd’s death and the suppression of black voices. He wanted to give me a police escort, and I agreed if he participated in the protest. He agreed. After, I created a flyer and sent it out. Over a thousand people marched 2 miles screaming “Black Lives Matter”. The local news station interviewed us about our experiences as activists and black people. At the end of the protest, I gave a speech demanding nationally police departments support Black lives and expose their comrades who devalue people of color. When it was over, I cried. We were heard across Philadelphia. We showed how we were stronger as one. I am grateful to have a community that supports others. It was a life-changing experience that led me to become a better person. Black Lives will forever Matter, and I have a thousand people who can say the same thing. I want to incorporate that sense of community into my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that's happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world. Article link: https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2020/06/14/penn-wood-high-school-student-victoria-monroe-leads-black-lives-matter-protest-in-delaware-county/
      Pride Palace LGBTQ+ Scholarship
      To me, womanhood goes beyond sex or even gender. It is to be everything this world needs and desires while still being pushed away. To be gay and a woman, though, is pushing against all odds, the undesirable, the desirable, being fetishized, being praised all for the sake of love which is a beautiful thing. Instagram: vmonroe.tori Twitter: torimonroe18
      Women in Music Scholarship
      Music is a consequential part of my family and I. I come from a family of musicians. This art runs in my blood. My most fond memory of music is playing with my grandfather. Ever since I was born, he wanted me to be a musician with no exceptions. By the age of 4, he was teaching me the piano and to sing in his homemade studio down in the basement. Singing and playing “Twinkle Twinkle”, eating our favorite, Oreos, was the best part of my day. Eventually, I began to stop taking lessons; I was a busy student. However, I always find my way back to a pair of headphones or a guitar, back to music. I never realized how much it meant to me and how intricately it is embedded into my soul until he passed. That’s when, for the first time, I realized I subconsciously pursued his legacy because it felt like home. I went on to participate in my school’s bands. Firstly, I was in a Concert Band. I was 2nd clarinet 1st chair and Section Leader. I really enjoyed Concert Band because it forced me to focus on my technique not only for myself, but my section as well. It created the same sense of family my grandfather gave me. Then I was in a Jazz Band. I played electric guitar and percussion. I really liked Jazz Band because it allowed myself to feel free in the music and have fun with my friends while playing music. Jazz also runs deep in my family. Whenever there is a function, there would be music, either performed live or off an old CD no one remembers the name of. We didn’t need to, we felt it. Lastly, I was in Marching band. I was also 2nd clarinet 1st chair. I loved the marching band. I loved the feeling of marching to tell a story, rooting for our football team in the stands, and participating in parades. Unfortunately my grandfather passed before he could see me in the band. However, he supported my aunt fully when she, too, was in the band. Everytime she sees videos or watches me perform, I see the same light in her eyes as him. Through her, I see and feel all of the memories we had as a family. Music has been and always will be a big part of my life and sharing that experience with other people as well as access to an unlimited amount of emotion and memory is, and continues to be, phenomenal.
