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Raianne Sereene Baysa

6495

Bold Points

11x

Nominee

4x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

As a low-income Filipino undergraduate pursuing a bachelor's degree in Clinical and Counseling Psychology, I invest my time in research to improve the psychological lives of Filipinos, including my family who have been battling with mental illnesses. Recently, I have authored a scholarly article addressing the issue of depression. Currently, I am working on establishing a Student Depression Inventory tailored to Filipino students, promising a culturally relevant assessment tool to inform mental health professionals. I am an aspiring licensed clinical psychologist committed to providing mental services in underserved rural areas of the Philippines. I want to elevate the well-being of single mothers, survivors of domestic violence, children with cleft palate, and families dealing with generational trauma. As the Women's Services and Resources Ambassador, I have promoted gender-inclusive support systems and led impactful Mental Health Awareness Walks within the Laie, Hawaii community. I serve women and their families as the Relief Society Organization counselor and students as the Vice President - Service and Career of our university's Psychology Club. I hope to be your next scholarship recipient. Your financial help will assist me as a student who funds her own education in Hawaii, as a daughter who sends money to my family in the Philippines, and as a wife to my growing family. My ultimate goal is to enter graduate school and become the first in my family to get licensed. Thank you for visiting my profile. Sending aloha to you!

Education

Brigham Young University-Hawaii

Bachelor's degree program
2020 - 2023
  • Majors:
    • Social Work
    • Clinical, Counseling and Applied Psychology
  • Minors:
    • Anthropology
  • GPA:
    3.9

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Clinical, Counseling and Applied Psychology
    • Social Work
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Mental Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Licensed Clinical Psychologist

    • Customer Services Lead

      Polynesian Cultural Center
      2021 – 2021
    • Teacher

      Philippines Missionary Training Center
      2019 – 20201 year
    • Front Desk Clerk

      Residential Life and Student Housing
      2021 – 20221 year
    • Teaching Assistant

      Psychology Department
      2022 – 2022
    • Pacific Studies Journal Research Assistant

      Jonathan Napela Center for Hawaiian and Pacific Studies
      2023 – Present1 year

    Sports

    Swimming

    Club
    2023 – Present1 year

    Table Tennis

    Club
    2016 – Present8 years

    Volleyball

    Intramural
    2010 – 20111 year

    Badminton

    Club
    2023 – Present1 year

    Research

    • Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Filipino Student Depression Inventory

      Psychology Department — Co-author with a student research assistant and a clinical psychologist
      2023 – Present
    • Mental Health Awareness Walk

      Psychology Department — Student research assistant with six other research assistants. We are organizing a Walk on October 21, 2023.
      2023 – Present
    • The Creation and Validation of the Filipino Student Depression Inventory

      Psychology Department at Brigham Young University - Hawaii — Research assistant working with another research assistant on a confirmatory factor analysis on the Filipino Student Depression Inventory. We also published a scholarly article on its creation.
      2022 – Present
    • Barriers to Accessing Mental Health Services

      Psychology Department — Student researcher in a group of four, supervised by a clinical psychologist. This is part of my mentored research.
      2023 – Present
    • Research Presentation

      Hawaii Pacific University — Presenter at a conference on "The Creation and Validation of Filipino Student Depression Inventory".
      2022 – 2022
    • Research Mentorship - Clinical and Counseling Psychology

      Psychology Department at Brigham Young University - Hawaii — Mentee of Dr. Eric Orr, a clinical psychologist.
      2022 – Present

    Arts

    • Kula Manu at Brigham Young University - Hawaii

      Photography
      "Where Our Fathers Were", Genealogy
      2023 – 2023
    • Isabela National High School

      Photography
      Photojournalism, Feature Writing, Broadcasting
      2012 – 2015
    • Isabela National High School

      Videography
      Agwat
      2014 – 2014

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Brigham Young University - Hawaii — Volunteer
      2023 – Present
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Psychology Club — Vice President
      2023 – Present
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Psychology Club — Treasurer
      2023 – 2023
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Filipino Club — Secretary
      2022 – 2022
    • Advocacy

