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McKinley Slinkard

6255

Bold Points

209x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

My name is McKinley Slinkard and I am going into my senior year of college at 19 years old. I would describe myself as a creative problem-solver and a critical thinker. I enjoy finding original solutions to complex issues and combining this skill with my developing ability and desire to stand up for what is right, not necessarily what is popular or widely accepted. I value freedom, integrity, and truth. With regards to college, my goal is to graduate with my bachelors debt free. I have lived in Colorado my whole life and love the outdoors. I have played competitive soccer for over 10 years and I raise, breed, and show livestock. I enjoy skiing (both water and snow), am scuba certified, and love to go backpacking with my family of six. I have maintained a 4.0 GPA (4.32 weighted and top class rank) while doing concurrent enrollment in a local community college to gain some college credits before graduation. I also have had the honor of being team captain for both my high school and club soccer teams. I have been selected as the Overall Grand Champion Showman for poultry, dairy goats, and livestock round robin in 4-H for multiple consecutive years and served as president of the Boedecker Bunch 4-H club.

Education

Colorado Early College Fort Collins

High School
2018 - 2022

Aims Community College

Associate's degree program
2018 - 2022

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Communication, General
    • Marketing
    • Economics
    • Political Science and Government
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Defense & Space

    • Dream career goals:

      Business owner, lawyer, design and communications

    • Delivery Driver

      Domino's Pizza
      2022 – 2022
    • Owner

      Aspen's Legacy Dairy Goats
      2012 – Present12 years
    • Manager

      Splash Pool Services
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Childcare Provider

      Cru19
      2019 – 20201 year
    • Pet and Equine Department

      Jax Outdoor Gear and Ranch
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Lifeguard

      Splash Pool Services
      2019 – Present5 years

    Sports

    Crossfit

    Present

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2008 – Present16 years

    Awards

    • 1st Team All-Conference
    • Team Captain
    • Rose to the Challege Award
    • Player of the Week (x2)

    Arts

    • Drawing
      Present
    • Graphic Art
      Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Group Mission Trips — Home repair
      2016 – 2017
    • Volunteering

      Fellowship of Christian Athletes — Huddle leader/coach
      2018 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Operation Christmas Child — box packing/checking
      2018 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Feed My Starving Children (Slammin' Famine) — packing food for kids all over the world who don't get to eat a meal every day
      2015 – Present

