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Madison Huckleberry

945

Bold Points

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Finalist

Bio

Hard working, highly self motivated, bilingual student who attends Cherokee Bluff high school. I plan to major in Biology on a pre med track and ultimately I want to pursue a career in medicine and become a physician . Two of my passions are service and travel. I hope to combine these with my dreams and passions and participate in programs like Doctors Without Borders

Education

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2028
  • Majors:
    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
  • Minors:
    • Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other

Cherokee Bluff High School

High School
2020 - 2024
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
    • Biology, General
    • Health/Medical Preparatory Programs
    • Human Biology
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Becoming a physician

    • Cashier

      Margaritaville at Lake Lanier island
      2024 – Present7 months
    • Intern

      Northeast Georgia Medical Center
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Server

      Cracker Barrel
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    Football

    Varsity
    2020 – 20233 years

    Awards

    • Football team manager letter

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      The Sandwich project — Volunteer
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Operation Christmas Child — Volunteer
      2020 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Samaritans feet — Volunteer
      2023 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Legacy — I helped organize i party for the families in my community with childhood cancer
      2020 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Young black leadership alliance — I was a volunteer and served the people
      2023 – 2023

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Janean D. Watkins Aspiring Healthcare Professionals Scholarship
    For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a doctor and when people would ask me why I would always say because I want to help people. While this answer is the truth it always felt very surface level, I felt like I was missing a deeper more personal reason for why I wanted to help people. I finally found my deeper reason, the summer going into my senior year. This summer I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. The trip was sponsored by the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA) in partnership with the non-profit organization, Samaritan’s Feet. During our trip to Belize, I was able to serve in a multitude of different ways. I painted a church, built a computer lab, provided food to the homeless, and in conjunction with Habitat for Humanity, we were able to help build a house for a family in need. Of all the things we did, the most impactful was being able to wash feet in a small community called Majestic Alley. There I got to hear so many different stories about people’s lives, including their struggles and triumphs. There was one story in particular that helped me find my deeper meaning Her name was Maria, and she was initially reluctant to wash her feet. She said l she only needed a pair of shoes for her and her daughter. We soon convinced her to sit down and participate in the feet washing. As I washed Maria’s feet, I asked her about her daughter. She told me that she was sick and could not make it. I went on to ask her what was wrong and with tears in her eyes, she shared that she does not know. They had been waiting to get a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately had not been able to get access. At that moment I felt useless; there was nothing I could do to help and I felt horrible. All I could do was tell her how sorry I was and how I hoped her daughter would get the care she needed, and pray for her and her daughter. When we got back to the hotel I decided to research the healthcare system in Belize. I learned that healthcare in Belize was free but most of the funding went to hospitals in the main city. It could take weeks, if not months, to get a doctor's appointment. Even when they finally see a doctor, it can take another few weeks to get test results and a proper plan of treatment. Learning all of this sparked something in me. I went on to do more research about the healthcare systems in different underdeveloped countries. I found that there was a huge need for doctors and that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to serve those in need, who otherwise would have no access to healthcare. With this new knowledge and experience, I finally found my deeper reasoning. I want to be a doctor to help people not because that is what doctors do but because I am truly passionate about it. I want to do everything I can to make sure there are a lot less Maria’s out there in the world. That feeling of helplessness was life-changing and solidified my plans to pursue a pre-med track in college. I know I can make a difference through giving and volunteering my time.
    Julie Adams Memorial Scholarship – Women in STEM
    Passion; is a strong and intractable or barely controllable emotion or inclination with respect to a particular person or thing. What am I passionate about? A question that I have asked myself many times over the years, and until this summer I have never really had a true answer. This summer I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. The trip was sponsored by the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA) in partnership with the non-profit organization, Samaritan’s Feet. During our trip to Belize, I was able to serve in a multitude of different ways. I painted a church, built a computer lab, provided food to the homeless, and in conjunction with Habitat for Humanity, we were able to help build a house for a family in need. Of all the things we did, the most impactful was being able to wash our feet. To be honest, I was actually nervous about washing my feet. I was not anxious about the act itself, but mainly because