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Louise Hubbard

3925

Bold Points

4x

Nominee

5x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I am a student at the University of Redlands as a human-animal studies and biology double major. My goal is to earn a DVM and specialize as a wildlife veterinarian. This dream combines my passions for conservation and animals. The reasons I chose human-animal studies are very close to my heart. This major combines biology, environmental studies, policy, philosophy, and psychology. With environmental pressures destroying biodiversity, it is important to protect wildlife. Learning through the lens of different subjects provides me with a unique view. I had the opportunity to study abroad in Salzburg, Austria. The small program size allowed me to receive private tutoring for German, fully funded by the program. Tutoring let me focus on areas I struggled in rather than relearning German I already knew. Trips to Vienna, Italy, and Bosnia-Herzegovina allowed us to explore conflicts in Europe and how these places acknowledge and hide their roles in these conflicts. I liked that this program didn’t center Western Europe and explored all European countries’ roles in the World Wars. In the spring of 2024, I was selected for a research project for the summer on the human impacts on the behaviors of marine mammals. I have been volunteering for this project for two years and am honored to be continuing this work as a research student. Since I pay for college on my own, I work full-time during the summers. I also tutor chemistry and biology during the school year through my work-study award. I am fluent in Swedish and intermediate in German. I am a dual citizen of Sweden and the US.

Education

University of Redlands

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Veterinary Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
    • Biology, General
    • Zoology/Animal Biology

College of Lake County

High School
2019 - 2021

Libertyville High School

High School
2017 - 2021

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Zoology/Animal Biology
    • Anthrozoology
    • Veterinary Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
    • Marine Sciences
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 1460
      SAT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Veterinary

    • Dream career goals:

      Wildlife Vet/Rehabilitator

    • Summer Research Student

      University of Redlands
      2024 – Present6 months
    • Senior Camp Counselor

      Apachi
      2023 – 2023
    • Chemistry and Biology Tutor

      University of Redlands
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Pet Sitter

      Self-Employed
      2011 – Present13 years
    • Babysitter

      Self-Employed
      2019 – Present5 years
    • Team Member

      Raising Cane's
      2022 – 2022
    • Team Member

      Chick-fil-A
      2019 – 20212 years

    Sports

    Track & Field

    Varsity
    2018 – 20213 years

    Research

    • Biology, General

      University of Redlands — Data Collection, ID marine mammals, document behavior
      2023 – Present

    Arts

    • High School Marching Band

      Music
      2017 – 2021
    • High School Band

      Music
      2017 – 2021
    • Red Rose Children's Choir

      Music
      2010 – 2021

    Public services

    • Public Service (Politics)

      Codepink — volunteered for mutual aid projects, attended morning protests 5 days/week, attended sit-ins
      2022 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      San Bernardino City Animal Shelter — sanitizing kennels, dishes, laundry, restocking, etc.
      2024 – Present
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Mary Eldy-Allen — delivered signs, assembled letters, mailed postcards
      2018 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Yucaipa Animal Placement Society — cat & dog socialization, dishes, laundry, etc.
      2024 – 2024

