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Isabella Avila

2245

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

I’ve struggled with anxiety from a very young age and I have learned so much from my time in therapy. I want to share all that has helped me and the tools I have learned with other teens. I want to share my story and help anyone who is struggling and who needs support. I'm currently studying Psychology with a minor in Art Therapy.

Education

Curry College

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Psychology, General
  • Minors:
    • Fine and Studio Arts

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Clinical, Counseling and Applied Psychology, Other
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      art therapy

    • Dream career goals:

      Therapist

    • PAL(Placement for the advancement of learning) Lead Peer Mentor

      Curry College
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Student Ambassador for the Psychology Department

      Curry College
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Assistant art teacher

      Beehive art studio
      2018 – Present6 years

    Sports

    Kickboxing

    Club
    2018 – Present6 years

    Awards

    • no

    Research

    • Intercultural/Multicultural and Diversity Studies

      Lsrhs — Student
      2019 – Present

    Arts

    • Actonart

      Drawing
      none
      2013 – 2018

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Loring Elementary School — Assistant
      2018 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      Independent — Assistant kickboxing teacher
      2018 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Elizabeth Schalk Memorial Scholarship
    From preemie to strong young woman. I arrived into this world ten weeks early and weighed in at only two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many struggles. I needed many different forms of therapy to help me grow and learn. School interventions for my learning disability and physical/occupational therapy for my body. I also had cognitive behavioral therapy, along with exposure therapy. From all the years of help I received I learned alot about myself, you kind of have to so you can keep reaching the next steps. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I dont need all those services anymore, but I do still see a therapist monthly. Over the years I've a created a toolbox of skills and strategies that I still use today. An early memory from therapy was when I was first diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn how my anxiety and depression would affect my life. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I grew older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked helped me become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a Psychology major in College I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences and I want to share my story with others. I attend Curry College where I'm a campus leader as well as a peer mentor for students in our learning difference program on campus. After graduation I plan to attend Graduate school and earn my Masters in Clinical Counseling. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that.
    TEAM ROX Scholarship
    Preemie baby to strong young woman. I was born premature weighing in at only two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy being one of them. I was diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years and later as a teen with depression. I didnt really know what all that meant, I was more interested in the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. Over the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. Although, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older though, I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked helped me become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified, but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome my fear and participate. Now as a Psychology major in College, I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences and I want to share my story. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. I believe in sharing your most vulnerable times with someone can help them feel less alone. I plan on continuing on to Graduate school and to earn a Master's degree as a clinical mental health counselor. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to do just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    ADHDAdvisor's Mental Health Advocate Scholarship
    I was born premature at only two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy being one of them. I was diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old by my first therapist. I didnt really know what all that meant, I was more interested in the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. Over the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. Although, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older though, I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked helped me become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified, but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome my fear and participate. Now as a Psychology major in College. I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences and I want to share my story.I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to do just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Ethan To Scholarship
    Preemie baby to strong young woman. I was born ten weeks early and weighed in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy which I began at six years old. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. An early memory from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. As I continued with therapy I started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant and how it would impact my life. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a Psychology major in College, I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences and I want to share my story with others. I think sharing your vulnerablilty with other people can help someone feel less alone. I'm very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to do that. Thank you for you consideration.
    John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
    I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. An early memory from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a Psychology major in College. I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that.