      Misha Brahmbhatt Help Your Community Scholarship
      “Use your feet to stand your ground, use your words to spark a revolution” Those were words I told my peers who were as tired as I was. My community needed their voices heard, and I did everything in my power to ensure it. During the summer, there was another tragic black death due to police ignorance. George Floyd, a 46-year-old father of five, was murdered. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, he called out to his mother in pain while his life was drained from his body. Derek Chauvin, sworn by the federal law to protect every citizen, murdered with little consequence. The tragedy woke up America. It broadcasted the pain Black Americans felt for over 400 years. We marched and screamed that we required change. Yet, the government only sees our skin two ways: a slave or a weapon. We were tormented by the people who gave us the right to protest. I saw my people risking their lives to ensure our future is the best. When George Floyd passed, I felt in my heart my community had to speak up and be a part of the movement. It started with an impulsive, explicit Instagram post resenting the justice system that doesn't believe my life matters. Then my friend said two words that set me off: “Do it.” I asked my peers what they wanted to see, hear, and how to represent us. I wanted to make sure it was not only my voice, but the whole community's. Then I contacted my local government officials. Surprisingly, the police department reached out to me before I could. The chief of police was devastated by George Floyd’s death and the suppression of black voices. He wanted to give me a police escort, and I agreed if he participated in the protest. He agreed. After, I created a flyer and sent it out. Over a thousand people marched 2 miles screaming “Black Lives Matter”. The local news station interviewed us about our experiences as activists and black people. At the end of the protest, I gave a speech demanding nationally police departments support Black lives and expose their comrades who devalue people of color. When it was over, I cried. We were heard across Philadelphia. We showed how we were stronger as one. I am grateful to have a community that supports others. It was a life-changing experience that led me to become a better person. Black Lives will forever Matter, and I have a thousand people who can say the same thing. I want to incorporate that sense of community into my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that's happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world. Article link: https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2020/06/14/penn-wood-high-school-student-victoria-monroe-leads-black-lives-matter-protest-in-delaware-county/
      Harold Reighn Moxie Scholarship
      Hello, my name is Victoria Monroe, and I am indubitably terrified. That is a broad statement that anyone could resolve with, “You have nothing to be scared about.” The only contradictory problem is, I have every right to be afraid. I am too young. I am applying to one of the best schools in the nation at sixteen years old. I commonly hear that I have not experienced enough of life. Truthfully, that is partly accurate; I can not drink, I can drive only between the hours of 7 am and 11 pm with one passenger, and I still have to ask my parents permission to walk to the store around the corner from my house. To propel this idea even further, I am still mentally, emotionally, and physically growing and have much to learn and experience. I have doubts that I am prepared for life simply because I am still a child. I am too naive. I decided to apply to 3 out of 8 Ivy League schools without regarding the stress that soon came after. Then I applied to seven more universities. I see the good in everyone, which is a blessing and a curse. In a competitive environment and field, it could turn brutal. I have doubts that my unwary nature could cost me emotionally and mentally. I am too critical. I strive for perfection and to be the best. In group settings, I do well. However, I often take a leadership position to ensure success, though those statements are incontestably disparate. I put the maximum effort into everything I do, and that can be very overwhelming. The push to be perfect strains my mental health. I have doubts about myself because of my drive to be flawless by any means. Yes, I am petrified of what is to come. However, there is one haven where I can allow myself to be vulnerable and to grow. It is at my desk, sketching by candlelight. When my pen touches the paper, I have no worries. I have nothing to be scared of. That space is where I transform into the person I know I can be. I am not too young, but instead have a modern mind. I bring new and innovative ideas to the table and find ways to materialize those thoughts. I use the doubt of lacking some knowledge to explore concepts without bounds, with the freedom to metamorphose from knowing not what is, but what can be. I am not too naive, but ambitious. I face all of my problems head-on tactically. If there is no explicit way provided, I will make my own. Anything is possible, and we must ensure that statement stays true. I am not too critical, but committed and immovable. I will do whatever is in my jurisdiction to create the most satisfactory outcome for everyone. My drive will push me to provide the best solutions not only for myself but for the community. I am determined and will not stop until we achieve a mutual goal. Art truly brings out my best self. It allows me to be free and grow from my imperfections. However, a significant part of my growth comes from others. Helping my community and bringing it together brings me the same feeling that art does; it is something I cherish. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that was happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world.
