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Leah Peterson

1165

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

Student at I.M. Terrell Academy || Environmentalist & Social Justice Advocate There's a moment in your life where you realize growing up in poverty may hinder you from accomplishing your dreams. It's until you look around your community, your state and your country that you realize there's people/organizations who care about you. They've never met you, but heard your story and want to help. I believe that Bold.org is one of those organizations that provides me with just that. I understand now that it's not solely how you start that counts, but how you finish is key. Having the opportunity to apply to these many scholarships made me realize that the value of education is something that I have understood since a very young age. Neither of my parents had an opportunity to attend college and faced many struggles in their personal and professional lives because of this. My family has made many sacrifices to allow me to focus on my education throughout primary and secondary school. However this process may go for me, I will continue to apply the same diligence to my collegiate studies as I have to this point, making education and service to others my top priority! Here is the link to my LinkedIn to find out more about me: https://www.linkedin.com/in/leah-grace-peterson-b457241b4

Education

Howard University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Economics and Computer Science
    • Economics

Terrell H S

High School
2018 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Public Policy

    • Dream career goals:

      Supreme Court Judge

    • Cashier

      Williams Fried Chicken
      2020 – Present4 years

    Sports

    Dancing

    Varsity
    2009 – 202011 years

    Research

    • Biological and Physical Sciences

      NASA — Student Intern
      2021 – 2021

    Arts

    • School

      Music
      2019 – Present

    Public services

    • Advocacy

      Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) — Youth Member
      2020 – 2023
    • Advocacy

      Sunrise Movement Dallas — Youth Member
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      ENGin — Student Teacher/Volunteer
      2021 – Present
    • Advocacy

