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Rocio Medina Febo

2535

Bold Points

14x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I’m a proud Latina from Bayamón, Puerto Rico. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I have a bachelor's in Theater Performance and Direction with a minor in Sociolinguistics from George Mason University in Virginia. You could say I’m a modern day Ironwoman—I wear multiple medical devices that I call my robot parts that allow me to live a really awesome life with a type one diabetes. Advocacy and being vocal about the health disparities among communities a big part of what I do. #Insulin4all My career goal is to become a certified Speech-Language Pathologist and work as a myofunctional therapist on the rehabilitation of Spanish-speaking stroke survivors at a clinical or hospital level. As an SLP, I hope to work and serve in my community and encourage and mentor high school students to pursue this career path. In the future, I hope to start my own clinic and give my community the care that it deserves. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish-speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.

Education

Inter American University of Puerto Rico-Metro

Master's degree program
2021 - 2023
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other

Universidad Ana G. Mendez-Cupey Campus

Bachelor's degree program
2020 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education

George Mason University

Bachelor's degree program
2014 - 2018
  • Majors:
    • Drama/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft
  • Minors:
    • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Medical Speech Language Pathology

    • Social Services Worker/ Receptionist

      The Salvation Army
      2020 – Present4 years
    • Senior Teaching Artist

      Acting For Young People
      2018 – Present6 years

    Sports

    Soccer

    Club
    2010 – 20144 years

    Awards

    • CCPR Congressional Winners 2017

    Dancing

    Club
    2014 – Present10 years

    Awards

    • Azucar Salsa Club

    Research

    • Drama/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft

      George Mason University CVPA — Researcher
      2017 – 2018

    Arts

    • Azucar Salsa Club

      Dance
      Cherry Blossom Festival , Agua Nights
      2014 – 2019
    • Mason Players

      Acting
      A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Happy Meal , The Crucible, The Vagina Monologues, 100th Meridian Project
      2014 – 2018

    Public services

    • Advocacy

      Taller Salud (Puerto Rico) — Health Promoter
      2018 – 2018
    • Volunteering