      Taylor Ibarrondo Memorial Scholarship
      “Use your feet to stand your ground, use your words to spark a revolution” Those were words I told my peers who were as tired as I was. My community needed their voices heard, and I did everything in my power to ensure it. During the summer, there was another tragic black death due to police ignorance. George Floyd, a 46-year-old father of five, was murdered. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, he called out to his mother in pain while his life was drained from his body. Derek Chauvin, sworn by the federal law to protect every citizen, murdered with little consequence. The tragedy woke up America. It broadcasted the pain Black Americans felt for over 400 years. We marched and screamed that we required change. Yet, the government only sees our skin two ways: a slave or a weapon. We were tormented by the people who gave us the right to protest. I saw my people risking their lives to ensure our future is the best. When George Floyd passed, I felt in my heart my community had to speak up and be a part of the movement. It started with an impulsive, explicit Instagram post resenting the justice system that doesn't believe my life matters. Then my friend said two words that set me off: “Do it.” I asked my peers what they wanted to see, hear, and how to represent us. I wanted to make sure it was not only my voice, but the whole community's. Then I contacted my local government officials. Surprisingly, the police department reached out to me before I could. The chief of police was devastated by George Floyd’s death and the suppression of black voices. He wanted to give me a police escort, and I agreed if he participated in the protest. He agreed. After, I created a flyer and sent it out. Over a thousand people marched 2 miles screaming “Black Lives Matter”. The local news station interviewed us about our experiences as activists and black people. At the end of the protest, I gave a speech demanding nationally police departments support Black lives and expose their comrades who devalue people of color. When it was over, I cried. We were heard across Philadelphia. We showed how we were stronger as one. I am grateful to have a community that supports others. It was a life-changing experience that led me to become a better person. Black Lives will forever Matter, and I have a thousand people who can say the same thing. I want to incorporate that sense of community into my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that's happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world. Article link: https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2020/06/14/penn-wood-high-school-student-victoria-monroe-leads-black-lives-matter-protest-in-delaware-county/
      Simple Studies Scholarship
      Ever since I was a child I have always been in love with two things. The first is art. From the performing arts to digital art, I loved expressing myself in creative ways. It also helped me with my interpersonal skills and articulation of character at a very young age. The second, more rudimentary then the first, is LEGO. I have built things like mugs, windmills, trains, and town halls most from scratch. Constructing intricate designs allowed me to develop my problem solving skills, spatial awareness, and the materialization of ideas. Not only did art and construction help my social skills, but I am extremely passionate about both which is why I am interested in architecture as a field of study. It combines my love of design, creativity, urban planning, and construction; passions that have carried throughout my entire life. In college, I hope to develop these passions into formal skills that can aid me in achieving success through what I love.
      Impact Scholarship for Black Students
      Hello, my name is Victoria Monroe. I am a Black, Queer woman and I am indubitably terrified. That is a broad statement that anyone could resolve with, “You have nothing to be scared about.” The only contradictory problem is, I have every right to be afraid. I am too young. I am applying to one of the best schools in the nation at sixteen years old. I commonly hear that I have not experienced enough of life. Truthfully, that is partly accurate; I can not drink, I can drive only between the hours of 7 am and 11 pm with one passenger, and I still have to ask my parents permission to walk to the store around the corner from my house. To propel this idea even further, I am still mentally, emotionally, and physically growing and have much to learn and experience. I have doubts that I am prepared for life simply because I am still a child. I am too naive. I decided to apply to 3 out of 8 Ivy League schools without regarding the stress that soon came after. Then I applied to seven more universities. I see the good in everyone, which is a blessing and a curse. In a competitive environment and field, it could turn brutal. I have doubts that my unwary nature could cost me emotionally and mentally. I am too critical. I strive for perfection and to be the best. In group settings, I do well. However, I often take a leadership position to ensure success, though those statements are incontestably disparate. I put the maximum effort into everything I do, and that can be very overwhelming. The push to be perfect strains my mental health. I have doubts about myself because of my drive to be flawless by any means. Yes, I am petrified of what is to come. However, there is one haven where I can allow myself to be vulnerable and to grow. It is at my desk, sketching by candlelight. When my pen touches the paper, I have no worries. I have nothing to be scared of. That space is where I transform into the person I know I can be. I am not too young, but instead have a modern mind. I bring new and innovative ideas to the table and find ways to materialize those thoughts. I use the doubt of lacking some knowledge to explore concepts without bounds, with the freedom to metamorphose from knowing not what is, but what can be. I am not too naive, but ambitious. I face all of my problems head-on tactically. If there is no explicit way provided, I will make my own. Anything is possible, and we must ensure that statement stays true. I am not too critical, but committed and immovable. I will do whatever is in my jurisdiction to create the most satisfactory outcome for everyone. My drive will push me to provide the best solutions not only for myself but for the community. I am determined and will not stop until we achieve a mutual goal. Art truly brings out my best self. It allows me to be free and grow from my imperfections. However, a significant part of my growth comes from others. Helping my community and bringing it together brings me the same feeling that art does; it is something I cherish. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that was happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world.
