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Joshua Sims

1425

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Finalist

Bio

My goal in life is to impact the world through my artistry, volunteering in my community and through philanthropic efforts. An artist at heart, I would love to use my artistry to spark conversations, inspire creativity in others and evoke feelings of happiness.

Education

Wish Academy High

High School
2017 - 2021

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Art/Art Studies, General
    • Applied Psychology
    • Business Administration and Management, General
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Arts

    • Dream career goals:

      Creative Director

    • Intern

      Made Fresh Customs
      2020 – Present4 years
    • Marketing Co-Director

      Summer Math and Science Honors Academy (SMASH)
      2020 – Present4 years
    • Owner/Artist

      DHJ Customs
      2019 – Present5 years

    Sports

    Basketball

    Varsity
    2017 – 20203 years

    Arts

    • Independent

      Painting
      na
      2017 – Present
    • Indepedent

      Drawing
      na
      2019 – 2020

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      116th Street Elementary School — Contest host, judge and artist
      2019 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      116th Street Elementary School — Artist and organizer
      2020 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Carson Fosters — Foster parent
      2017 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Funds2orgs — Organizer
      2019 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Independent — Food distributor
      2018 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    An artist at my core, but also having an aptitude for math and science, I’m not sure how 9th grade me made the tough decision to commit to 3 years in UCLA’s Summer Math And Science Honors Academy (SMASH). SMASH is a residential program targeting students of color who excel in math and the sciences. I expected to regret my decision because the timing meant that I had to decline an art opportunity that I’d been pursuing for years. I was also extremely intimidated by the anticipated rigor of SMASH and how/if I would fit in with some of the highest achieving high school students in Los Angeles. Did I really belong there? What if I failed? Yet I was still intrigued by the opportunity to study with other STEM enthusiasts in an exciting environment, so I accepted admission into the program. At SMASH, 3 assigned projects changed my outlook on educational growth. The first summer, we built a website, the second, a working water filtration system and the 3rd, with our program altered by Covid, we coordinated online to design a functional app using virtual reality technology. Collaborating on these projects unleashed a zest for challenge, creativity and comprehensive research. I’ve used these skills to better direct projects at school and enhance my competence in leadership roles. SMASH also provided an education in the complexities of college life. Away from home for 5 weeks each summer, I learned to manage a 17 hour day involving difficult classes, career networking events, study time, social activities and self-care. This led to a commitment and respect for the skill of organization and a blossoming maturity and independence when I returned home. I am also certain that the experience gave me confidence to meet the increasing obligations of impending adulthood. Finally, the director of SMASH UCLA, who I admire, taught us the significance of advocating for ourselves. I’ve followed her advice by speaking up at school concerning course placement and grades, by promoting my customs business and by protesting against racial injustice against my people. I have graduated from the program, but continually uncover situations that I am undeniably able to manage, as a result of responsibilities, experiences and lessons learned at SMASH. I learned that I had it within me to conquer the fear of the unknown and to successfully complete the program. I am now serving as Marketing Director of the SMASH Alumni Board. SMASH had such an impact on my growth, that in the future, I would like to have a leading role within SMASH or a similar community organization, so that I can take part in impacting the life of a high schooler of color. I want to be a living example that they too, can make it. Completing SMASH has been one of my greatest achievements to date.
    "What Moves You" Scholarship
    “You must not wait to be elected into office, before you begin to serve. Begin to serve everywhere you are; in the home, community, school, university, work, hospital, church, market, society, nation and among many other places.” ― Lailah Gifty Akita My name is Joshua Sims and I am a high school senior. I am a member of the National Honor Society and of the National Society of High School Scholars. I serve as Marketing Director for UCLA's Summer Math and Science Honors Academy (SMASH) Alumni Board and I am passionate about sports, community service and visual arts. I have also operated my own successful custom shoe design business for over 2 years. The above quote has inspired me to be unwavering in my passion for art so that I can use it to achieve not only personal and career goals, but to satisfy my drive to continue to be a lifelong humanitarian. My desire is to major in visual arts, with a minor in psychology, or vice versa. My goal is to pursue a career in art therapy, with an emphasis on working with the youth. Art helped me get through bullying in elementary school, body shaming in middle school and the academic stress of high school. It is exciting to know that I can help change someone’s life