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Sarah Reed

1965

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

I'm a dual public health (BA) and nursing (BSN) student, which is kicking my butt currently! The end-goal to this insanity is to transform rural healthcare delivery and significantly improve health outcomes for those residents. This is an unattainable goal from a patient-focused healthcare perspective, but entirely achievable in the field of public health. I want to merge these two disciplines to reassess why we are consistently failing this underserved population. The United States produces some of the most advanced medical research and capable providers, yet we're unable to deliver basic services to millions. My undergraduate focus on rural communities has demonstrated that these populations are an excellent litmus test for efficacy of pubic health interventions and healthcare capacity. I'm applying for scholarships because the nursing school's clinical requirements are expensive. It's unbelievably helpful to receive scholarships that cover my travel to rural clinical sites and facilities in southern Colorado. It reduces the burden of my student loans and allows me to use them sparing to support just tuition and the cost of living.

Education

Denver College of Nursing

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2022
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

University of Colorado Denver/Anschutz Medical Campus

Bachelor's degree program
2019 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Public Health
  • Minors:
    • Biological and Physical Sciences

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Infection Preventionist, Community Health Project Manager

    • Pool Supervisor

      City of Boulder - Parks and Recreation Department
      2011 – 20154 years
    • West Nile Virus Project Coordinator - Lab

      Colorado Department of Public Health (contracting company: OtterTail Environmental)
      2014 – 20173 years
    • Sterile Processing Department Lead

      Porter Adventist Hospital
      2017 – 20214 years

    Sports

    Swimming

    Varsity
    2007 – Present17 years

    Awards

    • State Competitor (Lettered)