    Future Interests

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Pettable Pet Lovers Scholarship Fund
    Pettable Life Transitions Pet Lovers Scholarship
    Bold Wisdom Scholarship
    "The happiest people in life don't have the best of everything, they just make the best of everything." A handful of people, including myself, have heard this piece of wisdom shared more than once. I would choose to share this simple sentence with the world as it applies to everyone regardless of their social status, race, gender, ethnicity, or cultural identity. The happiest person I know is someone who just barely makes ends meet She is not wealthy by any means, is not entitled, and is not seeking fame. She struggles to find work and take care of the people around her, yet she is the most joyful human being I have had the pleasure of interacting with. The reason for her cheerfulness and optimistic aura is simply due to the fact that she takes nothing for granted; she finds happiness in the littlest successes; she fills the hearts of those around her by making them feel valued and cared about. This woman's outlook on life never fails to surprise and inspire me. It is a perfect example of someone living life to the fullest in the darkest of times. She overflows with happiness, not because of her abundant material possessions, but because she chooses to make the best of circumstance. People all over the world get caught up in materialism and seeking to own the best clothes, have the coolest friends, have the newest technology, etc. Sadly, in doing so, they are missing out on the best parts of life - the memories, the smiles, the true friendships. I want people to live full, joy-filled lives, which can only come from striving to seek out the intangible, unfading things in life.
    Bold Motivation Scholarship
    Ironically, as I write this, I am hooked up to an ice machine with my right knee splinted and bandaged, two nerve blocks in my hip and quad, and a tight sleeve on my opposite leg to prevent blood clots. Yesterday, I underwent my second ACL reconstruction surgery in fourteen months. However, I do not want to focus on the nine months of painfully slow recovery that lie ahead of me, but rather I would like to share about the perseverance and grit that it took me to return to playing the competitive sport I love last time I endured this surgery. In the first scrimmage of my club soccer season after having my spring season canceled due to pandemic lockdowns, I suddenly felt a "pop" in my right knee as I dribbled down the field. I went down immediately. The next day, doctors confirmed a torn ACL, resulting in surgery two weeks later, followed by weeks of crutches and months of physical therapy. Knowing that my junior year of high school soccer was barely within striking distance, I did everything to pass the "return-to-play" evaluation. I passed one month early. Though I felt like a shell of myself on the field until playoffs, I started every game of the season and received the 1st Team All-Conference Award. Few people realize how much of a mental battle it is to go from not being physically able to flex the muscles in your leg to being able to sprint, cut, and play a full-contact sport again. Sitting here devastated, with no hope of a senior soccer season, my resolve is strengthened because I fought through it before and can do so again. This is what motivates me: knowing I have conquered past hardships and am stronger for having gone through them.
    Bold Joy Scholarship
    To me, joy means choosing an attitude of happiness and appreciation regardless of the little mishaps in life. Being happy and being joyful have many similarities on the surface, yet I think the true difference between the two is that being joyful is a decision whereas being happy is an emotion. Happiness may express itself in joy and is often a byproduct of selecting a joyful aura, but joy cannot be a result of the simple, changing feeling of happiness. I believe that joy is deeper, more recollective, and more expressive. Happiness may sit on someone's face due to the circumstances, but the attitude of joy defies the circumstances. Throughout my life, I can say that there have been countless moments of happiness, but much fewer of pure joy, yet the moments of joy last much longer. I have discovered that the path to finding joy is not in seeking out brief, happy experiences, but it is rooted in the relationships that share those experiences. Investing in real, authentic, face-to-face relationships is what sets one up for success. These are the people with whom I share the most laughs, memories, tears, and experiences with; they are the people who have loved me through thick and thin; they have pursued a true relationship with me and continually find time for me. Being around solid people is what allows me to find a sense of joy - joy in the little things. It is much easier to focus on the big picture and to let the small grievances go when I surround myself with others who are likeminded and intentionally choose to be joyful.
    Bold Best Skills Scholarship
    If I were to ask any of my friends or family members what my best skill is, they would nine times out of ten respond with, "You're a creative problem-solver." I think that this skill is best explained by one of my favorite experiences about six years ago. Dressed as the iconic "Rosie the Riveter" character from WWII with my goat, Speckles, adorned in a completely handmade outfit that displayed a salt map of Europe from a topographic perspective and the memorable "We can do it!" war propaganda poster on the opposite side, I walked through the arena and showcased my costume to the judge. Competitive and eager to exceed expectations, I had poured hours of effort and research into this project to insure its accuracy and to demonstrate my creative abilities. Not only did the costume have to be eye-appealing and sturdy, it had to tie in my knowledge of history, mechanics, and geography. I was proud of my work and felt that it truly did exhibit a snapshot of my talent. Thrilled, I was selected as the county fair Goat Costume Contest Champion for the fourth year in a row. Every year, I tried to incorporate something unique into my costume so that I would be memorable long after my interview with the judge - this year, it had been an hydraulic airplane that launched when triggered. My ability to approach this project creatively and originally is what allowed me to do so well. I was even interviewed and featured in the local newspaper shortly after the competition.* Though this is a fun, low-risk example of one of my best skills, it highlights my ability to creatively approach problems in my life as I continue to seek out opportunities to grow, improve, and finetune this skill. * https://www.reporterherald.com/2016/08/04/loveland-family-delves-back-to-wwii-for-county-fair-inspiration/
