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Sophia Sachs

2475

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1x

Finalist

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Winner

Bio

Hello! My name is Sophia and I am currently a first-year undergraduate student at Northeastern University. I am majoring in cell and molecular biology and minoring in psychology on a pre-medicine track. The summer before my junior year of high school, I became an emergency medical technician and have been working at my town's volunteer ambulance corps ever since. Becoming an EMT exposed my love for emergency medicine and providing care to the underserved. During high school, I founded a club for prospective emergency medical technicians and students that were interested in emergency medicine. During our bi-weekly meetings, we talked about various topics such as oxygenation methods, cardiac/respiratory arrest, triage, and bleeding control, and connected members with our town's ambulance corps. I also participated in my high school's tutoring club and Spanish club which allowed me to provide for younger students who were looking to improve their education about various topics. My life goal is to provide disburden and happiness to patients of all ages through medical care. I am most passionate about providing medical care to underserved communities. One way I have achieved this is by providing emergency medical care for my hometown through my town's volunteer ambulance corps. I truly enjoy being an EMT and being able to provide relief and care to my community. Being thanked by my patients is something that motivates me to achieve my future life goals.

Education

Northeastern University

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences
  • Minors:
    • Psychology, General

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

    • Shadower

      Englewood Hospital/ Comprehensive Women's Care
      2023 – 2023
    • Dental Assistant, Insurance Coverage Communicator, Receptionist

