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Kamaia Hall-Edwards

1525

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

Bio

Ever since I was young, I have always been passionate about chemistry and food. Climbing on countertops, I grabbed ingredients from the cabinets and fridge, thinking that if I could mix ingredients that would taste good and heal holistically, I could cure my great-grandpa’s Alzheimer’s. Since then, my goal is to progress in the food science industry and pursue my dream of becoming a flavorist. As a flavorist, I would further my ambition of creating unique flavors people will love, creating long-lasting enjoyment. Putting any received scholarships directly towards the cost of my education to pursue my Food Science degree, will not only help me financially, but help obtain access to opportunities beyond college. I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority.

Education

Alabama A & M University

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Foods, Nutrition, and Related Services
  • GPA:
    3.5

Walnut Hills High School

High School
2018 - 2022
  • GPA:
    3.9

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Food Science and Technology, Other
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Food Production

    • Dream career goals:

      Scientist

    • Bi-Weekly Student

      Alabama A&M
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Volunteer Assistant

      Native Moon Apothecary
      2021 – 20221 year

    Sports

    Basketball

    Junior Varsity
    2018 – 20191 year

    Research

    • Agricultural and Food Products Processing

      Alabama A&M University — Bi-Weekly Student
      2022 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Alabama A&M's SHE Organization — Vice President
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Native Moon Apothecary — Assistant
      2020 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      TutorTeens — Tutor
      2021 – 2021