    Clairo "For Atlanta" Scholarship
    For me, the strength to overcome life's adversities comes from the knowledge of knowing I have conquered past hardships and am stronger for having gone through them. From losing dearly-loved family members to suffering subsequent injuries and ER visits to facing injustice and fighting for my beliefs, my life has not been without heartbreak or trial. Though I am well-aware that people all over the planet have endured a life more testing than mine, I have learned priceless lessons along the way. Ironically, as I write this, I am hooked up to an ice machine with my right knee splinted and bandaged, two nerve blocks in my hip and quad, and a tight sleeve on my opposite leg to prevent blood clots. Yesterday, I underwent my second ACL reconstruction surgery in fourteen months. However, I do not want to focus on the nine months of painfully slow recovery that lie ahead of me, but rather I would like to share about the perseverance and sheer grit that it took me to return to playing the competitive sport I love last time I endured this difficult surgery. August 15th, 2020, in the first scrimmage of my club soccer season after having my spring season canceled due to pandemic lockdowns, I was sprinting down the field to support my team when I suddenly felt a "pop" in my right knee. I went down immediately. The next day, doctors confirmed I had torn my ACL, resulting in surgery two weeks later, followed by weeks of crutches and months of physical therapy. Knowing that my junior year of high school soccer was barely within striking distance, I did everything I could to pass the "return-to-play" test and evaluations. I passed one month early. Though I felt like a shell of myself on the field until playoffs, I started every game of the season and received the 1st Team All-Conference award. Few people realize how much of a mental battle it is to go from not being physically able to flex the muscles in your leg to being able to sprint, cut, and play a full-contact sport again. Sitting here devastated, with no hope of a senior soccer season, my resolve is strengthened in knowing that I fought through it before and can do so again. I know for a fact I will regret it if I choose to stop pursuing my dream of playing soccer after high school because of this injury. I resonate with Clairo's song "Bubble Gum" as it is about regret. I know that if I give up now, I will forever look back on today and wish I had pushed on in the face of loss and grief to overcome this obstacle. Mentally toughening and physically draining, this recovery will have its ups and downs; I know I will want to quit. However, I have learned that the regret of not doing something is greater than my fear of failure, and this is what allows me to conquer the tragedies that life throws at me.
    Bold Know Yourself Scholarship
    Over the course of the past few years of my high school education, I have become more aware of one of my personal strengths. Amid various trials and difficulties, my willingness and drive to stand up for what I believe and to assess situations through a lens of critical thinking has become apparent. The ability to think critically about a vast number of topics, particularly in this day and age, is extremely useful and has set me apart in a number of my classes. Though this skill is still developing, I have found that it tends to thrive in environments that do not align with my core beliefs and fundamental values about this world. In these types of situations, I have discovered an innate desire in myself to defend my views through critical thinking, which often presents itself in the form of playing "devil's advocate" to test my own view. I enjoy the process of thinking outside the box, coming up within original solutions to unoriginal problems, and applying logic and common sense to real world issues.
    Bold Perseverance Scholarship
    Ironically, as I write this, I am hooked up to an ice machine with my right knee splinted and bandaged, two nerve blocks in my hip and quad, and a tight sleeve on my opposite leg to prevent blood clots. Yesterday, I underwent my second ACL reconstruction surgery in fourteen months. However, I do not want to focus on the nine months of painfully slow recovery that lie ahead of me, but rather I would like to share about the perseverance and sheer grit that it took me to return to playing the competitive sport I love last time I endured this difficult surgery. August 15th, 2020, in the first scrimmage of my club soccer season after having my spring season canceled due to pandemic lockdowns, I was sprinting down the field to support my team when I suddenly felt a "pop" in my right knee. I went down immediately. The next day, doctors confirmed I had torn my ACL, resulting in surgery two weeks later, followed by weeks of crutches and months of physical therapy. Knowing that my junior year of high school soccer was barely within striking distance, I did everything I could to pass the "return-to-play" test and evaluations. I passed one month early. Though I felt like a shell of myself on the field until playoffs, I started every game of the season and received the 1st Team All-Conference award. Few people realize how much of a mental battle it is to go from not being physically able to flex the muscles in your leg to being able to sprint, cut, and play a full-contact sport again. Sitting here devastated, with no hope of a senior soccer season, my resolve is strengthened in knowing that I fought through it before and can do so again.
    Bold Joy Scholarship
    To me, joy means choosing an attitude of happiness and appreciation regardless of the little mishaps in life. Being happy and being joyful have many similarities on the surface, yet I think the true difference between the two is that being joyful is a decision whereas being happy is an emotion. Happiness may express itself in joy and is often a byproduct of selecting a joyful aura, but joy cannot be a result of the simple, changing feeling of happiness. I believe that joy is deeper, more recollective, and more expressive. Happiness may sit on someone's face due to the circumstances, but the attitude of joy defies the circumstances. Throughout my life, I can say that there have been countless moments of happiness, but much fewer of pure joy, yet the moments of joy last much longer. I have discovered that the path to finding joy is not in seeking out brief, happy experiences, but it is rooted in the relationships that share those experiences. Investing in real, authentic, face-to-face relationships is what sets one up for success. These are the people with whom I share the most laughs, memories, tears, and experiences with; they are the people who have loved me through thick and thin; they have pursued a true relationship with me and continually find time for me. Being around solid people is what allows me to find a sense of joy - joy in the little things. It is much easier to focus on the big picture and to let the small grievances go when I surround myself with others who are likeminded and intentionally choose to be joyful.