      The Salvation Army — Intake Coordinator
      2014 – 2019

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Art of Giving Scholarship
    I am applying to this because I’ll be starting grad school this upcoming fall and need some assistance covering the costs of my education. My dream is to become a Speech-Language Pathologist and someday buy my mother the house that she’s always dreamed of. As an SLP, I hope to work and serve in my community and encourage and mentor high school students to pursue this career path. In the future, I hope to start my own clinic to service my community. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish-speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves. I believe that through the pursuit of a college education my family and I can have a better life for generations to come. As the poet, Gwendolyn Brooks said “We are each other’s harvest. We are each other’s business. We are each other’s magnitude and bond.” I like the idea of thinking of ourselves as each other’s magnitude. So, I often gravitate toward thinking about my capacity, the limits of what is possible for my life. The greatness of the word “magnitude” suggests that what we’re talking about is abundance, not scarcity. And that’s where I’m headed.
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I was born on a rainy Father’s Day in San Juan, Puerto Rico to two teenage parents. It’s always been me, my parents and my brother Sebastián. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I had a neighbor named Natalia. I called her Tata for short. She cared for me after-school while my parents worked long hours. Tata taught me lots about the world, she was what I call a neighborhood celebrity. She would cook enough dinner to feed an army just in case anyone knocked on the door. She pushed me to be outspoken and pursue an education. She later got sick, had a brain stroke which left her paralyzed on the right side and unable to speak. One of the few things she could say was Ta-ta, the nickname I had given her as a child. A speech-pathologist worked with her a few times a week to rehabilitate her speech and swallowing. She had been working with a speech pathologist for over a year when I came to see her all dressed up in my gown for high school graduation when she uttered the words “proud of you” and made a rain sound and gesture meaning my name. That is when I decided that I wanted to be a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. In the U.S linguistically diverse clinicians are scarce; it was incredibly difficult to find a Spanish-speaking speech-pathologist; this leaves people like Tata without the right support. It is through my pursuit of a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology that I can impact my community by providing services that are not yet readily available. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.
    First-Gen in Health & Medicine Scholarship
    My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I was born on a rainy Father’s Day in San Juan, Puerto Rico to two teenage parents. It’s always been me, my parents and my brother Sebastián. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I had a neighbor named Natalia. I called her Tata for short. She cared for me after-school while my parents worked long hours. Tata taught me lots about the world, she was what I call a neighborhood celebrity. She would cook enough dinner to feed an army just in case anyone knocked on the door. She pushed me to be outspoken and pursue the education that she never got a chance to receive. She later got sick, had a brain stroke which left her paralyzed on the right side and unable to speak. One of the few things she could say was Ta-ta, the nickname I had given her as a child. A speech-pathologist worked with her a few times a week to rehabilitate her speech and swallowing. She had been working with a speech pathologist for over a year when I came to see her all dressed up in my gown for high school graduation when she uttered the words “proud of you” and made a rain sound and gesture meaning my name. That is when I decided that I wanted to be a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. In the U.S linguistically diverse clinicians are scarce; it was incredibly difficult to find a Spanish-speaking speech-pathologist; this leaves people like Tata without the right support. It is through my pursuit of a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology that I can impact my community by providing services that are not yet readily available. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I was born on a rainy Father’s Day in San Juan, Puerto Rico to two teenage parents. It’s always been me, my parents and my brother Sebastián. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I had a neighbor named Natalia. I called her Tata for short. She cared for me after-school while my parents worked long hours. Tata taught me lots about the world, she was what I call a neighborhood celebrity. She would cook enough dinner to feed an army just in case anyone knocked on the door. She pushed me to be outspoken and pursue an education. She later got sick, had a brain stroke which left her paralyzed on the right side and unable to speak. One of the few things she could say was Ta-ta, the nickname I had given her as a child. A speech-pathologist worked with her a few times a week to rehabilitate her speech and swallowing. She had been working with a speech pathologist for over a year when I came to see her all dressed up in my gown for high school graduation when she uttered the words “proud of you” and made a rain sound and gesture meaning my name. That is when I decided that I wanted to be a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. In the U.S linguistically diverse clinicians are scarce; it was incredibly difficult to find a Spanish-speaking speech-pathologist; this leaves people like Tata without the right support. It is through my pursuit of a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology that I can impact my community by providing services that are not yet readily available. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.
    Abran Arreola Latinx Scholarship
    My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I was born on a rainy Father’s Day in San Juan, Puerto Rico to two teenage parents. It’s always been me, my parents and my brother Sebastián. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I had a neighbor named Natalia. I called her Tata for short. She cared for me after-school while my parents worked long hours. Tata taught me lots about the world, she was what I call a neighborhood celebrity. She would cook enough dinner to feed an army just in case anyone knocked on the door. She pushed me to be outspoken and pursue an education. She later got sick, had a brain stroke which left her paralyzed on the right side and unable to speak. One of the few things she could say was Ta-ta, the nickname I had given her as a child. A speech-pathologist worked with her a few times a week to rehabilitate her speech and swallowing. She had been working with a speech pathologist for over a year when I came to see her all dressed up in my gown for high school graduation when she uttered the words “proud of you” and made a rain sound and gesture meaning my name. That is when I decided that I wanted to be a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. In the U.S linguistically diverse clinicians are scarce; it was incredibly difficult to find a Spanish-speaking speech-pathologist; this leaves people like Tata without the right support. It is through my pursuit of a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology that I can impact my community by providing services that are not yet readily available. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.
    Bervell Health Equity Scholarship
    My name is Rocío, it's Spanish for dewdrops. I was born on a rainy Father’s Day in San Juan, Puerto Rico to two teenage parents. It’s always been me, my parents and my brother Sebastián. My community is my family. My mother in raising me took “it takes a village” seriously. I had a neighbor named Natalia. I called her Tata for short. She cared for me after-school while my parents worked long hours. Tata taught me lots about the world, she was what I call a neighborhood celebrity. She would cook enough dinner to feed an army just in case anyone knocked on the door. She pushed me to be outspoken and pursue an education. She later got sick, had a brain stroke which left her paralyzed on the right side and unable to speak. One of the few things she could say was Ta-ta, the nickname I had given her as a child. A speech-pathologist worked with her a few times a week to rehabilitate her speech and swallowing. She had been working with a speech pathologist for over a year when I came to see her all dressed up in my gown for high school graduation when she uttered the words “proud of you” and made a rain sound and gesture meaning my name. That is when I decided that I wanted to be a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. In the U.S linguistically diverse clinicians are scarce; it was incredibly difficult to find a Spanish-speaking speech-pathologist; this leaves people like Tata without the right support. It is through my pursuit of a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology that I can impact my community by providing services that are not yet readily available. I grew up in a community where I could see the disparities in healthcare being received by patients. I saw a difference in the health of those who had access to clinicians who spoke their language. Seeing a lack of Spanish speaking clinicians in my majority Hispanic neighborhood, I realized that I could be a participant in delivering quality health care to all. To be able to care for patients would mean the world to me, it’s a step forward in getting my community the care it deserves.
    Pride Palace LGBTQ+ Scholarship
    @rocimotti Instagram My life is at the intersection of my identities. I am queer, I am latina, I am proud. Our legacy and future is bright, our past a fortress, a warrior, our present now here. We are powerful and queer. I am not ashamed anymore.
    Bold Moments No-Essay Scholarship
    Went on a trip to La Fortuna, Costa Rica. Slept on the shadow of an active volcano. You could see lava spewing out at night, a glowing ember in the distance. The locals would bathe in the river that runs close to the volcano, the water is warm, said to have healing properties. The locals would say be sure to not upset, the gods!