    Future Interests

    Philanthropy

    She Rose in STEAM Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Female Empowerment Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Larry D Parker Sr.’s Legacy Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Alexis Potts Passion Project Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity that not many can afford, financially or otherwise. I have been taught that in this world, as a black woman, I have to do double the work to get half as far. Putting and advancing my education first means putting myself first. When my mother noticed my interest in science as a little girl, she put me into STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including general chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. Executing chemistry experiments made me feel like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. When I was little my mom gave me books, movies, and music with black girls so I could always see someone who looked like me. When I told her I wanted to be a scientist, she gave me a poster of influential black women that I could look at every day in my room. Representation matters and with few black women in the STEM field, I aim to be a role model for little black girls. They deserve to see more women who look like them in STEM. I’m not only pursuing a college education for myself, but to thank my mom who pushed me and made sacrifices for me to get a higher education.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    My greatest success in the past year, which has also given me great satisfaction, was being accepted into every university I applied to, including being awarded multiple scholarships. I was accepted into 18 universities with zero rejections or waitlisting, which is more than I ever thought I would be capable of. While I was applying to colleges, I knew based on grades and test scores alone that I would be accepted into some of the colleges I applied to. My anxiety and self-doubt caused me to be scared and doubt my own ability. This past year, I have been working on improving how I view myself as far as uplifting and supporting myself. These acceptances are a perfect example of something I can regularly remind myself of that I achieved. Getting accepted into my dream school, with it being my first acceptance and a full-ride scholarship on top of that, solidified the fact that I am capable of achieving whatever I set my mind to and more. I was shocked beyond words and overjoyed when I found out about my acceptance. That amazing experience taught me that I need to recognize and be prouder of my accomplishments and not look for validation from others. In addition to congratulating myself, I learned to not stress as much and that as long as I do what I need to do and stay on top of my work. My ultimate goal going forward in life is to not rely on others to celebrate my accomplishments but to consistently celebrate myself, whether the accomplishment is big or small. I am a determined and passionate student with a strong interest in the field of food science, specifically product development and sensory science. Currently, I am majoring in Food Science, with a planned concentration in research and development, at Alabama A&M University. My career goal as a food scientist is to create foods and/or beverages with natural ingredients that benefit people’s mental and physical health. I want to make people’s comfort foods retain their flavor and homeliness while adapting them to become healthier and more beneficial for our bodies. I am eager to expand my knowledge in this field through my education, internships, and volunteer work. Attending college is also very important to me because there are not a lot of black women in the STEM field, particularly in the food science field. Representation matters and I aim to be a role model for little black girls so they can see more women who look like them in STEM. I’m not only pursuing a college education for myself but my family and the generations of black women after me.
    Rho Brooks Women in STEM Scholarship
    I climbed up on the kitchen counter, ransacking the cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather. He had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I was committed to finding a combination of foods from my refrigerator and cabinets to help revive his memory. He had a sweet tooth, so I used that knowledge in my experiments to make something that I hoped could also bring his memory back. I didn’t know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my clear interest in science as a little girl, my grandmother put me into STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including general chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. Executing chemistry experiments made me feel like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. I believe my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I will make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Show your Mettle - Women in STEM Scholarship
    I am a determined and passionate student with a strong interest in the field of food science, specifically product development and sensory science. Currently, I am majoring in Food Science, with a planned concentration in research and development, at Alabama A&M University. My career goal as a food scientist is to create foods and/or beverages with natural ingredients that benefit people’s mental and physical health. I want to make people’s comfort foods retain their flavor and homeliness while adapting them to become healthier and more beneficial for our bodies. I am eager to expand my knowledge in this field through my education, internships, and volunteer work. During the pandemic, I volunteered at Native Moon Apothecary, a black woman-owned apothecary. I assisted the owner with organizing and bagging herbs, helping customers, and price-tagging products. After closing, she taught me about the effects of different herbs and herbalism. Volunteering at the apothecary encouraged me to learn how I could help improve other’s lives by using natural ingredients. My acquired knowledge of how specific herbs affect people’s emotions and bodies will be helpful in my flavor-making process. I want to enrich people’s bodies by making foods that are most beneficial to them, while also creating delicious flavors for their taste buds. As a future flavorist, my goal is to create flavors that bring the same smile to people’s faces as the customers in the apothecary. To pursue my dream career of becoming a Flavorist, the field requires I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree, but I plan to earn my PhD in Food Science as well. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. The creative aspect of the career, allure of science, and practicality of food makes being a Flavorist my dream career. Attending college is also very important to me because there are not a lot of black women in the STEM field, particularly in the food science field. Representation matters and I aim to be a role model for little black girls so they can see more women who look like them in STEM. I’m not only pursuing a college education for myself but my family and the generations of black women after me. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I am a determined and passionate student with a strong interest in the field of food science, specifically product development and sensory science. Currently, I am majoring in Food Science, with a planned concentration in research and development, working towards my end goal of obtaining a PhD in Food Science at Alabama A&M University. My career goal as a food scientist is to create foods and/or beverages with natural ingredients that benefit people’s mental and physical health. I want to make people’s comfort foods retain their flavor and homeliness while adapting them to become healthier and more beneficial for our bodies. I am eager to expand my knowledge in this field through my education, internships, and volunteer work. During the pandemic, I volunteered at Native Moon Apothecary, a black woman-owned apothecary. I assisted the owner with organizing and bagging herbs, helping customers, and price-tagging products. After closing, she taught me about the effects of different herbs and herbalism. Volunteering at the apothecary encouraged me to learn how I could help improve other’s lives by using natural ingredients. My acquired knowledge of how specific herbs affect people’s emotions and bodies will be helpful in my flavor-making process. I want to enrich people’s bodies by making foods that are most beneficial to them, while also creating delicious flavors for their taste buds. As a future flavorist, my goal is to create flavors that bring the same smile to people’s faces as the customers in the apothecary. To pursue my dream career of becoming a Flavorist, the field requires I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree, but I plan to earn my PhD in Food Science as well. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. The creative aspect of the career, allure of science, and practicality of food makes being a Flavorist my dream career. Attending college is also very important to me because there are not a lot of black women in the STEM field, particularly in the food science field. Representation matters and I aim to be a role model for little black girls so they can see more women who look like them in STEM. I’m not only pursuing a college education for myself but my family and the generations of black women after me. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body.
    Youssef University’s College Life Scholarship
    Ever since I was young, I have always been passionate about chemistry and food. Climbing on countertops, I grabbed ingredients thinking that if I could mix them so they would taste good and heal holistically, I could cure my great-grandpa’s Alzheimer’s. Since then, my goal is to major in Food Science and progress in the food science industry to pursue my dream of becoming a flavorist. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Putting this scholarship directly towards the cost of my education to pursue my Food Science degree will not only help me financially but help provide access to opportunities beyond college. If I was given $1,000 right now, I would put it in my savings account and when it’s time, I would put it toward my fees for college. If awarded this scholarship, I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority.
    Surya Education Assistance Scholarship
    I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity that not many can afford, financially or otherwise. In this world, as a black woman, I have to do double the work to get half as far. Putting and advancing my education first means putting myself first. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. Putting this scholarship directly towards the cost of my education to pursue my Food Science degree will not only help me financially but help provide access to opportunities beyond college. I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. If awarded this scholarship, I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making my education and the aid of others my top priority.
    Empowering Women Through Education Scholarship
    I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity that not many can afford, financially or otherwise. In this world, as a black woman, I have to do double the work to get half as far. Putting and advancing my education first means putting myself first. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. Putting this scholarship directly towards the cost of my education to pursue my Food Science degree will not only help me financially but help provide access to opportunities beyond college. I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. If awarded this scholarship, I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making my education and the aid of others my top priority.
    Black Students in STEM Scholarship Fund
    I am a determined and passionate student with a strong interest in the field of food science, specifically product development and sensory science. I plan to major in Food Science, with a planned concentration in research and development, working towards my end goal of obtaining a Ph.D. in Food Science. My career goal as a food scientist is to create foods and/or beverages with natural ingredients that benefit people’s mental and physical health. I want to make people’s comfort foods retain their flavor and homeliness while adapting them to become healthier and more beneficial for our bodies. I am eager to expand my knowledge in this field through my education, internships, and volunteer work. I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority. While researching universities to apply to, I placed Alabama A&M University at the top of my list. Alabama A&M, is the top HBCU for food science because it offers a certified food science program by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), as well as a M.S, and Ph.D. food science degree. I know coming here will ensure that I will excel in the food science field, and become connected to successful A&M food science alumni and current students. I wish to feel the same warmth and sense of community that many African-Americans have felt at HBCUs. HBCU professors are known to show they care about their students and push them to do well by encouraging and connecting them to important people. It is important to me that I receive a top education and that it comes from black professors that want me to succeed in my career.