      Charles R. Ullman & Associates Educational Support Scholarship
      “Use your feet to stand your ground, use your words to spark a revolution” Those were words I told my peers who were as tired as I was. My community needed their voices heard, and I did everything in my power to ensure it. During the summer, there was another tragic black death due to police ignorance. George Floyd, a 46-year-old father of five, was murdered. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, he called out to his mother in pain while his life was drained from his body. Derek Chauvin, sworn by the federal law to protect every citizen, murdered with little consequence. The tragedy woke up America. It broadcasted the pain Black Americans felt for over 400 years. We marched and screamed that we required change. Yet, the government only sees our skin two ways: a slave or a weapon. We were tormented by the people who gave us the right to protest. I saw my people risking their lives to ensure our future is the best. When George Floyd passed, I felt in my heart my community had to speak up and be a part of the movement. It started with an impulsive, explicit Instagram post resenting the justice system that doesn't believe my life matters. Then my friend said two words that set me off: “Do it.” I asked my peers what they wanted to see, hear, and how to represent us. I wanted to make sure it was not only my voice, but the whole community's. Then I contacted my local government officials. Surprisingly, the police department reached out to me before I could. The chief of police was devastated by George Floyd’s death and the suppression of black voices. He wanted to give me a police escort, and I agreed if he participated in the protest. He agreed. After, I created a flyer and sent it out. Over a thousand people marched 2 miles screaming “Black Lives Matter”. The local news station interviewed us about our experiences as activists and black people. At the end of the protest, I gave a speech demanding nationally police departments support Black lives and expose their comrades who devalue people of color. When it was over, I cried. We were heard across Philadelphia. We showed how we were stronger as one. I am grateful to have a community that supports others. It was a life-changing experience that led me to become a better person. Black Lives will forever Matter, and I have a thousand people who can say the same thing. I want to incorporate that sense of community into my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that's happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world. Article link: https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2020/06/14/penn-wood-high-school-student-victoria-monroe-leads-black-lives-matter-protest-in-delaware-county/
      Joe Bonamassa Music Studies Scholarship
      Music is a consequential part of my family and I. I come from a family of musicians. This art runs in my blood. My most fond memory of music is playing with my grandfather. Ever since I was born, he wanted me to be a musician with no exceptions. By the age of 4, he was teaching me the piano and to sing in his homemade studio down in the basement. Singing and playing “Twinkle Twinkle”, eating our favorite, Oreos, was the best part of my day. Eventually, I began to stop taking lessons; I was a busy student. However, I always find my way back to a pair of headphones or a guitar, back to music. I never realized how much it meant to me and how intricately it is embedded into my soul until he passed. That’s when, for the first time, I realized I subconsciously pursued his legacy because it felt like home. I went on to participate in my school’s bands. Firstly, I was in a Concert Band. I was 2nd clarinet 1st chair and Section Leader. I really enjoyed Concert Band because it forced me to focus on my technique not only for myself, but my section as well. It created the same sense of family my grandfather gave me. Then I was in a Jazz Band. I played electric guitar and percussion. I really liked Jazz Band because it allowed myself to feel free in the music and have fun with my friends while playing music. Jazz also runs deep in my family. Whenever there is a function, there would be music, either performed live or off an old CD no one remembers the name of. We didn’t need to, we felt it. Lastly, I was in Marching band. I was also 2nd clarinet 1st chair. I loved the marching band. I loved the feeling of marching to tell a story, rooting for our football team in the stands, and participating in parades. Unfortunately my grandfather passed before he could see me in the band. However, he supported my aunt fully when she, too, was in the band. Everytime she sees videos or watches me perform, I see the same light in her eyes as him. Through her, I see and feel all of the memories we had as a family. Music has been and always will be a big part of my life and sharing that experience with other people as well as access to an unlimited amount of emotion and memory is, and continues to be, phenomenal. That is why I am ensuring as many scholarships as I can, to ensure my family can live comfortably when I go to college, but live on our legacy in music.