through therapy approached in such creative manner. I am also inspired to continue to making changes in the community with my art. For example, 116th Street Elementary School is in one of the most impoverished communities of Los Angeles. Trash and debris surround the entire school. With permission from the principal, I spent days creating a mural on the school grounds to brighten the space. The children were excited about the mural, but more inquisitive about the artwork on my shoes. Thus, I approached the principal with another project idea. This time, I hosted an essay and art contest. The winner would receive a free pair of custom shoes from me. The essay prompt asked them to discuss what they could do to step up in their community and make a difference. A picture representing their written ideas was also required. The winner of the contest was Keenan. He wrote a well thought out essay with accompanying artwork explaining how he would like to step up and help engage other students to clean up trash around the school community. As well, during the height of the pandemic, I chose 3 frontline workers from my mom’s Facebook friends list to provide with a free pair of custom shoes, in honor of their bravery and dedication to human service. I have done my best to embody the message in this quote. Not only do I initiate community service projects, I also find myself constantly in search of other available opportunities. I've learned that service doesn't always require a huge community effort or enormous amounts of time to plan. I, alone have the capacity to make a difference, every day.
    Undiscovered Brilliance Scholarship for African-Americans
    My name is Joshua Sims and I am an 18-year-old high school senior. I am a member of the National Honor Society and of the National Society of High School Scholars. I serve as Marketing Director for UCLA's Summer Math and Science Honors Academy (SMASH) Alumni Board and I am passionate about sports, fitness, community service and visual arts. I have also operated my own successful custom shoe design business for over 2 years. My dream is to major in visual arts, with a minor in psychology, or vice versa. Currently, my goal is to pursue a career in art therapy, with an emphasis on working with the youth. In my early years, art helped me get through the bullying in elementary school, the self-hate concerning my height in middle school and the stress from the academic rigor of high school. Studies show, and my personal experience proves that self-expression and the resulting artwork can help people understand their emotional conflicts, help create and improve self-esteem, reduce anxiety and develop necessary social skills to function in their environments. It is exciting to know that I can help change someone’s life through therapy approached in a somewhat, non-clinical and creative method. Through college and into adulthood, I will continue to make changes in the community with my art as I have always done. For example, 116th Street Elementary School is in one of the most impoverished communities of Los Angeles. Trash and debris surround the entire school. On the school grounds I noticed an awkwardly placed storage bin, which further contributed to the unappealing look of the campus and with permission from the principal, I spent days creating a mural to brighten the space. As I worked, I noticed that the children were more inquisitive about the artwork on my shoes than the mural, so after completion of the mural, I approached the principal with another project idea. This time, I hosted an essay and art contest. The winner would receive a free pair of custom shoes from me. The essay prompt asked them to discuss what they could do to step up in their community and make a difference. A picture representing their written ideas was also required. The winner of the contest was Keenan. He wrote a well thought out essay with accompanying artwork explaining how he would like to step up and help engage other students to clean up trash around the school community. It was interesting to learn what plans all the students had for the future and how they viewed the world and the problems that occur. I think this project helped to show them that there are people who care about their opinions and perspectives on community issues. I have also used my art to make bandanas for pet adoption day at the Carson Animal Shelter. I made 100 bandanas depicting art and various messaging such as “Pick Me!” or “Take Me Home With You!” As well, during the height of the pandemic, I chose 3 frontline workers from my mom’s Facebook friends list to provide with a free pair of custom shoes, in honor of their bravery and dedication to human service. Another community service project for which I am proud is the effort I led with a few schoolmates to collect over 3,500 pairs of shoes. These new, used and/or gently worn shoes were collected and shipped all over the world to provide an economic opportunity for micro-entrepreneurs in developing nations, and to help the environment by repurposing shoes. We walked door-to-door, reached out to friends and family and posted flyers in our neighborhood, online & at school. We learned that even as teens, with willpower and organization, we have the power to create a significant impact on the livelihoods of people around the globe. Participating in these service projects has exposed me to a diverse range of people, issues and experiences, which has led to an increased sense of social responsibility for me. Not only do I initiate self-driven community service projects, I also find myself constantly in search of other available opportunities. It has become an addiction of sorts that satisfies me to the core. Lastly, but equally as important, I am