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Kiersley Frasier

1215

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Education

Laurel High School

High School
2021 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Music
    • Human Development, Family Studies, and Related Services
    • Psychology, General
    • English Language and Literature/Letters, Other
    • Philosophy
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Mental Health Therapist

    • Dream career goals:

      Marriage & Family Studies

      Research

      • Social Sciences, General

        Researcher & Presenter
        2022 – 2023

      Arts

      • Music
        2022 – 2023

      Public services

      • Advocacy

        Speech, Drama & Debate — Presenter
        2021 – 2023

      Future Interests

      Advocacy

      Volunteering

      Philanthropy

      Entrepreneurship

      Marian Haley Memorial Scholarship
      My name is Kiersley Frasier. That may sound like a meaningless name, but it isn’t to me. My name is who I am. I’m 18 years old, and I enjoy playing the piano, reading, and writing poetry. I’ve participated in numerous extracurricular activities, including two school plays and a musical, Speech and Debate, managing both Track and Field and Cross Country, all while working, teaching piano lessons, and attending church activities. During school hours, I also participated in choir, a mentorship program, early morning seminary, and a variety of other classes. I am the oldest of six children, allowing me to become responsible not only for myself, but also for caring for my siblings as well. One of the most profound experiences of my life includes the two of my siblings who are adopted. It took us several months to adopt my sister, and over 5 years to adopt my brother. Adopting them was a hard-won battle, but taught me the importance of learning about and appreciating other people. It also taught me how important it is that we treat our bodies well and not abuse them by giving them harmful substances. My little sister was born on multiple types of drugs and was considered a premature baby. She also had a heart defect, giving her health issues. It took several years for her to be able to eat and interact with other people in a normal way. This helped me to become more caring to everyone else. I contribute to the community by participating in all of the things that I enjoy and encouraging others to do the same. I will do my best to welcome any and all new people and to provide a friendship that is comforting and fruitful. I will take care of myself, which allows me to be a good friend to others. My career choice - to become a therapist - will help me help others. My experience with the foster care system has taught me that helping others is my true passion. I consider it a productive day if I've been able to make someone smile or laugh just once, even by asking a simple question such as, "How was your day?". Ultimately, the name Kiersley Frasier might not mean much to anyone else. But to me, it holds a lifetime of memories, experiences, and not just lessons already learned, but lessons to be learned. My name encompasses me and my life, allowing me to learn and grow in order to be a better person. I look forward to expanding my experiences at college and through my career choice, allowing my name to encompass a better person than I was the day before.
      “The Office” Obsessed! Fan Scholarship
      I remember once, when I was young, I heard my dad talking in church. He said, "Make sure to talk to Ty about The Office. He loves it." Then, he laughed and left, while my mom rolled her eyes. I was confused because I didn't know what The Office was. Now, several years later, The Office has brought much joy and laughter into my life. From Jim's pranks to Michael's management style to Dwight's trivia, the sheer randomness of The Office has swept nations. I think what's so great about The Office is that the characters are all relatable and have their own unique style. For example, I can relate to Phyllis being timid and shy at first, and then opening up as we get to know her more. I relate to Jim's sense of humor and the want to play pranks on people who are bugging you. I relate to Andy's singing and obsessive need to be liked. I relate to Michael's want to be a good boss. All in all, though, I'd have to say the character I relate to most is Toby Flenderson. Although he's Michael's most hated coworker, I believe that I'm most similar to him. For one, HR is one of the fields I've considered going into, which I suppose would make me a buzzkill. I also think I'd be one of the more reasonable and responsible people of The Office. I'd love to go ziplining in Costa Rica, too, but we can't have everything (especially a broken back!). The Office is the guaranteed show I can go to in order to cheer myself up. The lighthearted humor helps take my mind off of heavy things. The Office may not be the most conventional show, or even have the most conventional characters. But that's what makes it a show that resonates with everyone. Including me (the Toby Flenderson of my office).
      A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