      Student Government — President
      2022 – Present
    • Advocacy

      Fort Worth ISD Superintendent Student Advisory Board — Student Councilwoman
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Fort Worth Teen Court — Teen Attorney
      2020 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Fort Worth Sister Cities — Youth Board President
      2019 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Chip Bag Project — Volunteer
      2021 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Black Leaders Scholarship
    “Freedom.” A word that brings my mind to many aspects of life in which I can live without concern and fear. Despite the many interpretations and ways others use the word freedom to navigate through their journey called life, I have found through my personal experiences that freedom to me means being able to have a choice when making decisions. It is being able to do what you find a passion in and using the opportunity of choice to strive for the betterment of not just yourself, but others. Over the years, I have found passion in being a voice and instrument in the lives of others without fear of what others may think or react. When reflecting on the very passion of mine, I am reminded of the words of my great aunt, June E. Johnson. In 1969, when the Panthers established a free breakfast program, it was just down the street from my great aunt, June E. Johnson. June and her siblings went on to receive not only free nutritious food but education through the after-school programs that they provided. My great aunt told me that the Black Panther Party gave her a "sense of pride and purpose." They showed her that just because she was a black woman in a time of hardship in the world, it doesn't mean she couldn't be successful. It was with those inspiring individuals that surrounded her and the inequality and injustice happening before her eyes that she went on to become a revolutionary activist during the Civil Rights Movement. Not only did the Panthers use the freedom of their choices to help society, but they opened the eyes of so many to the possibilities that come when you make selfless choices to make the world a better place. As a result of the major impact, they allowed my great aunt to use her freedom as a way to stand up for injustices happening around the world. She used the cards that society had dealt her and knowledge from the Panthers to pave the way to create her path of change and hope. I want to continue the legacy that June has set for me and the other future generations. I want to remind people that our strategies may be limited, but like our predecessors, we must consistently work to transform the context. Despite the adversity my great aunt faced, she still made many successful efforts for the betterment of her community. I use her accomplishments in a position of positively using her freedom, as a guide for navigating situations in my own life. She inspired me to stand up for people who may not have the voice to do so because that is what a true leader is. I aspire to be the person who is a positive light in the lives of whomever I may meet. June and others have laid out the blueprint for creating change, but it is up to us to continue that legacy and to continue to fight for changes in our current circumstances. It is up to us to use the freedom and resources that we have to continue making positive changes for the world. Helping at least a few people who might be dealing with similar issues may seem like a micro change, but that is far from the truth. On the macro scale, helping a few people might not change the world, but it could change the world for those few people, just like my great aunt did.
    NE1 NE-Dream Scholarship
    My lifelong concern for poverty, both personal and societal, has propelled me into a deep exploration of economics and data science, particularly focusing on the disparities between developed and developing cities across America. I want to use data science with my passion for economics to serve as the bridge between cutting-edge technology and evidence-based policymaking. Supply, demand, and scarcity were my first subjects of interest during my high school career. It seemed to me that the biggest issues facing mankind were on the micro scale; be it poverty, income inequity, or resource access disparities. This passion continued to manifest in my high school extracurricular activities. A notable experience was my position as Fort Worth Independent School District’s Student Advisory Board Chairwoman. My position as Chairwoman allowed me to hear from the voices of over 80,000 students from across the district addressing their concerns with their schools, the district, and the city as a whole. This made me realize that issues stem at the root and how we are dealing and supporting our communities in this case, where these students lived and grew up. I recognized that policies alone without well-rounded research on issues with insights from the people experiencing it themselves and the impact is useless. This is where my passion for applying well-constructed, diverse, and inclusive research to inform policies and other crucial political decisions began to form. During my undergraduate journey, I delved into microeconomic and macroeconomic principles, culminating in a comprehensive research paper analyzing Colombia's GDP and economy from 1976-2022. Furthermore, I collaborated with an economics professor on a research project titled "Contributing Factors to the Housing Cost Burden of Female-Headed Households." Using AHS data for 2015 and 2019, we meticulously examined variables such as marital status, race, ethnicity, and dependent status. Our analysis, incorporating fixed geographic effects to control for various factors, revealed significant housing cost burdens for single Black female-headed households with children compared to their white counterparts. These findings underscored the broader disparities affecting not just individuals but entire families. These experiences solidified my passion for economic and community development. My pursuit is to conduct summative and formative research on policies, data, and place-conscious interventions that assist those with low incomes in overcoming multifaceted challenges. Inequality is an undeniable reality in our world, and economic inequality is particularly pronounced in developing countries like the United States. Bridging the gap between academia and bureaucracy is essential, and my hope is that my research can contribute to this integration. I aspire to use my research and personal experiences to inform sustainable policies, combating issues like housing, income, education, and food insecurity. These interconnected challenges necessitate a holistic approach in addressing the root causes of inequity in strategic community development. Inspired by trailblazers like Dr. Sadie T.M. Alexander, the first African American woman in the U.S. to earn a Ph.D. in Economics, I see this scholarship as an opportunity providing the necessary support, tools, and knowledge for individuals like me. Dr. Alexander's historic legacy is a testament to the impact that belief in one's success, coupled with the right resources, can have on fostering excellence. In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, "The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams." This program would be a step in the right direction in allowing me to reach my dream, and I hope you see that too.
