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Terese Dodoo

3065

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

Hello ! My name is Terese, and I am a freshman at Augusta University.My dream is to be a pediatrician. I believe growing children in every corner of the world deserve a stable health during their development. This thought pushes me to achieve my dream of being a pediatrician in hopes of helping the next generation grow in good health to better our world.I am looking for available scholarships to help pursue this dream and I am very grateful for considering me. Thank you

Education

Augusta University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Biology, General
    • Psychology, General
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 1140
      SAT
    • 27
      ACT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      Pediatrician

    • Present

    Sports

    Soccer

    Intramural
    2018 – 20191 year

    Research

    • History, General

      Independent
      2020 – 2020

    Arts

    • Independent

      Drawing
      2015 – Present

    Public services

    • Student Government — Member
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      National Honor Society — member
      2020 – Present

    Future Interests

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Maxwell Tuan Nguyen Memorial Scholarship
    Since childhood, I have been drawn to the world of medicine, but it was not until a pivotal moment during my teenage years that my passion solidified into a clear path towards becoming a pediatrician. The inspiration behind my decision is deeply rooted in my experiences as a caregiver for my younger siblings. As the eldest child in my family, I assumed the responsibility of looking after my siblings from a young age. Babysitting them provided me with invaluable insight into the unique needs and vulnerabilities of children. I witnessed firsthand the joy, laughter, and boundless curiosity that characterize childhood, but I also encountered the challenges and uncertainties that accompany illness and injury. One particular incident stands out in my memory—a moment that ignited my passion for pediatric medicine. One evening, my youngest sibling fell ill with a high fever and persistent cough. As I sat by their bedside, offering comfort and reassurance, I felt a profound sense of responsibility to alleviate their suffering and restore them to health. In that moment, I realized the profound impact that healthcare providers have on the lives of children and their families. From that day forward, I dedicated myself to pursuing a career in pediatric medicine, driven by a deep-seated desire to make a meaningful difference in the lives of young patients. As a pediatrician, I aspire to provide compassionate, comprehensive care that addresses not only the physical symptoms of illness but also the emotional and psychological well-being of children and their families. My approach to pediatric medicine is grounded in empathy, patience, and understanding. I recognize the importance of building trusting relationships with my patients and their families, fostering open communication, and providing support every step of the way. Whether it is a routine check-up, a complex medical diagnosis, or a comforting hug during a moment of distress, I am committed to being a steadfast advocate for my patients' health and happiness. In addition to delivering exceptional clinical care, I am passionate about advocating for pediatric healthcare equity and addressing the social determinants of health that disproportionately affect vulnerable populations. Through community outreach initiatives, health education programs, and policy advocacy efforts, I aim to dismantle barriers to healthcare access and ensure that every child has the opportunity to thrive. Furthermore, I am committed to advancing pediatric medical education and research, pushing the boundaries of knowledge and innovation in the field. By staying abreast of the latest advancements in pediatric medicine and actively participating in clinical research, I hope to contribute to the development of new treatments, therapies, and interventions that improve outcomes for children around the world. In conclusion, my journey to becoming a pediatrician is driven by a deep-seated passion for caring, a profound empathy for children, and a commitment to making a positive impact in the world. Through my career, I aspire to be a source of hope, healing, and inspiration for the youngest members of our society, empowering them to lead healthy, fulfilling lives. As I embark on this noble path, I am guided by the words of Fred Rogers, who said, "Anyone who does anything to help a child is a hero to me." With unwavering dedication and compassion, I am determined to be that hero—a beacon of light in the lives of children and families everywhere.
    Ultimate K-Pop Stan Scholarship
    Stray Kids, the South Korean boy group under JYP Entertainment, holds a special place in the hearts of millions, and my own connection with them goes beyond being just fans. Their impact on my life and the broader global culture is profound, weaving through the threads of innovation, connection, and a shared journey of self-discovery. Stray Kids' music serves as a soundtrack to my life, resonating with its unique blend of genres and deeply meaningful lyrics. Each song feels like a chapter, exploring themes of identity, resilience, and the complexities of growing up. The members' active involvement in the creative process adds a layer of authenticity that transcends cultural and linguistic boundaries, making their music a universal language that speaks directly to the soul. As a part of the STAY fandom, the sense of community fostered by Stray Kids is unparalleled. The group's dedication to interacting with fans through social media and V Live broadcasts creates an intimate connection that goes beyond the stage. It's not just about being spectators; it's about being participants in this shared journey. The camaraderie among STAY members, regardless of geographical distances, is a testament to the unifying power of music and shared passion. Stray Kids' global recognition has exposed me to a myriad of cultures and perspectives. Through their success on international charts and the energy of their global tours, I've witnessed the unifying force of music. The language might differ, but the emotions embedded in Stray Kids' music are universally understood. It's a reminder that, despite our differences, there