I had to have personal conversations with the Belizean people. On the first day, I got lucky. We went to wash feet at a school with young children, and it was not so hard to talk to them. I asked about their favorite colors and subjects at school. The next day we went to a small community called Majestic Alley. In this community, there were people of all different ages and to say I was nervous was an understatement. I did not know what to expect, but this ended up being one of the best days of the trip. I got to hear so many different stories about people’s lives, including their struggles and triumphs. There was one story in particular that gave me the answer to my question regarding passion. Her name was Maria, and at first, she was reluctant to get her feet washed. She said that all she needed was a pair of shoes for her and her daughter. We soon convinced her to come sit down and participate in the feet washing. As I washed Maria’s feet, I asked her about her daughter. She told me that she was sick and could not make it. I went on to ask her what was wrong and she shared that she does not know. They had been waiting to get a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately had not been able to get access. I told her how sorry I was and how I hoped her daughter would get the care she needed, and then I prayed for her. When we got back to the hotel I decided to research the healthcare system in Belize. I learned that healthcare in Belize was free but most of the funding went to hospitals in the main city. It could take weeks, if not months, to get a doctor's appointment. Even when they finally see a doctor, it can take another few weeks to get test results and a proper plan of treatment. Learning all of this sparked something in me. I went on to do more research about the healthcare systems in different underdeveloped countries. I found that there was a huge need for doctors and that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to serve those in need, who otherwise would have no access to healthcare. With this new knowledge and experience I finally had the answer to my question, what am I passionate about? I am passionate about service. It was so fulfilling to serve and support the communities in Belize. I wanted to do more, figuring out a way to get Maria’s daughter, and those like her, the care they needed. Combining my newfound passion and dreams of becoming a physician to serve those in need, has solidified my plans to pursue a pre-med track in college. I know can make a difference through giving, and volunteering my time.
    Jiang Amel STEM Scholarship
    Colleen Hoover once said, “I’ve noticed when I fear something, if I just end up doing it, I’m grateful in the end.” My biggest fear is talking to new people. I am not sure what I’m so afraid of; maybe I’ll embarrass myself or say the wrong thing. This past July, I realized how wonderful it can be to meet and talk to people and how important it is to overcome your fears. This summer, I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. One of our service projects was washing feet. I was so nervous about this; not about the act itself, but because I was going to have personal conversations with the Belizean people. On the first day, I got lucky. We went to wash feet at a school with young children, and there was so much laughter from the kids around us and us tickling them that there wasn’t much room for conversation. The next day, we went to a small community called Majestic Alley. In this community, there were people of all different ages, and to say I was nervous was an understatement. This ended up being one of the best days of the trip. There was one person in particular I spoke to who really showed me the beauty of overcoming my fears and meeting new people. I had just finished washing a young girl's feet and looked up to see who my next person would be. Her name was Maria, and at first, she was reluctant to get her feet washed. She said all she needed was shoes for her and her daughter. They soon convinced her to sit down. I looked around and saw that I was the only one available, so they sent her my way. Panic began to set in, my heart beating so rapidly; I swear those around me could hear it. As she made her way, it felt like everything was going in slow motion. When she finally reached me and sat down, I said hello, introduced myself, and she did the same. I asked for her foot and began washing. Silence filled the air; I began to feel suffocated. As I finished her first foot, I knew this silence could not continue. I put her foot down, and she gave me the other. I took deep breaths to keep my voice from shaking and told her that I heard her talking about her daughter and wanted to know where she was. She told me that she was sick and couldn’t make it. I asked her what was wrong, and she shared she didn’t know. They had been waiting for a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately hadn’t been able to get access. She told me about how unsure she was about everything, and as she spoke, tears began to form in her eyes, which caused the same to happen to me. All I could say was I was sorry and hoped her daughter gets the care she needs. When I got back to the hotel, I decided to research Belize’s healthcare system, and what I found was heartbreaking. I also found that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to help people in these places get the lifesaving care they need. With this new knowledge and experience, I felt a spark light up in me. I wanted to do more to help people like Maria’s daughter get the care they need. Had I just sat there and not spoken to Maria, I would not have learned about these programs to help thousands of people.
    Etherine Tansimore Scholarship