      My name is Kiersley Frasier. That may sound like a meaningless name, but it isn’t to me. My name is who I am. I’m 18 years old, and I enjoy playing the piano, reading, and writing poetry. I’ve participated in numerous extracurricular activities, including two school plays and a musical, Speech and Debate, managing both Track and Field and Cross Country, all while working, teaching piano lessons, and attending church activities. During school hours, I also participated in choir, a mentorship program, early morning seminary, and a variety of other classes. I am the oldest of six children, allowing me to become responsible not only for myself, but also for caring for my siblings as well. One of the most profound experiences of my life includes the two of my siblings who are adopted. It took us several months to adopt my sister, and over 5 years to adopt my brother. Adopting them was a hard-won battle, but taught me the importance of learning about and appreciating other people. It also taught me how important it is that we treat our bodies well and not abuse them by giving them harmful substances. My little sister was born on multiple types of drugs and was considered a premature baby. She also had a heart defect, giving her health issues. It took several years for her to be able to eat and interact with other people in a normal way. This helped me to become more caring to everyone else. I will contribute to the community by participating in all of the things that I enjoy and encouraging others to do the same. I will do my best to welcome any and all new people and to provide a friendship that is comforting and fruitful. I will take care of myself, which allows me to be a good friend to others. My career choice - to become a therapist - will help me help others. My experience with the foster care system has taught me that helping others is my true passion. I consider it a productive day if I've been able to make someone smile or laugh just once, even by asking a simple question such as, "How was your day?". Ultimately, the name Kiersley Frasier might not mean much to anyone else. But to me, it holds a lifetime of memories, experiences, and not just lessons already learned, but lessons to be learned. My name encompasses me and my life, allowing me to learn and grow in order to be a better person. I look forward to expanding my experiences at college and through my career choice, allowing my name to encompass a better person than I was the day before.
      “Stranger Things” Fanatic Scholarship
      Have you ever had an experience that left you so nauseated, you could hardly eat? That you were so revolted by something, you couldn't stand to keep looking at it? Welcome to the Upside Down. To brave the stomach-churning adventures of the Upside Down, we all need our handy sidekicks. Between you and me, everyone in Hawkins has their own merit and their own reason to turn their lives physically and metaphorically upside down - but only 3 can come. Firstly, we have Robin, whose quick thinking and sharp wit have turned more than just a few heads. She might be clumsy, but she's perceptive and due to her appealing sense of humor, would bring well-needed comedic relief for our trip to the Upside Down. Her loyalty proves that she would stop at nothing to bring the monsters of the Upside Down to justice, especially if it includes protecting her friends. Then there's Hopper, a lovable grump of a dad. He's tough and buff, thanks to his time in Russia. Hopper is determined, resourceful, and will stop at nothing to prevail, leaving the enemies of the Upside Down no choice but to succumb to his will. Hopper is used to getting his way and refuses to bend down to others, making him a force to be reckoned with. Finally, Vecna is the ultimate support to have when leading a trip to the Upside Down. He may not be the most conventional choice, but if we can get him on our side, we'll have a guaranteed win. Not only is he powerful, but his ferociously callous demeanor ensures that no monster will ever get past him. Between Robin, Hopper, and Vecna, I know that we'll be able to face whatever monstrosities that try to threaten Hawkins. Robin's quick wit, Hopper's sheer determination, and Vecna's raw strength will make us formidable foes. We'll get into the Upside Down, slay the monsters, and save Hawkins. Because that's what it's all about, right?
      Reginald Kelley Scholarship
      Music has been such a big part of my life since I was a young person. I started piano lessons when I was 8. I distinctly remember going home from lessons and practicing as soon as I could because I was so excited to play my new songs. Then we moved and I had to get a new teacher, who I didn't end up liking much. She was strict and overbearing and I felt like music (and me) was the opposite of that. I wanted to quit. But I'm glad I stuck with piano (and two more teachers). It's completely changed who I want to be. In the 8th grade, I stopped lessons for the summer and didn't end up going back to them, but it was around that time that I started playing for church. I got the songs on a Thursday or Friday, spent 2 days madly practicing, and performed on Sunday. I loved it. It worked well in my favor - I practiced consistently and it helped me feel the Spirit and God so much easier. Not long after that, I took an organ lesson and started playing the organ instead. I would practice on the piano during the week and go early to church to practice on the organ because they're incredibly different instruments, believe it or not. That sounds like kind of a long and useless story about my history in music, but that leads to what has truly changed my life: teaching piano lessons. I had 6 students (I moved just this summer before my senior year) and I taught for a year and a half. I worked with 5 kids and 1 adult. I got to rediscover my love for piano, and I even learned some new things myself because of how many teachers I went to in my education. I always looked forward to piano lessons because it honestly brightened my day. It made me feel good to be changing someone's life with the knowledge of music. I loved seeing the people improve each week and get better than the week they were before. I enjoyed watching the growth that happened over the 12-18 months that I was teaching my students. It felt crazy