      "What Moves You" Scholarship
      “Use your feet to stand your ground, use your words to spark a revolution” Those were words I told my peers who were as tired as I was. My community needed their voices heard, and I did everything in my power to ensure it. During the summer, there was another tragic black death due to police ignorance. George Floyd, a 46-year-old father of five, was murdered. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, he called out to his mother in pain while his life was drained from his body. Derek Chauvin, sworn by the federal law to protect every citizen, murdered with little consequence. The tragedy woke up America. It broadcasted the pain Black Americans felt for over 400 years. We marched and screamed that we required change. Yet, the government only sees our skin two ways: a slave or a weapon. We were tormented by the people who gave us the right to protest. I saw my people risking their lives to ensure our future is the best. When George Floyd passed, I felt in my heart my community had to speak up and be a part of the movement. It started with an impulsive, explicit Instagram post resenting the justice system that doesn't believe my life matters. Then my friend said two words that set me off: “Do it.” I asked my peers what they wanted to see, hear, and how to represent us. I wanted to make sure it was not only my voice, but the whole community's. Then I contacted my local government officials. Surprisingly, the police department reached out to me before I could. The chief of police was devastated by George Floyd’s death and the suppression of black voices. He wanted to give me a police escort, and I agreed if he participated in the protest. He agreed. After, I created a flyer and sent it out. Over a thousand people marched 2 miles screaming “Black Lives Matter”. The local news station interviewed us about our experiences as activists and black people. At the end of the protest, I gave a speech demanding nationally police departments support Black lives and expose their comrades who devalue people of color. When it was over, I cried. We were heard across Philadelphia. We showed how we were stronger as one. I am grateful to have a community that supports others. It was a life-changing experience that led me to become a better person. Black Lives will forever Matter, and I have a thousand people who can say the same thing. Article link: https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2020/06/14/penn-wood-high-school-student-victoria-monroe-leads-black-lives-matter-protest-in-delaware-county/
      BIPOC Educators Scholarship
      I attained one of the most important life forces in humanity through education. That force is Hope. At 15, during my junior year, I took Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics without taking Calculus, the prerequisite. My teacher had doubts, but assured me if I put the effort in, he would work with me. He instilled hope and confidence that I would pass his class and excel. I had been previously traumatized by my private school English classes and doubted my abilities. The way I was previously neglected, isolated, and hopeless made future courses intimidating. My new teacher said, contrary to my belief, I was more than capable and had nothing to fear in Advanced Placement Language and Composition. She provided me with confidence that I could be exceptional. Ultimately, I earned a 4 from College Board on both exams. The promise of hope both teachers gave provided me strength to become greater than I was before. Their promise of hope inspired me to be a better person not only academically, but internally as well. It changed me, challenged me to thrive in every possible way. This summer, I organized a Black Lives Matter protest with one thousand people that was covered by several media outlets. My teachers even came to support. I wanted to continue to give back to my community, so I co-founded and joined several organizations that give youth a voice in their schools. That is why I would give everything to go to college to pursue my career goals. I turned the hope I found through education into a fuel to accomplish anything I put my mind to. Additionally, I'd like to teach at my local high school in Spanish studies. I want to pass down the hope that was given to me to inspire future interpreters, translators, international doctors, or even tour guides. Through education, I learned my strengths, my passions, my love for my community, my goals, and my future. Through education, I found what made me, Me.