    Research

    • Microbiological Sciences and Immunology

      University of Colorado — Research assistant
      2012 – 2015

    Arts

    • Denver Public Library

      Music
      No productions, just weekly practice times
      2015 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Denver Rescue Mission — Kitchen Volunteer
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Bervell Health Equity Scholarship
    Although many describe their passion for healthcare work in underserved communities as having been ignited by a spark or a moment, mine was slowly teased out by my parents' insistence on grueling road trips. Every spring and summer break, our family was driving to a vacation in some city 30 hours away. When you live in Colorado, that means driving through one or two fly-over states at a minimum. Like most kids, I never thought much about the areas we drove through; however, in my late teens, I remember questioning what you would doing living out here "in the holler". There isn't single Indian restaurant or frozen yogurt store. I started looking up the towns we drove past on Wikipedia, and reading aloud the featured information for my family. After a few trips, we began recognizing places with a unique annual festival, celebrity sighting, or factoid. While driving through Nebraska to Michigan, we were surprised to see one of these little towns featured in the New York Times*. Like many rural areas, eastern Nebraska was starved for healthcare facilities and workers, and this journalist highlighted the life of an elderly woman whose husband lived in an assisted care facility 50 miles away. The article was grim, pessimistic, and surprisingly inspiring to me. With all the time I'd spent driving through these regions, I could understand both why the facilities had closed and how devastating that is for the residents. Every new closure means another 30 to 50 miles are added to the commute to a a doctor's appointment. Each road trip of mine now carries an abrasive element, a nagging voice that tells me this is a fixable problem. In order to try, I'm finishing programs in nursing and public health. I believe both fields develop the problem solving styles needed to institute small, impactful changes in rural healthcare delivery. My aspiration in nursing specifically is to improve the health outcomes of Colorado's rural population through community health program development. Although I can't fix a nationwide crisis (yet!), my capstone research project is to develop an actionable plan for extending Denver's specialist care to eastern Coloradans. My current research is on how to expand our tele-health set up. This would allow residents to readily access services from specialties such as nephrology and endocrinology. I want to work in an underserved community because of my early exposure to and love of rural America. It's a strange, slow world worth preserving. Without the healthcare attention it needs, it will rot away in a generation or two; 100 mile roundtrip commutes for basic care aren't sustainable. Lastly, I sincerely believe this health disparity can be reduced significantly with enough brain power behind it, so I feel compelled to contribute one more brain. *Healy, J. (2019, March 4). Nursing Homes Are Closing Across Rural America, Scattering Residents. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/04/us/rural-nursing-homes-closure.html.
    White Coat Pending Scholarship
    Although many describe their passion for healthcare work in underserved communities as having been ignited by a spark or a moment, mine was slowly teased out by my parents' insistence on grueling road trips. Every spring and summer break, our family was driving to a vacation in some city 30 hours away. When you live in Colorado, that means driving through one or two fly-over states at a minimum. Like most kids, I never thought much about the areas we drove through; however, in my late teens, I remember questioning what you would doing living out here "in the holler". There isn't single Indian restaurant or frozen yogurt store. I started looking up the towns we drove past on Wikipedia, and reading aloud the featured information for my family. After a few trips, we began recognizing places with a unique annual festival, celebrity sighting, or factoid. While driving through Nebraska to Michigan, we were surprised to see one of these little towns featured in the New York Times*. Like many rural areas, eastern Nebraska was starved for healthcare facilities and workers, and this journalist highlighted the life of an elderly woman whose husband lived in an assisted care facility 50 miles away. The article was grim, pessimistic, and surprisingly inspiring to me. With all the time I'd spent driving through these regions, I could understand both why the facilities had closed and how devastating that is for the residents. Every new closure means another 30 to 50 miles are added to the commute to a a doctor's appointment. Each road trip of mine now carries an abrasive element, a nagging voice that tells me this is a fixable problem. In order to try, I'm finishing programs in nursing and public health. I believe both fields develop the problem solving styles needed to institute small, impactful changes in rural healthcare delivery. My aspiration in nursing specifically is to improve the health outcomes of Colorado's rural population through community health program development. The United States has an appalling disparity in healthcare access between urban and rural citizens, and Colorado isn't immune to this. Although I can't fix a nationwide crisis (yet!), my capstone research project is to develop an actionable plan for extending Denver's specialist care to eastern Coloradans. In Colorado, rural communities have an older median age than urban centers, so it's critical to provide these preventative services now. For many, the lack of access leads to a delay in seeking care until the condition becomes critical. My current research is on how to expand our tele-health set up. This would allow residents to readily access services from specialties such as nephrology and endocrinology. My long-term goal is to develop incentives for Denver specialists to provide care to a rural zip code for short periods of time. I want to work in an underserved community because of my early exposure to and love of rural America. It's a strange, slow world worth preserving. Without the healthcare attention it needs, it will rot away in a generation or two; 100 mile roundtrip commutes for basic care aren't sustainable. Lastly, I sincerely believe this health disparity can be reduced significantly with enough brain power behind it, so I feel compelled to contribute one more brain. *Healy, J. (2019, March 4). Nursing Homes Are Closing Across Rural America, Scattering Residents. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/04/us/rural-nursing-homes-closure.html.
    Art of Giving Scholarship
    I need this scholarship to pay for travel to remote clinical rotations while in nursing school. My aspiration in nursing is to improve the health outcomes of Colorado's rural population through community health program development. The United States has an appalling disparity in healthcare access between urban and rural citizens, and Colorado isn't immune to this. Although I can't fix a nationwide crisis (yet!), my capstone research project is to develop an actionable plan for extending Denver's specialist care to eastern Coloradans. In Colorado, rural communities have an older median age than urban centers, so it's critical to provide these preventative services now. For many, the lack of access leads to a delay in seeking care until the condition becomes critical. My current research is on how to expand our tele-health set up. This would allow residents to readily access services from specialties such as nephrology and endocrinology. My long-term goal is to develop incentives for Denver specialists to provide care to a rural zip code for short periods of time. To best serve my short-term research goal, I want to maximize the clinical rotations I serve at facilities in the region; however, the increased costs associated with this are a hurdle. These clinical sites involve traveling hours away from Denver in order to participate, incurring high fuel costs and motel charges. Because of the distance, I drive out the day before, stay the night, complete an early 12 hour clinical, and drive home the same day. By covering the additional expenses, this scholarship would allow me to participate in rural clinical rotations. If awarded to me, this scholarship will go towards much more than tuition. It will allow me to complete the necessary clinical hours for my BSN at facilities participating in my capstone project. It will support research into health interventions for people in my local underserved community. Most importantly, it will invest in someone passionate about improving healthcare infrastructure. I'd like to cheekily conclude by asserting that I should be awarded this scholarship as investments in public health projects have some of the greatest return*. Thank you for your time. I wish you the best in the selection process and hope to hear from you soon. *Masters R, Anwar E, Collins B, Cookson R, Capewell S. Return on investment of public health interventions: a systematic review. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017;71(8):827-834. doi:10.1136/jech-2016-208141