      Psychology Department at Brigham Young University - Hawaii — I was a Trail Guide leading faculty and students in the Mental Health Awareness Walk. I shared my or my family's personal experiences of how real disorders are and how we have overcome them.
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      St. John's United: Assisted Senior Living in Billings, MT — Part of our weekly service opportunity was to go to St. John's and help with the elderly, mingling, entertaining and caring for them. I also attended trainings that raise awareness about the old adulthood stage.
      2019 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints — I was a missionary sharing the doctrines and principles of our religion to thousands of visitors on Temple Square daily. I was also assigned to Billings, Montana and Humanitarian Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.
      2018 – 2019

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Top of the Mountain Memorial Scholarship
    My pursuit of environmental advocacy commenced with a deep-seated desire to expand my knowledge on how to effectively fulfill my role in preserving our planet. I attended a Green Summit conference in Thailand, where I had the privilege of listening to esteemed speakers discuss climate change and sustainable living. I presented a research project in Singapore on the precarious state of coral reef systems in Hawaii, shedding light on the urgency of addressing this environmental crisis in front of students and professors globally. I actively initiated and managed restoration projects. We collaborated with professors and fellow students who shared my passion for conservation biology - specifically in coral reef restoration in Hawaii by collecting coral damaged by strong waves and restoring them to the ocean. Additionally, I engaged in reforestation efforts, where my team and I hiked through challenging terrain to plant native Hawaiian trees. In pursuing environmental advocacy, I have also actively eradicated invasive species on land and water. In Oahu, I placed baits to locate little red fire ant colonies so they could be reported to the proper exterminators. Moreover, I participated in removing invasive mangroves, recognizing their detrimental impact on water quality for corals and native fish populations. As an advocate for the environment, communication is vital. The message I intend to place on the top of the mountain is simple: "You are the stewards of this world; Earth is your home. What are you doing today to take care of it?" This message encapsulates our shared responsibility and purpose in protecting our environment. Ending with a thought-provoking question encourages self-reflection and inspires individuals to make environmentally conscious choices in their daily lives. In conclusion, my journey toward advocating for the environment has been dedicated and marked by a deep commitment to learning, action, and collaboration.
    Minority/Women in STEM Scholarship
    I consider it a miracle to have reached this point in my academic journey as a senior student majoring in Psychology and Social Work at Brigham Young University-Hawaii. This university, located in the United States, seemed like an impossible dream due to my financial constraints, and I faced criticism from some who labeled me as an 'American Hunter' or 'Entitled Princess' for even aspiring to study here. Despite these discouraging opinions, I persisted and applied to the university, eventually gaining acceptance to pursue my bachelor's degree. As time went on, I encountered even more formidable challenges in my educational journey. I found myself lacking the financial means to cover my daily school and personal expenses, not to mention my responsibility to support my family in the Philippines. My family situation is complex, with separated parents. My father has ceased communication and support for my younger brother and me. Meanwhile, my mother, who earns a limited income as a virtual assistant, faced the devastating impact of COVID-19 and suffered a stroke that led to her job loss. In response, my brother and I made a conscious decision to take matters into our own hands and support each other. I diligently sought employment opportunities at our university and was fortunate to secure a position as a research assistant for the Pacific Studies Journal, earning $12 per hour for 19 hours per week. However, the cost of living in Hawaii is notably high, and my student job alone is insufficient to cover my daily expenses. Recognizing the need for additional financial support, I learned about the Dean's List scholarship at our university, which is awarded to students with a GPA of 3.75 or higher. I made a commitment to excel in my studies, often sacrificing my social life to prioritize academics. As a result, I have maintained a commendable GPA of 3.93 as a senior student. Acknowledging the substantial responsibility of providing for both myself and my family, I extended my search for financial resources. I reached out to community members, offering my cleaning services to their households while sharing my unique challenges as a student. Although it demanded a significant portion of my study time, I understood the necessity of making this sacrifice to meet my immediate needs. In addition to my academic pursuits, I invested my time in various leadership roles, which also presented scholarship opportunities. I actively contributed to the New Student Orientation, served as an ambassador for Women's Services and Resources, and assumed the role of Vice President in the Psychology Club. These experiences have not only enriched my personal and professional growth but also opened doors to financial aid opportunities. My motivation stems from a desire to alleviate the generational trauma, sexual abuse, and mental health issues my family has endured. I aim to become a licensed psychologist, breaking the cycle of suicide, domestic violence, depression, and bipolar disorder within my family. I also intend to address the scarcity of therapists in the Philippines, offering free psychological services in rural areas. While becoming the first licensed psychologist in my family is a personal dream, my primary goal is to help those facing poverty and limited education opportunities. I aspire to inspire others, demonstrating that no obstacle is insurmountable in achieving their dreams.