    I am a hardworking and highly self-motivated student who hopes to major in Biology or Biomedical Engineering. For as long as I can remember, I have dreamed of becoming a doctor. I want to be a doctor someday because I have a true passion for helping others and would love to do so through medicine. For a while, I was not exactly sure what field I wanted to go into, until my healthcare teacher brought an Anesthesiologist in to speak with us. Hearing all that they do and how they get to see and help with a variety of different cases piqued my interest. This year, I have also had the opportunity to learn more about OBGYN and am interested in this field as well. I understand the amount of time and commitment it takes to become a physician, and I have already begun to set a good foundation for achieving my goal. Throughout middle school and high school, I have challenged myself by taking rigorous classes, including nine AP classes in addition to my honors classes. I am also involved in many extracurricular activities that support my career goal. I am an active member of my school's HOSA club, which is an organization for students that plan to pursue a career in medicine. Another activity is the Honor’s Mentorship program, which has provided the amazing opportunity for me to shadow physicians and nurses in both the clinic and hospital settings. Over the past two years, I have gained real-life hands-on experience in the Emergency Department and within an OBGYN office. I have also had the opportunity to observe physicians in the operating room and gain a better understanding of the work that goes into providing high-quality health care to patients. I plan to continue gaining as much real-world experience as I can in college to help further prepare me for my career. I also plan to be involved in extracurricular activities during college to help build up my network and help my community. Once I become a doctor, I want to participate in organizations like Doctors Without Borders and become a healthcare advocate for underserved communities. I have a true passion for service, and when I learned about programs like Doctors Without Borders, I saw a way to combine my career aspirations and my passion. I want to be able to help those in need by using my talents and expertise. Both OBGYNs and Anesthesiologists are needed around the world in underserved communities, and I would love to help wherever and whenever I am needed.
    “I Matter” Scholarship
    This summer I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. The trip was sponsored by the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA) in partnership with the non-profit organization, Samaritan’s Feet. During our trip to Belize, I was able to serve in a multitude of different ways. I painted a church, built a computer lab, provided food to the homeless, and in conjunction with Habitat for Humanity, we were able to help build a house for a family in need. Of all the things we did, the most impactful was being able to wash our feet. To be honest, I was actually nervous about washing my feet. I was not anxious about the act itself, but mainly because I had to have personal conversations with the Belizean people. On the first day, I got lucky. We went to wash feet at a school with young children, and it was not so hard to talk to them. I asked about their favorite colors and subjects at school. The next day we went to a small community called Majestic Alley. In this community, there were people of all different ages and to say I was nervous was an understatement. I did not know what to expect, but this ended up being one of the best days of the trip. I got to hear so many different stories about people’s lives, including their struggles and triumphs. There was one story in particular that showed me how rewarding serving others is. Her name was Maria, at first, she was reluctant to get her feet washed. She said that all she needed was a pair of shoes for her and her daughter. We soon convinced her to come sit down and participate in the feet washing. As I washed Maria’s feet, I asked her about her daughter. She told me that she was sick and could not make it. I went on to ask her what was wrong and she shared that she does not know. They had been waiting to get a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately had not been able to get access. I told her how sorry I was and how I hoped her daughter would get the care she needed, and then I prayed for her. When we got back to the hotel I decided to research the healthcare system in Belize. I learned that healthcare in Belize was free but most of the funding went to hospitals in the main city. It could take weeks, if not months, to get a doctor's appointment. Even when they finally see a doctor, it can take another few weeks to get test results and a proper plan of treatment. Learning all of this sparked something in me. I went on to do more research about the healthcare systems in different underdeveloped countries. I found that there was a huge need for doctors and that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to serve those in need, who otherwise would have no access to healthcare. With this new knowledge and experience I finally had the answer to my question, what am I passionate about? I am passionate about service. It was so fulfilling to serve and support the communities in Belize. I wanted to do more, figuring out a way to get Maria’s daughter, and those like her, the care they needed. Combining my newfound passion and dreams of becoming a physician to serve those in need, has solidified my plans to pursue a pre-med track in college. I know can make a difference through giving, and volunteering my time.