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Logan Smith

735

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Slowly I see electric and hybrid cars taking over the streets. I can see the grease monkey breed is slowly dying out. California is even making a law to stop selling new combustion cars starting in 2035. Although I see the value in alternative fuel options, I don’t want car culture to fade away by 2035. Also, race tracks are slowly fading away like Sacramento Raceway and soon to be Laguna Seca Raceway. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles that an older generation once knew. I want to be the guy at Cars and Coffee that when he rolls in, everybody’s jaw drops. I still want them to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. Hopefully I can inspire a young kid to follow in my footsteps to keep the breed alive

Education

Oak Ridge High

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Trade School

  • Majors of interest:

    • Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians, Other
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Automotive

    • Dream career goals:

      Public services

      • Volunteering

        El Dorado Hills Community Service District — Promote and teach fishing to children at the El Dorado Hills Fishing Derby.
        2021 – 2024
      • Volunteering

        California State Parks — Park beautification and trail maintenance.
        2020 – 2024
      • Volunteering

        CAST for Kids — Teach special needs children and their family how to fish.
        2022 – 2023
      Tim Williams Automotive Student Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I can still hear those screaming, racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a recent high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. I just completed an auto shop class the last two years of high school, where I learned to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. This became especially clear after seeing the unbalanced statistics of how many new mechanics are available to replace retiring mechanics. I’ve always wanted to be a part of the auto industry, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would allow me to do that all day. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles, that an older generation once knew. I still want kids to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. I want to give back a piece of history my way. This scholarship would help me to pay my tuition at the Universal Technical Institute of Sacramento where I have been accepted and plan to start in August.
      Wolf Gustaveson Memorial Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I can still hear those screaming racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. This became especially clear after seeing the unbalanced statistics of how many new mechanics are available to replace retiring mechanics. I’ve always wanted to be a part of the auto industry, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would allow me to do that all day. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles, that an older generation once knew. I still want kids to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. I want to give back a piece of history in my way.
      Hamiltonville Farm Scholarship
      Winner
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I can still hear those screaming racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run again. My junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. This became especially clear after seeing the unbalanced statistics of how many new mechanics are available to replace retiring mechanics. I’ve always wanted to be a part of the auto industry, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would allow me to do that all day. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles, that an older generation once knew. I still want kids to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. I want to give back a piece of history in my way. This scholarship will assist me in the financial aspect of my education at Universal Technical Institute Sacramento, where I have been accepted. I want to help my parents by contributing to my own education since I have other siblings in the home they are responsible for. I want to help do my part and my minimum wage job will not accomplish this alone, especially as I attend school full time. I thank you for this opportunity!
      Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I can still hear those screaming racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. This became especially clear after seeing the unbalanced statistics of how many new mechanics are available to replace retiring mechanics. I’ve always wanted to be a part of the auto industry, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would allow me to do that all day. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles, that an older generation once knew. I still want kids to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. I want to give back a piece of history in my way. I have been accepted to the Universal Technical Institute of Sacramento in the Automotive and Diesel Technology program. I want to get back to basics with my impact on the world by providing transportation by any means to our community. Whether traveling by car, bus, taxi, truck, subway, boat or the like, everyone needs a safe and reliable mode of transportation to get them to school, work or anywhere to enjoy life. I would love to be the mechanic to help keep people safe and thriving.
      Frederick and Bernice Beretta Memorial Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium. I can still hear those screaming racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. This became especially clear after seeing the unbalanced statistics of how many new mechanics are available to replace retiring mechanics. I was recently accepted to UTI. I’ve always wanted to be a part of the auto industry, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would allow me to do that all day. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles, that an older generation once knew. I still want kids to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. I want to give back a piece of history in my way.
      John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show. I can still hear those screaming, racing v8s echoing through that stadium. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. When I looked at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it made me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to the Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18 year old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. Also I have a bass fishing boat from 1986, that has even more issues that I have to fix. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My Junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of the Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. My parents have always been big preachers of doing what you love, and this might be it. I’ve always wanted to be a part of an industry like cars, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would have me do that all day. Slowly I see electric and hybrid cars taking over the streets, I can see the grease monkey breed is slowly dying out. California is even making a law to stop selling new combustion cars starting in 2035. Although I see the value in alternative fuel options, I don’t want car culture to fade away by 2035. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles that an older generation once knew. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. Hopefully I can inspire a young kid to follow in my footsteps to keep the breed alive. I believe graduating from Universal Technical Institute will start me on this path.
