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Karis Johnson

1545

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Hi, my name is Karis Johnson! I am a student at Milwaukee School of Engineering. Some of my life goals include becoming a civil engineer after graduating from Milwaukee School of Engineering, working a government job in Civil Engineering, and helping as many people as possible through volunteer work and my job. I am a very dedicated student who enjoys learning and having a healthy work/life balance. Between classes or work, I enjoy to do work in AutoCAD, create my own music, hang out with family and friends, biking, and reading. Part of the reason why I would be a good candidate for many scholarships is so that I can continue my education at MSOE. With my brother also going to college, my dad being on multiple medications for various illnesses, and my mom being a teacher, getting a scholarship would mean a lot as it would take some of the financial burden off of my family, so that they can focus on their own lives at home while I am away at college. Thank you! Please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions! Email: carrotsjoy@gmail.com Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/karis-johnson-b61485291

Education

Milwaukee School of Engineering

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Civil Engineering

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

    -
  • Transfer schools of interest:

    -
  • Majors of interest:

    • Civil Engineering
    -
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Civil Engineering

    • Dream career goals:

      Working a government job where my job can have a positive impact to my community.

    • Soccer Coach

      City of Watertown Park and Rec.
      2021 – 20232 years
    • Barista

      Literatus & Co.
      2019 – 20234 years
    • Engineering Intern

      City of Watertown
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    Marching Band

    Varsity
    2019 - 20234 years

    Show Choir

    Club
    2019 - 20234 years

    Soccer - Coaching

    Club
    2021 - 20232 years

    Soccer

    Junior Varsity
    2019 - 20212 years

    Tennis

    Junior Varsity
    2021 - 20221 year

    Arts

    • Watertown School District

      Dance
      2016 – 2023

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Watertown Humane SocietyAnimal Volunteer
      2019 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      City of Watertown Park and Rec.Soccer Coach
      2021 – 2023

