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Mia Moore

2165

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Hello, my name is Mia. I am a Puerto Rican/Jamaican cartoonist and illustrator born and raised in New York that is passionate about pursuing the arts further as a first-year college student. Although my major of choice has been deemed unreasonable or unrealistic, I cannot and will not believe a future for myself where I will not be satisfied. As a low-income student from a single-parent household, I have committed myself to applying to various scholarships, foundations, and grants so that I may be able to pursue a Bachelors in Fine Arts and a Masters in Arts of Teaching to be able to inspire the next generation of young creatives the way I have aspired to since I was a child. In addition, I would like to study abroad to better understand the versatility and culture surrounding the arts. I will be attending the School of Visual Arts in New York City this upcoming Fall semester. I have been awarded the Haney Medal in 2022 by the School Art League and multiple Scholastic Art and Writing regional awards in 2023 and 2024 that has resulted in my editorial cartoon being presented at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education. I am incredibly grateful for the opportunities and awards granted to me over the past few years and hope to carry them with me when I attend college.

Education

School of Visual Arts

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2028

High School of Art and Design

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Fine and Studio Arts
    • Visual and Performing Arts, General
    • Education, Other
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Arts

    • Dream career goals:

      To publish a graphic novel, illustrate for children's books, and sustain myself on freelance without being tied down to an unstable or uncertain job. I would also like to become an art teacher when I feel it is right, after receiving my Masters in Arts of Teaching.

    • Freelance Poster Designer

      Astoria Film Festival
      2024 – 2024
    • Student Intern - Character Designer and Scriptwriter

      Sony Animation Kids/Astoria Film Festival
      2024 – Present6 months
    • Student Intern - Character Designer

      Noggin/Paramount
      2023 – 2023
    • Multi-Cultural Marketing Intern

      HBO Max
      2022 – 2022

    Research

    • Marketing

      HBO Max — Multi-Cultural Marketing Intern
      2022 – 2022

    Arts

    • Scholastic Art and Writing Awards

      Illustration
      2023 – 2024
    • School Art League

      Visual Arts
      2022 – 2022
    • High School of Art and Design

      Visual Arts
      2020 – Present
    • Art Students League of New York

      Painting
      2022 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      High School of Art and Design — Voting Registration Volunteer
      2024 – 2024
    • Volunteering

