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Sara Vieyra

1855

Bold Points

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Finalist

Bio

I am a first-generation college Senior at the College of the Holy Cross. I want to be a lawyer because my writing abilities in English and Spanish are extremely useful and aid my goal to help both English and Spanish speaking people who are under and/or misrepresented in my community.

Education

College of the Holy Cross

Bachelor's degree program
2020 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • English Language and Literature, General

Arrupe Jesuit High School

High School
2016 - 2020

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Law Practice

    • Dream career goals:

      Attorney

    • Research Associate

      Latino History Project of Worcester
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Legal Intern

      Ascentria Care Alliance - Immigration & Legal Assistance Program
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Intern

      Wheeler, Trigg, O'Donnell LLP
      2020 – Present4 years
    • Intern

      Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP
      2016 – 20182 years
    • Intern

      Denver City Attorney's Office
      2018 – 20202 years

    Sports

    Volleyball

    Junior Varsity
    2016 – 20171 year

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2016 – 20204 years

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Hector Reyes House — Community Based Learning Intern
      2021 – 2021

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Kim Moon Bae Underrepresented Students Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Strong Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Miguel Mendez Social Justice Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Ruebenna Greenfield Flack Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Scholarship Institute’s Annual Women’s Leadership Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. I'd like to be an example, a leader for my younger sister, younger cousins, and my community. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Barbara J. DeVaney Memorial Scholarship Fund
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming an immigration lawyer. However, the path to becoming a lawyer is very expensive. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Disney Super Fan Scholarship
    As a newly 21-year-old going into my Senior year of college with no kids and an excess of little cousins, I will always proudly sing “How Far I’ll Go” at the top of my lungs. I grew up watching Hannah Montana turn into Miley, and watching Zack and Cody grow up on my grandparents’ dusty CRT TV. Now I see my 6 younger cousins enjoy the drama of a coming-of-age plot that will ultimately also accompany them throughout their lives in the same way it has for my siblings, peers, and me. Growing up my parents struggled financially and since they were divorced, my older brother, my younger sister, and I didn’t experience much stability. My dad couldn’t hold down a job for more than a few months, and countless transmissions failed us, but the only parts of our lives that we could always rely on were going to school and having each other. However, an always effective method of distraction from our lives was watching TV, and what else would we be watching on cable other than Disney Channel? Disney has a special place in my heart, not just because I grew up with Miley and Kim Possible as they endured their challenges on screen, but because along with all of the good and the bad of my childhood, there was Disney always there to make me laugh. As I have grown up, completed high school, less than a year from graduating college, and turned 21 recently, I can say that Disney was with me throughout my whole childhood, adolescence, and now adulthood. My family isn’t wealthy by any means, but by saving for over a year, we were able to take a vacation with the whole family, made up of nearly 20 people. In October of last year, we went to Orlando, Florida and visited many sites including Disney World. Traveling with my family all together was a dream come true for all of us, especially my grandparents who are immigrants from Mexico and came to the U.S. with nothing to their names. What Disney has created is a legacy; one that grows and adapts with its audience. In my culture, what’s most important is family and sustenance. We pride ourselves on making good food: salsa, tacos, pipián, chiles rellenos, and eating that delicious food with our friends, family, and our community. Disney has become an extra member of our community. It brings us together which ultimately is the most important part of life. Recently I traveled to Poland on a month-long study abroad program. And as impactful as that experience was, one small moment in my trip was unique and unexpected. I was in a restaurant in Krakow with my friends and there was live music playing at a distance. I recognized the music which surprised me since it was sung in Polish. However, without realizing I started humming to the song and made out the chorus of Moana’s “How Far I’ll Go.” I started recording as my friends unseriously mocked me for holding my phone in the air hoping to capture the song more clearly. No matter where I have gone, whether it’s my home here in Denver, in my cramped dorm in Worcester, Massachusetts, or in Europe, I have always found Disney, or maybe it has found me. Now as I transition into the next stages of my life, I know for certain that Disney will remain with me, always making me laugh, making me cry, and always with the best music.
    La Santana Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Humanize LLC Gives In Honor of Shirley Kelley Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Dr. Alexanderia K. Lane Memorial Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Charles Pulling Sr. Memorial Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Joshua A. Vaughn Memorial Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    José Ventura and Margarita Melendez Mexican-American Scholarship Fund
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, I have always been proud of my heritage and my mixed cultures. One of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was for better work opportunities, which usually require a higher education, something that is more accessible and higher quality here. My family has struggled through poverty, displacement because of violence and corruption, and racial and sexual discrimination in a country where they didn’t know the language all for the hope, the esperanza, that one day they could provide a simple, happy, and healthy life for their loved ones and future generations. My grandpa Jesus came to the U.S. tied to a train with his belt with only a can of beans and some Fritos, yet he is the smartest man I know. He can do mathematical calculations in seconds and he prides himself in how quickly he was able to complete his GED, despite not knowing English and having a 6th-grade level education. As I begin my Senior year of college, I am reminded of my family’s hard work and sacrifices. I have the privilege of being a first-generation college student, and the way I hope to keep building this legacy is by becoming a lawyer. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, as the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly and positively impact their communities. Legal education also applies to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured because I want my and my family’s legacy to be one centered around community and generosity.
