For DonorsFor Applicants
user profile avatar

Sara De Angel

1025

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

Hi! My name is Sara de Angel and I'm from Caguas, Puerto Rico. I'm a student at Yale University majoring in Applied Mathematics.

Education

Yale University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Applied Mathematics
  • GPA:
    3.9

Thomas Alva Edison School

High School
2018 - 2023
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Applied Mathematics
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 1490
      SAT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Higher Education

    • Dream career goals:

      Professor

    • Yale Ambassador

      Yale Ambassador Program
      2024 – Present6 months
    • Yale Hospitality Student Manager

      Yale Student Employment
      2023 – Present1 year

    Arts

    • Talleres Danza Teatro

      Dance
      2014 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Proyecto Bibliotecario — Founder and President
      2021 – Present

    Future Interests

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Women in STEM Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    SigaLa Education Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    Innovators of Color in STEM Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    William Griggs Memorial Scholarship for Science and Math
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    Jeannine Schroeder Women in Public Service Memorial Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    Beyond The C.L.O.U.D Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
    I never knew how much I loved mathematics until I got to college. I always knew I liked to learn, but the question of what to study and what to do with that education was very daunting. However, when I took my first college math class, I realized for the first time how truly amazing mathematics are. I never missed a lecture, I went to Office Hours religiously, and I did every single practice problem I could find. It sounds cheesy, but not only did I enjoy them, they were often the highlight of my day. By the end of the semester I was determined: I was going to be an Applied Math major. Now that I'm in my second semester, I'm diving headfirst into Quantitative Reasoning classes, matriculating for every Math, Computer Science, and Statistics class I could fit into my schedule. I have never been so passionate about the material I'm learning: it is impossible for me to even choose a favorite class because I enjoy them all so much. Still, completing a major that has so many requirements is easier said than done. As a Latinx woman who comes from an unconventional background, saying you are a Math major can be very intimidating. Furthermore, coming from a high school with very few opportunities and no advanced classes, I am behind a lot of my classmates. I would use this scholarship to help pay for summer classes in Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. This would help me get on track for my major and open doors for research within Applied Math, which requires advanced classes to be a part of. I hope to use these classes to explore the different concentrations available within the major, especially Computer Science because of how much I have enjoyed learning Java over the past few months. Once I take these classes, I will feel a more confident grasp on what the department is like, which will inform the declaration of my major next semester. When I’m done with the core requirements for my major, I can finally start exploring across departments, and see which one I’m most passionate about for graduate school. Eventually, I hope that I can become a professor, and that I can help students in their education as much as my mentors have helped me. I will do my best to support women and underrepresented minorities in mathematics and strive for a world where everyone can use education to grow as people, as well as contribute to their communities.
    Servant Ships Scholarship
    With a sharp gust of wind, she wakes me up. I try to place where I am: September 20th, 2017; Caguas, Puerto Rico. I wonder why I’m laying in the middle of the hall, as the vague memory of my parents rushing me out of my rapidly flooding bedroom sinks in. She strikes the house again, and I am suddenly aware: it's her, she's here. She’s hard to describe: strong, relentless, violent. As I walk into the kitchen, I’m confused at the effect the storm shutters have. The darkness blinds you to her temper, but the sound of her anger passes through. You can hear her everywhere: smashing roof tiles against the pavement, bending palm trees to her will, spitefully pushing the trampoline into the pool. It suddenly dawns on me why it’s hard to say her name. It was a name I had heard practically every day of my life, so common it’s redundant. How painfully ironic that it was the same name given to the hurricane that was ripping my island apart: “Say it loud and there’s music playing, say it soft and it’s almost like praying. María.” The chaotic sound of the storm is followed by an eerie quiet. The people are shocked, mourning what they’ve lost and desperately trying to restore what’s left. I helped with what I could, but as a child in such a situation, there’s not much you can do. It was distressing, but for me the way back to sanity was literature. It was simultaneously peaceful and passionate, a constant source of warmth. Over the years this love developed, growing until it acted as both a shield and a sword. The shield, as a way to seek refuge from the world, to take comfort in the ink and paper, to dive into how another saw the world. The sword, because it gave my communication strength. It is a skill I owe truly and wholly to literature; a mesmerizing example of what it means to turn a monotonous string of events into a lively story that goes up, down and in circles. Through storytelling, I’m able to make people laugh with me, feel my pain, but most of all, understand me. Just before I began junior year, an idea formed in my mind. I had been incredibly lucky to find literature; it was a little blessing that emerged from a chaotic time. For so long I had known how wonderful and important literature could be, but I felt