      Fanfaire NYC — Vendor
      2023 – 2023

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    In many ways, the nuclear family dynamic has been seen as the standard of American life and the American Dream: a suburban house with a picket fence, a husband, a wife, and two or three children who all smile contently, knowing their life is perfect. Despite this widespread idea of perfection being perpetrated everywhere we look, many of us do not have the privilege of experiencing this kind of dynamic. Without a picket fence, without siblings---but most importantly---without two parents. I can vividly recall times where I would wonder to myself why I could not live like that. I could never come up with an answer of what I had done wrong. If there is anything I have gained from living in a single-parent household, it is an intense appreciation for my mother who I would likely go as far as to say, is the most influential person in my life. In my childhood, my mother worked long shifts, sometimes starting as early as five in the morning. She would wake me up at four and drop me off at my babysitter's house so that I would still be able to get to school even when she could not take me. Other times, I would stay in the break room at her job until her shift was over because she refused to let me stay home by myself. On weekends, she would take me to art and dance classes to encourage the creative passions and buy me art supplies and devices with what she had to help me advance in my skills. These acts of encouragement are what eventually led me to apply to and attend the High School of Art and Design in New York City and commit myself to the professional pursuit of the arts in the future. In childish ignorance, I did not truly realize how much my mother did for me growing up; it was simply my life and I did not know any life unlike it. That was, until a few years ago when she would get into a car accident that changed her life. Requiring multiple surgeries, hospital visits, and physical therapy, the accident had handicapped her in ways that still continue to fester into chronic pains and medical issues that will likely continue to hinder her for the rest of her life. She was forced to quit her job and has since been unable to return. Outside assistance such as social security and disability have been the main---if not, sole---source of our income, forcing us to adopt a new lifestyle to suit our budget. Despite all of this, however, my mother still does it. She enjoys herself when she can, she upkeeps the household, and she still supports me. Every day I grow more amazed by the strength she has to still look after me in spite of it all. Whenever I feel hopeless, I think of her and how she has persevered as inspiration. Now, in my senior year of high school and as the time to decide my future slowly runs out, I feel a lot of pressure about what is to become of me after graduation. While I have contemplated not attending college altogether to avoid the financial and mental burden, my mother has been there to reassure me that everything will work out and that she is sure I will make it big one day with my creations. It is my hope that what she says is true. After all, it would be a great disservice to her to let all of her efforts and encouragement be for naught.
    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    I remember it vividly. I was brought into a room that was nearly empty aside from a bed with a lifeless frail figure atop it that stared at the ceiling with big, bulging eyes. What lain in front of me was not a corpse but, rather, my grandmother. She wasn’t dead, at least not yet, but it felt as though she was. Her body was alive but I couldn’t see her anymore, as if her spirit was gone. As an eight-year-old, it hurt me to see a woman who was once so full of life in that state. Through my childhood she danced, painted, and laughed, but most importantly, she told stories. I loved to visit her house a road trip away from mine and listen to her entrancing tales of far-off worlds. She spoke with such passion that I would believe anything she told me, no matter how ludicrous. When my grandmother finally succumbed to her cancer, it took a while for me to grasp the concept of her death. Years of treatment at a center and the false hope given by doctors didn’t prepare me for what was seemingly inevitable. Deep down, I must have known it was coming, but I rejected the fact for weeks. Instead, I opted to comfort myself with stories of my own creation, just like the ones she told. Sometimes I would imagine that her soul was off in a magical land where she was joined by fairies and spirits, dancing with vigor. Other times, I would feel her around me. During storms, I would ask her to send me a sign by stopping the rainfall and surely enough, the droplets would slow their pace ever so slightly. Ignorantly, I took that as definitive proof. Maybe she was surfing on shooting stars in space or was an angel in the clouds. A new day offered a new theory. I don’t recall how, but one day the realization hit me that she was truly gone and my world came crashing down. I spent that night crying, feeling all of the pain I had unknowingly harbored. Feeling delusional for my ignorance, I began to feel angry; angry about the treatment center’s inability to save her, angry at her good-for-nothing husband whom I overheard my family criticizing, and angry at myself. Though I refused to indulge in my fantasies of her any longer, my love for storytelling never faltered. I found myself creating new ones—not ones about my grandmother, but instead, about characters I made up or watched in cartoons. I viewed stories as an art form. With inexpensive sketchbooks and pencils, I dedicated my time to primitively drawing the concepts I envisioned. Although I was not very skilled then, I persisted. As long as I was creating, I felt fulfilled. Fantastical tales about robots, warriors, fairies, and monsters had manifested themselves as a part of me. Even now, through ups and downs, burnout and self-doubt, stories continue to be the main source of my inspiration, making it almost impossible to imagine life—or art—without them. Over time, I’ve grown to accept my grandmother’s passing although I still get choked up whenever she is the topic of conversation. As I’ve matured, I find solace in returning to my previous “delusions.” In them, I’ve allowed myself to have a final memory of her more dignified than her lying lifelessly on her deathbed. The ability to imagine and create has helped me in times of darkness, brightening my world when life seemed bleak. Although it never occurred to me at the time, perhaps my grandmother’s influence was to blame. Even in her absence, she has always been with me and will continue to be through college, adulthood, and likely for the rest of my life. I often wonder how she’s doing now, dancing amongst the fairies and the spirits with their shimmering wings and flowing hair. She makes the most beautiful fairy.