are threads of commonality that bind us together. What sets Stray Kids apart for me is not just their musical prowess but also their commitment to addressing important societal issues. Their songs often delve into topics such as mental health, societal expectations, and the struggles of youth. In a world that sometimes feels disconnected, Stray Kids' willingness to tackle these subjects head-on resonates deeply, creating a sense of empathy and understanding that extends beyond the music itself. Moreover, Stray Kids challenges the stereotypes associated with K-Pop. Their versatility in music, energetic performances, and unapologetic expression redefine what it means to be a K-Pop group. In doing so, they empower their audience to embrace individuality and break away from societal norms—a message that has left an indelible mark on my own journey of self-discovery. In conclusion, Stray Kids has become more than just a K-Pop group to me; they are companions on this journey called life. Their music, the sense of community within the fandom, the exposure to diverse cultures, and their commitment to addressing real-world issues have collectively shaped my perspective. Stray Kids' influence on my life is a testament to the transformative power of music and the profound connections that can be forged through shared experiences, transcending borders and fostering a global culture of unity and understanding.
    Zendaya Superfan Scholarship
    Zendaya's career journey, marked by her diverse talents in acting, singing, and activism, has always been an inspiring spectacle. Yet, it's her distinct flair in the realm of fashion that resonates with me on a personal level, evoking a genuine admiration for her style and the impact she's had on the fashion industry. Zendaya's fashion choices aren't just about donning clothes; they are a powerful form of self-expression that showcases her confidence, creativity, and unapologetic individuality. It's this fearless approach to fashion that draws me in, encouraging me to embrace my own unique style without hesitation. Her red carpet appearances aren't just about glamorous outfits; they are visual narratives that tell stories of self-assurance and the celebration of personal identity. What sets Zendaya apart for me is her ability to effortlessly navigate through diverse styles while maintaining a sense of authenticity. Whether she's gracing the red carpet in a jaw-dropping gown or effortlessly rocking streetwear, there's a consistent thread of genuine expression that makes her fashion choices feel relatable. It's a reminder that style isn't confined to a particular mold but is a dynamic and evolving reflection of one's personality. Beyond the allure of her wardrobe, Zendaya's impact on fashion is elevated by her commitment to breaking down barriers. Her advocacy for diversity and inclusion within the industry is not just a stance; it's a call to action that resonates deeply. It encourages me to be mindful of the transformative power that fashion can have in promoting positive change and dismantling outdated norms. Zendaya's collaborations with renowned designers and her role as a muse showcase a level of mutual respect between her and the fashion community. This collaboration isn't just about aesthetics; it's a testament to the symbiotic relationship between creativity and expression, reinforcing the idea that fashion is a language that transcends spoken words. In my own fashion journey, Zendaya's influence serves as a beacon, guiding me to explore different styles, celebrate my individuality, and recognize the transformative potential of clothing. Her impact extends beyond trends, encouraging me to view fashion not just as an external adornment but as a form of self-empowerment. In conclusion, while Zendaya's career spans across various fields, it's her influence in the world of fashion that personally resonates with me. Her authentic approach, fearless experimentation, and advocacy for inclusivity have left an indelible mark, inspiring me to view fashion as a canvas for self-expression and a tool for positive change.
    American Dream Scholarship
    "The promised dreamland filled with golden opportunities." "A land where you can dream no matter how big your dreams are." My illusioned concept of America. While this concept is not entirely false, I hear my dad's words clearly in my head, "life is a war in this country." I stared enthralled as a well-meaning woman, with the letters "NGO" boldly displayed across her chest shared an urgent plea to help children in desperate need of medical attention. As the screen zoomed in on small, malnourished, ill-appearing children, I was immediately drawn to the scene. I thought back to the children born in Ghana, my place of birth, and wondered how many were not as fortunate as I, to be healthy and have the many opportunities I've been afforded. A seed had been planted. I thought about the possibilities and dreamed that I might heed this call someday. As an immigrant from Ghana, I often witnessed restricted access to quality and affordable healthcare, without realizing the vast impact it had on the majority of the country's population. I do recall the many occasions when neighbors, friends of my parents, and classmates encountered unstructured, inadequate health facilities, with all too often, devastating results. Although I witnessed this regularly, the thought I could potentially do something about it was somehow spurious. But my thoughts changed as I watched that NGO commercial, likely on a day when I simply allowed myself to wander and dream. In 2019, I was afforded the opportunity of a lifetime - I immigrated to the United States and joined my father and stepmother to start a new educational journey. A journey to provide me with the qualification needed to help contribute back to society. The sheer magnitude of this opportunity, especially compared to many of my former classmates currently living in Ghana, was not lost on me. "My American Dream has begun," I thought to myself. An opportunity to acquire the level of education, stability, and dreams my parents never had the chance to achieve. An opportunity to live a life without the worries my parents had. But just because the American dream is attainable, the road to success is a long one. My American dream is one where all my aspirations are manifested into reality, my parents lead a comfortable life and a chance for me to live a life reminiscent of my parents’ dreams. My American dream is one where I am able to give back to my community and provide the quality healthcare many of them lack. My American dream is contributing to the country filled with opportunities capable of realizing my dream. My American Dream is being myself and being recognized for who I am.