    Career Test Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    So You Want to Be a Mental Health Professional Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Mental Health Empowerment Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Mikey Taylor Memorial Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Autumn Davis Memorial Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    VonDerek Casteel Being There Counts Scholarship
    Preemie baby to powerful young woman. I was born premature. Popping into this world ten weeks early and weighing in at two pounds, which caused a delay in my mind and my body. Because of my eager arrival, I've experienced many different forms of therapy. One of which being behavioral therapy. From all those years of therapy I realized this is something I would love to pursue as a career. Now as a 21 year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Ms. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I learned alot about what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what having anxiety and depression really meant. One of the tools my therapist introduced me to was the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or worrying you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. As I got older I learned that exposing myself to new activities alongside hobbies that I liked can help you become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of High School I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. Now as a college student I'm learning to continue to build on those experiences, and I want to share my story. I'm a Psychology major with a minor in Art Therapy and plan to continue on to Grad school. I am very passionate about helping others and I want to pay it forward. This Scholarship would help me with my next steps to doing just that. Thank you for your consideration.
    Scholarship for Student Perseverance
    I was born premature, popping into this world at two pounds, thirteen ounces which caused a delay in my mind and body. Because of this, I have been in therapy since I was six years old and I have decided to major in Psychology in college; finding out more about how the mind and body can impact how someone feels. Now as a more confident 19-year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills and strategies that I can use in my life. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist. When the news was given to me and my parents I was very confused and I was more interested in the dolls and the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I gave a lot of thought as to what my diagnosis truly meant to me. At that point, my therapist introduced me to a “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or bothering you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. I found this tool fascinating and whole heartedly embraced it. As I grew older, I realized that my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. If I had an anxiety or depressive episode, it would last longer than expected and I would be confused and afraid. With support from my family, friends and therapists I finally accepted my diagnosis- disorders like these can get better, but not fully go away. Based on my experiences in high school, I believe that adolescents struggle the most with mental health issues, which is why I want to help them understand their anxiety and share my experiences with them. From the wellness classes that I have taken that encouraged me out of my comfort zone, I learned that exposing yourself to new activities alongside hobbies that you like, you can become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year of high school, I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership Adventure Program. It was a two-night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try new, risk taking activities. For instance, tree climbing, ziplining, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of the team advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. It was such an incredible three days and it was a turning point in my life and my journey with anxiety. Even after four years this event is still the defining moment of when I decided to study Psychology, I want to help others and share my story. Growing up with anxiety is kind of like working on a big intricate puzzle; each puzzle piece represents a new experience, a success, a failure and anything that happens in your life. Just like a puzzle piece, after trying a few times to find out where it goes, it finally fits.
    Nikhil Desai "Perspective" Scholarship
    Life Is A Puzzle By Isabella Avila I was born premature, popping into this world at two pounds, 13 ounces which caused a delay in my mind and body that needed to catch up. Because of this, I have been in therapy since I was six years old. All of which has made me very fond of Psychology and I am considering it as a major; finding out more about how the mind and body can impact how somebody feels. Now as a more confident 18-year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Mrs. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I specifically remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I gave a lot of thought as to what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what anxiety meant when my therapist introduced me to a “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or irritating you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. If I had an anxiety or depressive episode, it would last longer than expected and I would be confused and afraid. What I ended up learning is that for anxiety and depression there are not magic pills - disorders like these can get better, but not fully go away. At this point in my life, I’m considering psychology as something to study in college, as I am fascinated with how the brain works. Based on my experiences in high school, I believe that adolescents struggle the most with mental health issues, which is why I want to help them understand their anxiety and share my experiences with them. From the wellness classes that I have taken in which I have gotten out of my comfort zone, I learned that exposing yourself to new activities alongside hobbies that you like, you can become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year, I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. It was such an incredibly amazing three days, and looking back on it makes me want to share my story and to use my experiences to help others. Growing up with anxiety is kind of like working on a really big intricate puzzle; each puzzle piece represents a new experience, a success, a failure, and anything that happens in your life. Just like a puzzle piece, after trying a few times to find out where it goes, it finally fits.
