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Makeda McFarlane

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Bio

Hey there, thanks for stopping by! My name is Makeda McFarlane and I am originally from Philadelphia, PA and go to school in New Orleans, LA. I am a current rising sophomore at Xavier University of Louisiana. I would describe myself as goal-driven, ambitious, and caring. These are all traits that transfer into my school work. Community service is one of the things I am most passionate about as it is IMPERATIVE to give back to the community. Throughout my freshman year of college I emerged myself into a few of the community outreach programs on campus. My favorite one is called Outreach Day, where we hang out with young kids within the community and teach them about different topics and organize activities for them. Ultimately, I hope to always serve the community and leave a positive impact anywhere I go. I have hopes of becoming an OB/GYN to help bridge the health disparity gap for Black women, while also providing health care to women who do not have access to adequate health care. Outside of my passion for community service, I have a passion for all things music. Music is like therapy to me and I like to sing during my free time. I enjoy performing at talent shows and different places where I can showcase my talent. I believe that I will perform much better in school without the financial stress of how I am going to pay for it. I love the school that I go to and I would really like to graduate from here in a few years. However, I need the help of scholarships to aid me financially so I can can continue at my HBCU. Thank you for your consideration :)

Education

Xavier University of Louisiana

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Biology, General
  • Minors:
    • Chemistry

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      OB/GYN

    • Dream career goals:

      I would like to help close the disparity gap amongst Black women in healthcare one patient at a time. I would like to help service Black and Brown women that do not have access to adequate healthcare

    • I answered incoming calls, signed people in and out, made sure we closed on time, wiped down materials after every shift