a somewhat shy individual and my involvement with the community has helped me to broaden my communication and social skills which will be beneficial in college, in the workplace and for future community service projects. If I am granted with this award, it would contribute to allowing me to focus more on my academics, rather than be burdened with a full or part-time job as a freshman. If I do not need to secure a job, I would also have more flexibility to participate in the array of clubs and organizations on campus that focus on serving the surrounding and global communities. If I choose USC, I am interested in being part of the Alpha Phi Omega organization, and if my destination is Loyola Marymount University, I plan to become a member of the Creare Service Organization. “You must not wait to be elected into office, before you begin to serve. Begin to serve everywhere you are; in the home, community, school, university, work, hospital, church, market, society, nation and among many other places.” ― Lailah Gifty Akita
    Normandie Cormier Greater is Now Scholarship
    My cousin, aged 20, was admitted into a psychiatric facility for extreme panic attacks and depression; the effect of cruel treatment received as a black student at her predominantly white, midwestern college and academic overwhelm. Released a week later, she returned to California the first week of quarantine. Once home, she began virtual learning despite doctor’s recommendations to take time off. Home alone the majority of the day, she struggled with the volume of make up work needed to maintain her GPA. Panic attacks resurfaced. Worried, I wanted to support her. Not knowing exactly what to do, I searched online for guidance and discovered the importance of not letting her suffer alone. So, I sent her a message. “Please text if you ever feel panicked.” I didn’t expect a response since we hadn’t spoken in years. Days later, during a zoom meeting, I received a text. “Josh, feeling nervous…”. With no prior plan for this moment, I replied, “I’m in a meeting. Please FaceTime me, but stay on mute.” So she did. She watched as I attended my meeting, later expressing comfort in my virtual presence. This eventually evolved into a ritual; often on muted calls for hours on end during the school day. During our calls, if her attention waned, I motioned to her to focus. She soon watched me less and concentrated on her assignments more. We called our meet-ups “Club Quiet”. Although ”Club Quiet” was quite successful, I was often distracted and unmotivated to continue. I was internally and emotionally conflicted because “Club Quiet’ took place amidst my paralyzing fear of COVID, amidst escalating racial tensions in America and during the passing of my beloved dog who had been with me for my entire life. Many days I did not want to be in “Club Quiet” and preferred to nurse my own wounds. However, I decided not to abandon my personal commitment to my cousin, so I pushed through and eventually came to the realization that the calls with my cousin had also begun to become a source of comfort and solace for me. At the end of the school year, my cousin passed all of her classes, and with professional counseling, learned to better manage her panic attacks. Through continued counseling we have since learned that my cousin suffers from PTSD as a result of negative experiences in college away from home. However, she is now enrolled in a community college near her home and doing well. I enrolled in a psychology class that summer to learn more about mental health. I became so intrigued by the nuances of the human psyche that I have chosen Psychology as my intended major or minor. I have also learned to be more patient with myself and with others, because we all struggle and cope with life in unique ways. Had it not been for the pandemic, I would have never been able to be there for my cousin, nor would I have discovered my interest in psychology.
    Pandemic's Box Scholarship
    My cousin, aged 20, was admitted into a psychiatric facility for extreme panic attacks and depression; the effect of cruel treatment received as a black student at her predominantly white, midwestern college and academic overwhelm. Released a week later, she returned to California the first week of quarantine. Once home, she began virtual learning despite doctor’s recommendations to take time off. Home alone the majority of the day, she struggled with the volume of make up work needed to maintain her GPA. Panic attacks resurfaced. Worried, I wanted to support her. Not knowing exactly what to do, I searched online for guidance and discovered the importance of not letting her suffer alone. So, I sent her a message. “Please text if you ever feel panicked.” I didn’t expect a response since we hadn’t spoken in years. Days later, during a zoom meeting, I received a text. “Josh, feeling nervous…”. With no prior plan for this moment, I replied, “I’m in a meeting. Please FaceTime me, but stay on mute.” So she did. She watched as I attended my meeting, later expressing comfort in my virtual presence. This eventually evolved into a ritual; often on muted calls for hours on end during the school day. During our calls, if her attention waned, I motioned to her to focus. She soon watched me less and concentrated on her assignments more. We called our meet-ups “Club Quiet”. Although ”Club Quiet” was quite successful, I was often distracted and unmotivated to continue. I was internally and emotionally conflicted because “Club Quiet’ took place amidst my paralyzing fear of COVID, amidst escalating racial tensions in America and during the passing of my beloved dog who had been with me for my entire life. Many days I did not want to be in “Club Quiet” and preferred to nurse my own