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Jose Mejia

4275

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

2x

Finalist

Bio

I am determined to go to college. Everything I will do for the next 5-7 years has been planned out. Now all I need is a way to pay it. I know it will be difficult with my financial struggles but I hope this website, will help me get there one day.

Education

St Olaf College

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

Northbrook High School

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP

    • Crewmember

      Raising Cane's
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Student Ambassador

      The Parris Foundation
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Student Ambassador

      Be a Champion
      2022 – 20231 year
    • Student Election Worker

      Harris County Elections
      2021 – Present3 years

    Sports

    Volleyball

    2022 – Present2 years

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2021 – 20221 year

    Arts

    • Orchestra

      Music
      2017 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Houston Food Bank — To make sure each type of meal was in the right containers.
      2018 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      Northbrook middle school — Clinical Assistant
      2021 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Philanthropy

    Kelly O. Memorial Nursing Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, as all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Jean Antoine Joas Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, as all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Rev. and Mrs. E B Dunbar Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not interact with him, I did not acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running and sports; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, as all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a healthcare career. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I can achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Romeo Nursing Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, as all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a healthcare career. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Phoenix Opportunity Award
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “No.” My mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her life to raising me instead of pursuing post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. As I got older, I learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we must make to live the best lives we can. Sometimes, these decisions are made for our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for her sacrifice, the reason I will attend college. Undoubtedly, there will be people who will attempt to discourage me or tell me "drop out" because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, some people have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the mistake of dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything and not take anything for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. They are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not meet basic needs. This is why I desire to attend college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help them through healthcare access. Overall, no matter what you look like, your background, or what you have gone through does not define you. Hard work indeed pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard-working, Honduran American, who wants to attend college, achieve a BSN degree, elevate to a DNP, and become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of making my family proud, creating inspiration, and helping children in Honduras. Thank you, Jose Mejia – a first-generation student.
    Skip Veeder Memorial Scholarship
    Hard work is the foundation to step up and be successful in any challenge or difficult moments in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried from the pain, and I could only hear her in sadness wishing I could help. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom recover, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. I began to work out to show my mother that workouts and therapy are meant to help you be your best self. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time job with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. I also learned how to cook a bit, to make sure she was eating the proper nutrients and proteins, for her to be stronger. It has been 5 years now since the stroke and my mother has made a full recovery, she has complete control over her body and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to be successful and that even in near-impossible situations, all you need is strong faith. My future college career as a Family Nurse Practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, strong faith, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and survive anything. I can make a difference in the world just by working hard and being courageous. Thank you, Jose Mejia
    Be A Vanessa Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Si Se Puede Scholarship Award
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I can achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Mendez-Olvera Medicine and Public Health Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. Since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running and soccer; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. Most important of all is to stay true to our morals, and not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases.
    Kiaan Patel Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Norman H. Becker Integrity and Honor Scholarship
    Integrity to me is staying true to yourself and doing right even when no one's watching. That even when the odds are against you, doing right is most important. I learned this in middle school when I was part of the National Junior Honor Society. We would volunteer after school and go into the teachers' room and have access to a key that could open every door. I was in those rooms with items that were considered expensive, I could have taken some and no one would have suspected. Yet, I knew that integrity was one of the biggest values of NJHS and knew I needed to follow it because no good can come from a lie or a from doing wrong. As for honor, I show it as much as I can. I bring honor to my mother by working hard to get all A's and B's, I apply to at least 2 scholarships a day to afford college and respect my mother. I bring honor to my family by being accepted to a four-year institution. I exercise honor every day I volunteer with the National Honor Society in high school. We provide services to help change our community and help bring resources to our school. That even as minorities, we can do our job to bring honor to our ancestors and give honor to our school. Being a volunteer also helps me honor my community and show others that serving your school can help you feel more like you belong. I exercise my honor by showing my respect for every teacher I have. During class, I always pay attention and ask questions to show them I care about what they teach and be able to show them all that time spent in college was worthwhile. Honor helps us see the best of ourselves and integrity helps us be our best selves, every day. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    “I Matter” Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to help someone in need be successful in any challenge or difficult moments in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried, and I could only hear in sadness wishing to help her. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom get better, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time jo with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. It has been 5 years now and my mother has made a full recovery and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to be successful. My future college career as a nurse practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and survive anything. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Jose Montanez Memorial Scholarship