      Work Study/Intermurals
      2021 – 20221 year

    Sports

    Lacrosse

    Varsity
    2018 – 20213 years

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Mobilization at XU 2.0 — I helped organize the meeting by planning activities for the children to do every week with my team
      2021 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Yan Scholarship
    Being Jamaican has instilled many positive attributes in my life such as the value of family, culture, hard work, and education. I learned this first hand when I was twelve and my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it became my entrance into healthcare. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dressing her and taking her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. I am grateful for the chance to take care of her because it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. I gained transferable skills and experiences that matured me more rapidly than my peers. My grandmother often stressed the value of education. I hope that this spark of personal growth will continue to equip me to positively impact society, so I can someday teach my children all the important lessons my ancestors taught me. My paternal great-grandmother was a midwife. Although I did not get the chance to meet her, I have had the honor of listening to the stories about her through my father My great-grandmother was a healer and a great member of her community. Though she did not receive a formal education, she successfully maneuvered through her community without the benefit of an education. Not only was she a healer, but she knew how to grow different herbs and plants and used the tools of her community to her advantage. She also understood the importance of unity. Through midwifery, she was able to build a connection with the people of her community. She has shown me the impact that can be made on the community without formal education. By pursuing education, I can make an even bigger impact on my community. Taking care of my grandmother and hearing the stories of my great-grandmother have inspired me to pursue a career in medicine primarily for Black women. In the future, I plan on being an obstetrician-gynecologist to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health by serving those who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. It is imperative to give back to the communities where we come from because it can foster innovation and ambition in future generations. Whenever I am feeling unmotivated or defeated by the rigor of university, I think about my family and the values they've instilled in me. I think about how many people are counting on me and how my ancestors did not have half the opportunity that I have. I have an opportunity to obtain the formal education my ancestors did not receive. As I stride to become a doctor, I am living the life that they could only dream of. I am a manifestation of their wildest dreams, and I intend to make them proud.
    Esteemed Project Scholarship
    For the majority of my childhood, my parents made it their goal to keep me involved in extracurriculars, one of which being Girl Scouts. I thoroughly enjoyed girl scouts for all nine years I was a member. Girl Scouts took me out of my comfort zone, introducing me to new activities and potential career paths. The world of STEM was introduced to me and heavily emphasized throughout my time in Girl Scouts whether we practiced coding, toured hospitals, or participated in engineering workshops. One particular Saturday, my Girl Scout troop was invited to a program called Daughters of the Diaspora (DoD) hosted by a former alumna of the troop, Dr. Joy Cooper an OB/GYN at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was led by black women in different parts of their medical journey from med school students to resident interns, dedicated to helping young black girls learn about their anatomy and sexual education. It was here that I learned the complexity of the vagina, and my horizons were opened. Seeing a black woman who not only came from the same neighborhood as me but who also looked like me from the chocolate skin to the quirky glasses inspired me. Dr. Cooper was and still is a black woman excelling in her career and positively making an impact on her community. Looking back, Dr. Cooper’s influence over my curious mind continues to inspire me as it reminds me of the type of impact I hope to have in medicine and on my community which guides me on my medical journey. I have always been very passionate about helping people, especially those in marginalized groups. I’ve always been vocal about racial injustice and gender inequality in this country by spreading awareness and fighting to inflict change. Shortly after Dr. Cooper sparked medicine sparked my interest, I found myself researching health disparities in medicine. My dreams of becoming a doctor increased after learning many black women in America have disclosed that healthcare professionals have mistreated them by assuming that they are uneducated or unworthy because of their race, no matter what social class they are a part of. Thus, many black women are hesitant when it comes to visiting doctors when needed. This has inspired me to service black and brown women of underprivileged groups. It is important to give back to my community so it can flourish and grow for future generations to come. Around the same time I met Dr. Cooper, my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dress her, feed her and take her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. Taking care of my grandmother has inspired me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health and serve minority women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. I would also like to inspire young black girls in the same way Dr. Cooper and the ladies of the Daughters of Diaspora have for me.
    Christina Taylese Singh Memorial Scholarship
