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Nyree Andrews

2045

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

2x

Winner

Bio

I am a passionate storyteller, I bring my vision to life by writing, directing, and editing short films. Balancing a demanding academic schedule with a 3.8 GPA and a successful track career (including NC Hurdler of the Year 2022 and Queen City Conference 300m hurdle champion!), I actively contribute to the professional world as a social media manager for a Charlotte-based company and a lifeguard. As I enter my freshman year, I'm eager to continue this pursuit of excellence at the University of Southern California, where I plan to pursue a dual degree in Fine Arts and Business Administration Management, merging my creative passion with a strong business foundation.

Education

Central Piedmont Community College

High School
2023 - 2024

Mallard Creek High School

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
    • Film/Video and Photographic Arts
    • Arts, Entertainment, and Media Management
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Entertainment

    • Dream career goals:

      production company owner

    • Screen writer, director, post production

      FilmFreeway
      2023 – 2023

    Sports

    Track & Field

    Varsity
    2020 – Present4 years

    Research

    • Mental and Social Health Services and Allied Professions

      Wake Forest University — Interviewer
      2022 – 2023

    Arts

    • Harvey B Gantt Center

      Videography
      2023 – Present

    Public services

    • Advocacy

      Block Love Charlotte — Event Coordinator/Researcher
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Elevation Church — Greeter
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    North Carolina Scholarship
    Winner
    Growing up in a boisterous family of seven, I became self-sufficient at a young age. Amidst the chaos, my escape was found in the flickering images on the television screen. While others explored the outdoors, I was captivated by the magic of movies. However, one glaring issue gradually became apparent - a lack of representation for people like me. Where were the stories reflecting the diverse cultures and experiences I saw in my Charlotte community? This disconnect sparked a fire within me to create change through filmmaking. The harsh reality of Hollywood's narrow representation hit home when my sister, an aspiring actress, was bluntly told by her agent, "You're Black, Black" - code that she didn't fit the typical mold. I was outraged that her racial background could limit her opportunities. In that moment, I vowed to use my talents to amplify underrepresented voices and stories through film. Over the years, I've worked tirelessly to develop my skills, creating short films that tackle complex social issues like racial prejudice. My film "What Makes Us So Different" earned recognition in the National Youth Free Expression Film Festival, proving I have the ability to create impactful content. Now, I'm ready to take the next leap at the University of Southern California. USC's top-ranked film program provides the perfect launchpad for my vision. Through the innovative Business of Cinematic Arts program, I'll receive comprehensive training from industry experts in both the creative and business aspects of filmmaking. Required internships and hands-on opportunities will allow me to gain invaluable real-world experience. As well as the tight nit cohort where only 55 students are accepted to participate globally. My unwavering passion, coupled with a higher education, will equip me to become a force for positive change in Hollywood. I'll draw from my unique experiences to create films that reflect the world's beautiful diversity - ensuring no child ever feels unseen. Through inclusive storytelling, I'll not just envision a better tomorrow, but bring it to life on the big screen. This vision stands on the hope we'll someday live in a society where intelligence and skill sets are valued above ethnicity. Where damaging stereotypes no longer permeate the stories we see. I would have once deemed such a dream impossible, as only 5% of filmmakers are women of color like myself. Yet I refuse to let daunting odds deter me. Having immigrant grandparents who managed to come to this country with nothing, not even knowledge of the English language, and watching them thrive, as well as having two formally educated parents, and surviving my freshmen year of high school through zoom, I am confident in my ability to take on the challenges ahead. I'm driven by a belief that increasing diverse representation in media catalyzes social change. By bringing varied perspectives through inclusive storytelling, I hope to foster greater understanding and appreciation for everyone’s differences. An investment in my education means investing in a more inclusive future where everyone can see themselves represented through there television screens.
    Let Your Light Shine Scholarship
    Movies have captivated me since childhood. I spent countless hours glued to the television screen, fully entranced by the magic of Disney characters and the drama in love stories. Yet, despite my infatuation, a nagging question persisted: "Where are the people who look like me?” The answer became painfully clear when my sister, an aspiring actress, received a stark reality check from her agent: "You're Black, Black," implying she did not fit the look for the overwhelming majority of roles. Although a hard pill to swallow, the truth was that rather than a lack of talent in the Black community, there was a lack of opportunity for minorities in film. At ten years old, this revelation ignited a fire in me. Fueled by outrage, I made a promise to my sister – I would create films that showcased stories and faces that reflected ours. Back then, the "how" and "where" were mysteries, but the drive was real. Fast forward seven years, and I'm a National Youth Free Expression Film Festival finalist, and a future student at the University of Southern