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Orlyana Tantchou

1645

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

2x

Finalist

Bio

Hi! My name is Orlyana. Although I was born in America, I am Cameroonian at heart. My parents and most of my family were born in Cameroon. I have visited the country multiple times and it’s a beautiful place, full of distinct culture and traditions, wonderful tropical climate, and cheering merchants on the streets selling all kinds of art crafts with the noise of motorcycles taxis in the background zipping through rush hour traffic. These are fond memories of Cameroon that I take with me everywhere we go in the United States. Every city that we move in, there is always a strong urge to connect with fellow Cameroonians. I have used my nonprofit organization No Limit International to help my Cameroonian people come together and grow as a community. At No Limit International we aim to make a better world for all of us by working towards achieving 7 critical UN Sustainable Goals. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. As president, I have taken the lead regarding actions such as partnering with swimming federations, women empowerment projects, donations, and more. I'm also a Girl Scout Gold Award recipient for my gardening project, in which I started a community garden and taught other Girl Scouts how to garden. I'm currently attending UC Berkeley and want to major in computer science. I'm passionate about more black girls joining STEM fields.

Education

University of California-Berkeley

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Computer Science

Loretto Academy High School

High School
2016 - 2021

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Computer Science
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Computer Software

    • Dream career goals:

      I want to be a creative director at a major computer software company. I would also like to be the head of a major organization that encourages girls to code.

      Sports

      Basketball

      Junior Varsity
      2017 – 20192 years

      Awards

      • Most Improved Award

      Public services

      • Volunteering

        No Limit International — President
        2018 – Present
      • Volunteering

        FiCovid-19 — Interviewed consulates, and donated masks to them. Donated t-shirts and teddy bears to nursing homes. Made hand sanitizers to donate.
        2020 – 2021
      • Volunteering

        Girl Scouts — Started and completed my Gold Award Project
        2020 – 2021
      • Volunteering

        Girl Scouts — Participated and led many community service activities for Girl Scouts and earned my Community Service Bar
        2018 – 2021
      • Volunteering