wounds. However, I decided not to abandon my personal commitment to my cousin, so I pushed through and eventually came to the realization that the calls with my cousin had also begun to become a source of comfort and solace for me. At the end of the school year, my cousin passed all of her classes, and with professional counseling, learned to better manage her panic attacks. Through continued counseling we have since learned that my cousin suffers from PTSD as a result of negative experiences in college away from home. However, she is now enrolled in a community college near her home and doing well. I enrolled in a psychology class that summer to learn more about mental health. I became so intrigued by the nuances of the human psyche that I have chosen Psychology as my intended major or minor. I have also learned to be more patient with myself and with others, because we all struggle and cope with life in unique ways. Had it not been for the pandemic, I would have never been able to be there for my cousin, nor would I have discovered my interest in psychology.
    Mental Health Movement Scholarship
    My cousin was admitted into a psychiatric facility in 2019; the effect of cruel treatment received as a black student at her white, midwestern college. Upon release, she returned home to California during quarantine and began virtual learning despite her doctor’s recommendations to take time off. She struggled with the volume of make-up work needed to maintain her GPA. Her panic attacks resurfaced. Not knowing what to do, I searched online and discovered the importance of not letting people who experience mental illness to suffer alone. I sent her a message. “Text if you ever need me.” Days later, while in an online meeting, I received a text from her. “Josh, feeling nervous, are you available?” Intimidated, with no prior plan in place for this moment, I replied, “In a meeting, but Facetime me, I'll answer. Don’t say anything, I am in a meeting!” My cousin watched me during my meeting, later expressing that she felt calmer. She added that halfway through the meeting, she was able to think about her schoolwork without hyperventilating. A ritual evolved. We were on Facetime calls for hours on end during the day. If I noticed that her attention waned from her work, I motioned for her to focus. We called our meet ups “Club Quiet”. I often did not want to participate in "Club Quiet" because this all took place during fears about COVID, racial tensions in America and during the passing of my dog. I decided not to abandon my personal commitment to my cousin, so I pushed through and realized that the calls comforted me too. My cousin passed her classes, and learned to manage panic attacks. She is enrolled in a college near her home and doing well. That semester I learned about the daily struggle people of mental illness. The experience propelled me to enroll in a psychology class that summer to learn more about the treatment for, causes of, and types of mental health issues. I am now considering a major in psychology so that I work in a career where I assist those with mental illnesses.
    Elevate Minorities in the Arts Scholarship
    Understanding how I communicate is essential to understanding how I process my thoughts, views and ideas about the world around me. While I am an excellent verbal communicator as evidenced by my successes in leadership roles, presentation of information to others, and in situations requiring that I advocate for myself, I best articulate my deepest thoughts after thoroughly exploring my feelings through artistic expression. I am inspired to be creative when I have intense or difficult subjects to ponder. Most of my artist is articulated through customs shoes and clothing. This scholarship will help me improve my creative talents as an art major by allowing me extra funds to purchase books, supplies and other items needed as an art major. This scholarship could also be very useful in helping me fund a second major or minor in Business. With the added benefits of a Business degree, I will have positioned myself on how to promote my designs, how to communicate effectively, how to understand contracts and fine print and how to protect myself against competitors who may attempt to illegally copy my designs.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    116th Street Elementary School is located in one of the most impoverished communities of Los Angeles, CA; Watts. While I'm sure that the school custodians do what they can to keep the school grounds clean, trash and debris surround the school and often blow onto the school yard. In an attempt make the school grounds more inviting, most of the walls on the exterior of 116th Street Elementary School are covered with faded art from years past. However, near the entrance to one of the classrooms was an awkwardly placed, and eyesore of a storage bin, which begged for life and I wanted to be the one to take on the task. I was excited, yet somewhat intimidated by the project because I am a shoe artist and had never painted something on such a large scale. Having received permission from the principal to embark on this project, I spent my high school holidays, minimum days and some weekends creating a mural to brighten up the space. As I went about my work, I noticed that the children were less interested in my mural and more inquisitive and impressed in the artwork they saw on my shoes. I eventually finished the mural and was proud of it, but I had another idea about how I could give back to the school. Again, with the principal's blessings, I hosted an essay and art contest for the students. The winner would receive a free pair of customized shoes made by me. The essay prompt was to discuss the things that they could do to step