    Ernest Lee McLean Jr. : World Life Memorial Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    My inspiration to engage in community service can be distilled into a simple mantra: "Forget yourself and go to work." This principle has guided my actions since 2018 when I made the profound decision to leave my family in the Philippines to serve families in the United States, particularly in Utah and Montana. As a volunteer missionary in our Christian church, I committed to stepping out of my comfort zone and putting my career on hold, maintaining only weekly communication with my family. This transformative experience, funded by our church, spanned 18 months and involved serving in elderly hospice homes, interacting with homeless individuals in humanitarian centers, packing food for refugees, and delivering messages of hope centered around Christ to those who have suffered losses due to accidents and mental health issues. My commitment to giving back motivated me to launch a crowdfunding initiative for the Agays, in collaboration with faculty members, church leaders, community members, and even strangers. Together, we collected essential supplies such as food, clothing, and monetary contributions, which we personally delivered to the Agay communities. We organized a heartfelt program filled with music, dance, and mutual understanding, deepening the bonds between us. Although they expressed gratitude for my service, I reminded them that their spirit of resilience had served me even more. Recently, I received news of my mother's stroke due to her chronic illness back in the Philippines. Without hesitation, I utilized my school savings to be by her side, as I recognized that no one else would. Despite the concerns about the cost of flights and medical bills, I firmly believed that there was no wiser choice than being there for her. My time with my single mother was a sacred opportunity to provide care, from changing her diapers to assisting her transition from the hospital to home. Although it meant sacrificing my graduate school savings, I understood that no financial investment could replace the invaluable service I was providing. My commitment to service knows no bounds and transcends my personal circumstances. These volunteer experiences have instilled in me an unwavering desire to continue serving others, particularly in the realm of mental health. Witnessing family members grapple with depression, bipolar disorder, and sexual abuse, and some tragically choosing to end their lives due to a lack of resources, highlights the pressing need for accessible and affordable mental health services. My aspiration is to embark on a lifelong journey of service, driven by a deep commitment to make a difference. I am pursuing my major with the aim of helping individuals and families in my home country access vital social services. The volunteer experiences that have broadened my perspective on the daily injustices faced by others have inspired me to work toward creating meaningful change. I humbly request your support through this scholarship to help me turn these aspirations into reality.
    Dreamer's Midpoint Scholarship
    I consider it a miracle to have reached this point in my academic journey as a senior student majoring in Psychology and Social Work at Brigham Young University-Hawaii. This university, located in the United States, seemed like an impossible dream due to my financial constraints, and I faced criticism from some who labeled me as an 'American Hunter' or 'Entitled Princess' for even aspiring to study here. Despite these discouraging opinions, I persisted and applied to the university, eventually gaining acceptance to pursue my bachelor's degree. As time went on, I encountered even more formidable challenges in my educational journey. I found myself lacking the financial means to cover my daily school and personal expenses, not to mention my responsibility to support my family in the Philippines. My family situation is complex, with separated parents. My father has ceased communication and support for my younger brother and me. Meanwhile, my mother, who earns a limited income as a virtual assistant, faced the devastating impact of COVID-19 and suffered a stroke that led to her job loss. In response, my brother and I made a conscious decision to take matters into our own hands and support each other. I diligently sought employment opportunities at our university and was fortunate to secure a position as a research assistant for the Pacific Studies Journal, earning $12 per hour for 19 hours per week. However, the cost of living in Hawaii is notably high, and my student job alone is insufficient to cover my daily expenses. Recognizing the need for additional financial