        Girl Scouts — Girl Scouts Program Aide
        2018 – 2021

      Future Interests

      Advocacy

      Volunteering

      Philanthropy

      Entrepreneurship

      Femi Chebaís Scholarship
      I also hope to use my career in STEM to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even fewer of them being female too. I want to be the change in this primarily white and asian male dominated field of computer science and create an "African Girls Who Code" sub-organization under my nonprofit organization, No Limit International.
      Scholar Dudes in Computer Science Scholarship
      I’ve always been interested in ways to help less-developed countries. Particularly, countries that are heavily based on sustainable living. As my family is from Cameroon, I’ve been able to see first-hand the turmoil farmers are under whether it comes to prices or supply-and-demand. I’ve seen a local farmer spend a season producing massive amounts of produce, but only selling half of it. This problem affects smaller farmers drastically more. Farmers don’t know what price their competitor is selling at and end up getting the short end of the stick. Through my Girl Scout Gold Award project where I started a community garden, I gained a newfound interest in gardening and realized how important it is.I began to wonder how I could make the job of farming in poorer countries an easier task. The tricky part was finding out how I could relate sustainable living to computer science. A language I can clearly speak is programming language. Since my high school computer science class, I've been interested in the problem solving that comes with coding. Whether it be fixing a small bug or coding an algorithm from scratch, coding is something that, although challenging at times, is ultimately rewarding. Though it comes with lots of trial and error, the pure joy that radiates from me when I complete a program cannot be matched. Through my gold award research, I started to realize the disparities between poorer countries and the United States when it comes to farming. I'm interested in pursuing a degree in STEM in order to be ready and engage in solving world problems in this digital era. More specifically, with newly acquired technical know-how, I hope to develop applications for small local farmers in less developed countries. The goal is to empower them with digital tools that facilitate the maximization of their farming potential and sale of their crops at competitive market prices. This way, I can contribute to the fight against hunger and poverty by enabling the rural communities to feed their families through an adequate farming system. I also am pursuing a career in CS to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even less of them being female. Diversity in the workplace is important because I don’t want to see another black girl be as intimidated as I was, walking into a class where none of my peers looked like me. I want to be the change. My nonprofit organization No Limit International is based in Cameroon, Africa. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. I want to use my organization as a platform for a "African Girls who Code" club. I want to teach black, African girls how to code and enlighten them in different STEM fields. It's important that we break into the primary white and asian dominated field of computer science. I want to use the knowledge I've gained with my degree to help others do the same. If I can open the eyes of just one girl I'll consider my job done. Pursuing a degree in CS will not only be beneficial for me, as I will acquire knowledge that will last me a lifetime, but I plan to use my degree for the benefit of others: farmers who don't know their way around technology and girls who need some guidance.
      Abhi Khune Underrepresented Minorities Scholarship
      I’ve always been interested in ways to help less-developed countries. Particularly, countries that are heavily based on sustainable living. As my family is from Cameroon, Africa, I’ve been able to see first-hand the turmoil farmers are under whether it comes to prices or supply-and-demand. I’ve seen a local farmer spend a season producing massive amounts of produce, but only selling half of it. This problem affects smaller farmers drastically more. Farmers don’t know what price their competitor is selling at and end up getting the short end of the stick. Through my Girl Scout Gold Award project where I started a community garden, I gained a newfound interest in gardening and realized how important it is. I began to wonder how I could make the job of farming in poorer countries an easier task. The tricky part was finding out how I could relate sustainable living to computer science. A language I can clearly speak is programming language. Since my high school computer science class, I've been interested in the problem solving that comes with coding. I love being given a problem and coming up with an algorithm that best suits it. Though it comes with lots of trial and error, the pure joy that radiates from me when I complete a program cannot be matched. Whether it be fixing a small bug or coding an algorithm from scratch, coding is something that, although challenging at times, is ultimately rewarding. Ultimately, I'm interested in pursuing this degree in order to be ready and engage in solving world problems in this digital era. More specifically, with newly acquired technical know-how, I hope to develop applications for small local farmers in less developed countries. The goal is to empower them with digital tools that facilitate the maximization of their farming potential and sale of their crops at competitive market prices. This way, I can contribute to the fight against hunger and poverty by enabling the rural communities to feed their families through an adequate farming system. I also am pursuing a career in STEM to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even less of them being female. Diversity in the workplace is important because I don’t want to see another black girl be as intimidated as I was, walking into a class where none of my peers looked like me. I want to be the change. My nonprofit organization No Limit International is based in Cameroon, Africa. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. I want to use my organization as a platform for a "African Girls who Code" club. I want to teach black, African girls how to code and enlighten them in different STEM fields. It's important that we break into the primary white and asian dominated field of computer science. I want to use the knowledge I've gained with my degree to help others do the same. If I can open the eyes of just one girl I'll consider my job done. Pursuing a degree in STEM make an impact for me, as I will acquire knowledge that will last me a lifetime, but I plan to use my degree for the benefit of others: farmers who don't know their way around technology and girls who need some guidance.
      Lyndsey Scott Coding+ Scholarship
      I’ve always been interested in ways to help less-developed countries. Particularly, countries that are heavily based on sustainable living. As my family is from Cameroon, I’ve been able to see first-hand the turmoil farmers are under whether it comes to prices or supply-and-demand. I’ve seen a local farmer spend a season producing massive amounts of produce, but only selling half of it. This problem affects smaller farmers drastically more. Farmers don’t know what price their competitor is selling at and end up getting the short end of the stick. Through my Girl Scout Gold Award project I gained a newfound interest in gardening and realized how hard and important it is, as I created a community garden and taught other Girl Scouts how to garden. I began to wonder how I could make the job of farming in poorer countries an easier task. The tricky part was finding out how I could relate sustainable living to computer science. A language I can clearly speak is programming language. Since my high school computer science class, I've been interested in the problem solving that comes with coding. Whether it be fixing a small bug or coding an algorithm from scratch, coding is something that, although challenging at times, is ultimately rewarding. Through my gold award research, I started to realize the disparities between poorer countries and the United States when it comes to farming. I'm interested in pursuing a degree in computer science in order to be ready and engage in solving world problems in this digital era. More specifically, with newly acquired technical know-how, I hope to develop applications for small local farmers in less developed countries. The goal is to empower them with digital tools that facilitate the maximization of their farming potential and sale of their crops at competitive market prices. This way, I can contribute to the fight against hunger and poverty by enabling the rural communities to feed their families through an adequate farming system. I also am pursuing a career in computer science to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even less of them being female. Diversity in the workplace is important because I don’t want to see another black girl be as intimidated as I was, walking into a class where none of my peers looked like me. I want to be the change. My nonprofit organization No Limit International is based in Cameroon, Africa. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. I want to use my organization as a platform for a "African Girls who Code" club. I want to teach black, African girls how to code and enlighten them in different STEM fields. It's important that we break into the primary white and asian dominated field of computer science. I want to use the knowledge I've gained with my degree to help others do the same. If I can open the eyes of just one girl I'll consider my job done. Pursuing a degree in computer science will not only be beneficial for me, as I will acquire knowledge that will last me a lifetime, but I plan to use my degree for the benefit of others: farmers who don't know their way around technology and girls who need some guidance.