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    William Griggs Memorial Scholarship for Science and Math
    Since I committed to MSOE, many people have asked me why I wanted to study civil engineering. While civil engineering may not exactly be math or science, both are core pillars of becoming a civil engineer. Specifically physics, chemistry (need as an environmental civil engineer), and calculus. Civil Engineering is something that, little by little, more people are starting to learn about. When I first mentioned to my peers that I would go into engineering, they automatically assumed electrical, mechanical, etcetera. Just like civil engineering is less prominent than other fields, a civil engineer's work is done behind the scenes. Many do not understand the amount of time, effort, and money that goes into it all—the hours spent creating, editing, and finalizing the plan and then getting it approved. The permit application, finding a contractor, getting the materials at a reasonable price, and working with Wisconsin DOT all happen behind the scenes. I enjoy doing this behind-the-scenes work. It is a way that I can help my community by fixing roads, helping apply for the permits or grants needed to fix the bridges, creating the maps for future projects, or even getting to design and help with the building process of parks. These are all ways that my future job can help whatever community I end up in later in life, and it is something that I cannot wait to achieve. As a female in STEM, there are many ways that I can change the world and my community. Specifically, as I pursue my education as a civil engineer, I look forward to making the environment healthier and traveling safer. As a Civil Engineer, I would work alongside environmental, transportation, structural, and municipal civil engineers. All work together to help ensure that waterways, such as rivers and lakes, remain as clean as possible with very few pollutants, such as phosphorus or even trash, that go to the water via runoff from lawns, roads, and drainage systems. Another way that I would help make the world a better place is through safer travel. As people tend to go faster and faster as they need to reach their destinations, travel becomes more dangerous. By working to create faster working drainage and finding better ways to melt snow and gain traction (such as sand instead of salt), the roads are safer as they do not crack as much from the constant heat and reheat of the road. There is insufficient time or water for the ice to form on the road. One last way that I hope to help the world become a better place is by simply pursuing my education. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women still need to be more than one-third of all STEM workers. As I pursue my education and become a woman in STEM, I can encourage other young girls to pursue their dreams. While I looked at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree. In conclusion, I want to become a civil engineer because I enjoy my work. I am also becoming an engineer to impact my future community and, more importantly, encourage other young ladies to join the STEM field.
    Reginald Kelley Scholarship
    Since I committed to MSOE, many people have asked me why I wanted to study civil engineering. After experiencing what a civil engineer does during my internship, I realized how much I love civil engineering. More importantly, I am doing this to help my community and encourage other young girls to join the STEM field. Civil Engineering is something that, little by little, more people are starting to learn about. When I first mentioned to my peers that I would go into engineering, they automatically assumed electrical, mechanical, etcetera. Just like civil engineering is less prominent than other fields, a civil engineer's work is done behind the scenes. Many do not understand the amount of time, effort, and money that goes into it all—the hours spent creating, editing, and finalizing the plan and then getting it approved. The permit application, finding a contractor, getting the materials at a reasonable price, and working with Wisconsin DOT all happen behind the scenes. I enjoy doing this behind-the-scenes work. It is a way that I can help my community by fixing roads, helping apply for the permits or grants needed to fix the bridges, creating the maps for future projects, or even getting to design and help with the building process of parks. These are all ways that my future job can help whatever community I end up in later in life, and it is something that I cannot wait to achieve. As a female in STEM, there are many ways that I can change the world and my community. Specifically, as I pursue my education as a civil engineer, I look forward to making the environment healthier and traveling safer. As a Civil Engineer, I would work alongside environmental, transportation, structural, and municipal civil engineers. All work together to help ensure that waterways, such as rivers and lakes, remain as clean as possible with very few pollutants, such as phosphorus or even trash, that go to the water via runoff from lawns, roads, and drainage systems. Another way that I would help make the world a better place is through safer travel. As people tend to go faster and faster as they need to reach their destinations, travel becomes more dangerous. By working to create faster working drainage and finding better ways to melt snow and gain traction (such as sand instead of salt), the roads are safer as they do not crack as much from the constant heat and reheat of the road. There is insufficient time or water for the ice to form on the road. One last way that I hope to help the world become a better place is by simply pursuing my education. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women still need to be more than one-third of all STEM workers. As I pursue my education and become a woman in STEM, I can encourage other young girls to pursue their dreams. While I looked at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree. In conclusion, I want to become a civil engineer because the Lord calls me to do this, and I enjoy my work. I am also becoming an engineer to impact my future community and, more importantly, encourage other young ladies to join the STEM field.
    Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