    William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
    My lifelong concern for poverty, both personal and societal, has propelled me into a deep exploration of economics and data science, particularly focusing on the disparities between developed and developing cities across America. I want to use data science with my passion for economics to serve as the bridge between cutting-edge technology and evidence-based policymaking. Inequality is an undeniable reality in our world, and economic inequality is particularly pronounced in developing countries like the United States. Bridging the gap between academia and bureaucracy is essential, and my hope is that my research can contribute to this integration. I aspire to use my research and personal experiences to inform sustainable policies, combating issues like housing, income, education, and food insecurity. These interconnected challenges necessitate a holistic approach in addressing the root causes of inequity in strategic community development. During my undergraduate journey, I delved into microeconomic and macroeconomic principles, culminating in a comprehensive research paper analyzing Colombia's GDP from 1976-2022. Furthermore, I collaborated with an economics professor on a project titled "Contributing Factors to the Housing Cost Burden of Female-Headed Households." Using AHS data for 2015 and 2019, we meticulously examined variables such as marital status, race, ethnicity, and dependent status. Our analysis, incorporating fixed geographic effects to control for various factors, revealed significant housing cost burdens for single Black female-headed households with children compared to their white counterparts. These findings underscored the broader disparities affecting not just individuals but entire families. These experiences solidified my passion for economic and community development. My pursuit is to conduct summative and formative research on policies, data, and place-conscious interventions that assist those with low incomes in overcoming multifaceted challenges. My questions revolve around understanding the impact of government policies, key drivers of poverty, housing affordability, social security nets, and global economic trends on local efforts to combat poverty, housing, and food insecurity. A few examples being: “What are the key drivers of poverty and how can interventions effectively address them?” “In what ways does housing affordability contribute to or hinder economic development in urban areas?” “How effective are social security nets in reducing poverty and promoting economic stability?” Inequality is an undeniable reality in our world, and economic inequality is particularly pronounced in developing countries like the United States. Bridging the gap between academia and bureaucracy is essential, and my hope is that my research can contribute to this integration. I aspire to use my research and personal experiences to inform sustainable policies, combating issues like housing, income, education, and food insecurity. These interconnected challenges necessitate a holistic approach in addressing the root causes of inequity in strategic economic development. This scholarship will give me the support financially and personally to ensure that I am able to complete my undergraduate matriculation without the financial stress and burden, allowing me to pursue my graduate studies. In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, "The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams." This scholarship would be a step in the right direction in allowing me to reach my dreams, and I hope you see that too.
    Holt Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, how to look critically at the world and understand how to make a positive impact. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school diploma, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. As a result, I plan to study economics to understand the human economic condition better, conduct research on inadequately addressed policies, propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. I plan to attend Howard University this fall to continue my academic journey. Howard's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a degree in economics from Howard University will prepare me to enter the policy writing and legal field, and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I believe that I should be selected for this scholarship because I am determined to achieve my dreams. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to create a better future for my community and beyond. I see what others don’t in our overlooked youth. I see the importance of investing and not giving up on our youth. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed. This scholarship program will allow me to make this goal of mine possible.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better in doing so. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. I plan to attend Howard University this fall. Howard's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    David Michael Lopez Memorial Scholarship
    “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. I plan to attend Howard University this fall. Howard's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law and policy writing field, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    GD Sandeford Memorial Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better in doing so. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. I plan to attend Howard University this fall. Howard University's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    Jeannine Schroeder Women in Public Service Memorial Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. I plan to attend Howard University this fall. Howard University's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law and policy writing field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    Jaqaun Webb Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. Howard University's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law and policy writing field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    Miguel Mendez Social Justice Scholarship
