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Nathaniel Savel

2155

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I am a life-long Alaskan. I spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. Although a great venue, the school was essentially the only source for health and social education. This same story reads throughout rural Alaska as well as many communities in the US. As a veteran emergency responder at age 22 with five years on an advanced life support ambulance currently serving as lieutenant and lead medic, I have made my commitment to make a difference in those communities. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. My life experiences have prepared me extremely well for this career path. I started my career in health services immediately following high school by getting my EMT certification. I have worked ever since as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a recent promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance. The opportunity to become a nurse furthers my reach into the community. Nursing school is expensive. A scholarship would reduce debt-related stress and allow me to focus on my family, career, and community.

Education

Barnes-Jewish College Goldfarb School of Nursing

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Nursing, Other

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Associate's degree program
2016 - 2017
  • Majors:
    • Fire Science/Fire-fighting

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Bachelor's degree program
2016 - 2020
  • Majors:
    • Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services, Other
  • Minors:
    • Fire Science/Fire-fighting

Matanuska Susitna Borough School DIstrict-Palmer High School

High School
2012 - 2016

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Travel Nurse

    • Laborer

      JD Steel
      2016 – 20171 year
    • Student Firefighter

      Butte Fire Dept.-Palmer AK
      2015 – 20161 year
    • Sawyer

      State of AK Division of Forestry
      2016 – 20171 year
    • Lieutenant Firefighter and Lead Medic EMT

      University of AK UFD
      2017 – 20203 years
    • Student Intern in emergency room

      Barnes Jewish Hospital
      2021 – 2021

    Sports

    Track & Field

    Varsity
    2014 – 20151 year

    Awards

    • letter

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2015 – 20161 year

    Awards

    • letter

    Ice Hockey

    Varsity
    2013 – 20163 years

    Awards

    • valuable player

    Research

    • Fire Protection

      UFD — Intervention Officer
      2018 – 2019

    Arts

    • Personal Therapy/Relaxation

      Painting
      Not Applicable
      2019 – 2021

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      St Michael's Catholic Church — volunteer
      2012 – 2016
    • Volunteering

      Various Hockey Associations — coach and assistant coach, camp counselor
      2013 – 2016
    • Volunteering

      special olympics, peer mentor, challenge Alaska — peer mentor and coach for special needs kids
      2013 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      firefighters association — teacher, medic, and fundraising
      2016 – 2020