      Future Leaders in Technology Scholarship - College Award
      I’ve always been interested in ways to help less-developed countries. Particularly, countries that are heavily based on sustainable living. As my family is from Cameroon, I’ve been able to see first-hand the turmoil farmers are under whether it comes to prices or supply-and-demand. I’ve seen a local farmer spend a season producing massive amounts of produce, but only selling half of it. This problem affects smaller farmers drastically more. Farmers don’t know what price their competitor is selling at and end up getting the short end of the stick. Through my Girl Scout Gold Award project I gained a newfound interest in gardening and realized how hard and important it is, as I created a community garden and taught other Girl Scouts how to garden. I began to wonder how I could make the job of farming in poorer countries an easier task. The tricky part was finding out how I could relate sustainable living to computer science. A language I can clearly speak is programming language. Since my high school computer science class, I've been interested in the problem solving that comes with coding. Whether it be fixing a small bug or coding an algorithm from scratch, coding is something that, although challenging at times, is ultimately rewarding. Through my gold award research, I started to realize the disparities between poorer countries and the United States when it comes to farming. I'm interested in pursuing a degree in computer science in order to be ready and engage in solving world problems in this digital era. More specifically, with newly acquired technical know-how, I hope to develop applications for small local farmers in less developed countries. The goal is to empower them with digital tools that facilitate the maximization of their farming potential and sale of their crops at competitive market prices. This way, I can contribute to the fight against hunger and poverty by enabling the rural communities to feed their families through an adequate farming system. I also am pursuing a career in computer science to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even less of them being female. Diversity in the workplace is important because I don’t want to see another black girl be as intimidated as I was, walking into a class where none of my peers looked like me. I want to be the change. My nonprofit organization No Limit International is based in Cameroon, Africa. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. I want to use my organization as a platform for a "African Girls who Code" club. I want to teach black, African girls how to code and enlighten them in different STEM fields. It's important that we break into the primary white and asian dominated field of computer science. I want to use the knowledge I've gained with my degree to help others do the same. If I can open the eyes of just one girl I'll consider my job done. Pursuing a degree in computer science will not only be beneficial for me, as I will acquire knowledge that will last me a lifetime, but I plan to use my degree for the benefit of others: farmers who don't know their way around technology and girls who need some guidance.
      Sikora Drake STEM Scholarship
      I’ve always been interested in ways to help less-developed countries. Particularly, countries that are heavily based on sustainable living. As my family is from Cameroon, I’ve been able to see first-hand the turmoil farmers are under whether it comes to prices or supply-and-demand. I’ve seen a local farmer spend a season producing massive amounts of produce, but only selling half of it. This problem affects smaller farmers drastically more. Farmers don’t know what price their competitor is selling at and end up getting the short end of the stick. Through my Girl Scout Gold Award project I gained a newfound interest in gardening and realized how hard and important it is, as I created a community garden and taught other Girl Scouts how to garden. I began to wonder how I could make the job of farming in poorer countries an easier task. The tricky part was finding out how I could relate sustainable living to computer science. A language I can clearly speak is programming language. Since my high school computer science class, I've been interested in the problem solving that comes with coding. Whether it be fixing a small bug or coding an algorithm from scratch, coding is something that, although challenging at times, is ultimately rewarding. Through my gold award research, I started to realize the disparities between poorer countries and the United States when it comes to farming. I'm interested in pursuing a degree in STEM in order to be ready and engage in solving world problems in this digital era. More specifically, with newly acquired technical know-how, I hope to develop applications for small local farmers in less developed countries. The goal is to empower them with digital tools that facilitate the maximization of their farming potential and sale of their crops at competitive market prices. This way, I can contribute to the fight against hunger and poverty by enabling the rural communities to feed their families through an adequate farming system. I also am pursuing a career in STEM to inspire other African girls out there. When I walked into my first computer science class at UC Berkeley I was shocked to find a handful of black people in the class and even less of them being female. Diversity in the workplace is important because I don’t want to see another black girl be as intimidated as I was, walking into a class where none of my peers looked like me. I want to be the change. My nonprofit organization No Limit International is based in Cameroon, Africa. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fight hunger and poverty, provide youth educational and recreational activities, and empower people to believe in a better society. I want to use my organization as a platform for a "African Girls who Code" club. I want to teach black, African girls how to code and enlighten them in different STEM fields. It's important that we break into the primary white and asian dominated field of computer science. I want to use the knowledge I've gained with my degree to help others do the same. If I can open the eyes of just one girl I'll consider my job done. Pursuing a degree in STEM will not only be beneficial for me, as I will acquire knowledge that will last me a lifetime, but I plan to use my degree for the benefit of others: farmers who don't know their way around technology and girls who need some guidance.
      Elevate Women in Technology Scholarship
      Computers: devices that allow us to enter the realm of the internet with the click of a button. What may seem normalized in western societies, is not very prevalent in poorer countries. Many people in these countries don’t have access to technology. This leads them to remain unaware of the plethora of opportunities a computer may provide. With a computer, you can type documents, use the internet, send emails, and more. Many things in modern life require computers. Computers are so interesting because of their versatility. We have laptops, phones, and tablets which are all forms of computers. Seeing such a useful technology not being accessed by much of the world inspired me. I have a non-profit organization No Limit International. Our mission statement is to engage communities around the world in lifelong best practices aimed at improving health and living conditions, fighting hunger and poverty, providing youth educational and recreational activities, and empowering people to believe in a better society. My organization is based in Cameroon, Africa which is where much of my family is from and resides. Through my organization, we donated computers to schools to help bridge the digital divide. It brought a smile to my face to see these children open a laptop for the first time. I was even able to give “technology lessons” and teach them the key things they needed to know. Children are the future and they must be equipped with the materials needed to succeed in our future. Computers make the world a better place because they can help us as a society evolve technologically.