    “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Youth today are being pushed into the criminal justice system at an alarming rate. This issue is known as the school-to-prison pipeline ─ a phenomenon that refers to the practices and policies that have pushed school children, especially the most at-risk children, out of classrooms and into the juvenile justice system. As a result of this issue being on the rise and firsthand seeing peers fall to this pipeline, I am inspired to continuously advocate ending the school-to-prison pipeline for disenfranchised youth. Taking a stance to end this, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which works to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative and transformative justice process. Through this experience, I quickly understood that children from lower social economics homes were disproportionately affected by policies and educational funding. For most students, the pipeline begins with inadequate resources in public schools. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2003), overcrowded classrooms, a lack of qualified teachers, and insufficient funding for “extras” such as counselors, special education services, and even textbooks, lock students into second-rate educational environments.Schools have embraced zero-tolerance policies that automatically impose severe punishment regardless of circumstances. According to the Advancement Project (2005), rates of suspension have increased dramatically in recent years, and have been most dramatic for children of color. This failure to meet educational needs increases disengagement and dropouts, increasing the risk of later court involvement. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. Utilizing Howard University's curriculum for my undergraduate degree in a double major in Data Analytics and economics would provide me with substantive insights for understanding human social life and institutions, and expand my understanding of the principles and problems of modern economic life. I will also be able to develop data analysis skills that support public sector decision-makers by performing policy analysis through all phases of the policymaking process. This paired with Howard's mission to forward the development of scholars and professionals who drive change, and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, are all necessary in preparing me to enter the field of policy and law and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen. All students need advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources for learning to take on the world. I plan to work on doing just that in the lives of those I can impact in my current and future endeavors.
    OxStem Educational Scholarship
    “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Youth today are being pushed into the criminal justice system at an alarming rate. This issue is known as the school-to-prison pipeline ─ a phenomenon that refers to the practices and policies that have pushed school children, especially the most at-risk children, out of classrooms and into the juvenile justice system. As a result of this issue being on the rise and firsthand seeing peers fall to this pipeline, I am inspired to continuously advocate ending the school-to-prison pipeline for disenfranchised youth. Taking a stance to end this, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which works to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative and transformative justice process. Through this experience, I quickly understood that children from lower social economics homes were disproportionately affected by policies and educational funding. For most students, the pipeline begins with inadequate resources in public schools. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2003), overcrowded classrooms, a lack of qualified teachers, and insufficient funding for “extras” such as counselors, special education services, and even textbooks, lock students into second-rate educational environments.Schools have embraced zero-tolerance policies that automatically impose severe punishment regardless of circumstances. According to the Advancement Project (2005), rates of suspension have increased dramatically in recent years, and have been most dramatic for children of color. This failure to meet educational needs increases disengagement and dropouts, increasing the risk of later court involvement. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. Utilizing Howard University's curriculum for my undergraduate degree in a double major in Data Analytics and economics would provide me with substantive insights for understanding human social life and institutions, and expand my understanding of the principles and problems of modern economic life. I will also be able to develop data analysis skills that support public sector decision-makers by performing policy analysis through all phases of the policymaking process. This paired with Howard's mission to forward the development of scholars and professionals who drive change, and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, are all necessary in preparing me to enter the field of policy and law and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen. All students need advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources for learning to take on the world. I plan to work on doing just that in the lives of those I can impact in my current and future endeavors.
    Kynnedy Simone 'I Am The Dream' Scholarship
    The following accumulation of experiences has allowed me to learn and to create change for the communities I am a part of and beyond. A few notable examples are: 1.) Fort Worth Sister Cities, Youth Board President: I created a free virtual cultural exchange program in partnership with my district. 2.) Fort Worth ISD Superintendent Advisory Council: I serve the 80,000 students in the district by working on and implementing policies for them. 3.) Student Government, President 4.) ENGin, Student Volunteer: This is a free program that pairs Ukrainian students with English-speaking peers for free online conversation practice and cross-cultural connection. 5.) Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Youth Teacher: I am a Sunday school youth teacher assistant, and this past summer I was a free music teacher to underserved youth in my community. 6.) Sunrise Movement Dallas, Current Member: I have organized a campaign in hopes of trying to get free public transit for k-12 students in Dallas. 7.) Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), Youth Member: Published an Op-Ed that urges for a current act on climate issues for our present and future. 8.) The Fort Worth Teen Court, Teen Attorney Through these experiences, I’ve become more conscientious, altruistic, and a better version of myself. Currently, I am in the works of creating my non-profit called "Tune In World," which provides accessible cross-cultural exchanges through music lessons for underserved youth across the world. The guidance and support from this scholarship will allow me to further my goal of liberating globally disenfranchised youth.