    Catrina Celestine Aquilino Memorial Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, one of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was to find economic opportunities to build financial stability for generations to come. My family has never had much money, but I will always remember my grandma Elena’s perspective when it comes to materials and money. My grandma owned an alteration store for over 30 years and from time to time people would come in and steal merchandise. When I was 10 years old someone stole money from my grandma’s counter behind the counter, which was really only secured with an old curtain. She told me that as devastating as it was she knew that whoever took that money needed it more than she did. Otherwise they wouldn’t have stolen it. I believe that building a good financial foundation ensures that you can help your community whether it is with time or money. My family has never had extravagant trips or materialistic things, but with the money that we have, we have always tried to give back to our community. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly apply to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured.
    TJ Crowson Memorial Scholarship
    As a daughter and granddaughter of immigrants, one of the main reasons my family members risked their lives migrating to the United States was to find economic opportunities to build financial stability for generations to come. My family has never had much money, but I will always remember my grandma Elena’s perspective when it comes to materials and money. My grandma owned an alteration store for over 30 years and from time to time people would come in and steal merchandise. When I was 10 years old someone stole money from my grandma’s counter behind the counter, which was really only secured with an old curtain. She told me that as devastating as it was she knew that whoever took that money needed it more than she did. Otherwise, they wouldn’t have stolen it. I believe that building a good financial foundation ensures that you can help your community whether it is with time or money. My family has never had extravagant trips or materialistic things, but with the money that we have, we have always tried to give back to our community. Money aside, being a lawyer is an excellent career where I could use my skills as a bilingual speaker, reader, and writer. Because of my education and life-long experience utilizing both languages, I can help more people in need of legal representation without the extra hassle of needing a translator, ensuring that my clients will be clearly understood by me, their legal representative. My clients will also understand the full extent of their case, without being in the dark, an unfortunate but common occurrence within the legal system, despite this country’s diversity in languages. Growing up, I constantly heard and saw my family members and my friends’ family members experiencing miscommunications or a complete lack of communication and understanding because of language barriers, particularly in the legal and medical industries. And since I wasn’t interested or talented in the science or medical fields, I explored the legal field, and have been working as an intern at different firms and organizations since I was 14. I attended Arrupe Jesuit High School, and as part of the Cristo Rey Network, my peers and I interned at different work sites depending on our interests beginning at the age of 14, in our Freshman year. Over the past 7 years of working in private law firms, in the Denver City Attorney’s office, and in a legal organization in Worcester, Massachusetts that services immigrants and refugees, I have seen how much impact lawyers can make in their cities. As slow, and sometimes mind-numbing, the process can be, no matter the legal action, the education and experiences of lawyers greatly apply to multiple career opportunities and life experiences. I’d like to add to the community of lawyers here in Denver, Colorado or wherever I live. My interest in the law isn’t and has never been isolated. It has always been a goal of mine to become a lawyer, and despite the doubts I have faced, I have endured.
    Bold Career Goals Scholarship
    My parents had kids when they were very young. My mom had my brother when she was 16; she had me when she was 19, and she had my sister when she was 21. When my mom was pregnant with me, she and my dad lived with her parents and across the street from their house lived some of our family friends who were expecting a baby of their own. The parallel was unique and at times awkward because of the age difference, but nonetheless our families were united by mere coincidence. The other parents were both lawyers, and they had a beautiful property on the corner of a quiet street in what is still, 20 years later, a great neighborhood. That is what I want. I have wanted to be a lawyer since I was 11, and I have done everything in my power to propel myself towards that goal. However, the essence of this goal is the stability that comes with it, both financially and otherwise. This is the ultimate goal in, what I dare say, every immigrant family because of what our families have had to survive to get to where we are. I’ve worked in law firms since I was 14. I got above a 4.0 in high school, and I got into a fantastic college. But the work doesn’t stop there. I will finish my Bachelor’s in English and Spanish with a concentration in Latino America, Latinx, and the Caribbean. I will continue my internships, go to law school, and become an attorney. My dream is to be a lawyer, to have stability, and to give back to my family 100x what they gave me. And when I get there, I won’t be satisfied. I’ll just have to come up with a new dream.
    Bold Bravery Scholarship
    I grew up hearing stories of the grand adventures and treacherous experiences my grandparents had to endure. My grandpa Jesus had to tie himself to a pipe with his belt while he was on a moving train trying to make his way into the United States from Mexico in weather that he swears still chills the bones in his legs. My grandpa Rito drove for hours on a semi-truck to feed his family and once found himself a few feet from a full grown bear at a truck stop in the middle of the night. Both of my grandfathers lived to tell their grand stories over and over again over the dinner table, while we ate sopes or enchiladas, or while I struggled to pull their boots off after they had a long day of work. Now, I’m 19 years old and I have a lot to live up to; a lot to accomplish. My grandpa Rito passed away what will now be 3 years in a week from now, and my grandpa Jesus is recovering from the Covid-19 virus. I live in Denver, Colorado and I go to college in Massachusetts, and I’m going to be a lawyer when I grow up…all the way. I am brave because, like my grandpa Rito and like my grandpa Jesus, I won’t give up in the face of adversity. No matter what, I keep going. I’ll fight for my dreams because it’s in my blood and it’s who I am.