    ESOF Academic Scholarship
    I climbed up on the kitchen counter, ransacking the cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather. He had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I was committed to finding a combination of foods from my refrigerator and cabinets to help revive his memory. He had a sweet tooth, so I used that knowledge in my experiments to make something that I hoped could also bring his memory back. I didn’t know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my clear interest in science as a little girl, my grandmother put me into STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including general chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. Executing chemistry experiments made me feel like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. I wish my life journey had been a smoother one, but there were many bumps in the road (and even a few ditches). Losing family, experiencing homelessness, and receiving therapy for my anxiety, while maintaining good grades and social life, has not been easy. Baking and feeling a sense of comfort through the smell of treats in the oven, helped me cope during Covid. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I will make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Mary P. Perlea Scholarship Fund
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Next Young Leaders Program Scholarship
    I sat in the principal’s office with my head held high and my back straight. I was not deterred by the threat of detention or even suspension because I knew in my heart that I had done the right thing. In middle school, I started a month-long movement where POC girls in the school fought the discriminatory dress code. The dress code stated that shorts had to be longer than your fingertip length when your arms were at your sides. This code was repeatedly ignored when white girls would wear short shorts but strictly enforced when POC girls would do the same. When I brought my concern to the attention of the principal I was dismissed. This deeply frustrated myself and my friends. We agreed that something must be done for us to be treated fairly. My friends and I started a protest that we would wear short shorts until POC girls were treated the same as the white girls or vice versa. This protest spread outside of our friend group, and soon all of the POC girls in the middle school building were a part of it. We had many people supporting us, but some did not feel the same and we were often called racial slurs. Our protest was successful though, and soon white girls stopped receiving special treatment and received the same punishment that POC girls did. All girls were given detention if they were seen wearing short shorts, regardless of racial bias. The protest ceased, but the feeling of being a part of something important to me and my friends, and fighting for real change has continued to stick with me. Knowing about injustice is one thing, but it’s what you will do to fight it that makes a difference. This is one of the most important qualities of being a leader. In elementary school, we watched PSA videos about the difference between being a bystander and being someone who sticks up for those in need. Being a leader has no age qualification because you are never too young to do what’s right. A lot of people always think they have what it takes to be a leader, but when faced with conflict they back down. Everyone always roots for the heroes, but some lack the selfless qualities to be one. The ones who step up without hesitation, and help others without expecting anything in return are true leaders. After that eventful month in middle school, I looked at the world a little differently. It was the first time I saw blatant injustice that directly affected me and I felt inspired to continue to speak up and fight for what’s right, no matter the consequences. After college when I am an adult in the workforce I plan to stay alert on things that may not seem morally or ethically right. Whether it is social justice, focusing on racial or gender equality, or someone being discriminatory against me personally, I will continue to stand up for what I believe is right. I will not only continue to be a leader for others but a leader for myself as I matriculate through my life and educational career.
    Stephan L. Daniels Lift As We Climb Scholarship
    I climbed up on the kitchen counter, ransacking the cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather. He had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I was committed to finding a combination of foods from my refrigerator and cabinets to help revive his memory. He had a sweet tooth, so I used that knowledge in my experiments to make something that I hoped could also bring his memory back. I didn’t know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my clear interest in science as a little girl, my grandmother put me into STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including general chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. Executing chemistry experiments made me feel like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Covid caused an influx of customers searching for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. I wish my life journey had been a smoother one, but there were many bumps in the road. Losing family, experiencing homelessness, and receiving therapy for my anxiety, while maintaining good grades and social life, has not been easy. Baking and feeling a sense of comfort through the smell of treats in the oven, helped me cope during Covid. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What’s my purpose in life?” I believe my purpose is to help others, whether emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I’ll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Beaming Health Autism Post-Secondary Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. To pursue my dream career of becoming a Flavorist, the field requires I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree. I plan to major in Food Science and then go on to earn my Master’s to become a flavorist. The creative aspect of the career, allure of science, and practicality of food makes being a Flavorist my dream career. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Bold Giving Scholarship
    Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods.
    Bold Acts of Service Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority.
    Mark Neiswander "110" Memorial Scholarship
    I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity that not many can afford, financially or otherwise. In this world, as a black woman, I have to do double the work to get half as far. Putting and advancing my education first means putting myself first. To pursue my dream career of becoming a Flavorist, the field requires I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree. I plan to major in Food Science and then go on to earn my Master’s to become a flavorist. The creative aspect of the career, allure of science, and practicality of food makes being a Flavorist my dream career. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community. During the pandemic, I volunteered every Tuesday at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I’ve witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. Usually, this is due to a combination of lack of insurance and food deserts in their neighborhood. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients that benefit their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn more about how I could improve the lives of others through learning about herbs and foods. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority.
    Bold Driven Scholarship
    One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a specific branch of food science that particularly intrigues me: the career of a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. One of humankind’s favorite existential questions is, “What is my purpose in life?” I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, whether that’s emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I will continue to apply the same diligent work ethic to my college education as I have done to my previous studies, making education and the aid of others my priority.
    Bold Career Goals Scholarship
    At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I wanted to find a combination of foods to revive his memory. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. In my community, I've witnessed POC having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The apothecary allowed POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Bold Loving Others Scholarship
    Covid-19 has impacted everyone’s lives, and many tried to find a healthy way to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted by Covid-19 when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. While she was at home, I wanted to do something to let her know that I love her and to help reduce the stress in her life. Food became a way for my mom and I to cope as I occasionally assigned myself dessert duty after dinner. Sharing the treats helped strengthen our relationship, as we had many conversations curled up on the couch munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it’s certainly comforting every now and again. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my local community.
    Bold Perseverance Scholarship
    Overcoming depression has been a rollercoaster that I’m still riding, but have gotten over the gut-lurching drops. In order to help myself overcome this battle, I tried multiple coping mechanisms and different types of self-care. I journaled, read more books, limited social media, and focused on at least having my outward appearance look my best. I told myself that whenever I was having a bad day, I would do something different. Usually, it was my hair that I liked to change because it is so versatile. I believe that hair care is the best self-care. My hair is my crown and I decided to treat it as such. I sit for hours twisting, braiding, and doing all sorts of styles with my hair because it calms me down and I can focus on one thing at a time. Seeing my hair growth is a symbol of my own growth in myself. I’ve learned how to become mentally strong and in order to be truly happy I have to do things that make me happy and not others. This experience has impacted what I saw for my future because I now know what I want to become. My life goal is to do the best I can to be happy with myself. I want to experience all life has to offer, such as meeting new people, traveling the world, and learning new things. What I do in my life can either tear me down or lift me up and personally I choose the latter. Slowly overcoming depression has been the biggest challenge I have faced so far in my life, but I’m proud to say that every day I continue to learn more about myself and I get a little stronger.
    Scholarship Institute Future Leaders Scholarship
    I sat in the principal’s office with my head held high. I wasn’t deterred by the threat of detention or suspension because I knew in my heart that I’d done the right thing. In middle school, I started a month-long movement where POC girls fought the discriminatory dress code. The dress code stated that shorts had to be longer than your fingertip length when your arms were at your sides. This code was repeatedly ignored when white girls would wear short shorts but strictly enforced when POC girls would do the same. When I brought my concern to the attention of the principal I was dismissed. This deeply frustrated myself and my friends. We agreed that something must be done for us to be treated fairly. My friends and I started a protest to wear short shorts until POC girls were given equal treatment. This protest spread outside of our friend group, and soon all of the POC girls in the middle school were a part of it. We had many people supporting us, but some didn’t feel the same and we were often called racial slurs. Our protest was successful though, and soon white girls received the same punishment that POC girls did. All girls were given detention if they were seen wearing