to see how much they improved and how it seemed like they'd gone from 0 to 100 in so little time. This also improved my spirituality. Playing and listening to music is how I feel the Spirit and God the best. I get the chills when I listen to hymns or musical numbers that are gospel or Christ-related because they're so beautiful and I love creating music that helps other people feel the spirit as well. I never knew these things about myself until I started teaching piano lessons, which would never have happened if I hadn't started piano lessons. What seemed like such a simple decision when I was 8 years old has drastically changed my life so much and I am so grateful for it. I truly believe that music can change people's lives. I would use this ability to make other people's lives better. I would like to become a music therapist, to help heal people through the power of music. There would be no bigger honor to do the same for other people what music has done for me.
      Holli Safley Memorial Music Scholarship
      Music has been such a big part of my life since I was a young person. I started piano lessons when I was 8. I distinctly remember going home from lessons and practicing as soon as I could because I was so excited to play my new songs. Then we moved and I had to get a new teacher, who I didn't end up liking much. She was strict and overbearing and I felt like music (and me) was the opposite of that. I wanted to quit. But I'm glad I stuck with piano (and two more teachers). It's completely changed who I want to be. In the 8th grade, I stopped lessons for the summer and didn't end up going back to them, but it was around that time that I started playing for church. I got the songs on a Thursday or Friday, spent 2 days madly practicing, and performed on Sunday. I loved it. It worked well in my favor - I practiced consistently and it helped me feel the Spirit and God so much easier. Not long after that, I took an organ lesson and started playing the organ instead. I would practice on the piano during the week and go early to church to practice on the organ because they're incredibly different instruments, believe it or not. That sounds like kind of a long and useless story about my history in music, but that leads to what has truly changed my life: teaching piano lessons. I had 6 students (I moved just this summer before my senior year) and I taught for a year and a half. I worked with 5 kids and 1 adult. I got to rediscover my love for piano, and I even learned some new things myself because of how many teachers I went to in my education. I always looked forward to piano lessons because it honestly brightened my day. It made me feel good to be changing someone's life with the knowledge of music. I loved seeing the people improve each week and get better than the week they were before. I enjoyed watching the growth that happened over the 12-18 months that I was teaching my students. It felt crazy to see how much they improved and how it seemed like they'd gone from 0 to 100 in so little time. This also improved my spirituality. Playing and listening to music is how I feel the Spirit and God the best. I get the chills when I listen to hymns or musical numbers that are gospel or Christ-related because they're so beautiful and I love creating music that helps other people feel the spirit as well. I never knew these things about myself until I started teaching piano lessons, which would never have happened if I hadn't started piano lessons. What seemed like such a simple decision when I was 8 years old has drastically changed my life so much and I am so grateful for it.
      Harry Potter and the Sorting Hat Scholarship
      Growing up while reading Harry Potter, I always envisioned myself as a Ravenclaw. I was everything a Ravenclaw was said to be - sharp, witty, committed to the books. But as I've gotten older, I've realized the value of being multiple traits instead of just what was defined to one house. The other houses also have traits that I would like to inherit and that present themselves in me in different situations. When I think of myself as a Ravenclaw, I want to be described as clever and filled with wisdom, knowledge and intellectual ability. There's much value in this because then, as Ravenclaws, we know how to apply knowledge to a certain situation, which embodies wisdom. We know - and are aware of - our own minds and how they work, helping us to understand other people. When I think of Gryffindor traits, I think of being noble, of chivalry, of standing up for the right thing, and of determination. And really, isn't that something that we would all love to think we have? Sometimes, standing up for the right thing is hard, but maybe, as a Ravenclaw, I can learn how to apply myself in situation where determination is needed. Hufflepuff is regarded as almost a "weak" house, of sorts, without many specific characteristics that are described in the books. Hufflepuffs, however, have a lot of overlooked traits that are just as important as other the other houses: friendship, loyalty, kindness, patience, tolerance, fairness, and humbleness to name just a few of them. Because of these, I have come to realize that Hufflepuff embodies traits that are the most important of the houses. Without kindness, patience, or fairness, how can we each learn about ourselves and help others to learn about ourselves? If we didn't have friends or relationships that we truly cared about, then what would be the point in temperal things, such as wit or books? What would be the point in being clever or being noble? If there was no one we care about enough to stand up for, like a Gryffindor, then what would give us the motivation to do so? And finally, the last house, Slytherin, is usually thought of