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Bervell Health Equity Scholarship
    I am a life-long Alaskan who spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. I have made my commitment to make a difference. Immediately after high school, I got my EMT certification working as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an ALS ambulance at age 22. I incurred a major back injury along the way that has made me consider adding to my career path. Nursing seemed the natural direction to turn. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. My position as lieutenant prepared me for a career as a nurse because I learned to work and manage and lead a team. Although a nurse may often be somewhat autonomous in a rural setting, they are still responsive to a medical team. Medical teams require cohesiveness and collaboration. My time in the fire service allowed me to create inseparable bonds with my coworkers. Efficiency and cohesiveness improve our ability to help our patients. Serving as lead medic prepared me for a career as a nurse. I was the lead medic on an ALS ambulance acquiring experience and knowledge daily, which gave me an advantage as I step into a new career field. This role forced me to adapt and overcome challenges quickly while providing the ultimate level of support for patients and the crew. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, one can provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare, sporting, or community events just to name a few. I feel my work experience at the UFD, education, and community experiences provide a solid foundation for a career as a nurse, but most importantly I feel my individual beliefs and who I am as a person makes me a great candidate. I am compassionate and professional. I have learned a great deal in my life so far that I believe will help me succeed in a career as a nurse. I also have a great deal to learn. I believe I would make your organization proud as an awesome scholarship candidate seeking a position in a rural community in need of vital health care.
    White Coat Pending Scholarship
    I am a life-long Alaskan who spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. I have made my commitment to make a difference. Immediately after high school, I got my EMT certification working as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an ALS ambulance at age 22. I incurred a major back injury along the way that has made me consider adding to my career path. Nursing seemed the natural direction to turn. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. My position as lieutenant prepared me for a career as a nurse because I learned to work and manage and lead a team. Although a nurse may often be somewhat autonomous in a rural setting, they are still responsive to a medical team. Medical teams require cohesiveness and collaboration. My time in the fire service allowed me to create inseparable bonds with my coworkers. Efficiency and cohesiveness improve our ability to help our patients. Serving as lead medic prepared me for a career as a nurse. I was the lead medic on an ALS ambulance acquiring experience and knowledge daily, which gave me an advantage as I step into a new career field. Lead medics direct patient care. I directed up to 6 people at a time on the scene on how to provide the most efficient and safest care to patients. This role forced me to adapt and overcome challenges quickly while providing the ultimate level of support for patients and the crew. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, one can provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare, sporting, or community events just to name a few. I feel my work experience at the UFD, education, and community experiences provide a solid foundation for a career as a nurse, but most importantly I feel my individual beliefs and who I am as a person makes me a great candidate. I am compassionate and professional. I treat every patient with the respect and consideration they deserve. Whether it’s 3 AM and the second EMS call of the night or the first call of the day, I believe I demonstrate the same level of compassionate and professional care. Focusing on professionalism as a character trait has proven successful in my current position. I look forward to applying my strength to a career as a nurse. I have learned a great deal in my life so far that I believe will help me succeed in a career as a nurse. I also have a great deal to learn. I believe I would make your organization proud as an awesome scholarship candidate seeking a position in a rural community in need of vital health care.
    Art of Giving Scholarship
    I am a life-long AK who spent my elementary years in a rural AK Native village one-room school. I always wanted to be a firefighter. I was inspired to be directly involved in helping others. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the work of health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal extending their reach behind the scenes keeping communities safe. After high school, I worked for the UAF Fire Dept. while attending college. I encountered a back injury throughout this journey that prevented me from being a firefighter/EMT for a year. This was a pretty tough moment in my life. My initial recovery stages were simply anger. I rechanneled that to a new focus and retrained to accept a position as assistant fire marshal, which I did for almost a year; however, I missed the emergency responder's life. I returned to firefighting but soon realized my injury may require me to seek a different profession. I reflected on my childhood in that one-room schoolhouse. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. Health care and health care education were minimal. I am inspired to make a difference. I redirected my passion to pursue a nursing degree. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. My life experiences prepared me well for this career path by working as a lieutenant firefighter and lead medic Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance at age 22. In my position as lieutenant, I planned and supervised training needs, rescue scenarios, as well as day-to-day operations. I learned to work, as well as manage and lead a team. I am inspired to generalize my skill to nursing. Effective medical teams provide collaboration and cohesiveness that improve the ability to help patients. While serving as a lead medic, I was inspired daily by patients’ bravery, strength, and courage. In directing my crew on scene, watching the selfless devotion in providing ultimate care with sensitivity and respect even in the most difficult situations, they inspired me to be the best I could be every minute of every day. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, I am inspired to provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare. I am inspired to be a great asset to the health field. Having already invested well over $150,000 in pursuit of an education, even working full-time, my funds are depleted. I will make your organization proud as a valuable scholarship candidate, and I look forward to having the opportunity.
    Make Me Laugh Meme Scholarship
    The Moment You Realized You Do Not Have the Smartest Friends My share represents a boyhood moment when one boy instantly regrets his decision to follows another into a glacial-fed lake in Alaska. Memes are just downright funny, consoling, or happy. One can certainly say that any message that shares harmless laughter or a smile can be positive. We are fortunate to live in a time when sharing a message can spread in a matter of seconds. That matter of seconds documents a history of laughter, funny, care-free decisions with some little regard to natural consequences.
    Charles R. Ullman & Associates Educational Support Scholarship
    I am a life-long Alaskan who spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism and drug addiction plagued the community. The school was the only source for health and social education. This same story reads throughout rural Alaska and many communities in the US. I made a commitment to make a difference in our communities. My life experiences have prepared me well for this goal. As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Following graduation from Palmer High School, I began work as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance at age 22. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I want to help people. It is the passion of many to want to help others, but I am inspired to be directly involved. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, and educating the public. Most emergency health and safety personnel work go on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare and educate their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to my community which I will utilize as a nurse and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My past and current volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, one can provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare, sporting, or community events just to name a few. I’m excited about returning to some of my previous Mat-Su commitments like coaching, camp counselor, Special Olympics, and Red Cross. I look forward to completing school and giving back to the community.
    Hailey Julia "Jesus Changed my Life" Scholarship
    As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Upon graduation, I spent two summers wildland firefighting for the State of Alaska Division of Forestry. I began my career working for the UAF Fire Department as a student firefighter/EMT in Aug. 2017 following the academy. An honor bestowed upon me by my classmates and faculty were being nominated to be the graduation speaker. It was with great pleasure and pride I accepted the opportunity. I completed my Associate’s Degree from the UAF in Fire Science in Dec. 2018. I continued my education to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. I encountered an injury throughout this journey that prevented me from being a student firefighter/EMT for a full year. I was redirected to work as a student fire prevention officer. I returned to firefighting, but I realized my injury required me to seek a different profession. I am currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Barnes Jewish Goldfarb School of Nursing. The knowledge I have gained through UAF programs and my student fire department experience prepared me for the challenges I will face as I advance my career in the medical and emergency fields. I am inspired and passionate. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. An inspirational book that highlights that very idea is Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk by Sandy and Harry Summers. Saving Lives shares strategies and coping mechanisms to help health care workers go beyond just doing a job but also extend their roles with public education to dispel myths and inaccuracies. It is empowering and supportive of those in the emergency management and health care fields. Although I feel I have been less directly involved in the church the past few years while a full-time student and firefighter/EMT, my faith is still a tremendous part of my life. There are some tough calls. Specifically, a pediatric code required a lot of divine intervention to get through. Although I have responded to several suicides, one particularly stands out in my mind. I was the first to break through the window to find a gentleman against the door with a self-inflicted wound. What brought my mind to wander was the note which requested the first person to find him to call and turn off all the utilities. I’m still bewildered why someone who was so depressed and alone would in their last breaths as a dying wish ask someone to turn off the utilities. I did. It is in these moments; faith is the only answer. One of the reasons I love the emergency management and health fields so much is because I feel that I am devoting my time to the Christian faith every day. Helping others and showing kindness is one of the biggest things I’ve learned through my upbringing in a Christian family. Every day I’m on the engine or ambulance, I try to emulate that to the people I’m serving. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, educating the public, and demonstrating empathy. Most emergency health and safety personnel work go on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare, educate, and care for their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to the community which I will utilize as a nurse and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. I look forward to completing school and giving back to the community.