    Receiving this scholarship is not just a financial assistance; it's a catalyst for empowerment. With every step I take towards my college education, I am investing in myself and the future of young women in STEM. As an aspiring engineer, I am driven by a dual purpose: to excel in my field and to pave the way for other females to do the same. I want to create a better world by empowering other females to make a change and do what they dream of doing. The journey toward a college education is not just about personal growth; it's about breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes. In engineering, where women are still underrepresented, I see an opportunity to make a significant difference. Despite the progress made, females make up only a fraction of STEM professionals, a statistic that I am not just determined but deeply passionate about change. Your support through this scholarship will fuel my determination and encourage me to continue this fight for gender equality in STEM. My commitment to pursuing excellence in engineering is fueled by a desire to inspire other young girls to dream big and defy societal norms. Increasing the presence of women in STEM fields can drive innovation, foster diversity, and create a more inclusive society. Through my journey, I aim to be a beacon of hope and encouragement for the next generation of female engineers. While the road ahead may be challenging, I am buoyed by the invaluable support of fellow women in engineering who have blazed trails before me. Their encouragement and mentorship remind me that I am not alone. As I continue to push the boundaries of what is possible, I am committed to paying it forward and uplifting others along the way. I am deeply grateful for their support and guidance, which have shaped my journey. Receiving this scholarship will alleviate the financial burden of college and enable me to amplify my impact. With each opportunity that comes my way, I am reminded of the responsibility that comes with it—to inspire, lead, and make a difference. In conclusion, pursuing my college education is not just a personal endeavor; it's a mission to empower myself and others. By encouraging young girls to break free from stereotypes and pursue their dreams, I am also fueling my determination to transcend the limitations of the engineering world. With this scholarship, I am one step closer to realizing my goals and making a lasting impact on the world around me.
    Learner Math Lover Scholarship
    I love math for a few different reasons. I am going for an engineering major, so it is relevant to my future career. It's logical but still able to create complex problems, like a puzzle. But the biggest reason I love math is because it connects me to my family and friends. I have been good at math for as long as I can remember. Because of this, my parents would try challenging me and pushing me further to learn more. They would turn math into these fun games for me. So, as a child, I remember sitting around the kitchen table with my parents, creating new math and word problems for me. Especially my mom, since she was in charge of fourth-grade advanced math, this was a way for us to bond on a different level—bonding through math, which was something we both enjoyed. I was able to bond with my friends as well through math. We were all in advanced math, so almost all of us enjoyed doing complex problems and were competitive. So playing games such as Math 24, or seeing who scored higher, was fun for us, as nerdy as that sounds. It pushed all of us, especially me, to try harder. Then, we would work together to solve more intricate high-level problems in middle and college-level problems in early high school. Working and learning with these friends helped me fully understand my love for math, in the simplicity of the logic, yet the complexity of the problems. Had it not been for my love of math, I don't know where I would have ended up. I would not be on the path to becoming an engineer. I would not have the memories of sitting around the table with my parents, working on long multiplication and division in elementary school. I would not have the camaraderie with my friends as we challenged each other in Math 24 or see who scored higher. Through the complex simplicity of math, I gained better friendships, created fantastic childhood memories, and ultimately, became the logic engineering student I am today.
    Scholarship Institute’s Annual Women’s Leadership Scholarship
    One of the most important traits of a leader is being confident and able to overcome challenges. This can be seen when I stepped up to the plate in high school and took on the responsibility of drum major. Once I stopped asking why and found confidence in what I was doing, my band followed suit, and we were able to have one of our best marching seasons in years. Looking back on my junior year of high school, I remember music always being a part of my life. However, as we approached marching season, all of the drum majors from the previous year had graduated; no one wanted the challenge. So I decided to step up, take a chance, show that I was more than just a girl standing in the shadows, break the social norms that had unknowingly taken root, stop asking the questions, the why, and start taking action. During the interview, my director asked me why I wanted to become a drum major. At first, it was because I wanted the challenge. I knew I tended to excel and learn better when challenged. As the interview continued, I realized it was also because the band community I cherished was crumbling and needed a revival. After the interview, I waited for an eternity for the drum majors announcement. My heart pounded as they called my name. What was designated improbable, insignificant, and impossible had come true. My teachers saw something in me that I did not, but over time would. They saw my leadership, mentor ability, and how I attack challenges head-on to find the answers to the 'whys.' Completing what initially seemed excruciatingly hard, the season was burdensome. Having always been relatively quiet, I now had to lead over eighty students confidently, bellowing commands and conducting myself. As someone who had often tried to hide in the shadows, my "moment of fame" had arrived. My mentors and teachers sitting on the sidelines would never ask 'why' they had picked me but rather be proud of the growth in my self-confidence and leadership skills within the band and the community. Countless times throughout the season, I wondered, "Why?" Why had I done this? Why had they picked me? As the season progressed, I heard my voice carrying over the band, my hands stopped shaking before a performance, and I started trusting myself more. I learned I loved leading and taking control, helping guide people as they learn. It showed me that as I progress in life, I should look for work where I can lead and help people day after day. After the season ended, I was ecstatic and eagerly anticipated next year's season to lead and grow student participation again. To conclude, one of the best leadership qualities is to stop asking why and instead find a solution to the problem. Most importantly, they are confident. They take the issue in front of them and help lead their team through the problem. When the leader is sure in their leadership abilities and is confident in what they are doing, the team follows the leader's example and is also confident instead of timid. In the future, I hope to lead a team of skilled civil engineers while we work to find solutions to the problems facing our communities, such as transportation issues and environmental concerns.