support, I learned about the Dean's List scholarship at our university, which is awarded to students with a GPA of 3.75 or higher. I made a commitment to excel in my studies, often sacrificing my social life to prioritize academics. As a result, I have maintained a commendable GPA of 3.93 as a senior student. Acknowledging the substantial responsibility of providing for both myself and my family, I extended my search for financial resources. I reached out to community members, offering my cleaning services to their households while sharing my unique challenges as a student. Although it demanded a significant portion of my study time, I understood the necessity of making this sacrifice to meet my immediate needs. In addition to my academic pursuits, I invested my time in various leadership roles, which also presented scholarship opportunities. I actively contributed to the New Student Orientation, served as an ambassador for Women's Services and Resources, and assumed the role of Vice President in the Psychology Club. These experiences have not only enriched my personal and professional growth but also opened doors to financial aid opportunities. My motivation stems from a desire to alleviate the generational trauma, sexual abuse, and mental health issues my family has endured. I aim to become a licensed psychologist, breaking the cycle of suicide, domestic violence, depression, and bipolar disorder within my family. I also intend to address the scarcity of therapists in the Philippines, offering free psychological services in rural areas. While becoming the first licensed psychologist in my family is a personal dream, my primary goal is to help those facing poverty and limited education opportunities. I aspire to inspire others, demonstrating that no obstacle is insurmountable in achieving their dreams.
    So You Want to Be a Mental Health Professional Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Bold.org x Forever 21 Scholarship + Giveaway
    @justsereene
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Ruebenna Greenfield Flack Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Joshua A. Vaughn Memorial Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to pursue an education in Social Work. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelter, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Meaningful Existence Scholarship
    I am eager to become a therapist to break my family's generational trauma of suicide, domestic violence, severe depression, and bipolar disorder, contribute to the Philippines's lack of therapists, and provide free psychological services to Filipino citizens living in my country's rural areas. My mother's 20 long years of experience being victimized by domestic violence moved me to become a therapist. Lorraine endured the mental and physical battle scars from her six years of marriage and 14 years of her childhood. It is alarming to me to have witnessed and experienced some of these years with my younger brother, but I saw how she suffered more because she did not have the resources to heal and progress. Some people say that one only needs the willpower to move on, but I believe this is not the case for someone whose husband and family abused one's agency to choose. My mom has been battling severe depression, intensified by her hyperthyroidism, which cost her life twice. Moreover, my aunts continue to recover from sexual abuse and bipolar disorder, while my granduncle lost his life to suicide. They all weathered their trials without access to a therapist. I learned from them that it is impossible to heal these wounds without resources and a support system, let alone affordable and accessible professional help. I took responsibility for becoming their support system early in life, listening actively and intently, and showing empathy and compassion whenever they had "episodes" of triggers. I encouraged and accompanied my mom when she finally gathered her courage to see a therapist in Mandaluyong, Philippines, where we could only afford the free consultation in an abandoned-looking building. I felt the injustice for people with mental health disorders because there was no proper ventilation and light, no walls between patients, and a hundred patients had to wait hours to be accommodated in a small space. My mother's appointment was rushed due to a shortage of therapists. Truth hurts. Receiving proper mental health services felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Within my homeland, 3 to 5% of resources go toward mental health care. Services are usually available in urban areas and remain inaccessible to most Filipinos because of high prices. Two therapists cannot cover every 100,000 Filipinos who continue dealing with mental challenges and fight the stigma preventing students from pursuing mental health-oriented careers. I am passionate about creating shelters for domestic violence victims and providing therapy and vocational services to help them recover and function again. Our region has no shelters, and victims continue to increase in numbers. As a therapist, I want to implement the first-ever Marriage and Family Therapy in school systems. The Philippines is home to a lot of broken marriages and families, so I want to use my knowledge and experience to create a curriculum that can empower students like me to take on this field and help me in my cause of training families, couples, and individuals manage their family life that is evidence-based and culturally-informed. With my training in crisis intervention and mental disorders, I will be a frontline in our rural community that does not have a suicidal hotline and cannot access therapy. My greatest goal is to build psychological centers and offer free mental health services for my fellow Filipinos. Now that I am a senior undergraduate Psychology and Social Work student, I hope and pray for assistance in pursuing graduate school studying Marriage and Family Therapy at Brigham Young University in Provo. If given the chance, I will be the first to attend graduate school and get a license in my family's history.