      Ella Henderson Dream Big Scholarship
      Music is a consequential part of my family and I. I come from a family of musicians. This art runs in my blood. My most fond memory of music is playing with my grandfather. Ever since I was born, he wanted me to be a musician with no exceptions. By the age of 4, he was teaching me the piano and to sing in his homemade studio down in the basement. Singing and playing “Twinkle Twinkle”, eating our favorite, Oreos, was the best part of my day. Eventually, I began to stop taking lessons; I was a busy student. However, I always find my way back to a pair of headphones or a guitar, back to music. I never realized how much it meant to me and how intricately it is embedded into my soul until he passed. That’s when, for the first time, I realized I subconsciously pursued his legacy because it felt like home. I went on to participate in my school’s bands. Firstly, I was in a Concert Band. I was 2nd clarinet 1st chair and Section Leader. I really enjoyed Concert Band because it forced me to focus on my technique not only for myself, but my section as well. It created the same sense of family my grandfather gave me. Then I was in a Jazz Band. I played electric guitar and percussion. I really liked Jazz Band because it allowed myself to feel free in the music and have fun with my friends while playing music. Jazz also runs deep in my family. Whenever there is a function, there would be music, either performed live or off an old CD no one remembers the name of. We didn’t need to, we felt it. Lastly, I was in Marching band. I was also 2nd clarinet 1st chair. I loved the marching band. I loved the feeling of marching to tell a story, rooting for our football team in the stands, and participating in parades. Unfortunately my grandfather passed before he could see me in the band. However, he supported my aunt fully when she, too, was in the band. Everytime she sees videos or watches me perform, I see the same light in her eyes as him. Through her, I see and feel all of the memories we had as a family. Music has been and always will be a big part of my life and sharing that experience with other people as well as access to an unlimited amount of emotion and memory is, and continues to be, phenomenal.
      Undiscovered Brilliance Scholarship for African-Americans
      Hello, my name is Victoria Monroe. I am a Black, LGBTQIA woman and I am indubitably terrified. That is a broad statement that anyone could resolve with, “You have nothing to be scared about.” The only contradictory problem is, I have every right to be afraid. I am too young. I am applying to one of the best schools in the nation at sixteen years old. I commonly hear that I have not experienced enough of life. Truthfully, that is partly accurate; I can not drink, I can drive only between the hours of 7 am and 11 pm with one passenger, and I still have to ask my parents permission to walk to the store around the corner from my house. To propel this idea even further, I am still mentally, emotionally, and physically growing and have much to learn and experience. I have doubts that I am prepared for life simply because I am still a child. I am too naive. I decided to apply to 3 out of 8 Ivy League schools without regarding the stress that soon came after. Then I applied to seven more universities. I see the good in everyone, which is a blessing and a curse. In a competitive environment and field, it could turn brutal. I have doubts that my unwary nature could cost me emotionally and mentally. I am too critical. I strive for perfection and to be the best. In group settings, I do well. However, I often take a leadership position to ensure success, though those statements are incontestably disparate. I put the maximum effort into everything I do, and that can be very overwhelming. The push to be perfect strains my mental health. I have doubts about myself because of my drive to be flawless by any means. Yes, I am petrified of what is to come. However, there is one haven where I can allow myself to be vulnerable and to grow. It is at my desk, sketching by candlelight. When my pen touches the paper, I have no worries. I have nothing to be scared of. That space is where I transform into the person I know I can be. I am not too young, but instead have a modern mind. I bring new and innovative ideas to the table and find ways to materialize those thoughts. I use the doubt of lacking some knowledge to explore concepts without bounds, with the freedom to metamorphose from knowing not what is, but what can be. I am not too naive, but ambitious. I face all of my problems head-on tactically. If there is no explicit way provided, I will make my own. Anything is possible, and we must ensure that statement stays true. I am not too critical, but committed and immovable. I will do whatever is in my jurisdiction to create the most satisfactory outcome for everyone. My drive will push me to provide the best solutions not only for myself but for the community. I am determined and will not stop until we achieve a mutual goal. Art truly brings out my best self. It allows me to be free and grow from my imperfections. However, a significant part of my growth comes from others. Helping my community and bringing it together brings me the same feeling that art does; it is something I cherish. That is why I chose Architecture as my career path. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that was happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. I want to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world. I’m scared, but that is not going to deter me from my vision and passion.