    Mental Health Movement Scholarship
    I was born premature, popping into this world at two pounds thirteen ounces, which caused a delay in my mind and body. Because of this, I have been in therapy since I was six years old with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder and OCD, and most recently with depression. All of which has made me very fond of Psychology and I am considering it as a major; finding out more about how the mind and body can impact how somebody feels. Over the next several years, I gave a lot of thought as to what my diagnosis truly meant to me. My therapist at that time, introduced me to a tool I could use called the “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. Now as an 18-year-old young woman, I have been able to put all the strategies and tools I have learned over the years together to help me get through difficult moments. I have realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. What I ended up learning is that for anxiety and depression there are no magic pills - disorders like these can get better, but not fully go away. I’m planning to study psychology/art therapy in College next year. Based on my experiences in high school, I believe that adolescents struggle the most with mental health issues, which is why I want to help them understand their anxiety and share my story and experiences with them.
    Minority Student Art Scholarship
    I am reaching the end of my time in high school and giving some serious thought as to what I want to do in the future. I’m realizing that I have actually known for a long time what I want to learn in College and what I want to do. It has a lot to do with what I have experienced in my life. I have struggled with an anxiety disorder and OCD since I was six years old. I have seen a Cognitive Behavioral Therapist since my diagnosis. Along with my learning disability, it has made school and social situations difficult. But it is because of these struggles and challenges that I want to help other people. I have learned so many tools and strategies along the way and would love to share them. One strategy I have used continuously and that has been so helpful is Art. I have taken art classes for years and absolutely love all mediums. Using colors, clays, paints, yarn, beads, along with your imagination helps calm your body and mind. I want to learn about Art Therapy and Psychology in College. Based on my experiences in high school, I believe that adolescents struggle the most with mental health issues, which is why I want to help them understand their anxiety and share my experiences with them.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    I was born premature, popping into this world at two pounds, 13 ounces which caused a delay in my mind and body that needed to catch up. Because of this, I have been in therapy since I was six years old. All of which has made me very fond of Psychology and I am considering it as a major; finding out more about how the mind and body can impact how somebody feels. Now as a more confident 18-year-old young woman, I am slowly not having to go to counseling as much and I have adapted a toolbox of skills that I can use in my future. The earliest memory that I can remember from therapy was when I got diagnosed with generalized and social anxiety at six years old from my first therapist, Mrs. Roberta. When the news was given to me and my mom, I specifically remember not knowing how to react. I was very confused and I was more intrigued by the dolls in the dollhouse that my therapist had in her room. For the next several years, I gave a lot of thought as to what my diagnosis truly meant to me. I slowly started to learn about what anxiety meant when my therapist introduced me to a “worry box”; a box in which you place words and sayings about something that is stressing or irritating you. At the time I had severe social anxiety, so I wrote down sayings like: “I’m worried about making eye contact with people” and “I want to make new friends without being as anxious”. At only six years old, I found it fascinating that I learned my first tool to help with my anxiety. As I grew older, I realized that some of my worries will never fully go away and my anxiety will be a part of my life forever. They couldn’t be contained and forgotten as was promised to me by my worry box. If I had an anxiety or depressive episode, it would last longer than expected and I would be confused and afraid. What I ended up learning is that for anxiety and depression there are not magic pills - disorders like these can get better, but not fully go away. At this point in my life, I’m considering psychology as something to study in college, as I am fascinated with how the brain works. Based on my experiences in high school, I believe that adolescents struggle the most with mental health issues, which is why I want to help them understand their anxiety and share my experiences with them. From the wellness classes that I have taken in which I have gotten out of my comfort zone, I learned that exposing yourself to new activities alongside hobbies that you like, you can become stronger and more confident. At the end of my freshman year, I was nominated to participate in the Edge of Leadership adventure. It was a two night, three-day adventure where I and other students were expected to try risk-taking activities that would get us out of our comfort zones. For instance, tree climbing, zipline gliding, walking in the dark with a blindfold, mud running, group therapy, and other leadership activities. I was petrified when I heard that we would be doing all of these things but with the help of advisors and other student leaders, I was able to overcome these obstacles. It was such an incredibly amazing three days, and looking back on it makes me want to share my story and to use my experiences to help others. Growing up with anxiety is kind of like working on a really big intricate puzzle; each puzzle piece represents a new experience, a success, a failure, and anything that happens in your life. Just like a puzzle piece, after trying a few times to find out where it goes, it finally fits.