    Carlos F. Garcia Muentes Scholarship
    My grandfather Hilario Baysa 's biggest disappointment in life was that he did not achieve his ultimate potential because he and his family could no longer afford his attendance in college. Though he was given a two-year scholarship, his lack of financial resources prevented him from continuing his degree in Isabela, Philippines. It was difficult to save money from being a fish vendor and farmer, so he accepted his fate and strived to give a better life for his family. There are not many available jobs in our local area for people who did not finish college. Hilario applied to multiple jobs, from construction work to painting. His efforts paid off, and his two children graduated from college. From his experience, he believes that preparation is a critical tool in life. His story inspired me to pursue my desired degree to break the incomplete education cycle. On the other hand, my mother and her sisters and grand uncle bring to the surface one crucial issue left unresolved to this day. My mother, Anna Lorraine, who shares a similar struggle of no access to education, has also been dealing with severe depression most of her life. Coming out of domestic violence from my father, which I also have experienced, she did not have access to services after that because there was nothing available in our location. If there is one, it is 12 hours away and costs more than she earns. Ever since she had me when she was studying secondary education in college, she has not been able to go back to finish her degree because it is a real challenge to find a job that does not require a Bachelor's degree. Moreover, my aunt Lemons has been battling with Bipolar Disorder since 2018, and my aunt Shella was a victim of sexual abuse. My grand uncle Maldwayne ended his life because of bullying and poverty. The worst thing about all of these is that all of the people mentioned continue to deal with these challenges without help because of a lack of financial resources and access to psychological resources. Their stories remain unheard because they seem to represent almost every Filipino. But I want them to know that I heard their cries and pleas, and our situation moved me to become a licensed psychologist someday, not to mention that in the Philippines, there are only two psychologists for every 100,000 Filipinos, and only 3 to 5% go to mental health care. My ultimate goal is to provide Filipinos access to psychological services in the Philippines and advocate for an increased budget for mental health. I am also eager to create shelters for domestic violence victims, as there is none in my community. Ever since my parents separated and I had to provide for myself, I did my best to apply for a sponsorship to the US so I could study and work. Luckily, I got accepted to the IWORK Program of Brigham Young University-Hawaii and started my degree in Clinical and Counseling Psychology and Social Work while working part-time as a research assistant for a professor. Even though I only earn $250 biweekly, I still send money to my family. I carry them with me in every decision I make. I excel in school so I can enter graduate school someday as the first one in my family. While I aim to access a better life here, I will bring the gratitude and desire to help my family and community heal and improve. I believe that we did not come this far only to come this far.
    Kim Moon Bae Underrepresented Students Scholarship
    When I first came to my university in Hawaii, I faced microaggression from an older American adult. I was working part-time for a booth camp that our workplace organized for residential advisors who are primarily students. Among other attendees were senior volunteer missionaries, many of whom were from the mainland. On one occasion, I asked one of the older adults about his experience, and he responded in English with provoking and indirect words. Though offensive, I tried to remain composed and clarified that I was genuinely interested in learning about his insights. As my coworkers interjected, the man told the group, pointing at me, "This little Filipino right here does not understand what I was saying. You should know better." His gaze fixed on me, he continued, "You are now here in the United States and should learn to understand deep English!" As a Filipino who values dignity, this encounter was deeply disheartening and shameful and undermined my identity. It's clear to me that this was a manifestation of racism. I was educated in English as early as nursery school, but transitioning to applying it to an English institution presented challenges. Unfortunately, Filipinos continue to live with the stereotype of being a model minority and face the pressure of not living up to expectations. Filipinos like myself have silently carried their aggressive encounters throughout their lives, often leading to mental health struggles like depression. Reflecting on this incident, I realized that this reflects a structural and cultural bias that we encounter, and what is