    Voila Natural Lifestyle Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, and how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. Howard University's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed. Having the opportunity to be granted this scholarship will give me the financial assistance and mentorship to make this passion of mine possible.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    The revolutionary activist, Nelson Mandela, once said with great eloquence, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To me, education is more than just learning math formulas or biological processes–education is the act of learning how to think for yourself, and how to look critically at the world and understand how it works to make it better. My great-grandmother, who went back to school at the age of 50 to obtain her high school degree, inspired me to appreciate the value of education and use it to make a difference in my community and beyond. “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Unfortunately, today's youth are being pushed into the criminal justice system through the school-to-prison pipeline, a phenomenon that is robbing our youth of the opportunity to learn and grow. Inadequate resources, overcrowded classrooms, and zero-tolerance policies have resulted in disengagement, dropouts, and court involvement, disproportionately impacting children of color and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. To address this issue, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which aims to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative justice process. Through this experience, I realized that children from economically disadvantaged communities are most affected by the pipeline, prompting me to take a stand and advocate for policy reform. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources, and funds for quality learning and extracurricular involvement. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. Howard University's mission to develop scholars and professionals who drive change and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, aligns with my goals and aspirations. Thus, obtaining a Ph.D. and bachelor's degree in economics will prepare me to enter the law field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen, working towards creating equal opportunities for all students to receive adequate education through extensive research and policy implementation. Education is a right that every child deserves, and all students require advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources to achieve their full potential. I am committed to using my educational opportunities to improve our educational system. The time to end the school-to-prison pipeline is now, and I plan to work tirelessly to ensure that every child has access to quality education and a chance to succeed.
    Barbara Cain Literary Scholarship
    The Black Panther Party has been labeled many names throughout the years. Some have called it a threat to our national security. A few have named the party a terrorist or hate group. All these names getting thrown at them for seeking prosperity and justice for the silenced oppressed people all over the world. However, what many people fail to realize is that those given names couldn’t be farther from the party’s agenda for society. In the revolutionary book “To Die For The People” by Panther Party leader Huey Newton, he recognizes the survival programs as being some of the best works that the Party has created. He goes into depth about the ten-point list that the Party had issued in 1967, which stated their true beliefs and values. The list included things like full-time employment, an end to police brutality, and decent housing and living conditions. The party also launched community engagement programs such as the free breakfast for children program. In the book, Huey said that they believed that they could provide the needs of those living in poverty better than the government could. This specific agenda that the party sought to accomplish was very important to me, not only because of its impact on school meals today, but because I am a descendant of an individual who was able to reap these opportunities. In 1969, when the Panthers established a free breakfast program, it was just down the street from my great aunt June E. Johnson. June and her siblings went to receive not only free nutritious food, but an education through the after-school programs that Newton also mentions in the book. My great-aunt told me that the Party gave her a “sense of pride and purpose.” They showed her that just because she was a black woman in a time of hardship in the world, it doesn’t mean she can’t be successful. It was with those inspiring individuals that surrounded her and the inequality and injustice happening before her eyes that she went on to become a revolutionary activist during the Civil Rights Movement. She used the cards that society had dealt to her and paved the way to create her path of change and hope. Many times people are unaware of how the luxuries that we have today came about like the free and reduced school lunches. It took a group of people to stand up and create something so necessary in light of all they went through. I want to create a reminder through Newton’s work to the people seeking to create strategies for accessing justice, safety, and accountability in the face of oppression. Remember that our strategies may be limited, but like our predecessors, we must consistently work to transform the context. Newton, June, and others have laid out the blueprint for creating change, but it is up to us to continue that legacy to continue to fight for changes in our current circumstances.
    iMatter Ministry Memorial Scholarship