    Taylor Price Financial Literacy for the Future Scholarship
    As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Upon graduation, I spent two summers wildland firefighting for the State of Alaska Division of Forestry. I began my career working for the UAF Fire Department as a student firefighter/EMT in Aug. 2017 following the academy. An honor bestowed upon me by my classmates and faculty were being nominated to be the graduation speaker. It was with great pleasure and pride I accepted the opportunity. I completed my Associate’s Degree from the UAF in Fire Science in Dec. 2018. I continued my education to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. I encountered an injury throughout this journey that prevented me from being a student firefighter/EMT for a full year. I was redirected to work as a student fire prevention officer. I returned to firefighting, but I realized my injury required me to seek a different profession. I am currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Barnes Jewish Goldfarb School of Nursing. The knowledge I have gained through UAF programs and my student fire department experience prepared me for the challenges I will face as I advance my career in the medical and emergency fields. I am inspired and passionate. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. An inspirational book that highlights that very idea is Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk by Sandy and Harry Summers. Saving Lives shares strategies and coping mechanisms to help health care workers go beyond just doing a job but also extend their roles with public education to dispel myths and inaccuracies. It is empowering and supportive of those in the emergency management and health care fields. Although I feel I have been less directly involved in the church the past few years while a full-time student and firefighter/EMT, my faith is still a tremendous part of my life. There are some tough calls. Specifically, a pediatric code required a lot of divine intervention to get through. Although I have responded to several suicides, one particularly stands out in my mind. I was the first to break through the window to find a gentleman against the door with a self-inflicted wound. What brought my mind to wander was the note which requested the first person to find him to call and turn off all the utilities. I’m still bewildered why someone who was so depressed and alone would in their last breaths as a dying wish ask someone to turn off the utilities. I did. It is in these moments; faith is the only answer. One of the reasons I love the emergency management and health fields so much is because I feel that I am devoting my time to the Christian faith every day. Helping others and showing kindness is one of the biggest things I’ve learned through my upbringing in a Christian family. Every day I’m on the engine or ambulance, I try to emulate that to the people I’m serving. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, educating the public, and demonstrating empathy. Most emergency health and safety personnel work go on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare, educate, and care for their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to the community which I will utilize as a nurse and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. I look forward to completing school and giving back to the community.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    Winner
    I am a life-long Alaskan who spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism and drug addiction plagued the community. The school was the only source for health and social education. This same story reads throughout rural Alaska and many communities in the US. I made a commitment to make a difference in our communities. My life experiences have prepared me well for this goal. As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Following graduation from Palmer High School, I began work as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance, quite an achievement at age 22. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I want to help people. It is the passion of many to want to help others, but I am inspired to be directly involved. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, and educating the public. Most emergency health and safety personnel work go on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare and educate their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to Mat-Su which I will utilize as a nurse and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My past and current volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, one can provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare, sporting, or community events just to name a few. I’m excited about returning to some of my previous Mat-Su commitments like coaching, camp counselor, Special Olympics, and Red Cross. I look forward to completing school and giving back to the community I grew up in.
    "Your Success" Youssef Scholarship