      Sander Jennings Spread the Love Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Granada Hills Charter Highlander of the Year Scholarship
      Girl Scouts is an extracurricular activity that has not only made me a better person, but has polished my leadership skills and sparked my interest in community service. I love how I am able to do community work, lead projects and organize events. I led a project that encouraged girls about positive body image. I wanted to let the girls know that they are beautiful and that they are not alone, there are many other girls around the world dealing with similar self-esteem issues. I gave a presentation on body image, facilitated discussion and finalized with a body-positive movie viewing. This was an enriching experience in my life because it was the first time I had led an “activism” event. I felt like I was part of something meaningful and hidden in the closet of some girls. Another project I’m working on is my Gold Award Project. I’ve started a community garden and have been working on a garden bed that’s growing watermelon and okra. These items are then donated to a local restaurant that will give them back to the community. I have also hosted zoom classes to teach other Girl Scouts how to garden. Through Girl Scouts I have been able to take initiative and develop my leadership skills. It is so important to me because it’s not only the activity in which I invest most of my time, but it is also an activity in which I can learn and grow with others.
      Evie Irie Misfit Scholarship
      Transforming into a Butterfly I was the quiet kid, the kid who never raised her hand in class, the kid who had no friends. Whenever I uttered a word, the kids in my class would be shocked, did she just speak? Can you actually talk? These uncalled-for questions had a resounding effect on me. Being quiet was a barrier to meeting potential friends. I would spend nights pondering this and wondering how to snap out of the horror movie. At school, teachers would force me to participate and friends would get bored in conversation with me. I was a caterpillar slowly crawling and trying to transform into a butterfly. Yet, I couldn’t even reach the chrysalis stage. I remained a caterpillar for most of my life until my sophomore year in high school. All of that changed. On the first day of school, my Pre-AP English teacher read over the syllabus, and I listened as usual until she said something that made my heart drop: we were going to be graded on class participation. In previous classes, I was able to slide by with minimal participation but not this time around. Class participation was actually going to be a major part of our grade. Fear seized up inside of me as I thought of the dreaded “hand raise”. Two weeks into the school year, my teacher noticed that I wasn’t participating and told me that if I didn’t participate she would fail me. I was utterly in shock and stunned by the blunt statement. Ironically, the fear of failure was the turning point of my life. That night, I couldn’t sleep and kept replaying the sentence in my head. As the sun arose the next morning, I made a decision to stand up for myself and speak up today and forever; let the chips fall where they may. As class time approached, I was a nervous wreck, and my heart was beating as fast as a butterfly’s wings. My teacher asked a question to which I knew the answer, so I decided that it was time. I got the courage to lift my hand high and answer her question in a clear voice. After answering it, I thought to myself, “That wasn’t as hard as I thought it was going to be.” No one laughed at me, no one even really cared. At that moment, I realized that hiding inside myself was no longer an option. I embraced change. The little caterpillar morphed into a pupa. In all of my classes, I started participating more, and my teachers were glad to finally hear my voice and opinions. I had better conversations with my friends and gone were the days spent in the classroom as an invisible student. With a new perspective on life, I decided to join the Girl Scouts of America as well as to start a nonprofit organization where I could use my voice to engage communities for collective action. I now take pride in organizing fundraising activities and hosting troop events. Never in a million years did I think that I would be able to step out of my comfort zone and become such an active participant in social activities. During my nonprofit endeavors, in times of Covid-19, I seized the occasion to interview with major officials such as ambassadors and county officials and assess the management of Covid-19 in their respective communities. I realized how much I gained by opening up and letting my voice be heard. Overcoming shyness has been one of the greatest challenges of my life. The journey has been gratifying so far as I discover inner skills that were dormant for years. I have become the leader that I never thought I would be. The butterfly finally took flight. She is a beautiful butterfly flying across her community while helping others in need and using her powerful voice.
      Nikhil Desai Reflect and Learn COVID-19 Scholarship
      2020: The best and worst year Covid-19. It’s shocking how one word, one virus, one invisible enemy led to huge shifts in human behaviors. March 13, 2020, last day of classes before spring break, a day to remember in my life. The last time I hugged my friends, shared a laugh with my AP English teacher on the texture of my hair, and heard the resonance of the lockers slam in the hallway during dismissal. Little did I know that when the bell rang that day; it was the beginning of a new journey marked by fear of the unknown, drive-thru celebrations and reshaping of our societal norms. We thought it would go away as quickly as it appeared in our lives. I still remember in May when the school was finally over; we looked forward to meeting again as regular people in August at the start of our senior year. We are the class of 2021. Caught up between SAT cancellations, confusion and frustration; in short mixed feelings of a lost year, which happens to be our senior year of high school. This is what Covid-19 took away from me. The traditions of senior year and the spontaneity outside of the house. The weekend movie nights, the morning fist bumps with my neighbor. That human touch. I missed it all. But I did not let the novel coronavirus define and dictate my spirit of life. In fact, it brought a newfound sense of growth and leadership in my life. It became an opportunity to show resilience and bravery in times of crisis. After the first week of uncertainty, I decided to do some research about the virus and brainstorm ideas that could have an impact in the community. I wanted to be part of the solution against the global pandemic. I started blogging about the origins, facts, and preventative measures against the virus. The more I was writing and discovering stories around the world, the more I was determined to grow stronger in my quest to contribute and make a difference. What started as a simple blogging site became known as FICOVID-19, a website dedicated to our community engagement around the world marked by raising-awareness activities, donations of facemasks and hand sanitizers to various communities including consulates, shelters, prisons, people with disabilities, schools and interviews with major public officials to assess the management of the pandemic in their respective communities. The journey has changed my life and empowered me to think outside of the box, especially in times of adversity. It raised my level of appreciation and gratitude towards the healthcare workers who put their lives at risks every day to save ours. It mortified me to realize the depth of despair on the nursing home residents who had no place to go but stay “home” and still get infected despite all the precautions. I vividly remember the gratifying look on families in the Navajo Nation thanking us for lending support in a town marked by the longest lockdown in the country, 32 hour weekend lockdowns. So many life stories. An interview that really resonated with me was with a woman from a center that helps pregnant women, victims of abuse. This woman talked to me about the increase in domestic violence due to the pandemic and confinement measures. These stories helped me put a different spin and perspective on the pandemic. I gained life experiences. Covid-19 took away so many things in my life. But I am thankful and proud of the initiative taken during this challenging time to rise to the occasion and show leadership in the community at a time most needed. I consider 2020 to be the best year of my life. Yet, it’s the saddest feeling to wake up every day to the reality check of Covid-19 and quarantine. What a year 2020 has been for me in retrospective.