    Yan Scholarship
    I stared enthralled as a well-meaning woman, with the letters "NGO" boldly displayed across her chest shared an urgent plea to help children in desperate need of medical attention. As the screen zoomed in on small, malnourished, ill-appearing children, I was immediately drawn to the scene. I thought back to the children born in Ghana (W. Africa), my place of birth, and wondered how many were not as fortunate as I, to be healthy and have the many opportunities I've been afforded. A seed had been planted. I thought about the possibilities and dreamed that perhaps, I might heed this call someday. My name is Terese Dodoo, a 17-year-old high school senior who dreams of becoming a pediatrician. As an immigrant from Ghana (W. Africa), I often witnessed the restricted access to quality and affordable healthcare, without realizing the vast impact it had on the majority of the country's population. I do recall the many occasions when neighbors, friends of my parents, and classmates encountered unstructured, inadequate health facilities, with all too often, devastating results. Although I witnessed this regularly, the thought I could potentially do something about it was somehow spurious - an NGO commercial, likely on a day when I simply allowed myself to wander and dream. In 2019, I was afforded the opportunity of a lifetime - I immigrated to the United States and joined my father and stepmother to start a new educational journey. The sheer magnitude of this opportunity, especially when compared to many of my former classmates currently living in Ghana, was not lost on me. This memory of my homeland has motivated me to go to college. I see college as a way to give back to my community - provide the quality healthcare they deserve. Being a first-generation student has taught me the importance of appreciating the opportunities I am handed and being able to dream or think about attending college is the greatest gift of all. My dream is to be a pediatrician, taking care of those special kids and providing them with good healthcare to influence their development. College is a place for me to achieve my dreams and contribute actively to the change I wish to see in my homeland.
    Share Your Poetry Scholarship
    What it's like to be the daughter of immigrants It's "should I sleep 15 more minutes or study to improve my SAT score?" It's "how do I pay for college?" It's writing essays till your pen runs out of ink and praying every night in hopes of winning a scholarship It's pushing yourself 'til you feel like a bulldozer pushing through buildings, or running until you're out of breath, in hopes of crossing the finish line It's the constant reminder to remember "where you are coming from," "be a role model to your siblings," "appreciate the many sacrifices made for you," and "achieve the American Dream." It's "am I doing enough?" or "Am I even enough?" It's absorbing pressure just like the skin does with water It's the dream of a better life, a life without the same worries as your parents It's the training to conquer the never-ending war called LIFE
    Julia Elizabeth Legacy Scholarship
    We always dream of the brightest careers as children; doctors, lawyers, engineers, and many others. It's fascinating to imagine and see ourselves working in these industries. However, these dreams get shattered due to the judgment of our skills and qualifications based on our skin color. The color of our skin has long been an identifying element of how competent we are and to which limit we can achieve success. I am planning on pursuing a degree in biology as it would bring me a step closer to my goal of being a pediatrician. Being a pediatrician has been a dream for so long because I wanted to help children of poor or low-income backgrounds have access to the proper care they need. Pursuing a degree in biology could make this dream come true as I enjoy learning about the way living organisms function and provide an advantage for me in medical school as it provides an excellent foundation. As this seems like the best career choice to follow my dreams, the minimal percentage of minorities in STEM careers bothers me. Diversity is an essential key in STEM careers because it helps provide an opportunity for people from different backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences to collaborate, creating innovations well requested in today's world. "Despite these sources of difference, STEM continues to be dominated by white males, while women and other racial and ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented."(Rollins Marlynn. "Diversity in STEM: What is it, why does it matter, and how do we increase it.) As people of minority groups, we have to take ten extra steps to get one inch further, earn as many degrees as possible to qualify for a career we are eligible for, and prove ourselves over and over again. We constantly have to break through stereotypes and work hard for success with limited role models to admire. Diversity is important to me because I believe in representation. As a girl and person of color, I believe representation matters to influence the leaders of tomorrow. At this present time, we should have prominent figures in STEM careers that children can look up to build their hope. Employing different backgrounds means more opportunities to explore societal problems. Diversity drives innovation as the industry is representative of society. Societal problems affect different kinds of people; therefore, having people of these different backgrounds brings more to the table. Representation can provide answers to these issues they face. A homogenous industry would lack the resources necessary to create innovations beneficial to society. Diversity is important to me; because I dream of a world where everyone works together regardless of race, gender, or other factors. This dream can be realized if everyone puts in their effort and time.
    Kiaan Patel Scholarship