    For the majority of my childhood, my parents made it their goal to keep me involved in extracurriculars, one of which being Girl Scouts. I thoroughly enjoyed girl scouts for all nine years I was a member. Girl Scouts took me out of my comfort zone, introducing me to new activities and potential career paths. The world of STEM was introduced to me and heavily emphasized throughout my time in Girl Scouts whether we practiced coding, toured hospitals, or participated in engineering workshops. One particular Saturday, my Girl Scout troop was invited to a program called Daughters of the Diaspora (DoD) hosted by a former alumna of the troop, Dr. Joy Cooper an OB/GYN at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was led by black women in different parts of their medical journey from med school students to resident interns, dedicated to helping young black girls learn about their anatomy and sexual education. It was here that I learned the complexity of the vagina, and my horizons were opened. Seeing a black woman who not only came from the same neighborhood as me but who also looked like me from the chocolate skin to the quirky glasses inspired me. Dr. Cooper was and still is a black woman excelling in her career and positively making an impact on her community. Looking back, Dr. Cooper’s influence over my curious mind continues to inspire me as it reminds me of the type of impact I hope to have in medicine and on my community which guides me on my medical journey. I have always been very passionate about helping people, especially those in marginalized groups. I’ve always been vocal about racial injustice and gender inequality in this country by spreading awareness and fighting to inflict change. Shortly after Dr. Cooper sparked medicine sparked my interest, I found myself researching health disparities in medicine. My dreams of becoming a doctor increased after learning many black women in America have disclosed that healthcare professionals have mistreated them by assuming that they are uneducated or unworthy because of their race, no matter what social class they are a part of. Thus, many black women are hesitant when it comes to visiting doctors when needed. This has inspired me to service black and brown women of underprivileged groups. It is important to give back to my community so it can flourish and grow for future generations to come. Around the same time I met Dr. Cooper, my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dress her, feed her and take her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. Taking care of my grandmother has inspired me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health and serve minority women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. I would also like to inspire young black girls in the same way Dr. Cooper and the ladies of the Daughters of Diaspora have for me.
    She Rose in Health Scholarship
    For the majority of my childhood, my parents made it their goal to keep me involved in extracurriculars, one of which being Girl Scouts. I thoroughly enjoyed girl scouts for all nine years I was a member. Girl Scouts took me out of my comfort zone, introducing me to new activities and potential career paths. The world of STEM was introduced to me and heavily emphasized throughout my time in Girl Scouts whether we practiced coding, toured hospitals, or participated in engineering workshops. One particular Saturday, my Girl Scout troop was invited to a program called Daughters of the Diaspora (DoD) hosted by a former alumna of the troop, Dr. Joy Cooper an OB/GYN at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was led by black women in different parts of their medical journey from med school students to resident interns, dedicated to helping young black girls learn about their anatomy and sexual education. It was here that I learned the complexity of the vagina, and my horizons were opened. Seeing a black woman who not only came from the same neighborhood as me but who also looked like me from the chocolate skin to the quirky glasses inspired me. Dr. Cooper was and still is a black woman excelling in her career and positively making an impact on her community. Looking back, Dr. Cooper’s influence over my curious mind continues to inspire me as it reminds me of the type of impact I hope to have in medicine and on my community which guides me on my medical journey. I have always been very passionate about helping people, especially those in marginalized groups. I’ve always been vocal about racial injustice and gender inequality in this country by spreading awareness and fighting to inflict change. Shortly after Dr. Cooper sparked medicine sparked my interest, I found myself researching health disparities in medicine. My dreams of becoming a doctor increased after learning many black women in America have disclosed that healthcare professionals have mistreated them by assuming that they are uneducated or unworthy because of their race, no matter what social class they are a part of. Thus, many black women are hesitant when it comes to visiting doctors when needed. This has inspired me to service black and brown women of underprivileged groups. It is important to give back to my community so it can flourish and grow for future generations to come. Around the same time I met Dr. Cooper, my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dress her, feed her and take her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. Taking care of my grandmother has inspired me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health and serve minority women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. I would also like to inspire young black girls in the same way Dr. Cooper and the ladies of the Daughters of Diaspora have for me.
    Jeannine Schroeder Women in Public Service Memorial Scholarship
    For the majority of my childhood, my parents made it their goal to keep me involved in extracurriculars, one of which being Girl Scouts. I thoroughly enjoyed girl scouts for all nine years I was a member. Girl Scouts took me out of my comfort zone, introducing me to new activities and potential career paths. The world of STEM was introduced to me and heavily emphasized throughout my time in Girl Scouts whether we practiced coding, toured hospitals, or participated in engineering workshops. One particular Saturday, my Girl Scout troop was invited to a program called Daughters of the Diaspora (DoD) hosted by a former alumna of the troop, Dr. Joy Cooper an OB/GYN at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was led by black women in different parts of their medical journey from med school students to resident interns, dedicated to helping young black girls learn about their anatomy and sexual education. Seeing a black woman who not only came from the same neighborhood as me but who also looked like me from the chocolate skin to the quirky glasses inspired me. Looking back, Dr. Cooper’s influence over my curious mind continues to inspire me as it reminds me of the type of impact I hope to have in medicine and guides me on my medical journey. I have always been very passionate about helping people, especially those in marginalized groups. I’ve always been vocal about racial injustice and gender inequality in this country by spreading awareness and fighting to inflict change. Shortly after Dr. Cooper sparked medicine sparked my interest, I found myself researching health disparities in medicine. My dreams of becoming a doctor increased after learning many black women in America have disclosed that healthcare professionals have mistreated them by assuming that they are uneducated or unworthy because of their race, no matter what social class they are a part of. Thus, many black women are hesitant when it comes to visiting doctors when needed. This has inspired me to service black and brown women of underprivileged groups. It is important to give back to my community so it can flourish and grow for future generations to come. Around the same time I met Dr. Cooper, my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dress her, feed her and take her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. Through caretaking my grandmother, I gained transferable skills and experiences that matured me more rapidly than my peers. Taking care of my grandmother inspires me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health and serve minority women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. I would also like to inspire young black girls in the same way Dr. Cooper and the ladies of the Daughters of Diaspora have for me.