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    VNutrition & Wellness’ Annual LGBTQ+ Vitality Scholarship
    As a rising senior at the University of Redlands, my passion for protecting oceans has been fueled by their significance in climate regulation. Oceans play a crucial role in maintaining global climate stability. Their health directly impacts the well-being of every ecosystem on our planet. This has motivated me to pick a career path that protects our oceans and marine life, particularly marine mammals, through scientific research and veterinary medicine. Oceans act as carbon sinks, absorbing a significant portion of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. Through processes like photosynthesis and carbon sequestration, oceans mitigate the effects of climate change by regulating carbon levels in the atmosphere. Phytoplankton play a vital role in carbon regulation, absorbing carbon dioxide during photosynthesis. The complexities of marine photosynthesis mean that marine mammals, especially baleen whales, are thought to play a vital role, being responsible for an equal amount of water column mixing as all the waves and wind across the globe. This process impacts marine photosynthesis because it pushes phytoplankton and nutrients back up to the photic zone. More phytoplankton in the photic zone means more photosynthesis is taking place, which in turn draws more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Whales also release fecal plumes with nutrients that phytoplankton require. As organic matter, like phytoplankton and whale carcasses, sink to the ocean floor, the carbon becomes trapped there for millennia, effectively preventing it from entering the atmosphere. However, the balance of marine ecosystems is increasingly threatened by human activities. Pollution, overfishing, habitat destruction, and climate change are among the numerous facets impacting ocean health. The consequences extend beyond marine environments, affecting terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Therefore, safeguarding oceans is a necessity for the preservation of life on Earth. This summer, I am honored to be selected for a research project under the guidance of Dr. Lei Lani Stelle, focusing on the impact of human activities on marine mammal behavior off the coast of southern California. Although I've been fortunate to volunteer on this project since my second year, engaging in summer research enables me to develop my own research questions. This opportunity has deepened my understanding of the intricate relationships within marine ecosystems and strengthened my commitment to ocean conservation. Through fieldwork, data analysis, and collaboration with fellow researchers, I aim to contribute valuable findings to the challenges facing marine mammal populations. My aspiration to pursue a doctorate in veterinary medicine aligns with my dedication to wildlife conservation, particularly in marine environments. Becoming a wildlife veterinarian has been my goal for years, and my research this summer has driven me to specialize in marine mammals. This research project has provided me with invaluable hands-on experience and affirmed my passion for marine conservation and veterinary medicine. As a marine veterinarian, my passion lies in rehabilitation and advocacy for marine life. Within my professional life, I envision dedicating my expertise to the rehabilitation of injured or sick marine animals, in order to restore them to their natural habitat. Each intervention contributes to the preservation of the organisms, their species, and their ecosystems. Beyond my future clinical duties, I am committed to using my free time to advocate for the protection and conservation of marine life. Through placing pressure on politicians and raising public awareness, we can enact meaningful policy changes, implement stronger regulations to protect marine habitats, and promote sustainable practices in industries that affect our oceans. Combining rehabilitation efforts with advocacy work, I aspire to make a meaningful impact on marine conservation, ensuring a future for diverse marine ecosystems.
    Reginald Kelley Scholarship
    As a rising senior at the University of Redlands, my passion for protecting oceans has been fueled by their significance in climate regulation. Oceans play a crucial role in maintaining global climate stability. Their health directly impacts the well-being of every ecosystem on our planet. This has motivated me to pick a career path that protects our oceans and marine life, particularly marine mammals, through scientific research and veterinary medicine. Oceans act as carbon sinks, absorbing a significant portion of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. Through processes like photosynthesis and carbon sequestration, oceans mitigate the effects of climate change by regulating carbon levels in the atmosphere. Phytoplankton play a vital role in carbon regulation, absorbing carbon dioxide during photosynthesis. The complexities of marine photosynthesis mean that marine mammals, especially baleen whales, are thought to play a vital role, being responsible for an equal amount of water column mixing as all the waves and wind across the globe. This process impacts marine photosynthesis because it pushes phytoplankton and nutrients back up to the photic zone. More phytoplankton in the photic zone means more photosynthesis is taking place, which in turn draws more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Whales also release fecal plumes with nutrients that phytoplankton require. As organic matter, like phytoplankton and whale carcasses, sink to the ocean floor, the carbon becomes trapped there for millennia, effectively preventing it from entering the atmosphere. However, the balance of marine ecosystems is increasingly threatened by human activities. Pollution, overfishing, habitat destruction, and climate change are among the numerous facets impacting ocean health. The consequences extend beyond marine environments, affecting terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Therefore, safeguarding oceans is a necessity for the preservation of life on Earth. This summer, I am honored to be selected for a research project under the guidance of Dr. Lei Lani Stelle, focusing on the impact of human activities on marine mammal behavior off the coast of southern California. Although I've been fortunate to volunteer on this project since my second year, engaging in summer research enables me to develop my own research questions. This opportunity has deepened my understanding of the intricate relationships within marine ecosystems and strengthened my commitment to ocean conservation. Through fieldwork, data analysis, and collaboration with fellow researchers, I aim to contribute valuable findings to the challenges facing marine mammal populations. My aspiration to pursue a doctorate in veterinary medicine aligns with my dedication to wildlife conservation, particularly in marine environments. Becoming a wildlife veterinarian has been my goal for years, and my research this summer has driven me to specialize in marine mammals. This research project has provided me with invaluable hands-on experience and affirmed my passion for marine conservation and veterinary medicine. As a marine veterinarian, my passion lies in rehabilitation and advocacy for marine life. Within my professional life, I envision dedicating my expertise to the rehabilitation of injured or sick marine animals, in order to restore them to their natural habitat. Each intervention contributes to the preservation of the organisms, their species, and their ecosystems. Beyond my future clinical duties, I am committed to using my free time to advocate for the protection and conservation of marine life. Through placing pressure on politicians and raising public awareness, we can enact meaningful policy changes, implement stronger regulations to protect marine habitats, and promote sustainable practices in industries that affect our oceans. Combining rehabilitation efforts with advocacy work, I aspire to make a meaningful impact on marine conservation, ensuring a future for diverse marine ecosystems.
    Dr. Howard Hochman Zoological Scholarship
    Winner
    Just like any other kid, the thing I wanted most growing up was a pet. I was dedicated to getting my parents to finally approve of a pet, but unfortunately, that time never came. Instead, I grew up in the backyard playing with the toads and observing the insects. They were the closest things I had to pets. Then one day in elementary school, I received the assignment to bring in insects for a plastic bottle terrarium project. I was so over the moon that I would bring a cup to my bus stop every day in case I found any cool bugs. On the last day, I found a slug, but I had forgotten my cup at home. Without thinking, I picked it up in my bare hands and held it until we reached school. Many of the kids were grossed out by the slug, but I thought it was adorable. My whole life I’ve never been a people person. I always connected with animals much better. This slug was no exception. After graduating from college, I aspire to work in conservation and rehabilitation for a few years. I am a human-animal studies and biology double major. I believe that the combination of them will allow me to both understand how animals function from a biological perspective, and how they change based on human impact. Ideally, I will go back to school to get a Ph.D. in zoology after a few years of working in the field. After getting a Ph.D., I would love to do research on the effects of human activity on wildlife. I have not yet narrowed down my interest to a specific species or category of animals, but I hope my years working in the field after college will help me narrow down my very long list of interests. Conservation and rehabilitation have always been an interest of mine. Growing up, I always wanted to take every injured animal home to take care of it. My interest in rehabilitation started when we found an abandoned robin egg. My family brought it inside to hatch under a heat lamp and then took care of the fledgling until it was ready to fend for itself. I was always so happy that I saved the robin even if it was just one bird. I would love to do this on a larger scale and with more vulnerable species. Rehabilitating more vulnerable species is especially important because individuals need to live at least until they reach sexual maturity so that a new generation can be born. This generation can then live on to reproduce as well and restore the population. My research will also provide insight into how we need to change our behaviors to accommodate and protect wildlife. I want to make sure that we have the knowledge available to us so that we can improve life for the animals that cohabitate the world.