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Madison Bentley

1325

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

Hello! I’m currently in the process of completing a full career change. Pre-COVID-19 I was working in corporate retail, and I was miserable. Once I was laid off during the lockdown, I decided it was the perfect time to do something different, something that could make a difference. I’m enrolled in an associates of nursing program with plans to purse an APRN in Nurse Midwifery. I am deeply passionate about women’s health and human rights, so I found that this new path both allows me to help other women, and provides a sense of satisfaction and wholeness. I’m the sole income provider for my household, and I work full time as a phlebotomist. I have had my fair share of struggles and hardship in my life, but I refuse to give up on my dream. Anyone who knows me personally will gladly tell you that I work hard to build a better path for myself and others.

Education

North Central State College

Associate's degree program
2022 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

Ohio University-Main Campus

Bachelor's degree program
2010 - 2015
  • Majors:
    • Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs, Other
  • Minors:
    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

    • Phlebotomist Tech II

      American Red Cross
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    Swimming

    Varsity
    2006 – 20104 years

    Awards

    • State Champions

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Ohio Reformatory for Women — Patient Care Assistant
      2018 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Narcotics Anonymous — Volunteer
      2016 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Mental Health Matters Scholarship
    Hi, I’m Maddie and I’m an addict. I’ve been working a 12-step program of recovery for the past six years. I’ve discovered so much about myself during my time in recovery, including qualities in myself that I never realized I had. I take great pride in my compassion for others and my passion for service. Life with the disease of addiction is not easy. I have to wake up and choose to fight back every single day. My resilience is my armor, and though I’ve been pushed back, knocked down, and sucker punched a few times, I have always found a way to find my way through. I have lost so many friends to jails, institution’s, and death in my lifetime. Recovery is the hardest thing and the best thing I have ever done for myself. Being in recovery comes with its own set of difficulties and learning experiences. Once the fog had lifted and my mind was finally clear, I had to learn how to be myself, authentically myself, regardless of my past. I had to relearn the simplest things like paying bills, having a conversation, keeping my space clean, and keeping myself healthy. I had to learn how to do all of these things without the mind or mood altering substances that had ruled my life for nearly a decade. Choosing a new way of life is painful, sometimes agonizing, but all of the challenges I have faced pushed me to become the woman I am today. For that I am grateful, I am proud of myself for choosing life over self destruction. I firmly believe that love, connection, and understanding are the cure for this epidemic that claims more than 100,000 lives each year. I could never have gotten to where I am today without those three things, from myself and others. Presently, I volunteer at the Ohio Reformatory for Women in their inmate nursery unit. A vast majority of women incarcerated there are addicts caught in a web of domestic violence, of abuse, and substance use disorder. The women who impact me the most are those who are discovering that they can finally be free from the abuse of their past partners and can choose to become the mother they often never had. Today I am chasing my dream of becoming a Nurse Midwife. Without the women in my life I would never have made it to where I am right now. So many of them had to navigate a broken system when it comes to parenthood and recovery. I want to work with mothers struggling with addiction, and infants born into this disease. I want to create a safe and loving space to treat these patients with dignity and respect, instead of the shame that society heaps onto our community. I believe that an addict, any addict, can recover and find a new way of life. The stigma surrounding addiction keeps people sick, keeps them from seeking recovery. I want to work with the women who are still caught in the cycle of suffering and help them to see that life free from this disease is possible. I want to offer the same compassion, understanding, and strength to the women who are fighting for their lives in recovery. We do recover, but we can’t do it alone. We need each other to find our light in the darkness. The solution to addiction is human connection, and what better way to do so than to care for those suffering the most.
    Wieland Nurse Appreciation Scholarship
    Hi, I’m Maddie and I’m an addict. I’ve been working a 12-step program of recovery for the past six years. I’ve discovered so much about myself during my time in recovery, including qualities in myself that I never realized I had. I take great pride in my compassion for others and my passion for service. Life with the disease of addiction is not easy. I have to wake up and choose to fight back every single day. My resilience is my armor, and though I’ve been pushed back, knocked down, and sucker punched a few times, I have always found a way to find my way through. I have lost so many friends to jails, institution’s, and death in my lifetime. Recovery is the hardest thing and the best thing I have ever done for myself. Being in recovery comes with its own set of difficulties and learning experiences. Once the fog had lifted and my mind was finally clear, I had to learn how to be myself, authentically myself, regardless of my past. I had to relearn the simplest things like paying bills, having a conversation, keeping my space clean, and keeping myself healthy. I had to learn how to do all of these things without the mind or mood altering substances that had ruled my life for nearly a decade. Choosing a new way of life is painful, sometimes agonizing, but all of the challenges I have faced pushed me to become the woman I am today. For that I am grateful, I am proud of myself for choosing life over self destruction. I firmly believe that love, connection, and understanding are the cure for this epidemic that claims more than 100,000 lives each year. I could never have gotten to where I am today without those three things, from myself and others. Presently, I volunteer at the Ohio Reformatory for Women in their inmate nursery unit. A vast majority of women incarcerated there are addicts caught in a web of domestic violence, of abuse, and substance use disorder. The women who impact me the most are those who are discovering that they can finally be free from the abuse of their past partners and can choose to become the mother they often never had. Today I am chasing my dream of becoming a Nurse Midwife. Without the women in my life I would never have made it to where I am right now. So many of them had to navigate a broken system when it comes to parenthood and recovery. I want to work with mothers struggling with addiction, and infants born into this disease. I want to create a safe and loving space to treat these patients with dignity and respect, instead of the shame that society heaps onto our community. I believe that an addict, any addict, can recover and find a new way of life. The stigma surrounding addiction keeps people sick, keeps them from seeking recovery. I want to work with the women who are still caught in the cycle of suffering and help them to see that life free from this disease is possible. I want to offer the same compassion, understanding, and strength to the women who are fighting for their lives in recovery. We do recover, but we can’t do it alone. We need each other to find our light in the darkness. The solution to addiction is human connection, and what better way to do so than to care for those suffering the most.