    She Rose in STEAM Scholarship
    For the majority of my childhood, my parents made it their goal to keep me involved in extracurriculars, one of which being Girl Scouts. I thoroughly enjoyed girl scouts for all nine years I was a member. Girl Scouts took me out of my comfort zone, introducing me to new activities and potential career paths. The world of STEM was introduced to me and heavily emphasized throughout my time in Girl Scouts whether we practiced coding, toured hospitals, or participated in engineering workshops. One particular Saturday, my Girl Scout troop was invited to a program called Daughters of the Diaspora (DoD) hosted by a former alumna of the troop, Dr. Joy Cooper an OB/GYN at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was led by black women in different parts of their medical journey from med school students to resident interns, dedicated to helping young black girls learn about their anatomy and sexual education. It was here that I learned the complexity of the vagina, and my horizons were opened. Seeing a black woman who not only came from the same neighborhood as me but who also looked like me from the chocolate skin to the quirky glasses inspired me. Dr. Cooper was and still is a black woman excelling in her career and positively making an impact on her community. Looking back, Dr. Cooper’s influence over my curious mind continues to inspire me as it reminds me of the type of impact I hope to have in medicine and on my community which guides me on my medical journey. I have always been very passionate about helping people, especially those in marginalized groups. I’ve always been vocal about racial injustice and gender inequality in this country by spreading awareness and fighting to inflict change. Shortly after Dr. Cooper sparked medicine sparked my interest, I found myself researching health disparities in medicine. My dreams of becoming a doctor increased after learning many black women in America have disclosed that healthcare professionals have mistreated them by assuming that they are uneducated or unworthy because of their race, no matter what social class they are a part of. Thus, many black women are hesitant when it comes to visiting doctors when needed. This has inspired me to service black and brown women of underprivileged groups. It is important to give back to my community so it can flourish and grow for future generations to come. Around the same time I met Dr. Cooper, my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as dress her, feed her and take her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. Taking care of my grandmother has inspired me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health and serve minority women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. I would also like to inspire young black girls in the same way Dr. Cooper and the ladies of the Daughters of Diaspora have for me.
    Rho Brooks Women in STEM Scholarship
    Growing up, my family instilled many positive attributes in my life such as the value of family, culture, hard work, and education. I learned this first hand when I was twelve and my maternal grandmother moved from Florida to our home in Philadelphia. I assumed the role of her caretaker and it quickly became my entrance into health care. Taking care of my grandmother was an arduous adjustment as it required me to do a multitude of tasks I had never done before such as feeding her and taking her to the bathroom as she had vascular dementia. It was a big responsibility that required a lot of me; I am grateful for the chance to take care of her as it allowed us to grow closer and my appreciation for my elders grew. My grandmother often stressed the value of education, especially because she was a nurse. She understood the doors that could open if one received an education and made sure that I did as well. My continued care for her still teaches me valuable life skills that will follow and guide me through my college and professional career. On August 16th, 2021, my grandmother passed away. Since her death, I have made it my mission to make her proud by continuing my education and achieve my dreams of becoming an OB/GYN. It is my hope that this spark of personal growth will continue to equip me to positively impact society, so I can someday teach my children all the important lessons my ancestors taught me. My paternal great-grandmother was a midwife. Although I did not get the chance to meet her, I've had the honor of listening to the stories about her through my grandfather. A Jamaica native, my great-grandmother was a healer and a great member of her community. Though she did not receive a formal education, she was educated in other walks of life. Not only was she a healer, but she knew how to grow different herbs and used the tools of her community to her advantage. She managed to help heal many women within her community. I intend to help my community the same way. My great grandmother has given me the blueprint in aiding my community. She has shown me not only that it can be done, but dreams can be accomplished even with limited resources. Taking care of my grandmother and hearing the stories of my great grandmother have inspired me to pursue a career in medicine with a focus on black women and health inequities. In the future, I plan on being an OB/GYN to help close disparity gaps for Black women in health. In the future I would like to serve black and brown women who do not have access to adequate healthcare within their communities. The world needs Black women doctors now more than ever, especially when the government tries to tell women what to do with their bodies and Black women have the highest mortality rate during childbirth. Whenever I am feeling unmotivated or defeated by the rigor of university, I think about my family and the values they've instilled in me. I think about how many people are counting on me and how my ancestors did not have half the opportunity that I have. I have an opportunity to obtain the formal education my ancestors did not receive. As I stride to become a doctor, I am living the life that they could only dream of. I am a manifestation of their wildest dreams, and I intend to make them proud.