      Chris Jackson Computer Science Education Scholarship
      1- I like to be creative, analytic and thoughtful in everything I do or research about. Majoring in Computer Science gives me the opportunity to learn the foundational elements of computer programming and data processing while applying critical thinking skills. My passion for Computer Science stems from my love for mathematics, which has led me to take advanced and challenging classes since 8th grade. I have reached the ladder in terms of Advanced Mathematics class at my school by currently taking the very fast pace AP Calculus class. Furthermore, during my Pre-AP Computer Science class in junior year, I learned programming language. I discovered a true passion for writing lines of code, getting them wrong, and waking up at 3 a.m. to go back at it. In the end, there was no words to express the feeling of coding letter-by-letter, symbol-by-symbol the assembly of a video game. The process involved in creating the game was more meaningful than the result in itself. For all the reasons mentioned, I am thrilled and excited to major in a field that I am truly passionate about, Computer Science. 2- I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. 3- I am the best candidate for this scholarship because I want to make an impact in the global community using my computer science background as a foundation for change.
      Undiscovered Brilliance Scholarship for African-Americans
      Although I was born in the United States, I am Cameroonian at heart. My parents and most of my family were born in Cameroon. I have visited the country multiple times, and it’s a beautiful place, full of distinct culture and traditions, wonderful tropical climate and cheering merchants on the streets selling all kinds of art crafts, with the noise of motorcycle taxis in the background zipping through rush hour traffic. These are fond memories of Cameroon that I take with me everywhere we go in the United States. In every city to where we move, there is always a strong urge to connect with fellow Cameroonians and make sure that we are part of the vibrant community. One of the main challenges in Cameroon with the coronavirus outbreak has been the lack of access to water in a time and place where frequent hand washing is significant and a public health recommendation. My nonprofit organization, Ficovid-19, raised funds and decided to contribute to the fight against the global pandemic in Cameroon. The project was the building of a well and connecting it to a hand washing station for the betterment of the local community. I reached out to fellow Cameroonian and presented my action plan and the need to come together as a community to show support and join the country’s government efforts during these challenging times. They welcomed the idea and opportunity to help our fellow countrymen. I also organized Zoom meetings with friends in Cameroon to assemble a team of volunteers for the project. The end product has been a success with locals thanking us and wishing for more action in the neighborhood. I am proud of the outcome and the Cameroonian community coming together for a good cause under my leadership and activism. Concerning my activism in the United States during the pandemic, I engaged in various activities as well. Needless to say, quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Kap Slap "Find Your Sound" Music Grant
      I would volunteer and help the needy. As a matter of fact, that's the reason why my career goals are geared towards helping others and future generations in developing nations. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Future Black Leaders Scholarship
      Girl Scouts is an extracurricular activity that has not only made me a better person, but has polished my leadership skills and sparked my interest in community service. I love how I am able to do community work, lead projects and organize events. I led a project that encouraged girls about positive body image. I wanted to let the girls know that they are beautiful and that they are not alone, there are many other girls around the world dealing with similar self-esteem issues. I gave a presentation on body image, facilitated discussion and finalized with a body-positive movie viewing. This was an enriching experience in my life because it was the first time I had led an “activism” event. I felt like I was part of something meaningful and hidden in the closet of some girls. Another project I’m working on is my Gold Award Project. I’ve started a community garden and have been working on a garden bed that’s growing watermelon and okra. These items are then donated to a local restaurant that will give them back to the community. I have also hosted zoom classes to teach other Girl Scouts how to garden. Through Girl Scouts I have been able to take initiative and develop my leadership skills. It is so important to me because it’s not only the activity in which I invest most of my time, but it is also an activity in which I can learn and grow with others. I am the oldest of 5 children and the scholarship will help contribute to my college tuition and expenses. Upon graduation, I want to follow my dream and passion. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      LGBTQIA Arts and Personal Development Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. The scholarship will contribute towards the funding of my college tuition and expenses, which in return would help me acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to become a change agent in the global community.
      COVID-19 Perspective Scholarship
      Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways. Society will change from a community standpoint. People will realize that there is no need to go to work 5 days a week if I can work from home as effectively and save on gas, reduce pollution emissions and exercise more by sometimes riding a bike to work if I don't live far. People will also appreciate family time more as these challenging times have taught us the importance of social network and how it kept us connected to our loved ones who couldn't travel to meet with us.
      BIPOC Educators Scholarship
      Education is an opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge necessary to navigate life cycles. A powerful weapon that no one can take away from you but useful to better understand society and manage practical experiences outside of the classroom. For the most part, our decisions and actions depend on the knowledge acquired or lack thereof. Altogether, being educated brings a happy balance in life in terms of self-worth, career satisfaction, financial security, stability and confidence to achieve one’s dreams. Most importantly, it helps someone envision his/her future with better objectives and follow your dream and passion. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Elevate Black Entrepreneurs Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. At the same time, I would like to open a social entrepreneurship company to channel this vision and opportunity to be a change agent in our communities.
      Elevate Women in Technology Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Charles R. Ullman & Associates Educational Support Scholarship
      A community is a place where people with common goals, interests, values and characteristics live and abide by certain guidelines or principles that might be distinct from the society at large. It is important for people in general to give their time, effort and energy to the just cause so that the world can become a better place for the entire human kind. A community is truly a place where everyone can grow and prosper. As a founder of a nonprofit organization, I know what it takes to bring a community together and organize activities that are relevant to the common cause and emphasize collaboration and team work. Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      "What Moves You" Scholarship
      "Look at challenges in life as an opportunity to rise above it and become a better human being". This quote has inspired me throughout my childhood. Please see below why? Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways.
      Darryl Davis "Follow Your Heart" Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      AMPLIFY Digital Storytellers Scholarship
      I am writing about my involvement during lockdown and restrictions enforced upon ourselves to mitigate the spread of the virus in the community. Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways.