      Dr. Sachs and Associates
      2019 – 20223 years

    Research

    • Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences

      Northeastern University — Research Volunteer
      2023 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Tenafly Volunteer Ambulance Corps — Senior EMT-B
      2020 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    As a bisexual Latina woman, I quickly learned in life that our society is built to oppress minorities. But, rather than focusing on my perceived differences, I instead drove myself towards a more singular goal: increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone. It was my dream to become an EMT. I threw myself into training, motivated by the chance to give back to the community. When I finally joined the ambulance corps, I was prepared (or so I thought). Going out on calls and meeting the people we were helping gave me a sense of purpose. To this day, whenever a patient holds my hand and thanks me for their care, I am flooded with joy. I was growing and developing professionally. But working with so many diverse patients and teammates had also started the change and acceptance bubbling inside of me. Outside of patient calls, spending time with my teammates was nothing less than transformative. I spoke to many of them, who had already come out, about my developing identity and their experiences with self-acceptance. I watched as JP, my captain, discussed his transition. When we attended our local Pride Parade as a group, I felt as though a weight had been lifted off of my shoulders. Seeing the hundreds of people in front of me, all waving relatable signs, gave me peace. It finally felt like I could balance the two biggest parts of myself in a meaningful way. I believe that supporting all identities is just as important as providing quality medical care. Being able to aid my community in both of these ways will save lives. From my own identity, I know that having a community in which you feel safe will allow all individuals to thrive and grow. Increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone will make a positive impact on the world. I hope to further this impact by educating medical providers on the significance of creating a safe environment for all patients, no matter how they present themselves or how they identify. Overall, I am committed to using my skills and experience as an EMT to make a positive impact on the world, both through direct medical service and community outreach. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. On the rig, I don’t have to worry about anything but making sure my patients are okay. I relate to them—facing a challenge that seems, at the time, overwhelming and sometimes unconquerable. And much like my team helped me, I hope to help others overcome the roadblocks in their path. I am beyond grateful that becoming an EMT has taught me to never be ashamed of my uniqueness. I am more committed than ever now to celebrating our many differences as strengths and to creating community, care, and acceptance for everyone.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    As a bisexual Latina woman, I learned quickly in life that our society is built to oppress minorities. But, rather than focusing on my perceived differences, I instead drove myself towards a more singular goal: increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone. It was my dream to become an EMT. I threw myself into training, motivated by the chance to give back to the community. When I finally joined the ambulance corps, I was prepared (or so I thought). Going out on calls and meeting the people we were helping gave me a sense of purpose. To this day, whenever a patient holds my hand and thanks me for their care, I am flooded with joy. I was growing and developing professionally. But working with so many diverse patients and teammates had also started the change and acceptance bubbling inside of me. Outside of patient calls, spending time with my teammates was nothing less than transformative. I spoke to many of them, who had already come out, about my developing identity and their experiences with self-acceptance. I watched as JP, my captain, discussed his transition. When we attended our local Pride Parade as a group, I felt as though a weight had been lifted off of my shoulders. Seeing the hundreds of people in front of me, all waving relatable signs, gave me peace. It finally felt like I could balance the two biggest parts of myself in a meaningful way. I believe that supporting all identities is just as important as providing quality medical care. Being able to aid my community in both of these ways will save lives. From my own identity, I know that having a community in which you feel safe will allow all individuals to thrive and grow. Increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone will make a positive impact on the world. I hope to further this impact by educating medical providers on the significance of creating a safe environment for all patients, no matter how they present themselves or how they identify. Overall, I am committed to using my skills and experience as an EMT to make a positive impact on the world, both through direct medical service and community outreach. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. On the rig, I don’t have to worry about anything but making sure my patients are okay. I relate to them—facing a challenge that seems, at the time, overwhelming and sometimes unconquerable. And much like my team helped me, I hope to help others overcome the roadblocks in their path. I am beyond grateful that becoming an EMT has taught me to never be ashamed of my uniqueness. I am more committed than ever now to celebrating our many differences as strengths and to creating community, care, and acceptance for everyone.
    Carla M. Champagne Memorial Scholarship
    Although EMTs are the ones who save lives, becoming an EMT saved my life. Being an emergency medical technician means that no day is the same. When we’re on the rig, my team works together seamlessly: administering oxygen, providing medication, offering comforting words to patients, or taking a moment to breathe after a particularly rough call. Some days we are faced with panic attacks or potentially broken bones. Others, with life-saving measures. I find fulfillment in helping those in need, particularly in underserved communities. Within these constantly-changing moments, I find purpose and belonging—in my work and in my own beautifully complex identity. During my freshman year of high school, I realized that I was attracted to both men and women. I initially saw my bisexuality as a challenge to overcome. Grappling with these complex emotions made me feel as if I was living a double life—and not in the cool, Peter Parker/Spiderman sort of way. But, rather than focusing on my perceived differences, I instead drove myself towards a more singular goal: increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone. It was my dream to become an EMT. I threw myself into training, motivated by the chance to give back to the community. When I finally joined the ambulance corps, I was prepared (or so I thought). Going out on calls and meeting the people we were helping gave me a sense of purpose. To this day, whenever a patient holds my hand and thanks me for their care, I am flooded with joy. I was growing and developing professionally. But working with so many diverse patients and teammates had also started the change and acceptance bubbling inside of me. Outside of patient calls, spending time with my teammates was nothing less than transformative. I spoke to many of them, who had already come out, about my developing bisexual identity and their experiences with self-acceptance. I watched as JP, my captain, discussed his transition. When we attended the local Pride Parade as a group, I felt as though a weight had been lifted off of my shoulders. Seeing the hundreds of people in front of me, all waving relatable signs, gave me peace. I had never known that there were so many individuals in my town that were a part of the LGBTQ+ community, but this parade revealed the antithetical. It finally felt like I could balance the two biggest parts of myself in a meaningful way. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. On the rig, I don’t have to worry about anything but making sure my patients are okay. I relate to them—facing a challenge that seems, at the time, overwhelming and sometimes unconquerable. And much like my team helped me, I hope to help others overcome the roadblocks in their path. I am beyond grateful that becoming an EMT has taught me to never be ashamed of my uniqueness. I am more committed than ever now to celebrating our many differences as strengths and to creating community, care, and acceptance for everyone.