alone in this appreciation. I remember seeing how run down the school library was, and wondering when was the last time someone had read one. It began as just that, I wanted to get a group of students together to help me organize and clean the library. Over forty students signed up, and from there, we cataloged around 1,400 books and were able to constantly come up with activities that would motivate the student body; from Bookmark Making Contests, to Book Secret Santas, and more. It was a challenge, molding yourself into a leader is no easy task. But it’s the gratitude of your classmates when they tell you that you changed the way they saw reading; it’s seeing the preschoolers' excitement at recognizing you; it’s looking back at everything you’ve accomplished and taking pride in what you’ve given to your school and your community. This club is much more than a passion project, it’s a legacy I will leave behind, one that will be taken over by the next generation of the school’s leaders, and that will impact students long after I graduate.
    Barbara Cain Literary Scholarship
    With a sharp gust of wind, she wakes me up. I try to place where I am: September 20th, 2017; Caguas, Puerto Rico. I wonder why I’m laying in the middle of the hall, as the vague memory of my parents rushing me out of my rapidly flooding bedroom sinks in. She strikes the house again, and I am suddenly aware: it's her, she's here. She’s hard to describe: strong, relentless, violent. As I walk into the kitchen, I’m confused at the effect the storm shutters have. The darkness blinds you to her temper, but the sound of her anger passes through. You can hear her everywhere: smashing roof tiles against the pavement, bending palm trees to her will, spitefully pushing the trampoline into the pool. It suddenly dawns on me why it’s hard to say her name. It was a name I had heard practically every day of my life, so common it’s redundant. How painfully ironic that it was the same name given to the hurricane that was ripping my island apart: “Say it loud and there’s music playing, say it soft and it’s almost like praying. María.” The chaotic sound of the storm is followed by an eerie quiet. The people are shocked, mourning what they’ve lost and desperately trying to restore what’s left. I helped with what I could, but as a child in such a situation, there’s not much you can do. It was distressing, but for me the way back to sanity was literature. It was simultaneously peaceful and passionate, a constant source of warmth. Over the years this love developed, growing until it acted as both a shield and a sword. The shield, as a way to seek refuge from the world, to take comfort in the ink and paper, to dive into how another saw the world. The sword, because it gave my communication strength. It is a skill I owe truly and wholly to literature; a mesmerizing example of what it means to turn a monotonous string of events into a lively story that goes up, down and in circles. Through storytelling, I’m able to make people laugh with me, feel my pain, but most of all, understand me. Just before I began junior year, an idea formed in my mind. I had been incredibly lucky to find literature; it was a little blessing that emerged from a chaotic time. For so long I had known how wonderful and important literature could be, but I felt alone in this appreciation. I remember seeing how run down the school library was, and wondering when was the last time someone had read one. It began as just that, I wanted to get a group of students together to help me organize and clean the library. Over forty students signed up, and from there, we cataloged around 1,400 books and were able to constantly come up with activities that would motivate the student body; from Bookmark Making Contests, to Book Secret Santas, and more. It was a challenge, molding yourself into a leader is no easy task. But it’s the gratitude of your classmates when they tell you that you changed the way they saw reading; it’s seeing the preschoolers' excitement at recognizing you; it’s looking back at everything you’ve accomplished and taking pride in what you’ve given to your school and your community. This club is much more than a passion project, it’s a legacy I will leave behind, one that will be taken over by the next generation of the school’s leaders, and that will impact students long after I graduate.
    Sara Molina Memorial Scholarship
    With a sharp gust of wind, she wakes me up. I try to place where I am: September 20th, 2017; Caguas, Puerto Rico. I wonder why I’m laying in the middle of the hall, as the vague memory of my parents rushing me out of my rapidly flooding bedroom sinks in. She strikes the house again, and I am suddenly aware: it's her, she's here. She’s hard to describe: strong, relentless, violent. As I walk into the kitchen, I’m confused at the effect the storm shutters have. The darkness blinds you to her temper, but the sound of her anger passes through. You can hear her everywhere: smashing roof tiles against the pavement, bending palm trees to her will, spitefully pushing the trampoline into the pool. It suddenly dawns on me why it’s hard to say her name. It was a name I had heard practically every day of my life, so common it’s redundant. A name that Puerto Rican women dawn with pride. How painfully ironic that it was the same name given to the hurricane that was ripping my island apart: “Say it loud and there’s music playing, say it soft and it’s almost like praying. María.” The chaotic sound of the storm is followed by an eerie quiet. The people are shocked, mourning what they’ve lost and desperately trying to restore what’s left. I helped with what I could, but as a child in such a situation, there’s not much you can do. It was distressing to feel like you can’t do anything, but for me, the way back to sanity was literature. It was simultaneously peaceful and passionate, a constant source of warmth. Over the years this love developed, growing until it acted as both a shield and a sword. The shield, as a way to seek refuge from the world, to take comfort in the ink and paper, to dive into how another saw the world. The sword, because it gave my communication strength. It is a skill I owe truly and wholly to literature; a mesmerizing example of what it means