    Resilient Scholar Award
    In many ways, the nuclear family dynamic has been seen as the standard of American life and the American Dream: a suburban house with a picket fence, a husband, a wife, and two or three children who all smile contently, knowing their life is perfect. Despite this widespread idea of perfection being perpetrated everywhere we look, many of us do not have the privilege of experiencing this kind of dynamic. Without a picket fence, without siblings---but most importantly---without two parents. I can vividly recall times where I would wonder to myself why I could not live like that. I could never come up with an answer of what I had done wrong. If there is anything I have gained from living in a single-parent household, it is an intense appreciation for my mother who I would likely go as far as to say, is the most influential person in my life. In my childhood, my mother worked long shifts, sometimes starting as early as five in the morning. She would wake me up at four and drop me off at my babysitter's house so that I would still be able to get to school even when she could not take me. Other times, I would stay in the break room at her job until her shift was over because she refused to let me stay home by myself. On weekends, she would take me to art and dance classes to encourage the creative passions and buy me art supplies and devices with what she had to help me advance in my skills. These acts of encouragement are what eventually led me to apply to and attend the High School of Art and Design in New York City and commit myself to the professional pursuit of the arts in the future. When I first learned about the High School of Art and Design, I felt like my world became brighter. I had always been fascinated with art but did not truly understand that there was future in the arts for me until I stepped into the doors of the school for the first time and was surrounded by other creatives who shared my passion. It was an overwhelming sensation full of an unsavory mix of emotions that filled my stomach with butterflies; anxiety, fear, hope, excitement. Over the next few years, I would grow as a person and as a creative with the help of my peers and mentors, guiding me on the path to furthering my education. I believe that had I not attended the High School of Art and Design, I would not be who I am now. Now, in my senior year of high school and as the time to decide my future slowly runs out, I feel a lot of pressure about what is to become of me after graduation. While I have contemplated not attending college altogether to avoid the financial and mental burden, my mother has been there to reassure me that everything will work out and that she is sure I will "make it big" one day with my creations. It is my hope that what she says is true. After all, it would be a great disservice to her to let all of her efforts and encouragement be for naught.
    Jessie Koci Future Entrepreneurs Scholarship
    As a senior at the High School of Art and Design, the past few years of my life has strategically and specifically prepared me for a future career in the arts. While many of my peers have strayed from the path, some, like myself, have decided they would continue their creative studies in the upcoming academic year. While we students have already gotten a glimpse into the world of artistic academics---with internships being available with big companies and teachers who help nurture student passions---a whole new world awaits us once we graduate and take our first steps onto college campuses. Art schools, while all individually different, allow for an exploration of possible career paths with the helps of professors and working professionals in their field of interest that can only rarely be found in a self-guided manner. It is for this reason that I, after many college tours and nights of intensive research, have decided I will pursue a Bachelors in Fine Arts---majoring in Illustration---and a Masters of Arts in Teaching so that I may be able to one day help inspire the next generation of young creatives with my own publications and teachings. Unsurprisingly, I have been given many strange looks and criticisms from family members and peers when I tell them I want to go into the arts as a career. I could have been a doctor or a rocket scientist but I chose art. There is undeniably an instability associated with creative professions and I know that better than anyone, being told over and over again as reasoning for me to reconsider my choices. I have observed a shift in the art industry; one that has recently took to favoring generations from artificial intelligence over the creations of hardworking professionals. Many artists have suffered layoffs and lack of appreciation for their work in the midst of this rapid change in the industry and it has left many of them wondering the same thing: what's next? I believe now, more than ever, the world needs artists to stand their ground and show the masses that they are not going anywhere. This is why I want to be an entrepreneur. I want to be on the forefront of the reestablishment of the arts as a worthy and important part of our society. The world will always need innovative thinkers and designers to create their buildings, advertisements, media, and fashion. No matter what new technology is available, generators and for-profits can never replicate the heart and soul present in every brushstroke. I want to be able to make an impact, whether that is in making my own company or being able to sustain myself on my work alone, as long as it gets the message across that we are here to stay. While this instability is a very valid fear that has forced many to back down, I refuse to suffer such a fate.The awards, honors, and medals I have been received are a testament to my dedication to the arts as they inhabit almost every aspect of my life. I have already made so many connections with working professionals through the internships and mentorships I have participated in and know that they will help guide me on the path to success, using their industry knowledge for the better. I know the road ahead will be difficult but I have come this far and will not be giving up any time soon. These obstacles are only bumps in the road to progress and whatever lies in store for me in the future, I am ready to take it on.