    “Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's youth” is not a particularly new sentiment. But what is unique and has become a pressing question is what will become of the future if our youth are behind bars instead of in schools? Youth today are being pushed into the criminal justice system at an alarming rate. This issue is known as the school-to-prison pipeline ─ a phenomenon that refers to the practices and policies that have pushed school children, especially the most at-risk children, out of classrooms and into the juvenile justice system. As a result of this issue being on the rise and firsthand seeing peers fall to this pipeline, I continuously advocate ending the school-to-prison pipeline for disenfranchised youth. Taking a stance to end this, I joined the Fort Worth Teen Court, which works to rehabilitate juvenile offenders through a restorative and transformative justice process. Through this experience, I quickly understood that children from lower social economics homes were disproportionately affected by laws and educational funding. For most students, the pipeline begins with inadequate resources in public schools. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2003), overcrowded classrooms, a lack of qualified teachers, and insufficient funding for “extras” such as counselors, special education services, and even textbooks, lock students into second-rate educational environments. Schools have embraced zero-tolerance policies that automatically impose severe punishment regardless of circumstances. According to the Advancement Project (2005), rates of suspension have increased dramatically in recent years, and have been most dramatic for children of color. This failure to meet educational needs increases disengagement and dropouts, increasing the risk of later court involvement. The foundational work received from Fort Worth Teen Court informed my current and future work in policy writing to reform the current zero-tolerance policies, which criminalize schools and classrooms by creating strict regulations that schools must follow. I want to propose and champion laws that require schools to consider implementing additional restorative justice methods and resources. This purpose is why I will study economics—to grasp the human economic condition better. I want to use my position to assist and prevent these cycles from repeating for the current and future generations of these marginalized communities who are disproportionately impacted by this issue. I have had to privilege to get started with this work in my position as a councilwoman on my superintendent's student advisory board. This year, I worked with board members to implement the following: at-home homework helper, proving students with the necessary technology, diversity, equity and inclusion training, and free summer enrichment programs. I plan to attend Howard University to continue this passion of mine on a larger scale. Utilizing Howard University's and a future Ph.D. in economics would provide me with substantive insights for understanding human social life and institutions, and expand my understanding of the principles and problems of modern economic life. This paired with Howard's mission to forward the development of scholars and professionals who drive change, and engage in scholarship that provides solutions to contemporary global problems, particularly ones impacting the African Diaspora, are all necessary in preparing me to enter the law field and be a well-rounded and equipped citizen. All students need advocacy, assistance, and adequate resources for learning to take on the world. I plan to work on doing just that in the lives of those I can impact in my current and future endeavors.
    Femi Chebaís Scholarship
    In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” I aspire to have a career in law or social work, which is due to seeing my family members and many others thrown into the carceral system unfairly and left without regard for rehabilitation. There are many ever-changing yet complex problems in our society, and we need morally level-minded individuals in law.
    Cyrilla Olapeju Sanni Scholarship Fund
    This year I have focused on what community and mutual aid mean in terms of outreach, service, aid, and celebration. I learned that no group of people should be left behind in the work and progress that we are trying to achieve. Mutual aid and community work is not a volunteer opportunity, photo op, or resume builder. It is about coming together to meet the needs of everyone in the community. Being an instrument of hope and change in my community through the Chip Bag Project represents one of my most meaningful commitments to impact. The project combines my love for sustainability and my community. I've been able to do a lot of work around the city by getting more people to talk about the connections between environmental justice and social justice while engaging and assisting with it. Recently, we created over 100 bags from upcycled materials and donated them to local shelters. Creating this impact has allowed me to work towards aiding those in oppressive systems, ending stigmas regarding their situations, and in the long run, reducing numbers. I initially got involved and was motivated to join because the founder's story was similar to that of my mother. Becoming an independent woman in a patriarchal society, she faced immense injustices as her stepfather strived to destroy her. Disowned by her family, she was left with a ring, a blanket, and $300; she was left homeless with me in our early years living in Rochester. It was my goal in joining that we can aid those who are put in these situations, end the stigma of being unhoused, and lower the numbers. In addition, this organization and the experiences of my mother has made me realize that environmental racism, waste, and homelessness are not isolated issues — they're all connected. Many people have been making noise, but I think it's time to make more noise and get people to talk about it differently and show connections between these issues. We're all humans who share this planet, and I'm obligated to ensure the person next to me has access to necessities. We have major climate issues happening, and the people who are most impacted are those who are economically impoverished. That's why I enjoy bringing attention to trash and homelessness because people never put those two things together in a respectful way. In the words of Fred Hampton and supporting organizations of a once-promising coalition,"[We] are revolutionary!" This organization showed me what could still be as long as people are willing to fight for change. After joining and becoming an active member, I continued to inspire myself to find ways to keep the fight alive for ending environmental and systemic racism through my current advocacy, organizing, and future legal career. As a result of my own upbringing and current situation, I hope I can inspire others to do the same in creating change in their communities. Many have laid out the blueprint for creating change, but we must continue that legacy and advocate for changes in our current circumstances.