short shorts, regardless of racial bias. The protest ceased, but the feeling of being a part of something important to me and my friends, and fighting for real change has continued to stick with me. Knowing about injustice is one thing, but it’s what you will do to fight it that makes a difference. This is one of the most important qualities of being a leader. In elementary school, we watched PSA videos about the difference between being a bystander and being someone who sticks up for those in need. Being a leader has no age qualification because you are never too young to do what’s right. A lot of people always think they have what it takes to be a leader, but when faced with conflict they back down. Everyone always roots for the heroes, but some lack the selfless qualities to be one. The ones who step up without hesitation, and help others without expecting anything in return are true leaders. After that eventful month in middle school, I looked at the world a little differently. It was the first time I saw blatant injustice that directly affected me and I felt inspired to continue to speak up and fight for what’s right, no matter the consequences. After college when I’m an adult in the workforce I plan to stay alert on things that may not seem morally or ethically right. Whether it is social justice, focusing on racial or gender equality, or someone being discriminatory against me personally, I’ll continue to stand up for what I believe is right. I’ll continue to be a leader for others and a leader for myself. If I don’t speak up for what’s right, then who will?
    Bold Patience Matters Scholarship
    Being patient is about slowing down and enjoying the people and experiences around you. As kids, everyone wants to hurry and grow up so they can be adults, but then look back and miss being a kid again. You only have one life to live, and what you do with it is up to you. You don't want to rush through life in anticipation of something and end up disappointed or feeling empty. I like to go outside and enjoy nature because it helps me feel like I'm living in the moment. All throughout high school, kids are pressured to think about college and their future. They are rarely told to focus on themselves and their current lives. In high school, I always felt like I was playing catch up or wasn't doing enough. I wanted to hurry up and be done with school so I could live my life stress-free. This wasn't realistic though, and I ended up missing out on a lot of friendships and experiences because of how focused I was on my work. From this, I learned to be patient and enjoy my life in the present. I can't relive yesterday, and I can't predict tomorrow.
    Cliff T. Wofford STEM Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Connie Konatsotis Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Black Students in STEM Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Ruth and Johnnie McCoy Memorial Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. I was instructed on the value of education since I was little. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity not many can afford, financially or otherwise. One night, as I was researching STEM careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The creative aspect, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. The field requires that I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree in food science, but I plan to go on to earn my Master’s. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. Science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, but it's certainly comforting. While the pandemic continues to be a difficult time for the world, being able to help my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. Humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Attending college to become a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity not many can afford, financially or otherwise. One night, as I was researching STEM careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The creative aspect, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. The field requires I graduate with at least a bachelor’s degree in food science, but I plan to go on to earn my Master’s. I aim to learn the foundation of food science in college, before earning experience through internships and jobs. To me, college is an important stepping stone to get where I want to be in my life. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. Science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, but it's certainly comforting. While the pandemic continues to be a difficult time for the world, being able to help my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    SkipSchool Scholarship
    An activist with the voice of an angel, Marian Anderson shared her powerful voice with many important diplomats and thousands of people across the world. Marian became close friends with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, after the First Lady resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution in protest to Marian not being allowed to perform at Washington D.C.’s Constitutional Hall. This led to Marian’s historical concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in front of 75,000 people. Throughout her fame, she fought for integration and continuously broke barriers being the first black singer and/or woman to perform in multiple prestigious areas, such as the New York Metropolitan Opera and the White House.
    "If You Believe..." Scholarship