      Future Black Leaders Scholarship
      I regularly volunteer at a local daycare when they are unexpectedly understaffed, help prepare for local school events, specifically our annual Code-A-Thon, and give food and toiletries to those in need during food drives. However, with the civil unrest constantly escalating, I push to do more for my community. This includes cleaning local shopping centers after the riots, hosting several voter registration drives, and bringing the community together in multiple peaceful demonstrations to highlight we are not alone and we need to stand together and do what is right. In addition to my volunteering, I am a student athlete, playing volleyball, softball, and basketball, a musician, playing the guitar and clarinet, a part of 3 national honors societies, a thespian, a tutor, and more. I am a very busy student, to say the least. Fortunately, my parents support my busyness one hundred percent. Additionally, my family lives in a middle-class neighborhood. I had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities that my family had to sacrifice for. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that was happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. That is why I would like to study Architecture and own my own firm in the future. I would like to do whatever I can to say thank you for all they have done. Right now, that means obtaining good study habits, being safe, being happy, and having money for college so they don’t have to worry about anything while I am gone. With my love of art and construction (due to my childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO), I know I can build my community back up the way it did to me, especially my parents. For them, it is the absolute last thing I can do, try my hardest to be the best I can be so they can comfortably let me go.
      Rosemarie STEM Scholarship
      Ever since I was a child I have always been in love with two things. The first is art. From the performing arts to digital art, I loved expressing myself in creative ways. It also helped me with my interpersonal skills and articulation of character at a very young age. The second, more rudimentary then the first, is LEGO. I have built things like mugs, windmills, trains, and town halls most from scratch. Constructing intricate designs allowed me to develop my problem solving skills, spatial awareness, and the materialization of ideas. Not only did art and construction help my social skills, but I am extremely passionate about both which is why I am interested in architecture as a field of study. Whenever I reflect on myself, it always results back to Architecture. It combines my love of design, creativity, urban planning, and construction, passions that have carried throughout my entire life. Art and construction truly bring out my best self. It allows me to be free, grow from my imperfections, and feel at home. However, a significant part of my growth also comes from others. Helping my community and bringing it together brings me the same feeling that art does; it is something I cherish. Architecture also contributes to this passion. I grew up in a middle-class neighborhood and had to attend school outside of my district to maximize my academic opportunities. However, I transferred to my local high school and realized everything that was happening right in front of my face that I didn’t see. Severely underfunded schools, abandoned buildings, gentrification, lack of sustainable resources, I saw it all. After verily living in my community, I knew I had to come back. After college, I want the start my own architecture firm to give back to the community that gave me so much in the last three and a half years of my life. With my love of art and construction (due to childhood consisting of an abundance of LEGO as previously mentioned), I knew I could build my community back up the way it did to me. That is why I am ambitious, determined, and innovative. I want to make an impact on my community and even the world.
      Jaki Nelson LGBTQ+ Music Education Scholarship
      Music plays a consequential role in my family and I. It connects us and does unlimited memories. I come from a family of musicians, so this art runs in our blood. My most fond memory of music is playing with my grandfather. Ever since I was born, he wanted me to be a musician with no exceptions. By the age of 4, he was teaching me the piano and to sing in his homemade studio down in the basement. Singing and playing “Twinkle Twinkle”, eating our favorite, Oreos, was the best part of my day. Eventually, I began to stop taking lessons; I was a busy student. However, I always find my way back to a pair of headphones or a guitar, back to music. I never realized how much it meant to me and how intricately it is embedded into my soul until he passed. That’s when, for the first time, I realized I subconsciously pursued his legacy because it felt like home. I went on to participate in my school’s bands. Firstly, I was in a Concert Band. I was 2nd clarinet 1st chair and Section Leader. I really enjoyed Concert Band because it forced me to focus on my technique not only for myself, but my section as well. It created the same sense of family my grandfather gave me. Then I was in a Jazz Band. I played electric guitar and percussion. I really liked Jazz Band because it allowed myself to feel free in the music and have fun with my friends while playing music. Jazz also runs deep in my family. Whenever there is a function, there would be music, either performed live or off an old CD no one remembers the name of. We didn’t need to, we felt it. Lastly, I was in Marching band. I was also 2nd clarinet 1st chair. I loved the marching band. I loved the feeling of marching to tell a story, rooting for our football team in the stands, and participating in parades. Unfortunately my grandfather passed before he could see me in the band. However, he supported my aunt fully when she, too, was in the band. Everytime she sees videos or watches me perform, I see the same light in her eyes as him. Through her, I see and feel all of the memories we had as a family. Music has been and always will be a big part of my life and sharing that experience with other people as well as access to an unlimited amount of emotion and memory is, and continues to be, phenomenal.