    Hispanic Climb to Success Scholarship
    For as long as I can remember, I loved to draw. While other interests I had only remained fads, soon passing as I grew up, drawing is one of the few that truly stuck. With cheap sketchbooks and markers, I would draw to my heart's content, often replicating the cartoons I saw on my television screen and envisioning myself in the future as a creator of such media. My passions for art only grew as I matured and began to take the idea seriously as a career path, my mother encouraging me along the way. Such passion is what eventually led me to attend the High School of Art and Design in New York City where, with the help of teachers and industry professionals, I would learn more about the opportunities in store for me as I progress as a creative. It is my hope that after my high school graduation, I will be able to continue this path at an accredited institution where I will receive my Bachelors in Fine Arts and Masters in Arts of Teaching so that I may be able to help inspire the next generation of creatives in ways I once was. Undeniably, there has been mixed reactions when I tell people my educational goals moving forward. Many people believe that there is no future to be had in the arts and that I will only be wasting my time. The level of uncertainty associated with such unconventional academics, while undeniable, has been used by people around me to put me down and, unfortunately, it has sometimes worked. There have been times in my life where I have reconsidered what I wanted for myself, giving into the negative ideas people have put into my head; and yet, here I am. For all the criticisms and odd looks I have received from those around me, there is a glimmer of hope I feel for every person that believes in me. This hope is something that has motivated me whenever I have found myself in a place of seemingly-inescapable worry and guided me as I continue my studies. It is this hope that has allowed me to receive medals and awards from alliances and organizations, make connections with industry professionals from large companies, and find community with people who share experiences with me. I believe I should receive this scholarship because in spite of all the obstacles and criticisms I have received, I have the strength to keep pursuing the path I have set for myself. While most people would back down and settle for a career that they are not happy with, I am self-determined enough to trust that the skills and knowledge I have built up over my life time will take me where I need to be. The only issue that remains is unfortunately a financial one. With my single mother being unable to work because of injuries that have disabled her and the cost of tuition growing exponentially over time, the feasibility of my dream begins to seem farther out of reach. It is scholarships like these that, like the supports I have received in the past, represent a glimmer of hope for the future. No matter how small the glimmer, I intend to follow it. After all, it would be a great disservice to my mother, to my supporters, and myself if I were to give up now.
    Bald Eagle Scholarship
    In many ways, the nuclear family dynamic has been seen as the standard of American life and the American Dream: a suburban house with a picket fence, a husband, a wife, and two or three children who all smile contently, knowing their life is perfect. Despite this widespread idea of perfection being perpetrated everywhere we look, many of us do not have the privilege of experiencing this kind of dynamic. Without a picket fence, without siblings---but most importantly---without two parents. I can vividly recall times where I would wonder to myself why I could not live like that. I could never come up with an answer of what I had done wrong. If there is anything I have gained from living in a single-parent household, it is an intense appreciation for my mother who I would likely go as far as to say, is the most influential person in my life. In my childhood, my mother worked long shifts, sometimes starting as early as five in the morning. She would wake me up at four and drop me off at my babysitter's house so that I would still be able to get to school even when she could not take me. Other times, I would stay in the break room at her job until her shift was over because she refused to let me stay home by myself. On weekends, she would take me to art and dance classes to encourage the creative passions and buy me art supplies and devices with what she had to help me advance in my skills. These acts of encouragement are what eventually led me to apply to and attend the High School of Art and Design in New York City and commit myself to the professional pursuit of the arts in the future. In childish ignorance, I did not truly realize how much my mother did for me growing up; it was simply my life and I did not know any life unlike it. That was, until a few years ago when she would get into a car accident that changed her life. Requiring multiple surgeries, hospital visits, and physical therapy, the accident had handicapped her in ways that still continue to fester into chronic pains and medical issues that will likely continue to hinder her for the rest of her life. She was forced to quit her job and has since been unable to return. Outside assistance such as social security and disability have been the main---if not, sole---source of our income, forcing us to adopt a new lifestyle to suit our budget. Despite all of this, however, my mother still does it. She enjoys herself when she can, she upkeeps the household, and she still supports me. Every day I grow more amazed by the strength she has to still look after me in spite of it all. Whenever I feel hopeless, I think of her and how she has persevered as inspiration. Now, in my senior year of high school and as the time to decide my future slowly runs out, I feel a lot of pressure about what is to become of me after graduation. While I have contemplated not attending college altogether to avoid the financial and mental burden, my mother has been there to reassure me that everything will work out and that she is sure I will make it big one day with my creations. It is my hope that what she says is true. After all, it would be a great disservice to her to let all of her efforts and encouragement be for naught.