    I climbed on the kitchen counter, ransacking cabinets, intent on finding the perfect ingredients. At four years old, I was determined to make a cure that could help my great-grandfather, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was committed to finding a combination of foods to help revive his memory. I used the knowledge of his sweet tooth in my experiments to make something that I hoped would also bring his memory back. I didn't know it then, but I was discovering my lifelong interest in food science. Seeing my interest in science, my grandmother enrolled me in STEM camps to develop my knack for chemistry. Various summer camps, including chemistry and food chemistry programs, fascinated me. I felt like a magician from one of my favorite fantasy novels as I executed experiments. I was so intrigued by science that I decided to become a scientist when I grew up. My goal was to invent something beneficial for people to enjoy. One night, as I was researching science careers, I learned about the field of Food Science. It combined my interest in food and chemistry, making it emotionally and intellectually satisfying. I found a branch of food science that captivated me: a Flavorist. The more I read, the clearer it became that this was what my life had been leading me towards. The creative aspect of the career, making unique flavors, the allure of science, and the practicality of food all made being a Flavorist my dream career. Covid-19 impacted everyone's lives, and many tried to find healthy ways to cope with the challenges. I was personally impacted when my mother became unemployed amid the pandemic after her position as an event manager was eliminated. Food became a way for my mom and me to cope, as the treats helped strengthen our relationship while we had many conversations munching brownies. While science proves that sugar might not be the best ingredient to cope with stress, it's certainly comforting. Helping my mom through these stressful times made me realize I wanted to be helpful to others in my community. During the pandemic, I volunteered at my local black-owned apothecary, Native Moon Apothecary. Due to concerns over Covid, an influx of customers searched for healthy alternatives to strengthen their bodies. In my community, I've witnessed people of color (POC) having little to no access to proper health care and organic foods. The local apothecary allows POC to access affordable natural ingredients benefiting their minds and bodies. Volunteering there encouraged me to learn about how I could improve the lives of others through herbs and foods. One of humankind's favorite existential questions is, "What's my purpose in life?" I believe that my purpose in life is to help others, emotionally or physically, through the food I create. Being a flavorist will impact my life and others for the better, as I create foods with natural ingredients that benefit the mind and body. I'll make my four-year-old self proud, and, most importantly, my great-grandfather proud.
    Louise Speller Cooper Memorial Scholarship
    I was instructed on the value of education since I was a little girl. Coming from a single-parent household, my mother has made many sacrifices, allowing me to focus on my education. Earning a higher education is a privileged opportunity that not many can afford, financially or otherwise. I have been taught that in this world, as a black woman, I have to do double the work to get half as far. Putting and advancing my education first means putting myself first. The minute I was old enough to start looking at colleges, my mom fully encouraged me to research HBCUs. She constantly reminded me that I would be around white people for the rest of my life, so it is important for me to be around black people for at least my 4 years in college. Even though she was strongly biased towards FAMU, she gave me resources to connect with people from other HBCUs to assist me in my application process. If my mom couldn’t help me with something, she would connect me with someone who could. I always joke that she knows everyone in the city, but I wouldn’t have made it this far being successful without her help. I am determined to be a successful and well-rounded college student. This includes staying on top of my work, as well as taking advantage of all college has to offer. Unfortunately, my mom didn’t get to have the college experience she had hoped for due to a horrible accident her sophomore year in college. I am excited to join and participate in all of the clubs, sports, and events on campus that my mom didn’t get to enjoy. Attending college is also very important to me because there aren’t a lot of black women in the STEM field. When I was little my mom gave me books, movies, and music with black girls so I could always see someone who looked like me. When I told her I wanted to be a scientist, she gave me a poster of influential black women that I could look at every day in my room. Representation matters and I aim to be a role model for little black girls. They deserve to see more women who look like them in STEM. I’m not only pursuing a college education for myself, but for my family and the generations of black women after me.
    Next Young Leaders Program Scholarship
    I sat in the principal’s office with my head held high and my back straight. I was not deterred by the threat of detention or even suspension because I knew in my heart that I had done the right thing. In middle school, I started a month-long movement where POC girls in the middle school building fought the discriminatory dress code. The dress code stated that shorts had to be longer than your fingertip length when your arms were at your sides. This code was repeatedly ignored when white girls would wear short shorts, but strictly enforced when POC girls would do the same. When I brought my concern to the attention of the principal and was dismissed, my friends and I agreed to start a protest and wear short shorts until POC girls were treated the same as the white girls or vice versa. This protest spread outside of our friend group, and soon all of the POC girls in the middle school building were a part of it. Soon white girls stopped receiving special treatment and received the same punishment that POC girls did. The protest ceased, but the feeling of being a part of something and fighting for real change has continued to stick with me. Knowing about injustice is one thing, but it’s what you will do to fight it that makes a difference. This is one of the most important qualities of being a leader. In elementary school we watched PSA videos about the difference between being a bystander and being someone who sticks up for those in need. Being a leader has no age qualification either because you are never too young to do what’s right. Everyone always roots for the heroes, but some lack the selfless qualities to be one. The ones who step up and help others without expecting anything in return are true leaders. After that eventful month in middle school I looked at the world a little differently. It was the first time I saw blatant injustice that directly affected me and I felt inspired to continue to speak up and fight for what’s right, no matter the consequences. After college when I am a full adult in the workforce I plan to stay alert on things that may not seem morally or ethically right, and challenge the people who enforce them. Whether it is social justice, focusing on racial or gender equality, or someone being discriminatory against me personally, I will continue to stand up for what I believe is right. I will not only continue to be a leader for others, but a leader for myself. As the famous quote states, “If not us, who? And if not now, when?”