      Redefining Victory Scholarship
      When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I can still hear those screaming, racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. It was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota truck. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to the Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18 year old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. Also I have a bass fishing boat from 1986, that has even more issues that I have to fix. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. My Junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of the Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. Up until this point my parents have been telling me what their parents told them at my age… go to college, get a job, buy a house, make a family. This made me rethink the whole college part. We also have some family friends that have taken the trade route and have done pretty well for themselves. My parents have always been big preachers of doing what you love, and this might be it. Upon telling my parents about UTI, it made them realize that college isn’t for everyone. Especially after seeing the statistics of how many new mechanics will replace the current mechanics after they retire is completely unlevel. I’ve always wanted to be a part of an industry like cars, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would have me do that all day. Slowly I see electric and hybrid cars taking over the streets, I can see the grease monkey breed is slowly dying out. California is even making a law to stop selling new combustion cars starting in 2035. Although I see the value in alternative fuel options, I don’t want car culture to fade away by 2035. Also, race tracks are slowly fading away like Sacramento Raceway and soon to be Laguna Seca Raceway. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles that an older generation once knew. I want to be the guy at Cars and Coffee that when he rolls in, everybody’s jaw drops. I still want them to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. Hopefully I can inspire a young kid to follow in my footsteps to keep the breed alive. This scholarship will help provide funds to pay for some of my schooling through Universal Technical Institute in Sacramento. I have been accepted into their Automotive and Diesel Technology II program to attain my Associate of Occupational Studies Degree. My family needs assistance to help fund my passion, as schooling prices have definitely increased over the years. My parents want to help make my dreams come true, but I feel if I can receive a scholarship I will contribute in my own way as well. Thank you for this opportunity.
      Joe Ford Trade Scholarship
      What I Want to do in the Automotive Industry When I was younger, like many boys my age, I was intrigued by anything with a loud engine. I remember the first ever live show I went to was a Monster Jam show in the old Kings stadium, before they had built the Golden One Center. I could still hear those screaming racing v8s echoing through that stadium. I can remember the show ended early due to technical difficulties and I got a Donkey Kong monster truck stuffed animal for compensation. I still have that to this day. Also, the movie Cars came out a year after I was born, and my parents would watch that movie on loop with me if we got rained in. That is still one of my favorite movies to watch, even as a soon high school graduate. Before I even learned how to read, my grandparents gave me my first Lego set. From that point on I loved to tear apart and rebuild things. Fast forward to high school, I begin to learn more and more about my parents. When my parents were dating, they were in a four-wheeling club in Southern California. Well, it was mostly a Jeep club, but my dad had a Toyota. When I look at those almost 30 year old photos of my dad scaling cliffs, it makes me want to time travel to when times were simple. I wanted to live in a time when if you had motor problems, you rebuilt a carburetor. Almost every Saturday morning I try to make it to the Folsom Cars and Coffee to check out some sweet rides. I have an 18-year-old pickup truck that I constantly fix small issues on. Also I have a bass fishing boat from 1986, that has even more issues that I have to fix. I’m even in an auto shop class, where I learn to tear down motors and piece them back together and hopefully have them run. I watch all the car shows like Counts Kustoms, Rust Valley Restorers, Gas Monkey Garage, and Jay Leno’s Garage. I aspired to own or work at a professional restoration shop, but it all seemed to be realistic on TV, not in real life. My Junior year in high school my intro auto shop class took a tour of the Universal Technical Institute near the end of the year. At first I was excited because it was a day away from school, but once I was there I was blown away. The first time I toured the UTI campus I was amazed at the potential opportunities for a career this school could give me. Up until this point my parents have been telling me what their parents told them at my age… go to college, get a job, buy a house, make a family. This made me rethink the whole college part. We also have some family friends that have taken the trade route and have done pretty well for themselves. My parents have always been big preachers of doing what you love, and this might be it. Upon telling my parents about UTI, it made them realize that college isn’t for everyone. Especially after seeing the statistics of how many new mechanics will replace the old mechanics after they retire is completely unlevel. I’ve always wanted to be a part of an industry like cars, and to contribute to car culture in some way. Having problems and fixing them by myself is one of the best feelings, and being a service and repair technician would have me do that all day. Slowly I see electric and hybrid cars taking over the streets, I can see the grease monkey breed is slowly dying out. California is even making a law to stop selling new combustion cars starting in 2035. Although I see the value in alternative fuel options, I don’t want car culture to fade away by 2035. Also, race tracks are slowly fading away like Sacramento Raceway and soon to be Laguna Seca Raceway. Along with restoring vehicles, I want to restore the thriving culture that is automobiles that an older generation once knew. I want to be the guy at Cars and Coffee that when he rolls in, everybody’s jaw drops. I still want them to feel the same way I felt when I saw my first Monster Jam show. I want to pursue that by having my own restoration shop one day. I want to be able to restore old cars for both myself and clients in the greater Sacramento area. Hopefully I can inspire a young kid to follow in my footsteps to keep the breed alive.