      AMPLIFY Mental Health Scholarship
      Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways.
      GRLSWIRL Scholarship
      Although I was born in the United States, I am Cameroonian at heart. My parents and most of my family were born in Cameroon. I have visited the country multiple times, and it’s a beautiful place, full of distinct culture and traditions, wonderful tropical climate and cheering merchants on the streets selling all kinds of art crafts, with the noise of motorcycle taxis in the background zipping through rush hour traffic. Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      JuJu Foundation Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.
      Bubba Wallace Live to Be Different Scholarship
      Transforming into a Butterfly I was the quiet kid, the kid who never raised her hand in class, the kid who had no friends. Whenever I uttered a word, the kids in my class would be shocked, did she just speak? Can you actually talk? These uncalled-for questions had a resounding effect on me. Being quiet was a barrier to meeting potential friends. I would spend nights pondering this and wondering how to snap out of the horror movie. At school, teachers would force me to participate and friends would get bored in conversation with me. I was a caterpillar slowly crawling and trying to transform into a butterfly. Yet, I couldn’t even reach the chrysalis stage. I remained a caterpillar for most of my life until my sophomore year in high school. All of that changed. On the first day of school, my Pre-AP English teacher read over the syllabus, and I listened as usual until she said something that made my heart drop: we were going to be graded on class participation. In previous classes, I was able to slide by with minimal participation but not this time around. Class participation was actually going to be a major part of our grade. Fear seized up inside of me as I thought of the dreaded “hand raise”. Two weeks into the school year, my teacher noticed that I wasn’t participating and told me that if I didn’t participate she would fail me. I was utterly in shock and stunned by the blunt statement. Ironically, the fear of failure was the turning point of my life. That night, I couldn’t sleep and kept replaying the sentence in my head. As the sun arose the next morning, I made a decision to stand up for myself and speak up today and forever; let the chips fall where they may. As class time approached, I was a nervous wreck, and my heart was beating as fast as a butterfly’s wings. My teacher asked a question to which I knew the answer, so I decided that it was time. I got the courage to lift my hand high and answer her question in a clear voice. After answering it, I thought to myself, “That wasn’t as hard as I thought it was going to be.” No one laughed at me, no one even really cared. At that moment, I realized that hiding inside myself was no longer an option. I embraced change. The little caterpillar morphed into a pupa. In all of my classes, I started participating more, and my teachers were glad to finally hear my voice and opinions. I had better conversations with my friends and gone were the days spent in the classroom as an invisible student. With a new perspective on life, I decided to join the Girl Scouts of America as well as to start a nonprofit organization where I could use my voice to engage communities for collective action. I now take pride in organizing fundraising activities and hosting troop events. Never in a million years did I think that I would be able to step out of my comfort zone and become such an active participant in social activities. During my nonprofit endeavors, in times of Covid-19, I seized the occasion to interview with major officials such as ambassadors and county officials and assess the management of Covid-19 in their respective communities. I realized how much I gained by opening up and letting my voice be heard. Overcoming shyness has been one of the greatest challenges of my life. The journey has been gratifying so far as I discover inner skills that were dormant for years. I have become the leader that I never thought I would be. The butterfly finally took flight. She is a beautiful butterfly flying across her community while helping others in need and using her powerful voice.
      KUURO Master Your Craft Scholarship
      Girl Scouts is an extracurricular activity that has not only made me a better person, but has polished my leadership skills and sparked my interest in community service. I love how I am able to do community work, lead projects and organize events. I led a project that encouraged girls about positive body image. I wanted to let the girls know that they are beautiful and that they are not alone, there are many other girls around the world dealing with similar self-esteem issues. I gave a presentation on body image, facilitated discussion and finalized with a body-positive movie viewing. This was an enriching experience in my life because it was the first time I had led an “activism” event. I felt like I was part of something meaningful and hidden in the closet of some girls. Another project I’m working on is my Gold Award Project. I’ve started a community garden and have been working on a garden bed that’s growing watermelon and okra. These items are then donated to a local restaurant that will give them back to the community. I have also hosted zoom classes to teach other Girl Scouts how to garden. Through Girl Scouts I have been able to take initiative and develop my leadership skills. It is so important to me because it’s not only the activity in which I invest most of my time, but it is also an activity in which I can learn and grow with others. Quarantine was very tough for me. Not seeing my friends or going outside took its toll on me. Instead of focusing on the negative, I tried to branch to a positive outlet. I was sitting in my room, after being quarantined for two weeks, when I wondered about the people who couldn’t afford masks and hand sanitizers, who couldn’t afford to be quarantined. That is what prompted FiCovid-19. What started out as a coronavirus blog turned into an organization helping to provide supplies for others during these challenging times. Through friends and family, I was able to raise funds that enabled me to order masks. I wanted to help others in my community who were unable to purchase masks to keep them safe. I started out with homeless shelters in my town but wanted to connect to more people all over the world. I reached out to consulates. I drove from city to city, meeting with ambassadors and consulate generals and donating masks for them to give to their South and Central American communities. It was interesting to interview them and see how other countries were handling the pandemic. Something that stuck with me when interviewing a women’s shelter representative was the secondary causes of Covid-19 I discovered that there was a pandemic within the pandemic. Indeed, with the confinement measures enforced in cities, the number of women victims of domestic abuse also increased, and I was saddened by the news. At the beginning of the pandemic I was selfish I only thought of no friends, no prom and no school. However, I evolved from that mindset and looked at the glass half full. Helping others who are less fortunate and at higher risk than me made me realize how Covid-19 has truly affected the world, even in the smallest ways. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. My dream is to make the world a better place for all humankind in the smallest way by creating mobile applications.
      Harold Reighn Moxie Scholarship