    Bold Best Skills Scholarship
    If I were to ask any of my friends or family members what my best skill is, they would nine times out of ten respond with, "You're a creative problem-solver." I think that this skill is best explained by one of my favorite experiences about six years ago. Dressed as the iconic "Rosie the Riveter" character from WWII with my goat, Speckles, adorned in a completely handmade outfit that displayed a salt map of Europe from a topographic perspective and the memorable "We can do it!" war propaganda poster on the opposite side, I walked through the arena and showcased my costume to the judge. Competitive and eager to exceed expectations, I had poured hours of effort and research into this project to insure its accuracy and to demonstrate my creative abilities. Not only did the costume have to be eye-appealing and sturdy, it had to tie in my knowledge of history, mechanics, and geography. I was proud of my work and felt that it truly did exhibit a snapshot of my talent. Thrilled, I was selected as the county fair Goat Costume Contest Champion for the fourth year in a row. Every year, I tried to incorporate something unique into my costume so that I would be memorable long after my interview with the judge - this year, it had been an hydraulic airplane that launched when triggered. My ability to approach this project creatively and originally is what allowed me to do so well. I was even interviewed and featured in the local newspaper shortly after the competition.* Though this is a fun, low-risk example of one of my best skills, it highlights my ability to creatively approach problems in my life as I continue to seek out opportunities to grow, improve, and finetune this skill. * https://www.reporterherald.com/2016/08/04/loveland-family-delves-back-to-wwii-for-county-fair-inspiration/
    Bold Know Yourself Scholarship
    Over the course of the past few years of my high school education, I have become more aware of one of my personal strengths. Amid various trials and difficulties, my willingness and drive to stand up for what I believe and to assess situations through a lens of critical thinking has become apparent. The ability to think critically about a vast number of topics, particularly in this day and age, is extremely useful and has set me apart in a number of my classes. Though this skill is still developing, I have found that it tends to thrive in environments that do not align with my core beliefs and fundamental values about this world. In these types of situations, I have discovered an innate desire in myself to defend my views through critical thinking, which often presents itself in the form of playing "devil's advocate" to test my own view. I enjoy the process of thinking outside the box, coming up within original solutions to unoriginal problems, and applying logic and common sense to real world issues.
    Pettable Pet Lovers Scholarship
    These pictures are of just a handful of the baby goats I have had the privilege of raising, breeding, and showing over the past decade. I can honestly say that these little creatures have taught me some of the most valuable lessons I have learned, from responsibility and hard work to livestock husbandry and taking joy in the little things. Some of my best memories and experiences have come from being the owner and caretaker of such wonderful animals.
    Bold Perseverance Scholarship
    Ironically, as I write this, I am hooked up to an ice machine with my right knee splinted and bandaged, two nerve blocks in my hip and quad, and a tight sleeve on my opposite leg to prevent blood clots. Yesterday, I underwent my second ACL reconstruction surgery in fourteen months. However, I do not want to focus on the nine months of painfully slow recovery that lie ahead of me, but rather I would like to share about the perseverance and sheer grit that it took me to return to playing the competitive sport I love last time I endured this difficult surgery. August 15th, 2020, in the first scrimmage of my club soccer season after having my spring season canceled due to pandemic lockdowns, I was sprinting down the field to support my team when I suddenly felt a "pop" in my right knee. I went down immediately. The next day, doctors confirmed I had torn my ACL, resulting in surgery two weeks later, followed by weeks of crutches and months of physical therapy. Knowing that my junior year of high school soccer was barely within striking distance, I did everything I could to pass the "return-to-play" test and evaluations. I passed one month early. Though I felt like a shell of myself on the field until playoffs, I started every game of the season and received the 1st Team All-Conference award. Few people realize how much of a mental battle it is to go from not being physically able to flex the muscles in your leg to being able to sprint, cut, and play a full-contact sport again. Sitting here devastated, with no hope of a senior soccer season, my resolve is strengthened in knowing that I fought through it before and can do so again.
    Bold Art Scholarship
    "Fish Wordmark" by Sumesh A. K. is a logo that demonstrates how art can communicate it's message both effectively and creatively. Although this logo design has not yet been popularized, it inspires me in that it shows how an artist can use simple techniques to catch the eye of their audience. I love that this particular design has an element to it that intrigues you to figure out why it is shaped the way it is. Initially, you look at the design and can easily see that it says the word "fish," but you have to look at it for a second longer to see that the extra lines and cut outs form two small, simple fish. The font used is not anything extreme, but the addition of the two fish makes the word come to life and become expressive in a whole new way. This cleverness is something that I find inspiring and this unique technique is something that I strive to achieve in my own graphic works.