    “I Matter” Scholarship
    If there is anything I have learned in the past few years of going to school in New York City, it is that it is incredibly easy to get entirely focused on yourself. In such a uniquely fast-paced environment, it is every man for himself. Many choose to ignore those in need--whether that be the homeless or the impoverished--instead, going into their own little world to ignore what is happening around them. I would be lying if I said I had not also gained the habit of choosing to turn up the music in my headphones to ignore the drug addicts just a couple seats down from me on my commute home or the preachers at the bus stop trying to convert the masses. In these moments you sometimes miss the opportunity to help others and this fact was made no clearer to me than one day in the train station as I was making my way home from school. After a particularly bad day of classes, I entered the train station hoping to speed through and get on the next train home as fast as possible. Teachers and assignments filled my head and overwhelmed me to the point I simply wanted to return to my bed and rest once more. Upon entering the turnstile, however, I stopped at the sight of a woman with a stroller asking for help. Although clearly stressed, few people gave her a second glance and chose to walk right by her. Although I could have just pushed the idea of stopping aside and hoped for someone else to step up to the plate, I could not bear the sight of seeing her ignored despite her distress and so, I approached her. The woman was looking for directions. The train she needed to get to was on the other side of the station and she didn't know how to get there. Luckily, since my train was in that direction, I knew where to go and said I would show her the way. Her baby was asleep in his stroller and the only way to get to the train was down an escalator, through a small space, and down two flights of stairs where we would finally reach the platform so I offered to help her carry it. Through the station she would hold her baby in his carrier while I carried the stroller attachment down the stairs, balancing it on my knee. Once we finally reached the platform, the woman thanked me profusely and wished me well. As I watched her board the train and travel down the subway line, I felt a warm sense of accomplishment fuzzily growing inside of me. Any bad feelings I had harbored from the hours prior had dissipated and I was left content. I may have arrived home later than I wanted that day but I didn't care anymore. Knowing that the mother and her young son were able to reach their destination when nobody else would help them made the delay worthwhile. And while it may seem overly optimistic, I sometimes hope that we may one-day cross paths again in the train station. I only hope that when we do, I won't be too caught up in my own little world to notice.
    Social Anxiety Step Forward Scholarship
    While I am at a point in my life that I would consider decently well-off, being accompanied by friends that I have made over the past few years and discovering myself in new ways, there remains a problem that I have battled with consistently that is impossible to ignore. For the latter part of my life, I have suffered from feelings of intense distress and fears about the world around me that I could not name, nor could I deny. While my peers partied and socialized on a regular basis, I would stay within the confines of my bedroom, only getting glimpses to what I was missing out on from social media posts that only brought me more worry as I scrolled through them for hours on end. These experiences were only recently granted a name by my therapist after years of wondering what might have been "wrong" with me: Generalized Anxiety Disorder. I remember sitting there as I first read those three words, bolded under "diagnosis". At first, I didn't know what to think; whether I should be relieved or scared. On one hand, I finally knew I was not alone in my struggle. On the other, it confirmed there was something "wrong" no matter how many times I attempted to psyche myself into thinking it was all in my head. The two emotions fought with one another in my head for weeks, dictating my mood in sudden swings and panic attacks. I soon began to lose hope for recovery as weeks turned into months and I failed to see any progress. And, yet, I continued. I continued attending therapy sessions and forcing myself out of the house and while I couldn't see it at the time, I was getting better. My friends, family, and therapist could see it and, in time, so could I. As I begin to approach my high school graduation, many of these past fears and feelings of distress have returned in ways I could not have imagined. At times, I have found myself back at square one. However, I know now that the path to progress is rarely ever straightforward and these feelings are only temporary. The crippling fear of living my own for the first time in my life is one that has made me reconsider attending a college out of state, however, I believe that it is a necessary step in my progress. Being able to take care of myself in spite of my fears is an ability I will need to gain in order to achieve my professional and personal aspirations. While I would be lying if I were to say I am not scared for the future, I am ready to take on that fear and refuse to let my disorder get in my way.
    Isaac Yunhu Lee Memorial Arts Scholarship