    Women in STEM Scholarship
    Studying civil engineering at MSOE has sparked numerous inquiries about my choice in career path. My motivation can be distilled into three key aspects: divine calling, personal passion, and community impact. Addressing my first point, this is where the Lord calls me to be. Since middle school, I have struggled to figure out where I could make the most significant impact on those around me by sharing the gospel. In my junior year, I still did not know what I wanted to do and started panicking until I turned and began to cast my worries onto Him and pray. Once I started to pray, I could quickly see my plans changing. I started taking more interest in mathematics, using Inventor and Civil3D. My interests were transforming into a path that would align well with a Civil Engineer. The Lord even helped me get my current job as a Civil Engineering Intern with the City of Watertown— an opportunity cemented in my mind that I wanted to be a civil engineer. Through this experience, The Lord showed me how He will always provide and lead me in the path He has planned for me. Secondly, I derive immense satisfaction from the work inherent in civil engineering. The multifaceted nature of the field, encompassing tasks like infrastructure design, construction oversight, and stormwater management, resonates deeply with me. Crafting design plans and witnessing their realization through diligent effort brings me joy. Moreover, the opportunity to interact with diverse individuals, from city officials to curious visitors, adds richness to my professional experience. Civil engineering embodies a blend of technical challenges and human connection, fostering a sense of fulfillment in my daily endeavors. Thirdly, I am driven by a desire to effect positive change within my community. Civil engineering often operates behind the scenes, its intricacies obscured from public view. Yet, the impact of infrastructure improvements, environmental stewardship, and safety enhancements is profound. By leveraging my skills, I aim to contribute to the betterment of society, whether through road repairs, grant applications for bridge maintenance, or the design of recreational spaces. My future role holds the promise of tangible, enduring benefits for the communities I serve. One last way that I hope to help the world become a better place is by simply pursuing my education. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women are still less than one-third of all STEM workers. As I pursue my education and become a woman in STEM, I can encourage other young girls to pursue their dreams. While I looked at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree. In summary, my decision to study civil engineering at MSOE is driven by a confluence of factors: divine guidance, personal fulfillment, and a commitment to community service. As I embark on this journey, I am cognizant of the transformative potential inherent in my chosen vocation. By embracing my calling, nurturing my passion, and championing inclusivity, I endeavor to leave a lasting legacy of impact and inspiration within the realm of civil engineering.
    A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
    To help people when I become a civil engineer, I will have the power to make a positive difference in people's lives. My work will involve collaborating with other engineers to ensure that waterways remain clean and safe, protecting people's health and well-being. By finding innovative ways to reduce the amount of pollutants that enter these waterways from runoff, you can help prevent waterborne illnesses and keep communities healthy. In addition, I'll be able to find ways to make travel safer for people by improving drainage systems, finding better ways to melt snow, and gaining traction on icy roads as I continue my education. As a Civil Engineer, I would work alongside environmental, transportation, structural, and municipal civil engineers. All work together to help ensure that waterways, such as rivers and lakes, remain as clean as possible with very few pollutants, such as phosphorus or even trash, that go to the water via runoff from lawns, roads, and drainage systems. Another way that I would help make the world a better place is through safer travel. As people tend to go faster and faster as they need to reach their destinations, travel becomes more dangerous. Living and working in Wisconsin once I graduate, the streets, especially during winter, are icy and slippery. By working to create faster working drainage and finding better ways to melt snow and gain traction (such as sand instead of salt), the roads are safer as they do not crack as much from the constant heat and reheat of the road. There is insufficient time or water for the ice to form on the road or create black ice. Moreover, as a woman in STEM, I'll encourage other young girls who aspire to follow in my footsteps, pushing me to continue my education. I'll inspire and encourage them to pursue their dreams despite the challenges they may face. By sharing my experiences and successes, I'll be able to help other women overcome obstacles and achieve their own goals. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women are still less than one-third of all STEM workers. While looking at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree. The journey toward a college education is not just about personal growth; it's about breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes. In engineering, where women are still underrepresented, I see an opportunity to make a significant difference. Despite the progress made, females make up only a fraction of STEM professionals, a statistic that I am not just determined but inspired to change. Your support through this scholarship will fuel my determination and encourage me to continue this fight for gender equality in STEM.
    Connie Konatsotis Scholarship
    To help people when I become a civil engineer, I will have the power to make a positive difference in people's lives. My work will involve collaborating with other engineers to ensure that waterways remain clean and safe, protecting people's health and well-being. By finding innovative ways to reduce the amount of pollutants that enter these waterways from runoff, you can help prevent waterborne illnesses and keep communities healthy. In addition, I'll be able to find ways to make travel safer for people by improving drainage systems, finding better ways to melt snow, and gaining traction on icy roads as I continue my education. As a Civil Engineer, I would work alongside environmental, transportation, structural, and municipal civil engineers. All work together to help ensure that waterways, such as rivers and lakes, remain as clean as possible with very few pollutants, such as phosphorus or even trash, that go to the water via runoff from lawns, roads, and drainage systems. Another way that I would help make the world a better place is through safer travel. As