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Temya Davis

815

Bold Points

2x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I am a growing entrepreneur hoping to be the first to graduate college in my family and to open my very own restaurant after graduation. I love dancing and I am a part of my school’s band program.

Education

Livingstone College

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Hospitality Administration/Management
    • Culinary, Entertainment, and Personal Services, Other

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

    -
  • Transfer schools of interest:

    -
  • Majors of interest:

    -
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Restaurants

    • Dream career goals:

      -
    • Concessions

      Progressive Field
      2023 – Present1 year

    Sports

    Basketball

    Intramural
    2021 - 20221 year

    Research

    • Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations

      Teen EnterpriseMentee
      2021 – 2022

    Arts

    • Blazing Pantherettes Dance Team

      Dance
      2021 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Vision of Angels Youth Foundation Teacher
      2017 – 2018
    Sylvester Taylor "Invictus" Hospitality Scholarship
    Winner
    Growing up in the Buckeye-Shaker neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio was tough. I was surrounded by violence my entire life and watched as it took a toll on many of my past friends as they lost focus on their passions. My mother did her best to take care of me and my two sisters by working continuously all day every day. Once I was old enough to be left alone at home, I began to provide for me and my younger sister. My mother wasn’t getting any help and with her working constantly, I had no one in my ear motivating me to do the best I can. I believe that every child needs to hear that. I found my own motivation in life by my God-given gifts. Safe to assume that it all began with being home alone while my mother worked. Being left alone meant I had to learn how to cook so I taught myself. As the years went by, my cooking skills improved tremendously and so well that I found interest in starting my own small baking business. By the time I graduated high school, I knew that I wanted to continue my education in Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management. I will be the first person in my family to graduate college and to open my very own restaurant. However, sometimes I feel unmotivated with the lack of financial aid that I receive. I put my dreams on hold each morning wondering if I’ll even reach them if I can barely afford the education that is required. Is this the feeling my childhood friends felt when they decided that being in the streets was the better option? This self-inflicted fear makes me question my path towards success. This scholarship will help me cover the financial aid balance that has been draining my family’s pockets throughout the past year. With the help of this scholarship I can feel more confident in marking my way towards graduation. I have completed countless hours of community service, helping others not only through my co-educational fraternity (Phi Beta Lambda Business Fraternity INC.) but throughout campus. The poem “Invictus” is a poem that members of my fraternity have recited multiple times. The poem reminds me that no matter how hard things become in life, my fate and future is in my control.
    India Kinamore Memorial Scholarship
    Temya Davis 01/06/2024 Growing up in the Buckeye-Shaker neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio was tough. I was surrounded by violence my entire life and watched as it took a toll on many of my past friends as they lost focus on their passions. We get situated in certain places where sometimes success feels impossible. My mother did her best to take care of me and my two sisters by working continuously all day every day. Once I was old enough to be left alone at home, I began to provide for me and my younger sister. My mother wasn’t getting any help and with her working constantly, I had no one in my ear motivating me to do the best I can. I believe that every child needs to hear that. I found my own motivation in life by my God-given gifts. Safe to assume that it all began with being home alone while my mother worked. Being left alone meant I had to learn how to cook so I taught myself. As the years went by, my cooking skills improved tremendously and so well that I found interest in starting my own small baking business. By the time I graduated high school I knew that I wanted to continue my education in Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management. I will be the first person in my family to graduate college and to open my very own restaurant. However, sometimes I feel unmotivated with the lack of financial aid that I receive. I put my dreams on hold each morning wondering if I’ll even reach them if I can barely afford the education that is required. Is this the feeling my childhood friends felt when they decided that being in the streets was the better option? This self-inflicted fear makes me question my path towards success. I keep myself busy joining organizations such as marching band in order to maintain a positive mindset. Being American means there are opportunities. Being a Black American means that I have to reach far for those opportunities. It means that I have to have a little extra motivation and will. After my success, I want to give back to communities, including my own, by starting organizations and hosting events that help the youth understand and plan their career interests while also encouraging teens to seek the financial aid that is available to them. I had to come to an understanding that there is always a place of success for me, even if it is hard to achieve. I strive for those who could not reach their achievements, just to prove that anything is possible with faith and determination. I aim to share my experience with others as I help other people, especially the youth, find better solutions to success than violence.
    Sharen and Mila Kohute Scholarship
    Temya Davis 08/02/2023 While growing up I used to absolutely love helping my grandmother cook. I eagerly grabbed every opportunity to make dinner for my family. I started off cooking simple dinners such as spaghetti and meatloaf using pre-prepared ingredients from the local stores but eventually I learned that home made everything always tasted better. I began to make cakes from scratch and my curiosity became untamed. I was a natural and I could not help but to experiment by making new flavor combinations. I changed measurements around and noted how the textures and moistness changed. My sophomore year of high school I sold brownies after school as a way to get more opinions on my baking skills. Everyone was obsessed with them. That spring we were all pushed into quarantine. I was a merit roll and honor roll student being forced to learn through a laptop screen for my sophomore and junior year of high school. Some subjects were harder to comprehend outside of a classroom. In the midst of everything going on, including the Covid-19 pandemic, I decided to turn to the things that comforted me the most. I sketched often and baked a lot. April of 2020, I had finally figured out my career path. I decided to become a baker as a way of connecting the two things I loved to do most when life became tough. I joined an entrepreneurship program for teens called “Teen Enterprise” and started my own business. I completed two sessions of the program, working every Tuesday and Thursday to perfect my business pitch. I won first place in the Dare 2 Accelerate pitch competition and with the cash prize along with the money I raised