    Stand and Yell Community Impact Scholarship
    This year I have focused on what community and mutual aid mean in terms of outreach, service, aid, and celebration. I learned that no group of people should be left behind in the work and progress that we are trying to achieve. Mutual aid and community work is not a volunteer opportunity, photo op, or resume builder. It is about coming together to meet the needs of everyone in the community. Being an instrument of hope and change in my community through the Chip Bag Project represents one of my most meaningful commitments to impact. The project combines my love for sustainability and my community. I've been able to do a lot of work around the city by getting more people to talk about the connections between environmental justice and social justice while engaging and assisting with it. Recently, we created over 100 bags from upcycled materials and donated them to local shelters. Creating this impact has allowed me to work towards aiding those in oppressive systems, ending stigmas regarding their situations, and in the long run, reducing numbers. I initially got involved and was motivated to join because the founder's story was similar to that of my mother. Becoming an independent woman in a patriarchal society, she faced immense injustices as her stepfather strived to destroy her. Disowned by her family, she was left with a ring, a blanket, and $300; she was left homeless with me in our early years living in Rochester. It was my goal in joining that we can aid those who are put in these situations, end the stigma of being unhoused, and lower the numbers. In addition, this organization has made me realize that environmental racism, waste, and homelessness are not isolated issues — they're all connected. Many people have been making noise, but I think it's time to make more noise and get people to talk about it differently and show connections between these issues. We're all humans who share this planet, and I'm obligated to ensure the person next to me has access to necessities. We have major climate issues happening, and the people who are most impacted are those who are economically impoverished. That's why I enjoy bringing attention to trash and homelessness because people never put those two things together in a respectful way. I plan to leverage this program by continuously educating others, advocating for the disenfranchised, and further creating hands on solutions for this overlooked community. In the words of Fred Hampton and supporting organizations of a once-promising coalition,"[We] are revolutionary!" This organization showed me what could still be as long as people are willing to fight for change. After joining and becoming an active member, I continued to inspire myself to find ways to keep the fight alive for ending environmental and systemic racism through my current advocacy, organizing, and future legal career. As a result of my own upbringing and current situation, I hope I can inspire others to do the same in creating change in their communities. Many have laid out the blueprint for creating change, but we must continue that legacy and advocate for changes in our current circumstances.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    This year I have focused on what community and mutual aid mean in terms of outreach, service, aid, and celebration. I learned that no group of people should be left behind in the work and progress that we are trying to achieve. Mutual aid and community work is not a volunteer opportunity, photo op, or resume builder. It is about coming together to meet the needs of everyone in the community. Being an instrument of hope and change in my community through the Chip Bag Project represents one of my most meaningful commitments to impact. The project combines my love for sustainability and my community. I've been able to do a lot of work around the city by getting more people to talk about the connections between environmental justice and social justice while engaging and assisting with it. Recently, we created over 100 bags from upcycled materials and donated them to local shelters. Creating this impact has allowed me to work towards aiding those in oppressive systems, ending stigmas regarding their situations, and in the long run, reducing numbers. I initially got involved and was motivated to join because the founder's story was similar to that of my mother. Becoming an independent woman in a patriarchal society, she faced immense injustices as her stepfather strived to destroy her. Disowned by her family, she was left with a ring, a blanket, and $300; she was left homeless with me in our early years living in Rochester. It was my goal in joining that we can aid those who are put in these situations, end the stigma of being unhoused, and lower the numbers. In addition, this organization has made me realize that environmental racism, waste, and homelessness are not isolated issues — they're all connected. Many people have been making noise, but I think it's time to make more noise and get people to talk about it differently and show connections between these issues. We're all humans who share this planet, and I'm obligated to ensure the person next to me has access to necessities. We have major climate issues happening, and the people who are most impacted are those who are economically impoverished. That's why I enjoy bringing attention to trash and homelessness because people never put those two things together in a respectful way. In the words of Fred Hampton and supporting organizations of a once-promising coalition,"[We] are revolutionary!" This organization showed me what could still be as long as people are willing to fight for change. After joining and becoming an active member, I continued to inspire myself to find ways to keep the fight alive for ending environmental and systemic racism through my current advocacy, organizing, and future legal career. As a result of my own upbringing and current situation, I hope I can inspire others to do the same in creating change in their communities. My dream is that in the future we will all come together to assist and uplift the unhoused people in our communites to finally put an end to world homelessness. Many have laid out the blueprint for creating change, but we must continue that legacy and advocate for changes in our current circumstances.