    Staring enthralled as a well-meaning woman, with the letters "NGO" boldly displayed across her chest shared an urgent plea to help children in desperate need of medical attention. As the screen zoomed in on small, malnourished, ill-appearing children, I was immediately drawn to the scene. I thought back to the children born in Ghana (W. Africa), my place of birth, and wondered how many were not as fortunate as I, to be healthy and have the many opportunities I've been afforded. A seed had been planted. I thought about the possibilities and dreamed that perhaps, I might heed this call someday. Making funny faces, singing nursery rhymes in my not-so-Adele voice, choosing a bandaid from a group of Mickey mouse, PJ Masks, and Marvel Superheroes to distract my little brother from the pain of his scraped knee. These experiences confirmed and gave me more reason to pursue my long-life dream of a career as a pediatrician. My name is Terese Dodoo, a high school student, and soon-to-be college student. I want to be a pediatrician not only to comfort hurt children and ease their fear of needles but help provide adequate and affordable care to underprivileged children in low-income communities and countries. Growing up in Ghana, I often witnessed restricted access to quality and affordable healthcare, without realizing the vast impact it had on the majority of the country's population. I do recall the many occasions when neighbors, friends of my parents, and classmates encountered unstructured, inadequate health facilities, with all too often, devastating results. Although I witnessed this regularly, the thought I could potentially do something about it was somehow spurious - an NGO commercial, or choosing a PJ Masks bandaid, likely on a day when I simply allowed myself to wander and dream. In 2019, I was afforded the opportunity of a lifetime - I immigrated to the United States and joined my father and stepmother to start a new educational journey. The sheer magnitude of this opportunity, especially when compared to many of my former classmates currently living in Ghana, was not lost on me. Arriving in the United States also exposed me to the world and the afflictions of the African-American community. Ignorant of the magnitude of racism as I was born and lived in a homogenous society, this expanded my purpose of adhering to the NGO's call. Being offered lower-quality healthcare compared to their white counterparts, I realized the concept of healthcare being a luxury was no different from the little kids back home. With these experiences playing an ongoing loop in my head, I want to use the opportunity of being a pediatrician to impact the lives of the little people I meet one day. An opportunity to erase the concept of healthcare being a luxury. An opportunity to provide care to the next astronaut, artist, and president.
    Analtha Parr Pell Memorial Scholarship
    I stared enthralled as a well-meaning woman, with the letters "NGO" boldly displayed across her chest shared an urgent plea to help children in desperate need of medical attention. As the screen zoomed in on small, malnourished, ill-appearing children, I was immediately drawn to the scene. I thought back to the children born in Ghana (W. Africa), my place of birth, and wondered how many were not as fortunate as I, to be healthy and have the many opportunities I've been afforded. A seed had been planted. I thought about the possibilities and dreamed that perhaps, I might heed this call someday. My name is Terese Dodoo, a 17-year-old high school senior who dreams of becoming a pediatrician. As an immigrant from Ghana (W. Africa), I often witnessed the restricted access to quality and affordable healthcare, without realizing the vast impact it had on the majority of the country's population. I do recall the many occasions when neighbors, friends of my parents, and classmates encountered unstructured, inadequate health facilities, with all too often, devastating results. Although I witnessed this regularly, the thought I could potentially do something about it was somehow spurious - an NGO commercial, likely on a day when I simply allowed myself to wander and dream. In 2019, I was afforded the opportunity of a lifetime - I immigrated to the United States and joined my father and stepmother to start a new educational journey. The sheer magnitude of this opportunity, especially when compared to many of my former classmates currently living in Ghana, was not lost on me. I took every opportunity to work hard and stay engaged in multiple academic and community opportunities. I have had a babysitting job since late 2019, an opportunity to not only earn some financially but also engage in the process of caring for children. I volunteered at our local church Sunday school, have been mentored by a physician, remain active in multiple extracurricular activities at school and continue to fulfill my most important job to date - being a great role model to my toddler siblings. My ultimate goal is to attend Emory University, majoring in biology and a pre-med track, and then transition to John Hopkins Medical school. While I realize that there are many specialties and subspecialties within the field of medicine, I'm currently most interested in becoming a pediatrician and perhaps fulfilling that call from the NGO representative.
    She Rose in STEAM Scholarship
    I stared enthralled as a well-meaning woman, with the letters "NGO" boldly displayed across her chest shared an urgent plea to help children in desperate need of medical attention. As the screen zoomed in on small, malnourished, ill-appearing children, I was immediately drawn to the scene. I thought back to the children born in Ghana (W. Africa), my place of birth, and wondered how many were not as fortunate as I, to be healthy and have the many opportunities I've been afforded. A seed had been planted. I thought about the possibilities and dreamed that perhaps, I might heed this call someday. My name is Terese Dodoo, a 17-year-old high school senior who dreams of becoming a pediatrician. As an immigrant from Ghana (W. Africa), I often witnessed the restricted access to quality and affordable healthcare, without realizing the vast impact it had on the majority of the country's population. I do recall the many occasions when neighbors, friends of my parents, and classmates encountered unstructured, inadequate health facilities, with all too often, devastating results. Although I witnessed this regularly, the thought I could potentially do something about it was somehow spurious - an NGO commercial, likely on a day when I simply allowed myself to wander and dream. In 2019, I was afforded the opportunity of a lifetime - I immigrated to the United States and joined my father and stepmother to start a new educational journey. The sheer magnitude of this