    Gabriella Carter Music and Me Scholarship
    The volume of the song vibrated the car in a unique way that made me forget whatever I was doing, and feel an instant release of serotonin. Three year old me bopped my head and shimmied in my car seat, as 1 Thing by Amerie put an instant smile on my face. At home I had a wooden bongo set and an old CD player that my mom gave me. Whenever I was feeling bored, happy, or sad I would put my CDs in and start playing on my bongos. Dancing around my room and laughing was the highlight of my life as a child. Music has always been a big part of my life. Almost all of my family members on my dad’s side are involved in music. I believe that music is more than just enjoying the sound and lyrics, it opens up more about yourself and allows you to self-reflect on who you are. Growing up around music made me understand how it truly affects people, and especially black people. When we were taken to America, Africans only had their stories and music to connect them to their home. For centuries music in the black community has evolved into many different genres and styles, but all with a central theme. Music is made to make you feel something within yourself. Whenever I hear the beginning instrumental for 1 Thing by Amerie, I immediately smile as a warm nostalgic feeling washes over me. It reminds me of all the happy moments with my mom, when I barely saw her as she traveled for work at the time. The lively instrumentals make it almost impossible not to get up and dance. Even though I didn’t understand the lyrics when I was little, I still loved listening to the instrumentals and singing, “It’s this one thing that’s got me trippin” and a bunch of oh’s on repeat. Without even knowing what the song was saying, it brought me joy. This shows the importance of music and how it’s so special amongst people. It doesn’t matter about your age, race, gender, or even sexual orientation. Anyone and everyone can love music.
    Nikhil Desai Reflect and Learn COVID-19 Scholarship
    March 12, 2020. I woke up towards the end of math class, regretting my decision of staying up late, and counting down the minutes until I was home. Everyone crowded the doorway, anxious to be free from the living hell that is school and go home. Watching the sea of kids come out of every door and walk shoulder to shoulder in the halls was just another day in high school. I had no idea that it would be the last time I experienced this. That night my mom told me that I wasn’t going to school the next day because a parent was exposed to Covid-19. One parent out of 3,000 kids in the school was exposed and the whole school shut down. Fast forward to present day where the school board is trying to send all of the kids back in the building as numbers continue to rise. As clubs reopen, hospital numbers rise. As people party without care, families sit next to the hospital beds of their loved ones praying for this to end. Covid-19 has really opened my eyes to the strong hold that capitalism has on America. With no regard for other people’s lives, state, local, and national governments have reopened businesses rather than providing stimulus checks to help people through these rough times. My mom was an Event Manager and absolutely loved her job before her position was eliminated due to Covid-19. We finally had a stable home since she stopped being a flight attendant, and everything was starting to feel normal. Normal. What even is normal? Our world which we called normal turned upside down within a week. Masks are our new normal. Social distancing is our new normal. One of the most important things that I’ve learned from this pandemic, is that there is no normal, there only is. Just be. Don’t stress too much about the future because as my mom loves to say, you never know what tomorrow holds so it's best to live in the now.
    Gabriella Carter Failure Doesn't Define Me Scholarship
    I couldn’t tell her goodbye. In my sister’s last moments in the hospital, I failed to walk through the door to tell her goodbye. I will always regret this. Her going into cardiac arrest was a shock to everyone and it only went downhill from there. I thought I had time to tell her how much I admire her, how much I love her, how much she means to me. I took time for granted. After her passing, I went through all the stages of grief in different intervals of my life. She was the first person I lost who was really close to me. I felt guilty for not holding her hand, for not kissing her cheek, for not doing anything but stand there frozen. Anything at all. Through the help of my other siblings, I overcame my grief to an extent. They cheered me up and checked on me everyday to see how I was doing. I let them know often just how much I appreciate them. Without them, it would have been a lot harder to truly accept the fact that my sister was gone. After all of this, I realized how thankful, yet heartbroken, I was. I was thankful for the time I got to spend with her, for my siblings who helped cheer me up, and for my bravery to even walk into the room and at least see her. The whole event made me truly realize that you can not take anything or anyone for granted. Unfortunately, we don’t know when our time will end. My time could be today, tomorrow, or when I’m 100, but I want to leave knowing that I tried to be on good terms with the ones I love. Family connection and love is everything to me. Since I was little, some of my best memories have been with my family, no matter how close we are now. Sometimes I fall out with my mom and we’ll be mad at each other for a couple days. Then one of us will always either write a note or order the other’s favorite food, just to remind us how much we actually care about each other. I think that’s one of the most important things. As long as you know you care about each other, it doesn’t matter if you don’t talk often or if you always argue because you both know that you’ll always love each other. Jazmine, my beautiful and intelligent sister, helped me more than she’ll ever know. She showed me just how much my family truly means to me and that you can’t take anything for granted. When I see her one day, I will be sure to thank her.