      The Cities of My Heart The time had come again, 1:00 p.m. I put my final belongings in the last box. 3:00 p.m. We said good-bye to the place I had called home for only a couple of years. Welcome to my nomadic life style full of moving trucks and frequent relocation to new cities and homes. At first, I viewed every move as another setback leading to inconsistency and instability in keeping up with friends, schools and extra-curricular activities. Today, as I look back, every city has a piece of my heart and has made a major imprint on my seventeen years of life. I learned life lessons along the journey. Fairfax, Virginia is where it all started. Every afternoon, my parents took me to the park and pushed me on the swing “higher, higher,” I said. Then, it was time for my favorite part, going down the yellow, bumpy slide. My stomach would get butterflies just thinking about it. Then, I saw a little girl my age, who was by herself and sad because no one was playing with her. I asked her if she wanted to go down the slide with me. She said yes, and we went down that slide 100 times and screamed until we were out of breath. When my parents told me it was time to go, the girl said to me, “Thank you for playing with me. You made my day so much better.” In Fairfax, I learned kindness. Saginaw, Michigan, by far is the coldest of all the places I have lived. My first day of first grade didn’t turn out as happy as I thought it would be. The kids laughed at me and messed with me day after day. I remember standing in front of them crying as they screeched their childish taunts. Then, one day I decided enough was enough. I stood up for myself and told them to stop bullying me. I stopped crying, and once they saw that I didn’t care anymore, they moved on. In Saginaw, I learned bravery. Tallahassee, Florida was my favorite place and the hardest to leave. It was another regular day of 4th grade class and we were taking a test. I noticed that my friend seating at the next table was looking over at my answers sheet. Many conflicting thoughts swirled through my mind. I finished my test and took it to the teacher. When I sat back down, my friend smiled at me, like I had been an accomplice to her crime. That feeling didn’t sit right with me. After class, I decided to tell the teacher what had happened, and she commended me for being forthcoming about the incident. In Tallahassee, I learned honesty. Raleigh, North Carolina is where I started my tween and teenage years. I went to public school for the first time and was introduced to a multitude of different people with different backgrounds in a bigger classroom than what I was used to. Some of these people tried to influence me to do bad things or say bad words. Sometimes, it was intriguing, but, I always had my parents’ values in the back of my mind. I would repeatedly say no with zero hesitation. In Raleigh, I learned strength of character. While I am writing this essay, I am sitting at my desk, in my room, in El Paso, Texas. El Paso has become a place that I can truly call home. I don’t know if I have learned something here yet because my journey is not done. In all of the cities I have inhabited, there is one common theme: resilience. Every time I felt myself getting knocked down, I climbed back up again and pushed past the initial challenges and discomfort of a new setting. Moving has been one of the best experiences of my life even if I didn’t know it at the time.
      Brynn Elliott "Tell Me I’m Pretty" Scholarship
      A woman I admire is Dr. Natalia Kanem, a medical doctor who currently serves as the Executive Director of UNFPA, the United Nations sexual and reproductive health agency. In this capacity, she is among the highest-ranking women at the United Nations and the first Latin American to head UNFPA. I admire her and the work she has done to inspire girls across the world. She is an inspiration to many girls, including myself because she has undoubtedly had to overcome barriers and gender biases on the journey to where she is today. It is so inspiring that she is the first Latin American to head the UNFPA. She has brought to this position more than 30 years of great leadership, especially in the fields of women’s reproductive rights, and feminism. I enjoy reading her interviews in New African Magazine, because my family originates from Africa. A quote she said that I especially enjoyed was, “It is our collective global responsibility to ensure young people are able to access all the opportunities they should have access to. It is our responsibility to give them a seat at the table and the tools they need to succeed in tomorrow’s world.” It really inspired me, as a young person aspiring to do great things. The global pandemic has been a tumorous event that has affected millions across the world. Whether mentally or physically this pandemic has changed our world forever. After dealing with the pandemic in my community I sought out to learn how other communities were handling the coronavirus. I started researching, the country where my family originates, Cameroon. I started seeing that things were becoming worse for girls there, amid this pandemic. They were being forced to stay home, while their brothers were being sent to school. This called me as a girl and a human being to do something about this in a small way. This motivated me and my 3 younger sisters to do something to help our “fellow sisters”. This global pandemic has made me appreciate the country I live in more and the opportunities I have that other girls with the same mind set might not have, because of where they live. I have been inspired throughout this thoughtful journey by Dr. Kanem's work and philosophy. Following her footsteps, I would like to lead my nonprofit organization full time one day and empower young girls to believe in themselves and aspire for greatness. I would like to focus on the Sub Saharan African region because of the prevalent gender discrimination occurring in many countries. Whether it be arranged marriages or girls not going to school, I want to stop this. As I have traveled many times to Africa, I have seen the limited and altered opportunities available to young girls, first hand. I’ve also seen the lack of inspiration and confidence ingrained in those girls as a result. I would like to carry Dr Kanem life lessons and inspire these young girls in rural communities to believe in themselves and their potential.
      Writing With a Purpose Scholarship
      Transforming into a Butterfly I was the quiet kid, the kid who never raised her hand in class, the kid who had no friends. Whenever I uttered a word, the kids in my class would be shocked, did she just speak? Can you actually talk? These uncalled-for questions had a resounding effect on me. Being quiet was a barrier to meeting potential friends. I would spend nights pondering this and wondering how to snap out of the horror movie. At school, teachers would force me to participate and friends would get bored in conversation with me. I was a caterpillar slowly crawling and trying to transform into a butterfly. Yet, I couldn’t even reach the chrysalis stage. I remained a caterpillar for most of my life until my sophomore year in high school. All of that changed. On the first day of school, my Pre-AP English teacher read over the syllabus, and I listened as usual until she said something that made my heart drop: we were going to be graded on class participation. In previous classes, I was able to slide by with minimal participation but not this time around. Class participation was actually going to be a major part of our grade. Fear seized up inside of me as I thought of the dreaded “hand raise”. Two weeks into the school year, my teacher noticed that I wasn’t participating and told me that if I didn’t participate she would fail me. I was utterly in shock and stunned by the blunt statement. Ironically, the fear of failure was the turning point of my life. That night, I couldn’t sleep and kept replaying the sentence in my head. As the sun arose the next morning, I made a decision to stand up for myself and speak up today and forever; let the chips fall where they may. As class time approached, I was a nervous wreck, and my heart was beating as fast as a butterfly’s wings. My teacher asked a question to which I knew the answer, so I decided that it was time. I got the courage to lift my hand high and answer her question in a clear voice. After answering it, I thought to myself, “That wasn’t as hard as I thought it was going to be.” No one laughed at me, no one even really cared. At that moment, I realized that hiding inside myself was no longer an option. I embraced change. The little caterpillar morphed into a pupa. In all of my classes, I started participating more, and my teachers were glad to finally hear my voice and opinions. With a new perspective on life, I decided to join the Girl Scouts of America as well as to start a nonprofit organization where I could use my voice to engage communities for collective action. I now take pride in organizing fundraising activities and hosting troop events. During my nonprofit endeavors, in times of Covid-19, I seized the occasion to interview with major officials such as ambassadors and county officials and assess the management of Covid-19 in their respective communities. I realized how much I gained by opening up and letting my voice be heard. Overcoming shyness has been one of the greatest challenges of my life. The journey has been gratifying so far as I discover inner skills that were dormant for years. The butterfly finally took flight. She is a beautiful butterfly flying across her community while helping others in need and using her powerful voice.
      Breanden Beneschott Ambitious Entrepreneurs Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. The problem of lack of technical resources for the farmers in rural communities is worth solving because the solutions provided could be applicable in different regions of the world and provide an opportunity for the entrepreneur to earn money while helping others achieve better quality of life. I call it social entrepreneurship at its best.
      Mary Jo Huey Scholarship