opportunity, especially when compared to many of my former classmates currently living in Ghana, was not lost on me. Arriving in the United States also exposed me to the world and the afflictions of the African-American community. Ignorant of the magnitude of racism as I was born and lived in a homogenous society, this expanded my purpose of adhering to the NGO's call. Being offered lower-quality healthcare compared to their white counterparts, I realized the concept of healthcare being a luxury was no different from the little kids back home. My ultimate goal is to attend Emory University, majoring in biology and a pre-med track, and then transition to John Hopkins Medical school. While I realize that there are many specialties and subspecialties within the field of medicine, I'm currently most interested in becoming a pediatrician and perhaps fulfilling that call from the NGO representative. A dream to provide accessible healthcare to minorities from an early age so help reduce the gap between their white counterparts. A dream to improve their health as they matter just as everyone else.
    Barbara P. Alexander Scholarship
    The little boy, after falling was crying, and as his parents struggled to calm him down, the experience of calming my siblings played in my head for a moment, prompting me to do the same as I do for them, speak calmly and reassuringly to help relieve his pain. This moment substantiated my dream of being a pediatrician and my desire to help children. My name is Terese Dodoo - a high school senior and soon-to-be college student. I want to become a pediatrician to help provide adequate and affordable care to underprivileged children in low-income countries and communities. Growing up in Ghana, I witnessed the deprivation of accessible healthcare due to financial struggles and the failing healthcare system. This greatly saddened me as children need the best healthcare during their early years. The health of children is important to me because they are the future of their generation. After noticing how some children lacked the proper healthcare necessary for their growth and development, my decision to be a pediatrician was affirmed as I dream of working with non-profit organizations to provide healthcare to underprivileged children. My dream of being a pediatrician would be the best opportunity to positively impact underprivileged communities. After obtaining a bachelor's degree in biology, I plan to go on to medical school and complete my residency to provide the adequate foundation I need to materialize my dream. The conditions I witnessed play a recurring loop in my mind, helping me stay driven, focused, and motivated. Staying focused would get me through the trying and difficult times during medical school as I know I am doing all that for a greater cause - a cause to positively impact the future generation. There are so many ways I could make a positive impact in the world in my chosen career. A career as a pediatrician would help me impact the littlest patients I come across for a lifetime. Having the opportunity to provide care to the next president, engineer, or astronaut. I plan on partnering with a non-profit organization to help provide accessible healthcare to those deprived of it and think of healthcare as a luxury. Partnering with a non-profit organization would also help make a positive impact in the world as these children benefit from quality healthcare to aid their growth and development. Pediatricians play a key role in the early development of children and this chosen path of mine would only be the start to helping the world become a better place. This career is so dear to my heart as I think of all the many children I can help. I hope to impact and inspire the next pediatrician
    Etherine Tansimore Scholarship
    The little boy, after falling was crying, and as his parents struggled to calm him down, the experience of calming my siblings played in my head for a moment, prompting me to do the same as I do for them, speak calmly and reassuringly to help relieve his pain. This moment substantiated my dream of being a pediatrician and my desire to help children. My name is Terese Dodoo - a high school senior and soon-to-be college student. I want to become a pediatrician to help provide adequate and affordable care to underprivileged children in low-income countries and communities. Growing up in Ghana, I witnessed the deprivation of accessible healthcare due to financial struggles and the failing healthcare system. This greatly saddened me as children need the best healthcare during their early years. The health of children is important to me because they are the future of their generation. After noticing how some children lacked the proper healthcare necessary for their growth and development, my decision to be a pediatrician was affirmed as I dream of working with non-profit organizations to provide healthcare to underprivileged children. My dream of being a pediatrician would be the best opportunity to positively impact underprivileged communities. After obtaining a bachelor's degree in biology, I plan to go on to medical school and complete my residency to provide the adequate foundation I need to materialize my dream. The conditions I witnessed play a recurring loop in my mind, helping me stay driven, focused, and motivated. Staying focused would get me through the trying and difficult times during medical school as I know I am doing all that for a greater cause - a cause to positively impact the future generation. There are so many ways I could make a positive impact in the world in my chosen career. A career as a pediatrician would help me impact the littlest patients I come across for a lifetime. Having the opportunity to provide care to the next president, engineer, or astronaut. I plan on partnering with a non-profit organization to help provide accessible healthcare to those deprived of it and think of healthcare as a luxury. Partnering with a non-profit organization would also help make a positive impact in the world as these children benefit from quality healthcare to aid their growth and development. Pediatricians play a key role in the early development of children and this chosen path of mine would only be the start to helping the world become a better place. This career is so dear to my heart as I think of all the many children I can help. I hope to impact and inspire the next pediatrician.
    Francis “Slip” Madigan Scholarship