    I am a life-long Alaskan who spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education were minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism and drug addiction plagued the community. The school was the only source for health and social education. This same story reads throughout rural Alaska and many communities in the US. I made a commitment to make a difference in our communities. My life experiences have prepared me well for this goal. As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Following graduation from Palmer High School, I began work as a firefighter/EMT for the University of AK Fire Department (UFD) with a promotion to Lieutenant and lead medic on an Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance at age 22. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I want to help people. It is the passion of many to want to help others, but I am inspired to be directly involved. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, and educating the public. Most emergency health and safety personnel work go on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare and educate their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to Mat-Su which I will utilize as a nurse and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My past and current volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, one can provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare, sporting, or community events just to name a few. I’m excited about returning to some of my previous Mat-Su commitments like coaching, camp counselor, Special Olympics, and Red Cross. I look forward to completing school and giving back to the community I grew up in.
    Bold Moments No-Essay Scholarship
    I played hockey through school learning leadership, teamwork, and commitment. I thought I had things figured out until Rockin’ Hockey. After a competitive high school season, rivals came together to compete in a final event unlike any game before. The hockey players were special needs students. We pushed our peers in chairs on the ice in a mad dash for a beach ball. The season’s grudges and feuds befell upon smiles, compassion, and fun. Cheers rang out for every goal regardless of uniform! It wasn't the special hockey players that received something special that day. It was all of us!
    JuJu Foundation Scholarship
    I am a life-long AK who spent my elementary years in a rural AK Native village one-room school. I always wanted to be a firefighter. I was inspired to be directly involved in helping others. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the work of health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal extending their reach behind the scenes keeping communities safe. After high school, I worked for the UAF Fire Dept. while attending college. I encountered a back injury throughout this journey that prevented me from being a firefighter/EMT for a year. This was a pretty tough moment in my life. My initial recovery stages were simply anger. I rechanneled that to a new focus and retrained to accept a position as assistant fire marshal, which I did for almost a year; however, I missed the emergency responder's life. I returned to firefighting but soon realized my injury may require me to seek a different profession. I reflected on my childhood in that one-room schoolhouse. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. Health care and health care education were minimal. I am inspired to make a difference. I redirected my passion to pursue a nursing degree. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. My life experiences prepared me well for this career path by working as a lieutenant firefighter and lead medic Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance at age 22. In my position as lieutenant, I planned and supervised training needs, rescue scenarios, as well as day-to-day operations. I learned to work, as well as manage and lead a team. I am inspired to generalize my skill to nursing. Effective medical teams provide collaboration and cohesiveness that improve the ability to help patients. While serving as a lead medic, I was inspired daily by patients’ bravery, strength, and courage. In directing my crew on scene, watching the selfless devotion in providing ultimate care with sensitivity and respect even in the most difficult situations, they inspired me to be the best I could be every minute of every day. Giving back to the community has always been a strong commitment of mine. My volunteer efforts include Special Olympics, youth sports, and community health and safety education. A nurse has a natural opportunity to give back to communities in the highest capacity. With a versatile health background, I am inspired to provide services to rural communities that lack adequate healthcare. I am inspired to be a great asset to the health field. Having already invested well over $150,000 in pursuit of an education, even working full-time, my funds are depleted. I will make your organization proud as a valuable scholarship candidate, and I look forward to having the opportunity.
    Liz's Bee Kind Scholarship
    I grew up playing hockey in my backyard at -20 F. Although, I did have other interests I lived to play the game. I played all through elementary, high school, and juniors competitively. I learned discipline, leadership, comradery, teamwork, resilience, and commitment. I was a team captain, 4.0 student, healthy family, and thought I had things pretty well figured out until Rockin’ Hockey. A special education teacher was kind enough to invite my team and me to participate in a special game of hockey after the competitive high school season came to a close, rival teams from the community were brought together to compete in a final game of the season. It was unlike any game before. The hockey players were students with special needs who never had the opportunity to play before. The high school hockey players were recruited to push our peers in chairs on the ice in a mad dash for a beach ball. The season’s grudges and feuds befell upon smiles, compassion, and sheer fun. Cheers rang out for every goal regardless of the uniform! It was not the special hockey players that received something special that day. It was all of us! https://www.frontiersman.com/sports/rockin-hockey-event-pairs-high-school-players-and-special-needs-students-for-a-day-on/article_739c8b74-5c3a-11e9-8767-b3ba76bb6cef.html