scarier to think about is that it's not isolated to a single moment but a part of a larger narrative that shapes marginalized populations like us. Being a Filipino who is a member of an underrepresented minority population has made me acutely aware of the importance of proactivity and advocacy. This was a turning point for me to challenge stereotypes, biases, and discrimination, and also contribute to the growing need for psychologists in the Philippines to aid those who are trying to heal from intergenerational trauma brought on by colonization and other forms of oppression. This realization has moved me to illuminate the necessity of accessible and culturally sensitive psychological support. Filipinos continue to hesitate to seek help due to stigma, limited resources, and lack of understanding about mental health. This is why I aspire to become a psychologist to provide Filipinos access to psychological services in the Philippines and advocate for an increased budget for mental health. I am eager to create shelters for domestic violence victims and to educate individuals, couples, and families on mental health. Currently, I am studying as a senior Psychology and Social Work undergraduate as one of my first steps to reaching my goals. I have recently published a scholarly article on the creation of a Filipino Student Depression Inventory, which aims to produce a culturally sensitive measurement that will support the healthcare system in our country. Next month, I will be sent to the Philippines to gather our data to confirm our research factors, and also present about the Mental Health Awareness Walk, which I lead as a trail guide. I am forever grateful for the experiences that helped shape my desire to serve my country in the field of mental health. My identity strengthened my goal of pursuing higher education. I am saving up financially so I can set a great example for my future generations as the first one in the family to enter graduate school and get a license in the professional field. Thank you for your kind consideration and generosity.
    Lauren Czebatul Scholarship
    "Forget yourself and go to work." This has become my mantra starting in 2018, when I decided to leave my family in the Philippines so I can serve other families in the United States, specifically in Utah and Montana. I became a volunteer missionary in our church, and I vowed to leave behind my comfort zone and career, having to only communicate with my family once a week. I am grateful that I have been given an opportunity by our church which funded my trip, and I embarked on an 18-month long mission. This experience volunteering in elderly hospice homes, visiting with homeless people in humanitarian centers, packing food and ministering to refugees, and delivering messages of hope and peace about Christ to people who have lost loved ones to accidents and mental health issues has greatly changed my outlook in life. I have learned that when you start to forget yourself and go to work, you undergo through a hard time. Hard, meaning Humble And Refining Days. Because you begin to humble yourselves by empathizing with others, setting aside your personal matters, and focusing on their best interest. And it can be refining because in order to best serve others, one will need to surpass challenges and be nurtured even by the uncomfortable experiences along the way. But these are all necessary for growth. My volunteering experience helped me realize that I am a person that is more into growth than comfort. As I continue to volunteer in organizations and in my current university, I am moved to have the mindset that I will go back to my country and help my family and my fellow Filipinos, especially in the field of mental health. My mother experienced physical and emotional abuse from her former spouse and now has been battling with severe depression, trying to understand her purpose in life. My aunts experienced sexual abuse and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. My grand uncle just passed away of suicide, and my family has really gone through a difficult time. I also was diagnosed with severe depression and generalized anxiety, and coming from a broken family, I find it a miracle to be internally motivated to move forward in life. Because of my family and of the fact that for every 100,000 Filipinos there are only 2 psychiatrists available in my country, I am determined to be in the mental health field. I am currently an incoming senior Psychology and Social Work undergraduate student, maintaining a 3.930 GPA. It is my goal to enter graduate school, and I will be the first in the whole generation of my family to ever attend grad school if given the chance. I need this scholarship financially because I need assistance to afford graduate school. I am a low-income international student, and ever since my father decided that he is not going to support me anymore I raised myself and worked to support my needs. I have been studying hard to get good grades to be eligible in scholarships, that's why I was able to attend an American University. Even though I do not get rewarded for my success in every semester, I still discipline myself to become a contributing citizen to the society. My mom had a stroke last December and had a job loss during Covid. Since then she can only afford daily needs. I am also working part-time as a research assistant at a minimum wage while also sending money to my family. It is my greatest dream to attend grad school to help my family and my country. Thank you!