    Over the course of my academic career, there have been very few teachers who have made a profound impact on me even after I had stepped foot outside of the classroom. While I have always been an honor roll student, I often found myself lacking excitement to learn. That is, except for when I was in the classroom of my eighth-grade English teacher. One morning, our class was told that the topic of discussion for the upcoming unit would be the work of Edgar Allen Poe. I had heard the author's name in the past, however, I was never really acquainted with his work until that point. Over the next few weeks, we read and discussed several of Poe's short stories, one in particular that thoroughly captured my attention: The Masque of the Red Death (1850). The intimidating figure of the personification of a deadly disease was a visual I could very easily picture in my mind when I read and thought back on the tale. It wasn't until my junior year of high school, however, that I would finally make something out of these visuals and put pen to paper. In my rendition of The Masque of the Red Death, the Red Death–an unexpected and unwelcome guest–looms over the wealthy party-goers in attendance and takes hostage the gathering until every last attendee falls dead as twelve strokes ring from the clock’s brazen lungs. It is a chilling scene that I recall rereading over and over when I had first been introduced to the story. This chill–this horror–is something I wanted to make apparent throughout my piece within the twisted faces of the socialites facing their own mortality, through the architectural figures overseeing the massacre, and through the dark presence of the Red Death itself. In the creation of this scene, I took inspiration from Venetian and historical masquerades which I believed to suit the gothic origins of the story. In addition, I was inspired by the art nouveau pieces created by impactful artists such as Alphonse Mucha. Although my artwork lacks the pale colors and foliage, which are defining characteristics of the movement, the inspiration taken from nouveau works is seen in the borders containing each of the five figures, representing the many columns and rooms that decorate the party’s halls. The edges of the borders feature Corinthian-inspired architecture as an homage to the plant life in such pieces. In a way, I believe this twist on past art movements to fit a grimmer subject matter allows the work to feel more personal to me and my interests. Now that I am growing closer to my high school graduation, I have had a lot of time to reflect on the past few years as I look deeper to figure out my goals. I believe I owe a lot to my English teacher. His passion for teaching all those years ago inspired me to feel more excited about literature in a way other teachers failed. Recently, I have taken the initiative to email him and thank him for his efforts and we have since remained in contact to discuss life after I’d graduated middle school. I hope that I will be able to thank him and update him on my accomplishments and strides as I transition from a high schooler to a college student and, eventually, a professional working in the art field–wherever that may be.
    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    It is undeniable that to succeed, one must pick themselves up after they've fallen down. At least, that's what we were told growing up. Whether it was after falling off your bike after taking the training wheels off or because you were crying that your favorite toy had been sold out, it is that unremarkable phrase that has been engraved into our minds by our guardians whenever we were discouraged. You have to keep trying, to bounce back—to persevere. The events in our history books, the businesses down the street, the transportation ridden to work; all would be nonexistent had perseverance been nonexistent. Although commonplace in childhood, very few truly take the notion to heart. My inability to do so has hindered me in making the right choices, staying on the ground after falling. It is for that reason I never learned to ride my bike without training wheels. For the latter part of my life, I have struggled with feelings of inadequacy and mental anguish that I can remember as far back as the age of nine. Starting high school, the problems only grew in strength until they required assistance from therapists, counselors, and psychiatrists. Initially, I thought more positively about my situation, believing I was on the right path to improvement. In time, however, that outlook faded in the wake of a new struggle. The most difficult part of my battle with depression was the lack of understanding of why I experienced it. While I may have had the strength to get myself out of bed, to find myself something to eat, or to go to school at the start, over time I began to lose sight of what I was fighting against. It's a difficult task to fight a foe you cannot see. Just when you think you’re able to strike, you feel it claw itself into you from a completely different angle. My grades began to slip, I stood home from school frequently, missed my therapy appointments, and laid in bed all day in a state of inescapable numbness. It soon became noticeable to those around me; my parents, my friends, even my teachers. This persisted for months, causing me to doubt my ability to continue on. And yet, I did. I spoke with my teachers about my struggles and made up my missed assignments little by little. I continued attending therapy sessions no matter how much I detested them. I got myself out of the house even when my brain begged me to stay in my room. Every small effort chipped away at the weight I bore on my shoulders even if seemingly insignificant. Eventually, I began to feel a little better. I started to laugh with my friends again, made it back onto the honor roll, and started to feel the little bits of joy in my day-to-day life that I'd lost. I still continue to struggle as I make my way through life, fluctuating between horrible days to tolerable ones, and although I often find myself in what seems to be an inescapable pit, I know these feelings will not last forever. The path to progress is rarely ever straightforward and I look back on my previous experiences as a reminder of that fact. I know now that if I had been unable to persevere despite the circumstances, I wouldn’t have been able to live to see a brighter day. It is this notion that I hope to carry with me as I transition from high school to college and as I get atop the seat of my bicycle once more this summer.
    Heather Rylie Memorial Scholarship