    "Should I sleep 15 more minutes of study to improve my SAT score?" "How do I pay for college?" "How many more scholarships can I find to write essays for until my pen runs out and pray every night in hopes of winning those scholarships?" My constant thoughts as I realize being a first-generation college student is a golden opportunity found at the end of a maze. A maze full of pressure, uncertainty, and countless sacrifices. Going to college is important to me considering the sacrifices my parents went through to secure a position for me to proudly say, "I am a first-generation college student." Having immigrant parents means earning all As in all classes, learning work ethics and other values in everything you do, serving as a role model to your siblings, and above all, reaching the expectation of attaining a higher education as they sacrificed theirs for you. Born and raised in Ghana, my father completed his secondary education with plans of furthering his education; however, recognizing the inadequate quality of education, he decided to seek green pastures in a foreign land. A land he has never known in hopes of achieving the American Dream. Joining my father here in 2019, I realized how hard he worked as I rarely saw him at home. My arrival in the United States presented the struggle for the American Dream in a clear, lucid light. Struggles I would appreciate as I would get the opportunity to repay the struggles of my parents in kind by improving myself through a college education. My home country, Ghana, holds a special place in my heart, but I cannot fail to recognize the poor healthcare system. Growing up there, I often saw children with life-threatening conditions lack access to adequate care needed for them to recover and develop. The healthcare system, operating with limited government funds merged with financial distress makes affordable healthcare seem like a fantasy. Adequate healthcare is necessary for the growth and development of children in their early years. Recognizing this problem, my dream of becoming a pediatrician was born. I plan to become a pediatrician and work with non-profit organizations to serve low-income communities and countries by providing quality healthcare to avoid seeing children deprived of quality healthcare. This dream supported by my family cannot be realized without other factors. Constantly hunting for scholarships is imperative for me to see this dream come true therefore I would be truly grateful if I won this scholarship to aid my dream of seeing quality healthcare being affordable and not viewed as a luxury.
    Mental Health Importance Scholarship
    "What's wrong with you?" a question I hate answering to. Not because of the guilt of something I had done wrong but the sudden emotions and feelings I feel when the last syllable of this question travels through my ear, settling in my mind. My mental health, an aspect of my life I rarely discuss, for the reason that growing up in an African household, the topic of mental health is rarely mentioned, seems like a foreign element of my life. As defined by the CDC, "Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices." My emotional health, a part of my mental health I constantly avoided with thoughts that it wasn't really important affects me now. Being a senior and going through the college application process, the stress is enormous and I look for ways to manage it. Upon realizing how stressful life would be after high school, I have reversed my opinion on the importance of mental health. My mental health is important to me because not only would poor mental health affect me but others around me by causing a strain within these relationships if I fail to recognize my poor health. I greatly value the relationships I have in my life and thinking of these relationships ever being severed scares me. Having good mental would health strengthens my relationships and provide a sense of understanding within myself. An understanding that emotions are natural, and even though they may be confusing, the best way is not to avoid them but manage them. After recognizing, how devastating ill mental health could affect me, I have found different strategies to help manage my mental health with my main target being my emotional wellness. A medium through which I can look within myself and handle these emotions instead of pushing them to the side, deeming them irrelevant. One way is through exercise. I enjoy the rapid pumping of my heart, the sweat draining the back of my shirt, and the constant attempts to catch my breath after a fulfilling and intense workout. Although not a regular routine, I exercise when I get the chance with respect to managing my emotional well-being. A chance to reflect on the stressful events happening in my life and the emotions I feel with these events. A chance to realize emotions are natural and I feel like that during these events because I am human. Exercising increases my energy level, providing a positive mood by releasing endorphins and a moment to appreciate me for me.
    Ms. Susy’s Disney Character Scholarship
    Disney movies - a familiar highlight of everyone's childhood. Lovable characters ranging from a sleeping princess placed under a spell only to be broken by a handsome prince, a fearless woman taking the place of her ailing father in the army, the classic mouse in red shorts and yellow shoes, and the unforgettable story of a maiden turned royalty by fitting a glass slipper. It is incredibly difficult to pick a favorite out of these great classics; however, my favorite Disney character -an independent, driven woman, and unlike the other princesses, worked with her own hands -Tiana earns a special place in my heart. Growing up, I enjoyed Disney movies with all the fascinating colors and scenes, above all, the lovable and beautiful characters. But one thing I felt incredibly curious about was why a girl like me was not represented as a princess. I envied the princesses portrayed because of their long, silky hair, their beautiful clothes, and most importantly, their skin color. I just could not understand why a skin color like mine was not represented. Seeing The Princess and the Frog for the first time, I eventually believed little girls like me - black girls - could be princesses too. As a child, I enjoyed watching The Princess and the Frog because of its fantastic story, colors, songs, and character that looks like me, oblivious to the many life lessons shown. Now, as a senior and soon-to-be college student, I recognize these lessons I missed in my childhood. Magic is not present in every situation; however, hard work pays. Tiana, unlike the other princesses, was not born into royalty; however, has a job and works hard to achieve her dream of opening a restaurant. Being a first-generation college student, I undeniably understand the value of hard work, staying focused, and being driven. The constant reminder of the many sacrifices of my immigrant parents pushes me to stay focused while striving to achieve my goal of being a pediatrician. A lucid illustration that I would not be handed a silver platter until I work for it, just as magic was nonexistent in Tiana's struggles. Tiana's character really holds a place in my heart as I am constantly reminded magic is only in fairytales and you have to work for what you want to achieve in the real world, earning her the spot as my favorite Disney Character.