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I am a hardworking and highly self-motivated student who hopes to major in Biology or Biomedical Engineering. For as long as I can remember, I have dreamed of becoming a doctor. I want to be a doctor someday because I have a true passion for helping others and would love to do so through medicine. For a while, I was not exactly sure what field I wanted to go into, until my healthcare teacher brought an Anesthesiologist in to speak with us. Hearing all that they do and how they get to see and help with a variety of different cases piqued my interest. This year, I have also had the opportunity to learn more about OBGYN and am interested in this field as well. I understand the amount of time and commitment it takes to become a physician, and I have already begun to set a good foundation for achieving my goal. Throughout middle school and high school, I have challenged myself by taking rigorous classes, including nine AP classes in addition to my honors classes. I am also involved in many extracurricular activities that support my career goal. I am an active member of my school's HOSA club, which is an organization for students that plan to pursue a career in medicine. Another activity is the Honor’s Mentorship program, which has provided the amazing opportunity for me to shadow physicians and nurses in both the clinic and hospital settings. Over the past two years, I have gained real-life hands-on experience in the Emergency Department and within an OBGYN office. I have also had the opportunity to observe physicians in the operating room and gain a better understanding of the work that goes into providing high-quality health care to patients. I plan to continue gaining as much real-world experience as I can in college to help further prepare me for my career. I also plan to be involved in extracurricular activities during college to help build up my network and help my community. Once I become a doctor, I want to participate in organizations like Doctors Without Borders and become a healthcare advocate for underserved communities. I have a true passion for service, and when I learned about programs like Doctors Without Borders, I saw a way to combine my career aspirations and my passion. I want to be able to help those in need by using my talents and expertise. Both OBGYNs and Anesthesiologists are needed around the world in underserved communities, and I would love to help wherever and whenever I am needed.
    Women in Healthcare Scholarship
    For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a doctor and when people would ask me why I would always say because I want to help people. While this answer is the truth it always felt very surface level, I felt like I was missing a deeper more personal reason for why I wanted to help people. I finally found my deeper reason, the summer going into my senior year. This summer I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. The trip was sponsored by the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA) in partnership with the non-profit organization, Samaritan’s Feet. During our trip to Belize, I was able to serve in a multitude of different ways. I painted a church, built a computer lab, provided food to the homeless, and in conjunction with Habitat for Humanity, we were able to help build a house for a family in need. Of all the things we did, the most impactful was being able to wash feet in a small community called Majestic Alley. There I got to hear so many different stories about people’s lives, including their struggles and triumphs. There was one story in particular that helped me find my deeper meaning Her name was Maria, and she was initially reluctant to wash her feet. She said l she only needed a pair of shoes for her and her daughter. We soon convinced her to sit down and participate in the feet washing. As I washed Maria’s feet, I asked her about her daughter. She told me that she was sick and could not make it. I went on to ask her what was wrong and with tears in her eyes, she shared that she does not know. They had been waiting to get a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately had not been able to get access. At that moment I felt useless; there was nothing I could do to help and I felt horrible. All I could do was tell her how sorry I was and how I hoped her daughter would get the care she needed, and pray for her and her daughter. When we got back to the hotel I decided to research the healthcare system in Belize. I learned that healthcare in Belize was free but most of the funding went to hospitals in the main city. It could take weeks, if not months, to get a doctor's appointment. Even when they finally see a doctor, it can take another few weeks to get test results and a proper plan of treatment. Learning all of this sparked something in me. I went on to do more research about the healthcare systems in different underdeveloped countries. I found that there was a huge need for doctors and that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to serve those in need, who otherwise would have no access to healthcare. With this new knowledge and experience, I finally found my deeper reasoning. I want to be a doctor to help people not because that is what doctors do but because I am truly passionate about it. I want to do everything I can to make sure there are a lot less Maria’s out there in the world. That feeling of helplessness was life-changing and solidified my plans to pursue a pre-med track in college. I know I can make a difference through giving and volunteering my time.
    Sloane Stephens Doc & Glo Scholarship
    Colleen Hoover once said, “I’ve noticed when I fear something, if I just end up doing it, I’m grateful in the end.” My biggest fear is talking to new people. I am not sure what I’m so afraid of; maybe I’ll embarrass myself or say the wrong thing. This past July, I realized how wonderful it can be to meet and talk to people and how important it is to overcome your fears. This summer, I had the opportunity to participate in a service abroad trip to Belize. One of our service projects was washing feet. I was so nervous about this; not about the act itself, but because I was going to have personal conversations with the Belizean people. On the first day, I got lucky. We went to wash feet at a school with young children, and there was so much laughter from the kids around us and us tickling them that there wasn’t much room for conversation. The next day, we went to a small community called Majestic Alley. In this community, there were people of all different ages, and to say I was nervous was an understatement. This ended up being one of the best days of the trip. There was one person in particular I spoke to who really showed me the beauty of overcoming my fears and meeting new people. I had just finished washing a young girl's feet and looked up to see who my next person would be. Her name was Maria, and at first, she was reluctant to get her feet washed. She