    Jeannine Schroeder Women in Public Service Memorial Scholarship
    As an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), my primary focus is to provide essential medical care and assistance to individuals in need. However, I also believe that I have a responsibility to make a positive impact on the world through my activism and community service. One of the ways I plan to achieve this is by continuing to volunteer my time and skills at my town's ambulance corps to not only help individuals in need of medical care but by providing a safe environment for everyone, particularly those in underserved communities. I believe that emergency medical services play a crucial role in the activism for equality. As an EMT, I have been trained to provide basic life support and first aid in challenging situations, no matter who the patient is and how they identify. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. When responding to a call, nothing else is on my mind besides thinking about how I can provide the best medical care. In addition to this, I plan to make a positive impact on the world by combining medical care with activism for LGBTQ+ rights. Outside of patient calls, my town's ambulance corps attends several events hosted by our town. Specifically, an event that is very important to us is our town's annual Pride Parade. Being able to show individuals that their first emergency response team does not discriminate is highly important. My captain, a trans man, discusses his transition annually and shows individuals that they are welcome no matter who they are. As a bisexual Latina woman, it fills my heart with joy to see people similar to me feel accepted in their community. I believe that supporting all identities is just as important as providing quality medical care. Being able to aid my community in both of these ways will save lives. From my own identity, I know that having a community in which you feel safe will allow all individuals to thrive and grow. Increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone will make a positive impact on the world. I hope to further this impact by educating medical providers on the significance of creating a safe environment for all patients, no matter how they present themselves or how they identify. Overall, I am committed to using my skills and experience as an EMT to make a positive impact on the world, both through direct medical service and community outreach.
    Project Pride of NJ Scholarship
    As an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), my primary focus is to provide essential medical care and assistance to individuals in need. However, I also believe that I have a responsibility to make a positive impact on the world through my activism and community service. One of the ways I plan to achieve this is by continuing to volunteer my time and skills at my town's ambulance corps to not only help individuals in need of medical care but by providing a safe environment for everyone, particularly those in underserved communities. I believe that emergency medical services play a crucial role in the activism for equality. As an EMT, I have been trained to provide basic life support and first aid in challenging situations, no matter who the patient is and how they identify. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. When responding to a call, nothing else is on my mind besides thinking about how I can provide the best medical care. In addition to this, I plan to make a positive impact on the world by combining medical care with activism for LGBTQ+ rights. Outside of patient calls, my town's ambulance corps attends several events hosted by our town. Specifically, an event that is very important to us is our town's annual Pride Parade. Being able to show individuals that their first emergency response team does not discriminate is significantly important. My captain, a trans man, discusses his transition annually and shows individuals that they are welcome no matter who they are. As a bisexual Latina woman, it fills my heart with joy to see people similar to me feel accepted in their community. I believe that supporting all identities is just as important as providing quality medical care. Being able to aid my community in both of these ways will save lives. From my own identity, I know that having a community in which you feel safe will allow all individuals to thrive and grow. Increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone will make a positive impact on the world. I hope to further this impact by educating medical providers on the significance of creating a safe environment for all patients, no matter how they present themselves or how they identify. Overall, I am committed to using my skills and experience as an EMT to make a positive impact on the world, both through direct medical service and community outreach.
    @Carle100 National Scholarship Month Scholarship
    Chief Lawrence J. Nemec Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    Winner
    Although EMTs are the ones who save lives, becoming an EMT saved my life. Being an emergency medical technician means that no day is the same. When we’re on the rig, my team works together seamlessly: administering oxygen, providing medication, offering comforting words to patients, or taking a moment to breathe after a particularly rough call. Some days we are faced with panic attacks or potentially broken bones. Others, with life-saving measures. I find fulfillment in helping those in need, particularly in underserved communities. Within these constantly-changing moments, I find purpose and belonging—in my work and in my own beautifully complex identity. During my freshman year of high school, I realized that I was attracted to both men and women. I initially saw my bisexuality as a challenge to overcome. Grappling with these complex emotions made me feel as if I was living a double life—and not in the cool, Peter Parker/Spiderman sort of way. But, rather than focusing on my perceived differences, I instead drove myself towards a more singular goal: increasing healthcare access and promoting a safer, more supportive environment for everyone. It was my dream to become an EMT. I threw myself into training, motivated by the chance to give back to the community. When I finally joined the ambulance corps, I was prepared (or so I thought). Going out on calls and meeting the people we were helping gave me a sense of purpose. To this day, whenever a patient holds my hand and thanks me for their care, I am flooded with joy. I was growing and developing professionally. But working with so many diverse patients and teammates had also started the change and acceptance bubbling inside of me. Outside of patient calls, spending time with my teammates was nothing less than transformative. I spoke to many of them, who had already come out, about my developing bisexual identity and their experiences with self-acceptance. I watched as JP, my captain, discussed his transition. When we attended the local Pride Parade as a group, I felt as though a weight had been lifted off of my shoulders. Seeing the hundreds of people in front of me, all waving relatable signs, gave me peace. I had never known that there were so many individuals in my town that were a part of the LGBTQ+ community, but this parade revealed the antithetical. It finally felt like I could balance the two biggest parts of myself in a meaningful way. Medical emergencies don’t discriminate. The people I see on my rig come from all different backgrounds and cultures. They have different beliefs and love different people. On the rig, I don’t have to worry about anything but making sure my patients are okay. I relate to them—facing a challenge that seems, at the time, overwhelming and sometimes unconquerable. And much like my team helped me, I hope to help others overcome the roadblocks in their path. I am beyond grateful that becoming an EMT has taught me to never be ashamed of my uniqueness. I am more committed than ever now to celebrating our many differences as strengths and to creating community, care, and acceptance for everyone.