    John J. DiPietro COME OUT STRONG Scholarship
    Steve MacSwain was raised in Anchorage where he began playing youth hockey. He set the state high school season scoring mark of 60 goals and 62 assists for 104 points in just 48 games in 1983, which still stands. After a stellar career in the collegiate ranks with the NCAA-power University of Minnesota, Steve played nine seasons of professional hockey in Canada and Europe before returning to Anchorage and concluding his career with the Anchorage Aces from 1995-99. He has been both an assistant and head coach for teams in the USA, Canada, and Europe during his pro career. He resides himself as the rink manager at the Palmer Ice rink. And he was my former hockey coach. Steve MacSwain certainly carts an impressive resume with professional accolades that surpass any current or past Alaskan athlete. However, it isn’t Steve’s remarkable career that sets him aside from others. It is his ability to demonstrate compassion with grit. It seems contradictory to include grit and compassion in the same description of a person, but you don’t know Steve. As a fierce competitor in professional hockey, including the NHL, Steve is the epitome of toughness and hard work. He is one of the hardest working, selfless, and kindest men I know. Steve puts countless hours into the youth hockey programs statewide. It doesn’t matter whether the player is an outstanding prospect or a 4th line bench warmer; they receive the same attention and commitment from Steve. Steve also holds a very special commitment to those who experience special needs donating his time and heart. Recently committing his interest to a program he is calling Rockin’ Hockey, he has made a thwarted effort to bring the game of ice to a population who has never had the opportunity to experience such a thrill. Steve wasn’t just a coach for me; he was been a mentor, a role model, and a leader. Steve represents the type of person I want to be recognized as; hard-working, tough, yet kind. He taught me from a very young age that I must always work as hard as I can to be successful but always remember where I came from. He reminded me regularly through comments that certainly suggested his faith that God and family are important above all. Seems like an easy suggestion, but when one is fourteen years old and hockey was my life, not so true. I had the misfortune to break my back at that very age. Everyone I knew played hockey and everything I did revolved around hockey. Steve guided me through this very tough time. I came back to the ice even more hungry than before only to break my collar bone in my last competitive game before the high school season. By the time high school was over, I had broken my back, my collar bone twice, my ankle, torn my rotator cuff, and tore a ligament and tendon in my ankle. Three surgeries and countless hours of physical therapy put me back together. But it was Steve’s guidance and the love and support of my faith and family that continued to get me back on the ice. Steve showed me you can accomplish anything with hard work. He puts his heart on the line and 100% effort into everything he has ever done. He is an extraordinary man. He is a leader by example. I aspire to follow his example. I would not be the person I am today without Steve MacSwain’s leadership and guidance. And like me, I’m 100% positive Steve would do anything he could to play just one more game, but at the end of the day, the game is just a little bigger than a sheet of ice, a hockey stick, and a little black puck.
    Darryl Davis "Follow Your Heart" Scholarship
    As a high school student, Butte Volunteer Fire Department offered me my first experience with emergency services. As a firefighter trainee, I trained alongside fellow community members. I continue to be grateful for that opportunity. Upon graduation, I spent two summers wildland firefighting for the State of Alaska Division of Forestry. I began my career working for the UAF Fire Department as a student firefighter/EMT in Aug. 2017 following the academy. An honor bestowed upon me by my classmates and faculty were being nominated to be the graduation speaker. It was with great pleasure and pride I accepted the opportunity. I completed my Associate’s Degree from the UAF in Fire Science in Dec. 2018. I have continued my education to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. I encountered an injury throughout this journey that prevented me from being a student firefighter/EMT for a full year. I was redirected to working as a student fire prevention officer. I have since returned to firefighting, but I realize my injury may require me to seek a different profession. I am seeking to further my education by pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Barnes Jewish Goldfarb School of Nursing. The knowledge I have gained through UAF programs and my student fire department experience has better prepared me for the challenges I will face as I advance my career in the medical and emergency fields. I am inspired and passionate. I have always wanted to be involved in emergency management and health-related fields. I want to help people. It is the passion of many to want to help others, but I am inspired to be directly involved. I wanted the first-hand opportunity to save peoples’ lives and make a difference in the world. While Hollywood dramas often show the heroics of firefighters rushing into burning buildings and nurses covering gunshot wounds in an ER, the daily work of emergency health and safety providers goes far beyond that portrayal. An inspirational book that highlights that very idea is Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk by Sandy and Harry Summers. Saving Lives shares strategies and coping mechanisms to help health care workers go beyond just doing a job but also extend their roles with public education to dispel myths and inaccuracies. It is empowering and supportive of those in the emergency management and health care fields. Although I feel I have been less directly