up in their community and make a difference. They also had to draw a picture that represented the ideas that they had for making a difference. In total, I received about 40 essays. I believe that this project helped bridge a gap between the community and I because I got to understand the ideas and thoughts of the younger generation. These are the people who may grow up to be activists, leaders or business people in the community, so it was interesting to get to understand what plans they had for the future at such a young age. One joy that I had during this project was reading all of the essays and seeing how the younger kids viewed the world and the problems that occur. To the next student who may decide to follow in this assignment, I recommend being patient and taking time to read through all of the submissions in depth. In total, I received about 40 essays. The winner of the contest was Keenan. He wrote a very well thought out essay with accompanying artwork about how he would like to step up and help engage other students to clean up trash around the school community. When I met him in person, it was nice speaking to him about his clean up project idea and about the ideas he had for the custom shoes. He was just as intelligent and creative as I imagined from the ideas that he had in his essay. It is important to be involved in a project like this because it feels good to know that you are encouraging younger people to talk about important issues. It's also important because it shows the students that there are people out there, like me, who care about their opinion and perspectives on community issues. The mural and essay/art contest is how I acted locally to make a difference. I would love to see schools, public officials, businesses and regular people like me do more to get the younger generations to think about and become passionate about affecting positive changes that they would like to see in in their lives and their communities. Contests, giveaways, scholarships, etc., are a great way to garner initial interest amongst youth which can lead to an array of colorful ideas, thoughtful solutions and engaging discussions about their lives, their communities and the world around them.
    Mirajur Rahman Self Expression Scholarship
    Creative Expression Scholarship
    African-American Entrepreneurs Grant — Male Award
    My greatest talent is my power to bring visions to life. I have always gravitated toward creative outlets that begin with an artistic thought and culminate with tangible evidence of that thought. Early on, I created pieces beyond the scope of my young mind; even winning a $100 art competition at the age of 5. Nurturing my passion, my parents enrolled me in art programs, connected me with art tutors and later registered me for classes at local art colleges. My wheelhouse is sketching, but my passion takes on many personalities. At 7, I constructed a functional cardboard arcade. At 8, I recreated life-size models of Marvel super hero weapons. At 11, I designed and helped build a portable stage for my tap dancing performances. At 14, I directed the painting of my high school’s first mural, and at 15, needing a last minute “costume” for Cartoon day at school, I painted the Simpson’s characters on plain, white Vans and another branch of my artistic passion was ignited. Shortly thereafter, I began receiving and fulfilling requests for custom shoes. Pursuing perfection, I studied hours of “how-to” videos on shoe design, shoe preparation, and on complex shoe painting techniques, such as painting with an air operated tool, called an airbrush. Difficulty mastering this technique, I humbly reached out through social media, to a team of local airbrush experts. Explaining that I wanted to hire them for airbrush lessons, they wanted to first meet and see samples of my work. Surprisingly, by the meeting's end, they had offered me an internship. To date, they have mentored me in airbrushing, masking, stenciling, color blending, sneaker display and photography. They also have provided me with critique on my personal custom projects while also allowing me to participate in the design and painting of orders coming through their shop. As a result my artistry has greatly improved. I have now customized over 100 pairs of shoes, and other miscellaneous items for customers including well-known singers, models and YouTubers. I plan to continue this business throughout college and beyond, not only to help nurture and explore my feelings through artistic expression, but to give my customers a way to articulate through my art, their personal style, who they are and in what they believe.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    My cousin, aged 20, was admitted into a psychiatric facility for extreme panic attacks and depression; the effect of cruel treatment received as a black student at her predominantly white, midwestern college and academic overwhelm. Released a week later, she returned to California the first week of quarantine. Once home, she began virtual learning despite her doctor’s recommendations to take time off. Home alone the majority of the day, she struggled with the volume of make up work needed to maintain her GPA. Panic attacks resurfaced. Worried, I wanted to support her. Not knowing exactly what to do, I searched online for guidance and discovered the importance of not letting her suffer alone. So, I sent her a message. “Please text if you ever feel panicked.” I didn’t expect a response since we hadn’t spoken in years. Days later, during a zoom meeting, I received a text. “Josh, feeling nervous…”. With no prior plan for this moment, I replied, “I’m in a meeting. Please FaceTime me, but stay on mute.” So she did. She watched as I attended my meeting, later