      As an aspiring entrepreneur, I have faced challenges in identifying the steps required to make an impact in the rural communities where my passion and drive to succeed have led me. I have managed to be patient and strategic in dealing with daily frustration when you work in developing nations. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. The success of this venture will depend on learning the skills necessary to implement the project. I am confident that the end result will validate all the hard work undertaken and necessary to bring the project to light. I am motivated by the desire to be a change agent in the community and make the world a better place for everybody including rural population in developing nations.
      RushOrderTees Young Entrepreneurs Scholarship
      I am interested in entrepreneurship because I want to pursue my passion and goals to make the world a better place, especially in developing nations. In fact, I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically. My goal is to become a social entrepreneur helping people in rural communities achieve higher yield in their crop production while making strides to improve their daily livings.
      Mirajur Rahman Perseverance Scholarship
      Although I was born in the United States, I am Cameroonian at heart. My parents and most of my family were born in Cameroon. I have visited the country multiple times, and it’s a beautiful place, full of distinct culture and traditions, wonderful tropical climate and cheering merchants on the streets selling all kinds of art crafts, with the noise of motorcycle taxis in the background zipping through rush hour traffic. These are fond memories of Cameroon that I take with me everywhere we go in the United States. There are five children in our family with high hopes of attending colleges and graduating with degrees that can equip us with the intellectual and personal skills to become change agents in the communities. I am the oldest of my siblings and I aspire to use this scholarship to fund part of my tuition for college. Education is an opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge necessary to navigate life cycles. A powerful weapon that no one can take away from you but useful to better understand society and manage practical experiences outside of the classroom. As such, I would use this scholarship money to pursue my passion and goals to become college educated and ready for the workforce. I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app.
      A Sani Life Scholarship
      2020: The best and worst year Covid-19. It’s shocking how one word, one virus, one invisible enemy led to huge shifts in human behaviors. March 13, 2020, last day of classes before spring break, a day to remember in my life. The last time I hugged my friends, shared a laugh with my AP English teacher on the texture of my hair, and heard the resonance of the lockers slam in the hallway during dismissal. Little did I know that when the bell rang that day; it was the beginning of a new journey marked by fear of the unknown, drive-thru celebrations and reshaping of our societal norms. We thought it would go away as quickly as it appeared in our lives. I still remember in May when the school was finally over; we looked forward to meeting again as regular people in August at the start of our senior year. We are the class of 2021. Caught up between SAT cancellations, confusion and frustration; in short mixed feelings of a lost year, which happens to be our senior year of high school. This is what Covid-19 took away from me. The traditions of senior year and the spontaneity outside of the house. The weekend movie nights, the morning fist bumps with my neighbor. That human touch. I missed it all. But I did not let the novel coronavirus define and dictate my spirit of life. In fact, it brought a newfound sense of growth and leadership in my life. It became an opportunity to show resilience and bravery in times of crisis. After the first week of uncertainty, I decided to do some research about the virus and brainstorm ideas that could have an impact in the community. I wanted to be part of the solution against the global pandemic. I started blogging about the origins, facts, and preventative measures against the virus. The more I was writing and discovering stories around the world, the more I was determined to grow stronger in my quest to contribute and make a difference. What started as a simple blogging site became known as FICOVID-19, a website dedicated to our community engagement around the world marked by raising-awareness activities, donations of facemasks and hand sanitizers to various communities including consulates, shelters, prisons, people with disabilities, schools and interviews with major public officials to assess the management of the pandemic in their respective communities. The journey has changed my life and empowered me to think outside of the box, especially in times of adversity. It raised my level of appreciation and gratitude towards the healthcare workers who put their lives at risks every day to save ours. It mortified me to realize the depth of despair on the nursing home residents who had no place to go but stay “home” and still get infected despite all the precautions. I vividly remember the gratifying look on families in the Navajo Nation thanking us for lending support in a town marked by the longest lockdown in the country, 32 hour weekend lockdowns. So many life stories. An interview that really resonated with me was with a woman from a center that helps pregnant women, victims of abuse. This woman talked to me about the increase in domestic violence due to the pandemic and confinement measures. These stories helped me put a different spin and perspective on the pandemic. I gained life experiences. Covid-19 took away so many things in my life. But I am thankful and proud of the initiative taken during this challenging time to rise to the occasion and show leadership in the community at a time most needed. I consider 2020 to be the best year of my life. Yet, it’s the saddest feeling to wake up every day to the reality check of Covid-19 and quarantine. What a year 2020 has been for me and the rest of the world. I am looking forward to taking the lessons learned and continue to be a change agent in the community and study in Economics because I want to actively engage in global challenging issues such as fighting for hunger and poverty in developing countries.
      Simple Studies Scholarship
      I am passionate about political economy, especially economic inequality among nations. Less-developed countries don’t get even half as many resources as America does, and some of these less-developed countries even have larger, or similar populations to the U.S. I want us to live in a world where every person has access to basic human rights, where kids aren’t begging for food on the streets, where families don’t know when they’ll have their next meal, and where the water is clean. I want to make this change because of how much despair I see in the world. It is sad to see myself having a great life here in the U.S., and seeing my Cameroonian cousins struggle for clean water. I’ve seen, firsthand, what happens in these less-developed countries. So, I want to be the person that provides the opportunity to change that. The first step I would take towards this change is by graduating college, majoring in both Computer Science and Economics. Through this double major, I’ll be able to acquire the knowledge, skill sets, and social networking opportunities that will help me reach my ultimate career goals. I want to pursue a career at The World Bank or The International Monetary Fund, two major economic organizations, where my interdisciplinary background will be used and serve the purpose of fighting for economic equality among nations in the digital era and promote international economic cooperation. Through these organizations, I can be an advocate for poor nations and propose new policies that can improve the current living conditions of their populations. This career allows me to be at the frontlines of any economic crisis between countries. I’ll do my best to make sure that all countries’ rights are being fulfilled, and economic justice is being served. One specific way that I could change economic inequality, in relation to my double major, is by helping small farmers that are facing challenges, in these less-developed countries. I discovered during my frequent travels to Cameroon, West Africa that the small farmers need significant help in maximizing their productivity and marketing their crops at competitive prices. So, I would create applications for them to better sell their crops, by for example, showing competitive crop prices on the app. These are general and specific ways that I will contribute to economics around the world. I want to make the world a more equal place, economically.