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    “Use your brain, not your emotions,” my father told me one night as I told him I want to go home to my home country to see my mother who got very sick. It was in the middle of December last year when suddenly she had a stroke and hyperthyroidism in storm that caused the blood in her brain. Such a critical condition will cause one never to wake up again, and with the only family member that has held me through good and bad times, losing her will be losing everything. In deciding between going home or staying here, I faced two dilemmas. I have been saving up money for my dream to go to graduate school. I am currently a Filipino student taking up Psychology and Social Work at an American university who is about to graduate next year in June, and I am working hard to go to grad school being the first one in my family to ever do so, if given the chance. Though it sounds fancy, I am not rich at all. I worked hard to maintain a high GPA to be on a scholarship in school where I can study and work at the same time. Not having any financial support from my family, I took the responsibility to look after myself and save up. If I use this to go home, I will lose huge savings for my grad school; and if I do not go home, no one will be there to take care of my mother. Because of the expensive flights, I initially thought it might be better just to send the money to help pay her bills. But at that time, I knelt, paused my activities, and vocally expressed my pleadings to the ultimate Social Worker, God. I asked, “What can I, as a servant, do for my mother?” To give a little background about my family, my parents are separated. My mother has disclosed to me previously her case of physical and emotional abuse from her marriage. This information was vital for me to know as I am a witness myself to what had happened to her. Since their separation in 2007, she has been living alone as my younger brother and I was brought to our grandparents. Thus, coming home to her was not an issue of money anymore but of determining needs that would be in her best interest. To me, my mother is the "poor, oppressed, and underserved” in society. I then told the Lord in my prayers that I was going home for the sole purpose of serving my mother. I went home immediately and fulfilled my goal of serving my mother. I changed her diapers, bathed her, fed her, gave her medicines, cleaned her house, fed her cats and dogs, empathized, listened, and dedicated my time to being there for her. After two weeks of caring for her, my mom messaged me and said, “Thank you for not thinking twice about going home despite your plans changing. You did not delay going home and went home right away. You don’t know how much of a gift that was for me.” My siblings also said that she could have gotten the strength and will when she learned that I was coming home to her. From this experience, emotions were not the primary agents. It was both my heart and my mind to determine how to best help my Filipino mother in her situation. There is no question on the capacity that money can do to resolve things, but there is no irreplaceable service than the gift of physically being there for the people. From this, I have become more self-aware that I will be a person that will go the extra mile to serve individuals, families, and the community, a person that will teach herself to become culturally competent and effective by obtaining a high-quality education to serve better her fellowmen, and a future professional that feels people and goes to where they are to be there for them. As I journey to become a working professional someday in the field of mental health, I will carry with me the attitude of humility. I know what it means to be poor, I am one myself. I know how it feels to have to decide if I will think of myself first or others, but I am most proud that this only motivated me to pursue my dreams to enter grad school someday.
    Reasons To Be - In Memory of Jimmy Watts
    Dear Kuo Family, I am Sereene, an incoming senior Psychology and Social Work undergraduate student. I work hard to maintain a GPA of 3.930 because I am sincere in pursuing graduate school. I will be the first in my family's history ever to attend grad school, and my pursuit comes from my goal to elevate the lives of my other Filipino citizens by helping them have accessible mental health services and advocate for the disadvantaged and oppressed in my country. I am very intentional and purposeful whenever I serve others, and my strong desire to serve results from a lifelong habit of acts of service exercised while growing up. In high school, I led a huge project on documenting the lives of an indigenous group in our area called "Agays," who live in an isolated area. I organized a team, and we went to their houses in the mountains to hear their pleas to the government. Through our search, I helped make their voices heard when it seemed impossible. The attitude of giving back to people led me to raise crowdfunding for the Agays. I collaborated with faculty members, church leaders and members, and strangers. Together, we gathered food, clothes, and money to donate to Agays. I brought all of them to Agays' areas, and we held a program full of singing and dancing and getting to know each other. They were very grateful for my service, but I told them they served me even more. When I serve, I forget myself and go to work. I applied this when I volunteered to become a missionary at our church for 18 months in Salt Lake City, Utah and Billings, Montana. I left my family to show God my