California, ready to change the cinematic universe. In 2018, I got to witness first hand the impact of culturally representative films, first with the release of Black Panther, a groundbreaking film that empowered the African American community and made history, being nominated for several awards and jumpstarting the careers of numerous Black actors. Then again, with the release of Crazy Rich Asians which starred a primarily Asian cast and production team, that potential revolutionized Hollywood. Inspired by the way these films resonated across racial and ethnic lines, I felt confident about creating something similar. However, the challenge of being a woman in a male-dominated field loomed large. Convincing my family that film, an industry where less than 5% of filmmakers are women of color, could be my career required dedication. Over time I proved myself with my serious intentions and commitment to social change. My first film, "What Makes Us So Different," which uses the analogy of cats and dogs to discuss racial prejudice in America, earned me a top 9 finalist spot in the National Youth Free Expressions Film Contest. This achievement boosted my confidence and demonstrated my filmmaking capabilities. Now, as my senior year concludes, I'm working on my second project, aiming to shed light on the often-unvoiced struggles of young men facing social pressure without healthy outlets. As a film producer I hope to make drastic changes in an industry that has been long overdue for diversification. Joining the Trojan family I will use my inherited network to elevate my production company to unprecedented heights in the film industry and open doors for the next generation of filmmakers of color. Although I began my film journey out of childhood anger, my passion has evolved into a lifelong commitment. I am now determined to fulfill my promise and provide a platform for diverse voices to be heard.
    Alexis Mackenzie Memorial Scholarship for the Arts
    My artistic journey wasn't born on a film set, but with a fistful of crayons. As a child, when words felt like locked doors, sketchbooks and canvases became my windows. I recall several memories of bringing home papers filled with colorful scribbles intended to be family members or figures of my imagination, which I'd proudly present to my parents. With each piece I would hope it would be hung up on their walls or placed on their work desks, yet a coveted spot on the fridge was the ultimate validation. Eventually, my doodling days came to an end and my artistry took on different avenues. I dabbled in sketching and painting, but my true calling arrived with the final credits of my first short film. My introduction to this captivating world stemmed from my sisters' pursuit of acting. Witnessing ideas leap from scripts to the television screen ignited a spark of curiosity. This fascination led me onto a film set, where I was immediately mesmerized by the lively activity of blaring lights, massive cameras, and intricate equipment. Sitting behind the camera monitors during takes, my ten-year-old self overflowed with questions. Surprisingly, the crew welcomed my curiosity and encouraged me to pick up a camera and create my own movies. The idea of becoming a filmmaker, especially as a Black woman, was novel to me at the time. Although I disregarded their comments at that moment, the seed to get involved in filmmaking was unknowingly planted in my head. They saw something in me that day that would take me years to discover for myself. After the release of “Black Panther” my filmmaking dreams were sent into orbit. Watching as the entire theater, regardless of race, gender, or age arose from their seats and cheered, cried, and hollered throughout the movie gave me revelation on how impactful art can be. In that moment I knew I wanted to evoke emotions from an audience in that same manner and contribute to creating influence through film. Last fall, I took a leap by writing and producing my first short film, “What Makes Us So Different” which used the analogy of cats and dogs to illustrate the ignorance of racial prejudice. By utilizing a twenty-year-old camera and the help of friends I successfully turned a dream into reality. What started as a passion project soon garnered recognition, earning a top spot in the National Youth Free Expression Film Festival. This honor gave me confidence in my filmmaking abilities and made me recognize that my artwork, which was once confined to family walls and office desks, could now reach a broader audience through social platforms and national exhibitions. Art, in its many forms, has always been at the center of my identity. I aim to continue connecting with others and exploring the world through creative expression. Recognizing art’s power to shift perspectives, drive change, and transform lives, my goal is to use storytelling to empower marginalized communities. Through narratives that reflect minority experiences and culture, I aspire to use art as a catalyst for positive societal change, striving to make the world a more inclusive and understanding place.
    Kristen McCartney Perseverance Scholarship
    Winner