people tend to go faster and faster as they need to reach their destinations, travel becomes more dangerous. Living and working in Wisconsin once I graduate, the streets, especially during winter, are icy and slippery. By working to create faster working drainage and finding better ways to melt snow and gain traction (such as sand instead of salt), the roads are safer as they do not crack as much from the constant heat and reheat of the road. There is insufficient time or water for the ice to form on the road or create black ice. The journey toward a college education is not just about personal growth; it's about breaking down barriers and challenging stereotypes. In engineering, where women are still underrepresented, I see an opportunity to make a significant difference. Despite the progress made, females make up only a fraction of STEM professionals, a statistic that I am not just determined but inspired to change. Your support through this scholarship will fuel my determination and encourage me to continue this fight for gender equality in STEM. Moreover, as a woman in STEM, I'll encourage other young girls who aspire to follow in my footsteps, pushing me to continue my education. I'll inspire and encourage them to pursue their dreams despite the challenges they may face. By sharing my experiences and successes, I'll be able to help other women overcome obstacles and achieve their own goals. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women are still less than one-third of all STEM workers. While looking at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree.
    Heron Wolf Civil & Infrastructure Scholarship
    Winner
    Since I committed to MSOE, many people have asked me why I wanted to study civil engineering. The answer can be divided into three parts. To begin with, this is where the Lord is calling me to be. After experiencing what a civil engineer does during my internship, I realized how much I love civil engineering. Finally, I am doing this to help my community and encourage other young girls to join the STEM field. Addressing my first point, this is where the Lord calls me to be. Since middle school, I have struggled to figure out where I could make the most significant impact on those around me by sharing the gospel. In my junior year, I still did not know what I wanted to do and started panicking until I turned and began to cast my worries onto Him and pray. Once I started to pray, I could quickly see my plans changing. I started taking more interest in mathematics, using Inventor and Civil3D. My interests were transforming into a path that would align well with a Civil Engineer. The Lord even helped me get my current job as a Civil Engineering Intern with the City of Watertown— an opportunity cemented in my mind that I wanted to be a civil engineer. Through this experience, The Lord showed me how He will always provide and lead me in the path He has planned for me. Next, I enjoy civil engineering. Civil engineers have many aspects, including designing roads and parks, doing construction site inspections to ensure they follow their permits, stormwater management, and much more. One of my favorite parts of my job is creating design sheets and plans. I especially enjoy seeing those plans become a reality after hard work and dedication. Another fun part is getting to meet new people every day. Whether they need help with something, want a map, or are simply eager young kids on a field trip, I enjoy getting to know them and their personalities as they visit the City Hall office. Civil Engineering is a job that I want to do because of the tasks I do, the people I meet, and the fact that every day, I walk into the office with exciting new work for me to do. Civil Engineering is something that, little by little, more people are starting to learn about. When I first mentioned to my peers that I would go into engineering, they automatically assumed electrical, mechanical, etcetera. Just like civil engineering is less prominent than other fields, a civil engineer's work is done behind the scenes. Many do not understand the amount of time, effort, and money that goes into it all—the hours spent creating, editing, and finalizing the plan and then getting it approved. The permit application, finding a contractor, getting the materials at a reasonable price, and working with Wisconsin DOT all happen behind the scenes. Still, most people only see some work leading to the final product. I enjoy doing this behind-the-scenes work. It is a way that I can help my community by fixing roads, helping apply for the permits or grants needed to fix the bridges, creating the maps for future projects, or even getting to design and help with the building process of parks. These are all ways that my future job can help whatever community I end up in later in life, and it is something that I cannot wait to achieve. As a female in STEM, there are many ways that I can change the world and my community. Specifically, as I pursue my education as a civil engineer, I look forward to making the environment healthier and traveling safer. As a Civil Engineer, I would work alongside environmental, transportation, structural, and municipal civil engineers. All work together to help ensure that waterways, such as rivers and lakes, remain as clean as possible with very few pollutants, such as phosphorus or even trash, that go to the water via runoff from lawns, roads, and drainage systems. Another way that I would help make the world a better place is through safer travel. As people tend to go faster and faster as they need to reach their destinations, travel becomes more dangerous. Living and working in Wisconsin once I graduate, the streets, especially during winter, are icy and slippery. By working to create faster working drainage and finding better ways to melt snow and gain traction (such as sand instead of salt), the roads are safer as they do not crack as much from the constant heat and reheat of the road. There is insufficient time or water for the ice to form on the road or create black ice. One last way that I hope to help the world become a better place is by simply pursuing my education. As a female in STEM, especially at an engineering school, females are only a tiny population in my classes. Women are still less than one-third of all STEM workers. As I pursue my education and become a woman in STEM, I can encourage other young girls to pursue their dreams. While I looked at becoming an engineer, I was determined to bring up the percentage of females in STEM, and as I continue my education, having other women in engineering support me and telling me to keep going is such an encouragement. I want to be one of those women encouraging young girls to pursue that degree. In conclusion, I want to become a civil engineer because the Lord calls me to do this, and I enjoy my work. I am also becoming an engineer to impact my future community and, more importantly, encourage other young ladies to join the STEM field.