to turn a monotonous string of events into a lively story that goes up, down and in circles. Through storytelling, I’m able to make people laugh with me, feel my pain, but most of all, understand me. Once the storm had passed, I felt more motivated than ever to get an education. Neither of my parents had gone to college in the United States, so when I told them that I wanted to go to an Ivy League University, they didn't understand why. Still, I was determined to get in. Over the years, I organized a community service project to reorganize my school's library, created a Spanish Book Club, and was captain of my school's Oratory Team, all because I knew that it was necessary to accomplish my goals. I remember self-studying for the SAT every day for months, including the 15 minutes of snack time and during every lunch period. I remember being very nervous when admissions decisions were coming out, but my family's reaction of pure elation to my Yale acceptance made it worthwhile. I want to take advantage of every opportunity college will offer me. My degree will not simply be a piece of paper that is framed and hung on a wall. Instead, my college experience will lend itself to the betterment of my person and my profession. I want my education to have a purpose beyond myself, and for me to have a positive impact on Puerto Rico and its people.
    Richard Neumann Scholarship
    In the age of short attention spans, literature is increasingly overlooked as an instrumental part of our culture. Because of this, it is more important than ever for young people to motivate a change in perspective. This belief is what led to "Club Literario", a language arts club which encompassed "Proyecto Bibliotecario", a community service project to organize the school library. The first step was to hand in a written proposal of all the activities I had planned and present it to the administration for its approval. Once I got permission, I recruited over forty students, exceeding all my expectations. We started organizing lectures, book exchanges between the students, and toy drives throughout the semester, while going every week to the library to register and rearrange the books. Even considering COVID-19 delays, we managed to completely transform our school library and coordinate my favorite activity: the Bookmark Making Contest. In this contest, we included artists from 1st to 12th grade, asking them to design a bookmark for Valentine’s Day. The six winners received gift cards to the local Puerto Rican bookstore named, ironically enough, The Bookmark. It was one of the most personally gratifying moments when one of my classmates gifted me the bookmark she made, an image of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza painted in acrylics. Now that we’re at the end of the club’s second year, we know that there is still a lot of work to do. Students are constantly coming up with new activities, from creating an illustrated kid’s book for the Preschoolers to building “take a book, leave a book” stations in the halls. It is very heartwarming to know that we have had a positive impact on our school, and observe how, little by little, students started to see literature as more than just a “dead medium”. It was a challenge, molding yourself into a leader is no easy task, but in the end, I would have to attribute it to my team; everything “Club Literario" has accomplished has been because of the giving and passionate people that have helped. This is why I trust that the impact we have had goes beyond what we have done by the time I graduate. Students want to continue with Club Literario, already coming up with ideas of what they can do years from now. This experience has taught me that no matter how unlikely your goal might seem, the world needs people that have the bravery to try.
    Lillian's & Ruby's Way Scholarship
    In the age of short attention spans, literature is increasingly overlooked as an instrumental part of our culture. Because of this, it is more important than ever for young people to motivate a change in perspective. This belief is what led to "Club Literario", a language arts club which encompassed "Proyecto Bibliotecario", a community service project to organize the school library. I’d never really thought of myself as a leader; not until last year, anyway. The first step was to hand in a written proposal of all the activities I had planned and present it to the administration for its approval. Once I got permission, I recruited over forty students, exceeding all my expectations. We started organizing lectures, book exchanges between the students, and toy drives throughout the semester, while going every week to the library to register and rearrange the books. Even considering COVID-19 delays, we managed to completely transform our school library and coordinate my favorite activity: the Bookmark Making Contest. In this contest, we included artists from 1st to 12th grade, asking them to design a bookmark for Valentine’s Day. The six winners received gift cards to the local Puerto Rican bookstore named, ironically enough, The Bookmark. It was one of the most personally gratifying moments when one of my classmates gifted me the bookmark she made, an image of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza painted in acrylics. Now that we’re at the end of the club’s second year, we know that there is still a lot of work to do. Students are constantly coming up with new activities, from creating an illustrated kid’s book for the Preschoolers to building “take a book, leave a book” stations in the halls. It is very heartwarming to know that we have had a positive impact on our school, and observe how, little by little, students started to see literature as more than just a “dead medium”. In the end, I would have to attribute it to my team; everything “Club Literario" has accomplished has been because of the giving and passionate people that have helped. This is why I trust that the impact we have had goes beyond what we have done by the time I graduate. Students want to continue with Club Literario, already coming up with ideas of what they can do years from now. This experience has taught me that no matter how unlikely your goal might seem, the world needs people that have the bravery to try.