    My admiration for motion pictures has persisted since childhood. Despite protests from my parents, I often times spent hours glued to the television screen, captivated by the magic of Disney movies and romantic comedies. Yet, amidst this infatuation, one question continuously racked my brain: “Where are the people who look like me?”  Growing up in Charlotte, North Carolina, I was fortunate enough to experience a diverse community from a young age. Immersing myself in different cultures shaped my worldview and made me a global thinker. However, the depictions on-screen reflected a world much different from mine. The tough realization of underrepresentation became painfully clear when my sister, an aspiring actress, received a harsh reality check from her agent: "You're Black, Black", implying she did not fit the look for the overwhelming majority of roles. Although a hard pill to swallow, the truth wasn’t a lack of talent in the Black community, but rather a lack of opportunity for minorities in film. Understanding that racial background could potentially hinder someone's chances of obtaining acting roles sparked rage in my 10-year-old self. Fueled by disappointment and anger, I made a promise to my sister: I would create films that showcased stories and faces reflecting our own. Back then the "how" and "where" to start filmmaking remained mysteries, but my drive was unwavering. In 2018, I witnessed first-hand the impact of culturally representative films, first with the release of Black Panther, a groundbreaking film that empowered the African American community and made history, being nominated for several awards and jumpstarting the careers of numerous Black actors. Then again, with the release of Crazy Rich Asians, which starred a primarily Asian cast and production team, that potentially revolutionized Hollywood.   Inspired by how these films resonated across racial and ethnic lines, I felt confident about creating something similar. However, the challenge of being a woman in a male-dominated field loomed large. Convincing my family that film, an industry where less than 5% of filmmakers are women of color, could be my career required dedication. Over time I proved myself with my serious intentions and commitment to social change. "What Makes Us So Different," my first short film uses the analogy of cats and dogs to discuss racial prejudice in America, and earned me a top 9 finalist spot in the National Youth Free Expressions Film Contest. This achievement boosted my confidence and demonstrated my filmmaking capabilities. Now, as my senior year concludes, I am working on my second project, aiming to shed light on the often-unvoiced struggles of young men facing social pressure without healthy emotional outlets. My next chapter finds me at the University of Southern California, home to the nation's number one film school, studying Business of Cinematic Arts (BCA). Being granted the opportunity to learn firsthand from experienced directors, screenwriters, and producers, who will help me hone my skills and simultaneously provide me with the necessary connections to break into the film industry. No matter the path I follow in the entertainment field, I know the BCA program will help me serve my audience and focus on the business components of production and the creative aspects. This program fosters career excellence through required internships, the opportunity to create films, teachings from industry professionals, and guest speakers with extensive experience in production. I will continue harnessing the power of film: illuminating issues impacting marginalized communities, advocating for diverse representation on screens everywhere, and ensuring that no child ever questions their worth or beauty due to a lack of reflection in the stories they see.
    Heather Rylie Memorial Scholarship
    My artistic journey wasn't born on a film set, but with a fistful of crayons. As a child, when words felt like locked doors, sketchbooks and canvases became my windows. I recall several memories of bringing home papers filled with colorful scribbles intended to be family members or figures of my imagination, which I'd proudly present to my parents. With each piece, hoping it'd find a home around my parent's bedroom walls or upon their work desk, yet a coveted spot on the fridge was the ultimate validation. Eventually, my doodling days came to an end and my artistry took on different avenues. I dabbled in sketching and painting, but my true calling arrived with the final credits of my first short film. My introduction to this captivating world stemmed from my sisters' pursuit of acting. Witnessing ideas leap from scripts to the silver screen ignited a spark of curiosity. My fascination led me onto a film set, where I was immediately mesmerized by the lively activity of blaring lights, massive cameras, and intricate equipment. Sitting behind the camera monitors during takes, my ten-year-old self overflowed with questions. Surprisingly, the crew welcomed my curiosity and encouraged me to pick up a camera and create my own movies. The idea of becoming a filmmaker, especially as a Black woman, was novel to me at the time. I was unsure of my capabilities let alone the capability of doing so with the limited number of directors that looked like me, I was certain I had no chance. Although I disregarded their comments at that moment, the seed to get involved in filmmaking was unknowingly planted in my head. They saw something in me that day that would take me years to discover for myself. After the release of “Black Panther,” my filmmaking dreams were sent into orbit. Watching as the entire theater, regardless of race, gender, or age arose from their seats and cheered, cried, and hollered throughout the movie gave me revelation on how impactful art can be. In that moment I knew I wanted to evoke emotions from an audience in that same manner and contribute to creating influence through film. In 2023, I took a leap of faith by writing and producing my first short film, utilizing a twenty-year-old camera and the help of friends. What started as a passion project soon garnered recognition, earning a top spot in the National Youth Free Expression Film Festival. This honor gave me confidence in my filmmaking abilities and made me recognize that my artwork, which was once confined to family walls and office desks, could now reach a broader audience through social platforms and national exhibitions. Art, in its many forms, has always been at the center of my identity. I aim to continue connecting with others and exploring the world through creative expression. Recognizing art’s power to shift perspectives, drive change, and transform lives, my goal is to use storytelling to empower marginalized communities. Through narratives that reflect minority experiences and culture, I aspire to use art as a catalyst for positive societal change, striving to make the world a more inclusive and understanding place.