    Sikora Drake STEM Scholarship
    We always dream of the brightest careers as children; doctors, lawyers, engineers, and many others. It's fascinating to imagine and see ourselves working in these industries. However, these dreams get shattered due to the judgment of our skills and qualifications based on our skin color. The color of our skin has long been an identifying element of how competent we are and to which limit we can achieve success. I am planning on pursuing a degree in biology as it would bring me a step closer to my goal of being a pediatrician. Being a pediatrician has been a dream for so long because I wanted to help children of poor or low-income backgrounds have access to the proper care they need. Pursuing a degree in biology could make this dream come true as I enjoy learning about the way living organisms function and provide an advantage for me in medical school as it provides an excellent foundation. As this seems like the best career choice to follow my dreams, the minimal percentage of minorities in STEM careers bothers me. Diversity is an essential key in STEM careers because it helps provide an opportunity for people from different backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences to collaborate, creating innovations well requested in today's world. "Despite these sources of difference, STEM continues to be dominated by white males, while women and other racial and ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented."(Rollins Marlynn. "Diversity in STEM: What is it, why does it matter, and how do we increase it.) As people of minority groups, we have to take ten extra steps to get one inch further, earn as many degrees as possible to qualify for a career we are eligible for, and prove ourselves over and over again. We constantly have to break through stereotypes and work hard for success with limited role models to admire. Diversity is important to me because I believe in representation. As a girl and person of color, I believe representation matters to influence the leaders of tomorrow. At this present time, we should have prominent figures in STEM careers that children can look up to build their hope. Employing different backgrounds means more opportunities to explore societal problems. Diversity drives innovation as the industry is representative of society. Societal problems affect different kinds of people; therefore, having people of these different backgrounds brings more to the table. Representation can provide answers to these issues they face. A homogenous industry would lack the resources necessary to create innovations beneficial to society. Diversity is important to me; because I dream of a world where everyone works together regardless of race, gender, or other factors. This dream can be realized if everyone puts in their effort and time.
    Affordable College Prep's First Time Winners Scholarship
    Step 1; Choose a part of your life interesting enough to talk about and why you deserve the said scholarship Step 2; Write an eye-catching hook Step 3; Write till your pen runs out of ink and the lead of your pencil fades out Step 4; Ask for feedback from parents, teachers and mentors Step 5; Edit your essay to make it the best one yet Step 6; Submit your application and pray for positive news This routine has been constant since I started writing scholarship essays. Unfortunately, I haven’t received the positive news I have prayed for after every submission. Every applicant’s hope is to receive an e-mail or mail saying the word “Congratulations…” The sight of that one word shows the applicant’s hard work has been recognized. Writing scholarship essays is not the easiest thing to do; from planning what to write about, fitting it with the prompt, analyzing and editing it to make sure it would be the choice of judges, and anxiously waiting for a response. The application process doesn’t end with submitting just one essay. Writing scholarship essays and applying for them is a daunting task but nevertheless, I have learned the value of tenacity. Tenacity to me involves dedication and drive to achieve mindset goals. As a first-generation college student, a back-straining reminder to be a role model to my siblings, applying for scholarships has taught me to be determined and resilient with a sense of urgency and purpose. Being tentative is not always easy. Having applied to many essays, I am yet to see that one word, “Congratulations….” This would be the breakdown point for anyone to stop trying, but these many defeats have taught me to get back up when I stumble and grow stronger when faced with challenges. “Challenges are road checks in everyone’s bumpy road called life.” “Life is one long journey filled with challenges and the strong-willed persevere. “These daily reminders encourage me to keep going and fight my way through to achieve my goals. Scholarships are ways to fund college and no one would expect to learn much from the application process. However; in my application process, I have learned a valuable lesson. Tenacity, a trait not only essential in school but the real world shows one’s drive and strength to achieve any mindset goals. The application process has helped me discover my inner strength and will to go beyond.
    Femi Chebaís Scholarship
    My goal for life is to be a pediatrician. There are many children in remote parts of the world lacking a physician to help in their growth and development. My goal is to be a pediatrician to help these children grow to be the next important people of their generation.
    Bold Learning and Changing Scholarship