love for Him by serving His children. In this mission, I took part in helping people visiting the Humanitarian Center. I interacted with refugees and helped them feel God's love for them. Recently, I also got to go home to my mother in the Philippines. When I learned she had a stroke because of her chronic illness, I did not think twice about using my school savings to go to her because I realized no one would. Despite people saying that it will not be a wise choice because flights are expensive and we still need money to pay for her medical bills, I believe there is no wiser choice than serving people by being there for them. My time with my single mother was sacred because I was there to change her diapers and help her transition from the hospital to her place. Despite knowing that I will lose my grad school savings, I know that I can never replace the service I will do for my mom. My service is not bound to my circumstance. Through my volunteer experiences, I developed this desire to never stop serving others, especially in the mental health field. A lot of my family members have suffered from depression, bipolar disorder, and sexual abuse, and some decided to end their life. They did not know their resources. And mental health services are inaccessible and expensive to avail. This is why I goal to have a lifelong journey of service. I am pursuing my major to help individuals and families in my country access social services. I am grateful to have had volunteer experiences that opened my eyes to the injustice others face daily. I hope to receive this scholarship to help me make this happen.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    My dream version of my future self is that I, Raianne Sereene Baysa, a Filipino licensed psychologist that provides accessible and affordable mental health services to Filipinos, eliminating the stigma surrounding people dealing with mental health disorders, and advocating for domestic violence to bring social justice to women and children.
    Humanize LLC Gives In Honor of Shirley Kelley Scholarship
    Winner
    Grandparent and parent roles combined: Challenge Accepted! Aloha and hello, Humanize LLC! I am Sereene from the Philippines. I am currently studying Psychology, Social Work, and Cultural Anthropology at Brigham Young University - Hawaii. I was drawn to your scholarship because you honor the influence of grandparents, so I want to tell you how my life has changed because of them. Hilario and Remedios Baysa were both generous and selfless grandparents who raised me and my brother. They were given the responsibility of becoming our grandparents and guardians when I was still a newborn baby, and they accepted me with open hearts. My grandmother, who I call "Mamang", is a retired elementary education teacher. When I was brought to their home, she became my source of great examples. Although Mamang only relied on my father's financial assistance, she budgeted carefully and managed to feed us three times daily. She never wanted anything for herself except that we become successful in life by pursuing our dreams. For her, our happiness is her happiness. She would always put us first. I look up to her great examples. She sleeps early so she can wake up early. I see her read her scriptures at 4 in the morning, leaving her enough time to prepare breakfast for us. She is my example of hospitality and one that honors inclusivity. She invites volunteer missionaries in our home and feeds them with great Filipino food. She was also involved in social work in our community and engaged herself in outreach programs. She knows our community members and leaders by name and opens our home to anyone in need. On the other hand, my grandfather, or "Papang", worked in a Coca-Cola engineering company and is a freelance artist. Papang led our home with principles of honesty and discipline, inviting us to prioritize the things that matter most. It is crucial for him that I finish college, as he could not finish his because of a lack of financial resources. Papang ensured he was there in every school meeting my brother and I had. He led parents-teachers meetings and significantly alleviated air issues in our classrooms. Now, this is not to point out that I have perfect grandparents. But I want to emphasize that I will be forever in awe to have grandparents who spent most of their lives serving and nourishing us. Mamang and Papang, I have so much love to give to others because of your love. Because of their great examples, I valued higher education. I was motivated to include Social Work as one of my majors. I am also planning to apply to graduate school because I want to give back to them and my country, who need mental health help. We lack staff and resources there, and my grandparents have exemplified that we do not need to be millionaires to change the world. WHO WE ARE is already changing the world. So now, as a Filipino student, I am involved in a school that welcomes diversity and practices inclusivity. I am leading Mental Health Awareness Walks at our university. I am studying with discipline, dedicating my time to researching Filipino Student Depression Inventory to understand more deeply the depression experienced by students in my country. Because of their teachings, I involve myself in every opportunity that emphasizes service and advocacy for social justice. Their loving guidance and dedication mark every step I take now in my career. They gave me the best life possible, and now I am set to give others their best life because my grandparents showed it is possible.