    As I've solidified myself in the pursuit of an education and career in the arts, a question I have begrudgingly become familiar with is just that: "Why art?" I could have been a doctor discovering the cure for cancer or the head of an aspiring corporation but I chose art; why? While I have detested the question ever since I first heard it, I believe this repetition has forced me to internalize it and ask it for myself in recent years, instilling a certain sense of doubt and worry in my mind that perhaps I have been misled and overly optimistic. From a young age, rereading the children´s books that filled my bookshelves, I found much solace in art. I replicated what I saw with cheap sketchbooks and markers and, after time, hoped to one day be alongside the artists creating for the public's viewing pleasure. As I've matured, my interests have changed but it is undeniable that my goal never has. Instead, I've only found more reasons that I believe art to be a worthy career, no matter the uncertainty and hardship that come with it. I don't believe there is anything I could see myself doing besides creating. It is the reason I auditioned for and attended the High School of Art and Design after years in a charter school. It is the reason I decided to become a representative for my school on our senior committee. And it is the reason I have won medals and awards from the School Art League and the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. I have allowed art to involve itself in every aspect of my life and, naturally, I would like it to remain that way. Art, of course, extends far past cartoons on bookstore shelves. It is the cause of revolution and innovation. It is a byproduct of change and ideology. It incites emotion, violence, and inspiration. There is nothing more versatile in its influence than art in all of the many forms it has and will forevermore continue to take on. In many ways, I wholeheartedly believe the world we know today would not and could not exist without its presence. The world keeps changing and so too will the artistic endeavors of creatives inhabiting it as it does. There has been plenty of fear about the state of the industry at this given time and what is to come in the future with the rise of artificial intelligence and theft that has succeeded in convincing even the most perceptive of individuals of images and realities that simply aren't there. Layoffs and disregard towards artists and their passion projects by higher-ups have disheartened many hard workers that there is no future for them in their field of interest. I believe that now, more than ever, the world needs artists; their visions, their voices, their passion. This is why I am committed to my craft. I refuse to stand by in a world that throws aside personal and passionate creations in exchange for that without heart or vision. I want to be able to inspire the next generation of young artists the same way I once was inspired through publishing my own work professionally. I hope that my efforts in pursuing this passion of mine won't be for naught and that I will, in some way, make a difference. Whether that be through spreading a message, inspiring others, or showing that there is success to be made, I am ready for it.
    Lewis Hollins Memorial Art Scholarship
    As I've solidified myself in the pursuit of an education and career in the arts, a question I have begrudgingly become familiar with is just that: "Why art?" I could have been a doctor discovering the cure for cancer or the head of an aspiring corporation but I chose art; why? While I have detested the question ever since I first heard it, I believe this repetition has forced me to internalize it and ask it for myself in recent years, instilling a certain sense of doubt and worry in my mind that perhaps I have been misled and overly optimistic. From a young age, rereading the children´s books that filled my bookshelves, I found much solace in art. I replicated what I saw with cheap sketchbooks and markers and, after time, hoped to one day be alongside the artists creating for the public's viewing pleasure. As I've matured, my interests have changed but it is undeniable that my goal never has. Instead, I've only found more reasons that I believe art to be a worthy career, no matter the uncertainty and hardship that come with it. I don't believe there is anything I could see myself doing besides creating. It is the reason I auditioned for and attended the High School of Art and Design after years in a charter school. It is the reason I decided to become a representative for my school on our senior committee. And it is the reason I have won medals and awards from the School Art League and the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. I have allowed art to involve itself in every aspect of my life and, naturally, I would like it to remain that way. Art, of course, extends far past cartoons on bookstore shelves. It is the cause of revolution and innovation. It is a byproduct of change and ideology. It incites emotion, violence, and inspiration. There is nothing more versatile in its influence than art in all of the many forms it has and will forevermore continue to take on. In many ways, I wholeheartedly believe the world we know today would not and could not exist without its presence. The world keeps changing and so too will the artistic endeavors of creatives inhabiting it as it does. There has been plenty of fear about the state of the industry at this given time and what is to come in the future with the rise of artificial intelligence and theft that has succeeded in convincing even the most perceptive of individuals of images and realities that simply aren't there. Layoffs and disregard towards artists and their passion projects by higher-ups have disheartened many hard workers that there is no future for them in their field of interest. I believe that now, more than ever, the world needs artists; their visions, their voices, their passion. This is why I am committed to my craft. I refuse to stand by in a world that throws aside personal and passionate creations in exchange for that without heart or vision. I want to be able to inspire the next generation of young artists the same way I once was inspired through publishing my own work professionally. I hope that my efforts in pursuing this passion of mine won't be for naught and that I will, in some way, make a difference. Whether that be through spreading a message, inspiring others, or showing that there is success to be made, I am ready for it.