from customizing shoes, the program helped me invest into my business by purchasing new baking supplies and stocking my kitchen cabinets. My first customer loved their cake and it pushed me to specialize in baking cakes. I went from personal size cakes to tier cakes and built a platform for my business by using social media and attending market day events with Teen Enterprise. The owner of Teen Enterprise, Tory Coats, created a major impact on my life and helped me realize how far I could excel. I never envisioned having my very own business growing up. Growing up in the Buckeye-Shaker neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio was tough for me and my family. Most people in my community either did not have access to the resources needed to start a business or lacked motivation. It was truly a blessing to have such a great person come into my life and guide me to those resources while enlightening me with everything that he knew about business and being an entrepreneur. Tory highly recommended that I attend college to further my education in entrepreneurship and culinary. In my final year of high school, I had been pushed to go for my dreams as a chef leading me straight to Livingstone College. Tory Coats was a light in my dimmed life that I will never forget. Meeting Tory and being a part of his program opened the pathway to me attending college. Once I began my journey as a college student, I knew that I was heading in the right direction. Being in the campus atmosphere gave me a different feeling. The feeling was telling me that I could be anyone that I wanted to be if I just believe in myself and my work. I hope that Teen Enterprise continues to create the same change in other teens lives that it made for mine.
    Henry Bynum, Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    Temya Davis 08/02/2023 Growing up in the Buckeye-Shaker neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio was tough. I was surrounded by violence my entire life and watched as it took a toll on many of my past friends as they lost focus on their passions. We get situated in certain places where sometimes success feels impossible. My mother did her best to take care of me and my two sisters by working continuously all day every day. Once I was old enough to be left alone at home, I began to provide for me and my younger sister. My mother wasn’t getting any help and with her working constantly, I had no one in my ear motivating me to do the best I can. I believe that every child needs to hear that. I found my own motivation in life by my God-given gifts. Safe to assume that it all began with being home alone while my mother worked. Being left alone meant I had to learn how to cook so I taught myself. As the years went by, my cooking skills improved tremendously and so well that I found interest in starting my own small baking business. By the time I graduated high school I knew that I wanted to continue my education in Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management. I will be the first person in my family to graduate college and to open my very own restaurant. However, sometimes I feel unmotivated with the lack of financial aid that I receive. I put my dreams on hold each morning wondering if I’ll even reach them if I can barely afford the education that is required. Is this the feeling my childhood friends felt when they decided that being in the streets was the better option? This self-inflicted fear makes me question my path towards success. I keep myself busy joining organizations such as marching band in order to maintain a positive mindset. Being American means there are opportunities. Being a Black American means that I have to reach far for those opportunities. It means that I have to have a little extra motivation and will. After my success, I want to give back to communities, including my own, by starting organizations and hosting events that help the youth understand and plan their career interests while also encouraging teens to seek the financial aid that is available to them. I had to come to an understanding that there is always a place of success for me, even if it is hard to achieve. I strive for those who could not reach their achievements, just to prove that anything is possible with faith and determination. I aim to share my experience with others as I help other people, especially the youth, find better solutions to success than violence.
    Mark Neiswander "110" Memorial Scholarship
    Temya Davis 07/30/2023 When I think of America, I think of its bright flag, fast food, and most importantly the diversity. To be American means that I can be anything that I want to be, even when the power of stereotypes hover over. Being a Black American means that I have something to prove. It gives me a sense of motivation knowing that people who look like me have changed not only America but the entire world in so many positive ways. I wake up each day wondering if I will be the “average black person” or grow to be the next billionaire or even the next President of the United States. I am proud to be an American but even more proud to be a Black American because the trials and tribulations that we go through have the strong effect of worldwide change. Growing up in the Buckeye-Shaker neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio was tough. I was surrounded by violence my entire life and watched as it took a toll on many of my past friends as they lost focus on their passions. We get situated in certain places of America where sometimes success feels impossible. My mother did her best to take care of me and my two sisters by working continuously all day every day. Once I was old enough to be left alone at home, I began to provide for me and my younger sister. My mother wasn’t getting any help and with her working constantly, I had no one in my ear motivating me to do the best I can. I believe that every child needs to hear that. I found my own motivation in life by my God-given gifts. Safe to assume that it all began with being home alone while my mother worked. Being left alone meant I had to learn how to cook so I taught myself. As the years went by, my cooking skills improved tremendously and so well that I found interest in starting my own small baking business. By the time I graduated high school I knew that I wanted to continue my education in Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management. I will be the first person in my family to graduate college and to open my very own restaurant. However, sometimes I feel unmotivated with the lack of financial aid that I receive. I put my dreams on hold each morning wondering if I’ll even reach them if I can barely afford the education that is required. Is this the feeling my childhood friends felt when they decided that being in the streets was the better option? This self-inflicted fear makes me question my path towards success. I keep myself busy joining organizations such as marching band in order to maintain a positive mindset. Being American means there are opportunities. Being a Black American means that I have to reach far for those opportunities. It means that I have to have a little extra motivation and will. After my success, I want to give back to communities by starting organizations and hosting events that help the youth understand and plan their career interests while also encouraging children to stick together. I am proud to be American because there is always a place of success for me, even if it is hard to achieve. I strive for those who could not reach their achievements, just to prove that anything is possible with faith and determination. I aim to share my experience with others as I help other Americans, especially Black Americans, find better solutions to success.