said all she needed was shoes for her and her daughter. They soon convinced her to sit down. I looked around and saw that I was the only one available, so they sent her my way. Panic began to set in, my heart beating so rapidly; I swear those around me could hear it. As she made her way, it felt like everything was going in slow motion. When she finally reached me and sat down, I said hello, introduced myself, and she did the same. I asked for her foot and began washing. Silence filled the air; I began to feel suffocated. As I finished her first foot, I knew this silence could not continue. I put her foot down, and she gave me the other. I took deep breaths to keep my voice from shaking and told her that I heard her talking about her daughter and wanted to know where she was. She told me that she was sick and couldn’t make it. I asked her what was wrong, and she shared she didn’t know. They had been waiting for a doctor's appointment for weeks, but unfortunately hadn’t been able to get access. She told me about how unsure she was about everything, and as she spoke, tears began to form in her eyes, which caused the same to happen to me. All I could say was I was sorry and hoped her daughter gets the care she needs. When I got back to the hotel, I decided to research Belize’s healthcare system, and what I found was heartbreaking. I also found that there were programs where doctors could volunteer to help people in these places get the lifesaving care they need. With this new knowledge and experience, I felt a spark light up in me. I wanted to do more to help people like Maria’s daughter get the care they need. Had I just sat there and not spoken to Maria, I would not have learned about these programs to help thousands of people.
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    I am an Ambassador for the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA), a youth leadership organization that empowers young black teens to become the next great leaders of the world by providing college and career guidance, public speaking training, international community service activities and national opportunities for networking. This summer, YBLA in partnership with the nonprofit organization Samaritans Feet ,provided me the opportunity to go on a service abroad trip to Belize. On this trip we distributed shoes to the homeless, painted a church, and gave bags of food to families in need. We also worked with Habitat for Humanity to build a house for a family displaced by a hurricane. Many of the people that I served were around my age and being able to listen to their stories, their hopes and dreams and see how happy they were no matter their circumstances was truly meaningful and impactful. One girl I met during my time there, while I was distributing shoes and washing feet, was a 19 year old named Yuri. During my time with Yuri I learned that she was in school and had dreams of becoming a doctor just like me. I also learned that while working to pay for school, she is the oldest of 5 and helps her mom to take care of her younger siblings. Hearing her story really caused me to shift my values and views on life. I far too often take the opportunities that I have so easily available to me for granted. There are so many people out there like Yuri who don’t have as much as I do and have to work three times harder to achieve their hopes and dreams. She helped me see that you don’t need to have all these resources and opportunities available to you to accomplish your goals and that you shouldn’t take it all for granted. I now try not to use all that I have access to as an excuse to not work as hard, but as something that is an addition to my own hard work. I want my hard work and drive and passion to be what gets me to where I want to go. When people meet me I want them to know that I got to where I am not because I had these things available to me, but because I worked hard for it and everything else just helped add to my hard work.
    Curry & C/O ‘22 Scholarship
    I am an Ambassador for the Young Black Leadership Alliance (YBLA), a youth leadership organization that empowers young black teens to become the next great leaders of the world by providing college and career guidance, public speaking training, international community service activities and national opportunities for networking. This summer, YBLA in partnership with the nonprofit organization Samaritans Feet ,provided me the opportunity to go on a service abroad trip to Belize. On this trip we distributed shoes to the homeless, painted a church, and gave bags of food to families in need. We also worked with Habitat for Humanity to build a house for a family displaced by a hurricane. Many of the people that I served were around my age and being able to listen to their stories, their hopes and dreams and see how happy they were no matter their circumstances was truly meaningful and impactful. One girl I met during my time there, while I was distributing shoes and washing feet, was a 19 year old named Yuri. During my time with Yuri I learned that she was in school and had dreams of becoming a doctor just like me. I also learned that while working to pay for school, she is the oldest of 5 and helps her mom to take care of her younger siblings. Hearing her story really caused me to shift my values and views on life. I far too often take the opportunities that I have so easily available to me for granted. There are so many people out there like Yuri who don’t have as much as I do and have to work three times harder to achieve their hopes and dreams. She helped me see that you don’t need to have all these resources and opportunities available to you to accomplish your goals and that you shouldn’t take it all for granted. I now try not to use all that I have access to as an excuse to not work as hard, but as something that is an addition to my own hard work. I want my hard work and drive and passion to be what gets me to where I want to go. When people meet me I want them to know that I got to where I am not because I had these things available to me, but because I worked hard for it and everything else just helped add to my hard work.