expressing comfort in my virtual presence. This eventually evolved into a ritual; often on muted calls for hours on end during the school day. During our calls, if her attention waned, I motioned to her to focus. She soon watched me less and concentrated on her assignments more. We called our meet-ups “Club Quiet”. Amidst the fear of COVID, escalating racial tensions and the passing of my dog, admittedly, there were days when I did not want to be in “Club Quiet”. However, deciding not to abandon my personal commitment, I pushed through and realized that the calls had also become a source of comfort for me. My cousin passed her classes, and with professional counseling, learned to manage panic attacks. She is now in a community college near her home. “Club Quiet” had been a success. I’m glad I didn’t let my cousin suffer alone. I enrolled in a psychology class that summer to learn more about mental health. I became so intrigued by the nuances of the human psyche that I have chosen Psychology as my intended major or minor on several college applications. I have also learned to be more patient with myself and with others, because we all struggle and cope with life in unique ways.
    Impact Scholarship for Black Students
    I hope to become well-educated in life. Education reflects the manifestation of a journey of growth. It is to be better informed based on information understood and retained over a period of time. I am in pursuit of a well-rounded education, because throughout college and life, I want to be prepared to make informed decisions about my career, family life and about successfully navigating as a productive member of society. Through focused study, asking questions and testing of information learned, I will have positioned myself to be educated. College is one path to the journey of higher knowledge, however, there are many roads to take. Education can be gained through positive or negative life experiences, by observation of the people and the world around us, or by finding unique ways to conquer business, personal or societal problems. In college, I will take full advantage of the tools provided for my success. I will study vigorously and will recognize all situations as possible learning opportunities. I will seek to increase knowledge from professors, through research and by being observant and inquisitive in my college community. I will know that I am educated when I can communicate and operate at an advanced level in my field of study. I will know that I am educated when I have the information at my fingertips to make swift, critical and accurate decisions in my career and personal life. Lastly, I will stay educated when I allow my knowledge base to be challenged and I leave myself open to receive new information. I see education as experience that can, if we allow, change our outlook on the world.
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    My cousin, aged 20, was admitted into a psychiatric facility for extreme panic attacks; the effect of cruel treatment received as a black student at her predominantly white, midwestern college and academic overwhelm. Released a week later, she returned to California the first week of quarantine. Once home, she began virtual learning despite her doctor’s recommendations to take time off. Home alone the majority of the day, she struggled with the volume of make up work needed to maintain her GPA. Panic attacks resurfaced. Worried, I wanted to support her. Not knowing exactly what to do, I searched online for guidance and discovered the importance of not letting her suffer alone. So, I sent her a message. “Please text if you ever feel panicked.” I didn’t expect a response since we hadn’t spoken in years. Days later, during a zoom meeting, I received a text. “Josh, feeling nervous…”. With no prior plan for this moment, I replied, “I’m in a meeting. Please FaceTime me, but stay on mute.” So she did. She watched as I attended my meeting, later expressing comfort in my virtual presence. This eventually evolved into a ritual; often on muted calls for hours on end during the school day. During our calls, if her attention waned, I motioned to her to focus. She soon watched me less and concentrated on her assignments more. We called our meet-ups “Club Quiet”. Amidst the fear of COVID, escalating racial tensions and the passing of my dog, admittedly, there were days when I did not want to be in “Club Quiet”. However, deciding not to abandon my personal commitment, I pushed through and realized that the calls had also become a source of comfort for me. My cousin passed her classes, and with professional counseling, learned to manage panic attacks. She is now in a community college near her home. “Club Quiet” had been a success. I’m glad I didn’t let my cousin suffer alone. I enrolled in a psychology class that summer to learn more about mental health. I became so intrigued by the nuances of the human psyche that I have chosen Psychology as my intended major or minor on several college applications. I have also learned to be more patient with myself and with others, because we all struggle and cope with life in unique ways.
    Bold Moments No-Essay Scholarship
    Try walking a mile in my shoes! It was hard work, but definitely worth the effort. I set out to collect 1,500 pairs of new and gently used shoes to support individuals in third-world countries start their own micro-businesses. Poverty in these countries make basic survival difficult, and the shoes provide an opportunity for another stream of income to make ends meet. I am proud to say that I led the effort and secured over 3,500 pairs of shoes, which helped to support micro-businesses, and helped those who donated a way to dispose of shoes in a socially responsible way.