    Cindy J. Visser Memorial Nursing Scholarship
    Hi, I’m Maddie and I’m an addict. I’ve been working a 12-step program of recovery for the past six years. I’ve discovered so much about myself during my time in recovery, including qualities in myself that I never realized I had. I take great pride in my compassion for others and my passion for service. Life with the disease of addiction is not easy. I have to wake up and choose to fight back every single day. My resilience is my armor, and though I’ve been pushed back, knocked down, and sucker punched a few times, I have always found a way to find my way through. I have lost so many friends to jails, institution’s, and death in my lifetime. Recovery is the hardest thing and the best thing I have ever done for myself. Being in recovery comes with its own set of difficulties and learning experiences. Once the fog had lifted and my mind was finally clear, I had to learn how to be myself, authentically myself, regardless of my past. I had to relearn the simplest things like paying bills, having a conversation, keeping my space clean, and keeping myself healthy. I had to learn how to do all of these things without the mind or mood altering substances that had ruled my life for nearly a decade. Choosing a new way of life is painful, sometimes agonizing, but all of the challenges I have faced pushed me to become the woman I am today. For that I am grateful, I am proud of myself for choosing life over self destruction. I firmly believe that love, connection, and understanding are the cure for this epidemic that claims more than 100,000 lives each year. I could never have gotten to where I am today without those three things, from myself and others. Presently, I volunteer at the Ohio Reformatory for Women in their inmate nursery unit. A vast majority of women incarcerated there are addicts caught in a web of domestic violence, of abuse, and substance use disorder. The women who impact me the most are those who are discovering that they can finally be free from the abuse of their past partners and can choose to become the mother they often never had. Today I am chasing my dream of becoming a Nurse Midwife. Without the women in my life I would never have made it to where I am right now. So many of them had to navigate a broken system when it comes to parenthood and recovery. I want to work with mothers struggling with addiction, and infants born into this disease. I want to create a safe and loving space to treat these patients with dignity and respect, instead of the shame that society heaps onto our community. I believe that an addict, any addict, can recover and find a new way of life. The stigma surrounding addiction keeps people sick, keeps them from seeking recovery. I want to work with the women who are still caught in the cycle of suffering and help them to see that life free from this disease is possible. I want to offer the same compassion, understanding, and strength to the women who are fighting for their lives in recovery. We do recover, but we can’t do it alone. We need each other to find our light in the darkness. The solution to addiction is human connection, and what better way to do so than to care for those suffering the most.
    Sloane Stephens Doc & Glo Scholarship
    Hi, I’m Maddie and I’m an addict. I’ve been working a 12-step program of recovery for the past six years. I’ve discovered so much about myself during my time in recovery, including qualities in myself that I never realized I had. One of these that I take pride in is my resilience. Life with the disease of addiction is not easy. I have to wake up and choose to fight back every single day. My resilience is my armor, and though I’ve been pushed back, knocked down, and sucker punched a few times, I have always found a way to find my way through. I have lost so many friends to jails, institution’s, and death in my lifetime. Recovery is the hardest thing and the best thing I have ever done for myself. Being in recovery comes with its own set of difficulties and learning experiences. Once the fog had lifted and my mind was finally clear, I had to learn how to be myself, authentically myself, regardless of my past. I had to relearn the simplest things like paying bills, having a conversation, keeping my space clean, and keeping myself healthy. I had to learn how to do all of these things without the mind or mood altering substances that had ruled my life for nearly a decade. Choosing a new way of life is painful, sometimes agonizing, but all of the challenges I have faced pushed me to become the woman I am today. For that I am grateful, I am proud of myself for choosing life over self destruction. I certainly haven’t had the easiest life so far, but I wouldn’t go back and change anything. I have never been happier or more loving with myself than I am now. The journey to self-love has never been smooth or simple, it requires consistent and constant effort on my part. I firmly believe that love, connection, and understanding are the cure for this epidemic that claims more than 100,000 lives each year. I could never have gotten to where I am today without those three things, from myself and others. The connectedness is what gives me strength to pick myself up and keep trying after every setback, every misstep, and every failure. Because I have seen those who came before me find their way through this crazy world with serenity, I know that I can too. Their strength carried me before I could carry myself. They loved me before I loved myself. They picked me up when I fell and showed me how to try again. They showed me that life free from addiction is possible, and that I can have it if I keep chasing recovery. I am resilient. I know it seems cliché, especially during these past few years. Being in recovery taught me that I can survive even my worst days, the hardest days, even when I feel like throwing in the towel. I have personal evidence that shows me I am capable of finding new ways through the difficulties of my life. I am strong because I choose to survive, to fight back, every day I wake up on this earth. Even though it’s not easy, I still choose life instead of addiction. Choosing resilience is what shows me through the darkest times to the light at the end of the tunnel. Choosing life has granted me something worth fighting for.