involved in the church the past few years while a full-time student and firefighter/EMT, my faith is still a tremendous part of my life. There are some tough calls. Specifically, a pediatric code this year required a lot of divine intervention to get through. Although I have responded to several suicides, one particularly stands out in my mind. I was the first to break through the window to find a gentleman against the door with a self-inflicted wound. What brought my mind to wander was the note which requested the first person to find him to call and turn off all the utilities. I’m still bewildered why someone who was so depressed and alone would in their last breaths as a dying wish ask someone to turn off the utilities. I did. It is in these moments; faith is the only answer. One of the reasons I love the emergency management and health fields so much is because I feel that I am devoting my time to the Christian faith every day. Helping others and showing kindness is one of the biggest things I’ve learned through my upbringing in a Christian family. Every day I’m on the engine or ambulance, I try to emulate that to the people I’m serving. Firefighters/EMTs and nurses are responsible for disaster preparedness, responding to medical emergencies, educating the public, and demonstrating empathy. Most emergency health and safety personnel work goes on behind the scenes to help keep communities safe. Duties don’t end at the fire station or hospital, firefighters/EMTs and nurses work diligently to prepare, educate, and care for their communities. I will bring that experience and commitment to my community.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    I am a life-long Alaskan. I spent my elementary years in a rural Alaskan Native village one-room schoolhouse with my dad as the teacher. Health care and health care education was minimal. Children in my class suffered from physical, sexual, and mental abuse. Although a dry village, alcoholism, and drug addiction plagued the community. Although a great venue, the school was essentially the only source for health and social education. This same story reads throughout rural Alaska as well as many communities in the US. I would like to see improved health care and health care education as well as access for all. I have made a commitment to make a difference in those communities. I am pursing a degree in nursing. A nurse provides the ultimate opportunity to provide direct patient care by treating and assessing patients as well as getting to know them in a more personal manner. As a veteran emergency responder at age 22 with five years on an advanced life support ambulance, my life experiences have prepared me extremely well to meet this goal. The opportunity to become a nurse furthers my reach into the community. Nursing school is expensive. A scholarship would reduce debt related stress and allow me to focus on my family, career, and community. Your investment in me would be an investment in the community, country, and world.
    Better Food, Better World Scholarship
    I think I learned to skate before I could walk. I lived and breathed hockey. My body consumed thousands of calories from breakfast to my third dinner after practice. My mother was health-conscious always finding new ways to disguise junk food into something healthy like blueberries in hamburgers or rhubarb in spaghetti sauce, but none-the-less, I managed to find my share of tasty sugar-filled preserved gems. Seemed a pretty safe gamble as a healthy young athletic man. Then... The health I always took for granted took a trend toward bad luck and bad genetics. God had blessed me with a pars defect. In simple words, a bad back worthy of a spinal fusion...twice. My competitive nature, with no regard to the outcome of my body, blessed me with a broken collar bone twice, a broken ankle, torn ankle tendon, and torn teres minor. Each time, my life felt like it halted. I had very little control over how my body healed except what I put into it. Suddenly the incessant heckling my father, siblings, and I had given my mother over the years seem the most powerful force I had to gain my life back. I began to focus on food. Thanks to mom the ice was already laid, I just had to start playing the game. I'm not a nutritionist but I am a strategist. My goals were to shoot for nature's bounty, be a smart player, and learn to change the game. Living in Alaska allows one to have a huge advantage in taking advantage of our natural resources. Shoot for eating wild game and fish as often as possible. Tasty dishes of moose, caribou, salmon, halibut, and game hens provide action-packed vitamins and minerals to keep one's blood running warm in the cold. The meat is cleaned and processed right away with no preservatives. Not everyone has that advantage, and nor am I always successful fishermen or hunters. I then rely on chick breast, fish, limited lean meat, beans, and legumes to fill the team. Eating healthy is expensive. As a college student, it is essential to be a smart player. Skate through the farmer's markets and local stores to find the best sales. Stock up on fruits, vegetables, and other essential health products. Process them safely and store them properly. Keep them for back up when fresh legs aren't available. College students rely on microwave and google. Learning to change the game plan with recipes is survival to healthy eating. Learn to identify the benchwarmers, the fats, sweets, and preservatives. Go to work to find a fresh set of skaters. Olive oil and coconut oil provide the best defense. Honey is a stellar offense. Oatmeal is inexpensive and can be quickly trained to replace flour. Change the game! The Stanley Cup has arrived. Food directly responds to the quality, respect, and value of the game of life. Honoring your body enough to respect the sources your food comes from makes it spiritual with healing qualities. And finally, happiness, sharing a bountiful meal with my team, friends and family under the rink of healthy living is the best "goal" I ever made.