    Palette & Purpose Scholarship
    Winner
    As I've solidified myself in the pursuit of an education and career in the arts, a question I have begrudgingly become familiar with is just that: "Why art?" I could have been a doctor discovering the cure for cancer or the head of an aspiring corporation but I chose art; why? While I have detested the question ever since I first heard it, I believe this repetition has forced me to internalize it and ask it for myself in recent years, instilling a certain sense of doubt and worry in my mind that perhaps I have been misled and overly optimistic. From a young age, rereading the children´s books that filled my bookshelves, I found much solace in art. I replicated what I saw with cheap sketchbooks and markers and, after time, hoped to one day be alongside the artists creating for the public's viewing pleasure. As I've matured, my interests have changed but it is undeniable that my goal never has. Instead, I've only found more reasons that I believe art to be a worthy career, no matter the uncertainty and hardship that come with it. I don't believe there is anything I could see myself doing besides creating. It is the reason I auditioned for and attended the High School of Art and Design after years in a charter school. It is the reason I decided to become a representative for my school on our senior committee. And it is the reason I have won medals and awards from the School Art League and the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. I have allowed art to involve itself in every aspect of my life and, naturally, I would like it to remain that way. Art, of course, extends far past cartoons on bookstore shelves. It is the cause of revolution and innovation. It is a byproduct of change and ideology. It incites emotion, violence, and inspiration. There is nothing more versatile in its influence than art in all of the many forms it has and will forevermore continue to take on. In many ways, I wholeheartedly believe the world we know today would not and could not exist without its presence. The world keeps changing and so too will the artistic endeavors of creatives inhabiting it as it does. There has been plenty of fear about the state of the industry at this given time and what is to come in the future with the rise of artificial intelligence and theft that has succeeded in convincing even the most perceptive of individuals of images and realities that simply aren't there. Layoffs and disregard towards artists and their passion projects by higher-ups have disheartened many hard workers that there is no future for them in their field of interest. I believe that now, more than ever, the world needs artists; their visions, their voices, their passion. That´s why I am committed to my craft. I refuse to stand by in a world that throws aside personal and passionate creations in exchange for that without heart or vision. I want to be able to inspire the next generation of young artists the same way I once was inspired by publishing my own work. I hope that my efforts in pursuing this passion of mine won't be for naught and that I will, in some way, make a difference. Whether that be through spreading a message, inspiring others, or showing that there is success to be made, I am ready for it. It is my hope that this scholarship will be able to aid my studies and make these dreams a reality.
    Alexis Mackenzie Memorial Scholarship for the Arts
    As I've solidified myself in the pursuit of an education and career in the arts, a question I have begrudgingly become familiar with is just that: "Why art?" I could have been a doctor discovering the cure for cancer or the head of an aspiring corporation but I chose art; why? While I have detested the question ever since I first heard it, I believe this repetition has forced me to internalize it and ask it for myself in recent years, instilling a certain sense of doubt and worry in my mind that perhaps I have been misled and overly optimistic. From a young age, watching cartoons on cable or revisiting animated movies on DVDs that we had stored under our television stand, I found much solace in art. I replicated what I saw with cheap sketchbooks and markers and, after time, hoped to one day be alongside the artists animating for the public's viewing pleasure. As I've matured, my interests have changed but it is undeniable that my goal never has. Instead, I've only found more reasons that I believe art to be a worthy career, no matter the uncertainty and hardship that come with it. I don't believe there is anything I could see myself doing besides creating. Any other reality aside from that is one I do not believe I could live in. Art, of course, extends far past cartoons on a bulky television set. It is the cause of revolution and innovation. It is a byproduct of change and ideology. It incites emotion, violence, and inspiration. There is nothing more versatile in its influence than art in all of the many forms it has and will forevermore continue to take on. In many ways, I wholeheartedly believe the world we know today would not and could not exist without its presence. The world keeps changing and so too will the artistic endeavors of creatives inhabiting it as it does. There has been plenty of fear about the state of the industry at this given time and what is to come in the future with the rise of artificial intelligence and theft that has succeeded in convincing even the most perceptive of individuals of images and realities that simply aren't there. Layoffs and disregard towards artists and their passion projects by higher-ups have disheartened many hard workers that there is no future for them in their field of interest. I believe that now, more than ever, the world needs artists; their visions, their voices, their passion. This is why I am committed to my craft. I refuse to stand by in a world that throws aside personal and passionate creations in exchange for that without heart or vision. I want to be able to inspire the next generation of artists the same way I once was inspired, whether that be through the publication of my own artistic work or becoming an art teacher after receiving my Masters in Arts of Teaching. I hope that my efforts in pursuing this passion of mine won't be for naught and that I will, in some way, make a difference. No matter the form this may inevitably take on, I am ready for it.