as the "bad guys", and yes, while most of the bad guys or bullies in the series came from Slytherin, that doesn't mean we don't have anything to learn in their house. Slytherin students are known for being resourceful, cunning, strong leaders, ambitious, and achievement-oriented. We need these traits among ourselves if we want to achieve anything. Having determination and creative ideas, as well as leadership qualities and goals for our future, is really important. We can be a leader anywhere and everywhere, even when it feels hopeless for ourselves. So, having reviewed the traits of each house, I can safely say that I envision myself as a Ravenclaw. But I can also envision myself as a Hufflepuff, Gryffindor, or Slytherin. Preferably all four. The qualities all feed into each other. As the Sorting Hat has taught us, though, we can choose which house we want to be. We can learn the qualities that we want to have and work towards achieving our goals, which isn't just the lesson of Harry Potter - it's also the lesson of our lives.
      New Kids Can Scholarship
      Being the new kid has impacted my life in quite a few ways, just as it can affect anyone. I've been the new kid quite a lot in quite a few different ways. Firstly, being the new kid has impacted what I want with my future and even what I want in my future. Right after fifth grade, my family and I moved states, marking the second state I had ever lived in. It was a scary time at 11 years old: leaving my school, my friends, and my home. Really, everything I was familiar with. Moving to Montana led me on the biggest adventure of my life, including adopting two of my siblings, one of whom was born prematurely and another who struggled with abandonment issues. Both suffered from development problems, making it hard for them to connect with us. This led me to what I want to do with my life: help other people. This sounds like a simple, yet complex statement, doesn't it? More specifically, I realized I wanted to become a therapist to help children with similar struggles as my siblings. This might never have been a dream realized if I hadn't moved states and met two new siblings. On the other side, starting a new middle school when I didn't know anybody was terrifying. The popular crowd was mean, but somehow I managed to get a seat with them at the lunch table, which felt both horrible and gratifying. Mostly, though, I was a bookworm, and shy, and read for hours every day to bury myself in someone else's troubles. This experience went on for two and a half years until COVID hit, but it taught me to always stay true to myself, no matter other people's expectations. I was homeschooled in a group for my freshman year, meeting once a week with a group to discuss classwork. I guess this "technically" made me a new student, even though my class was composed of only three people. It might not have been a traditional school, but I got to read a different classical novel every week and then write a novel on it - something that I loved doing. I got to read many amazing novels and come to a deeper appreciation of literary works of olden times. The Witch of Blackbird Pond and An Old-Fashioned Girl were some of my favorites from that semester because I felt that the female empowerment, even from a book of those times, was truly impressive. For my sophomore year, I attended public school once again, except for this time, it was high school. Going into my sophomore year, I was incredibly nervous about making friends. I didn't want to force myself onto new people or feel like I wasn't wanted. Thankfully, I found just the opposite - a wonderfully supportive friend group that I wouldn't change for anything. This led to best friends, my first boyfriend, and so much more. They provided support for me when I didn't know I would need it and never failed to make me laugh. They have helped me grow as a person. I struggled with anxiety for a while, and most of them never knew I struggled with it, but they helped more than anyone ever could have by simply accepting me for who I am. I will miss them - and the old times - forever when we leave to go our separate ways. Being the new kid can be a roller coaster. There's good and bad to it. But I wouldn't trade my experiences for anything.
      Book Lovers Scholarship
      I would choose, "Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret" by Judy Bloom. It's a children's book, but a very impactful book. It's about the confusion of growing up. The main character is torn by religion. She doesn't know what she wants. She's torn by friends, whether she has real friends or not. She moves states and has to make new friends. She has to learn about periods and puberty. She has to learn about herself throughout the book. Judy Bloom does a terrific job of getting this across. There's something relatable in here for everyone. Everyone has had to grow up. Everyone has had to move. Everyone has had to decide on their religion. Everyone has had two sides try to convince them of things. Margaret goes through a primitive year, and I think that her story helps me to process my own change and my own life. Even if it doesn't help other people the way that it's helped me, I think it helps everyone remember how hard and confusing and difficult middle school was. I think it will help people understand things that other human beings have gone through and learn to appreciate that sometimes it's okay to not be okay. It's okay to not be sure. It's okay if you don't know what you want. It's okay to be confused. The book has an entertaining storyline aside from just the learning curves that this one year has given Margaret. It shows how much a human can change in one year, and I think that this would be a great book for everyone to read.