    “Change begins at the end of your comfort zone.” This quote by Roy T Bennett sums the lessons I learned during a shift from my comfort zone and how differently I view the world now. Growing up in Ghana, West Africa, I was comfortable with my way of life, family, friends and school. I was in my comfort zone since my environment was constant and had no worries. This changed when I was informed that I will soon be leaving for the United States. The thought of moving to a new country was filled with exciting imaginations and increased levels of nervousness as I believed I would face obstacles too difficult to conquer. Upon my arrival, I started a new school in its last few weeks of the 8th grade school year. One main issue I faced was my accent and communication with others. Even though I spoke English, I had to repeat myself many times to be understood. This was really frustrating as I tried to avoid conversations. On the other hand, I could hardly understand what others were saying. My school had a high black population and students and teachers alike used Ebonics. This way of speaking was difficult for me to understand. Academically, my lack of understanding had a toll. For example during lessons in my Maths class, I could barely understand anything the teacher taught. With the help of YouTube videos and other resources, I realized most concepts were quite familiar. This situation proved to me that no obstacle was big enough to stop me from learning. Life has no pause and play buttons rather changes we encounter are inevitable and the only way is to accept them. Whatever obstacles we face is not enough reason to stop us from learning to achieve our goals.
    Julia Elizabeth Legacy Scholarship
    We always dream of the brightest careers as children; doctors, lawyers, engineers, and many others. It's fascinating to imagine and see ourselves working in these industries. However, these dreams get shattered due to the judgment of our skills and qualifications based on our skin color. The color of our skin has long been an identifying element of how competent we are and to which limit we can achieve success. Diversity is an essential key in STEM careers because it helps provide an opportunity for people from different backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences to collaborate, creating innovations well requested in today's world. "Despite these sources of difference, STEM continues to be dominated by white males, while women and other racial and ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented."(Rollins Marlynn. "Diversity in STEM: What is it, why does it matter, and how do we increase it.) As people of minority groups, we have to take ten extra steps to get one inch further, earn as many degrees as possible to qualify for a career we are eligible for, and prove ourselves over and over again. We constantly have to break through stereotypes and work hard for successes with limited role models to admire. Diversity is important to me because I believe in representation. As a girl and person of color, I believe representation matters to influence the leaders of tomorrow. At this present time, we should have prominent figures in STEM careers children can look up to building their hope. Employing different backgrounds means more opportunities to explore societal problems. Diversity drives innovation as the industry is representative of society. Societal problems affect different kinds of people; therefore, having people of these different backgrounds brings more to the table. Representation can provide answers to these issues they face. A homogenous industry would lack the resources necessary to create innovations beneficial to society. Diversity is important to me; because I dream of a world where everyone works together regardless of race, gender, or other factors. This dream can be realized if everyone puts in their effort and time.
    "What Moves You" Scholarship
    Why do we face difficulties? Life is a voyage bound with battles,trials and achievements. There are minutes where everything on the planet makes perfect sense and others that make us desperate to escape. Life is as enchanting as roses with troubles like thistles that ought to be addressed and conquered. These challenges serve as opportunities for the development and enhancement of an individual's strength and potential. Mike Gafka once said,"To be successful, you must accept all challenges that come your way. You cannot just accept the ones you like." This quote and encouragement from my family has inspired me to confront challenges I encounter rather than finding possible ways to escape from them. Two years ago, I boarded a plane in Ghana, West Africa, heading to for the United States to begin a new chapter in my life. The thought of leaving my family, friends and the only country I have ever known was too much to contemplate. I knew change brought about challenges, but I was confident I would overcome them due to the derived inspiration from Mike Gafka's words. Having arrived in the last few weeks of the eighth grade school year, adjusting to a new education system was overwhelming. As in any case, moving to a new school midyear would be a giant nightmare for anyone. The thought of new teachers, classroom environments, learning culture and the school as a whole was challenging to get accustomed to. I had no idea what a block schedule was or the fact that students had to go to different classes rather than the teacher coming in. Changing schools meant adjusting to a contrasting curriculum to my previous one. Some topics taught were unfamiliar creating an enormous hurdle for me. I often wondered if I would ever understand the topics covered in time for any upcoming tests. Challenged with these obstacles, I made it a priority to pay extreme attention in class, complete all assignments given and make use of resource videos on YouTube to better understand challenging concepts. The final weeks of the eighth grade school year crept in fast as I prepared for final examinations, doubtful of how well I would perform. However, the encouragement from my family,teachers and Mike Gafka's words,"To be successful, you must accept all challenges that come your way. You can not just accept the ones you like", inspired me to work harder till the end. The stress of the examinations faded out when I received an invitation to an awards show. This invitation demonstrated how determination and staying focused leads to success. I also believe words have an impact on a person's life as Mike Gafka's words encouraged me to strive for success while confronting challenges that come my way.