    No, I was not in the foster care system. I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers, should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I can achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Coleman for Patriots Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to local underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers, should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families in my local community. Once I can achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration of my application, Jose Mejia
    Evan James Vaillancourt Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers, should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I can achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen for profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all. Unfortunately, I have no connections with the military but I want to take a moment to appreciate all they do. They protect us every day and risk their lives for ours to be better. Thank you, Jose Mejia
    Voila Natural Lifestyle Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion for nursing, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences, and they have made the mistake of dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Many students in Honduras don't have anyone to inspire them to reach their goals or inspire them to be successful. This scholarship will help me be able to afford college and be able to continue my goals. As a low-income student, a first-generation student, and an undocumented mother I don't have a lot of ways to get large amounts of money. Unfortunately, my mother has no bonds, investments, stocks, or any savings money she could offer me to help pay for college. This is why how much money I have to pay at each college will determine which college I attend. Yet I have worked so hard throughout my high school career and obtaining this scholarship will help me have a wider range of colleges/ universities I can attend. Winning this scholarship will help me one day be able to go back to Honduras and volunteer in hospitals, to be able to give my 2nd home access to reliable healthcare they can trust and afford. I believe this will help grow the number of nurses, doctors, and people that are interested in medicine. Volunteering in places like Honduras to help causes like this is what helps give my life meaning and helps me have hope that we can make a better world, together.
    Athletics Scholarship
    Athletics is one of the best things that have ever happened to me. Volleyball, specifically, has helped me be a new person. I was never much for sports in high school because I used to think I was too skinny to play or that I just wasn't meant to play. Then my senior year came, and I was offered to be a volleyball manager for volunteer hours. I began to learn how to bump and pass and it felt amazing. At first, I could not even serve, but there was something in me that told me to keep practicing to be better. Some people don't like to practice or feel like they don't have to but practicing to me felt like fun. I could practice for hours and not get tired of it, I would serve, pass, set and practice serve receiving. I did it so much that I began to feel better when I played and felt more confident in myself. I began to play with the varsity girls and was able to keep up with them even when they had years of experience and I only had 3 months. Unfortunately, the season ended at the end of October, and I thought I was going to lose all the process I had made. I loved volleyball so much that I desired to start playing club and get even better at it. My determination took me to find a volleyball center where I could practice Tuesdays and Thursdays at open gym. I could not afford the men's volleyball club, but that did not mean I could not keep practicing to be better. I love volleyball so much now I can't see my life without it. The best part about Volleyball was the freedom I felt when I played it. Volleyball helps me stay stress-free and taught me to manage my stress. There were days I felt I had no strength or energy after school. Calculus more specifically would stress me out so much because it is such a difficult course for me. When the day ended, I had the blessing to go and play volleyball and just forget about everything. When I play nothing else matters, all that matters is the relaxation I feel when I play, all my energy and dedication are centered on the game. All the difficulties in the world, and all the stress I felt went away and I can just enjoy passing the ball. My favorite position is libero, my job is to play defense and get the ball when it is about to touch the floor. What I love so much about this position is you have to be fast, and you have to dive to get the ball. Every time I dig a ball, I feel this adrenaline that makes me feel like I can do anything and that all my dreams can come true. Volleyball has become an important part of my life; I dream that one day I can play D-1 volleyball in college and someday play for the USA Olympic Volleyball team. I know I still have a lot to learn and that it won't be easy, but I am willing to put in the work and keep going. Volleyball changed my life and I hope one day I can share that with someone else and help them feel the way I do about their favorite sport or activity. Volleyball is now an official part of me and I will work every day to be better at it. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Jennifer Webb-Cook Gameplan Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. Being part of a single parent household hasn't been easy, seeing all the work my mother has to do to support us and everything she has lived through is painful. Like last year, my mother works long hours as a janitor at a Muslim church, and in March, they have an event called Ramadan. The church stays open all day and this meant she was gonna have to work more hours, meaning I was gonna need to take the bus and pick up my brothers every day. This wasn't easy it meant I had to wake up extra early and once school finished run to get my brothers as fast as possible, so as to not miss the bus. The benefits of this difficult situation were that I learned to appreciate transportation and learned to take care of my brothers even in situations like this one. I am so glad for this because it has taught me to be strong even when I face limitations. As for sports, they are one of the best things that have ever happened to me. Volleyball, specifically, has helped me be a new person. I was never much for sports in high school because I used to think I was too skinny to play or that I just wasn't meant to play. Then my senior year came and I was offered to be a volleyball manager for volunteer hours. I began to learn how to bump and pass and it felt amazing. At first, I could not even serve, but there was something in me that told me to keep practicing to be better. Some people don't like to practice or feel like they don't have to, but practicing to me felt like fun. I could practice for hours and not get tired of it, I would serve, pass, set and practice serve receiving. I did it so much that I began to feel better when I played and felt more confident in myself. I began to play with the varsity girls and was able to keep up with them even when they had years of experience and I only had 3 months. Unfortunately, the season ended at the end of October and I thought I was gonna lose all the process I had made. I loved volleyball so much that I desired to start playing club and get even better at it. My determination took me to find a volleyball center where I could practice Tuesdays and Thursdays at open gym. I could not afford the men's volleyball club, but that did not mean I could not keep practicing to be better. I love volleyball so much now I can't see my life without it. Thank you, Jose Mejia
    Betty and Earl Hinson Scholarship
    My economics teacher, Ms. Myles has made the biggest impact on my life. She was the first person in her family to go to college and study economics. Her teaching style allowed me to understand everything she said clearly and did not confuse me. I was nervous s at first to take her class since I was not the best at understanding finances and how they worked, but she made it easy to understand. She showed me the importance of being financially literate because if you don’t know how to work money you don’t know how to better your financial situation. She inspired me to study economics in college as a minor. Learning how the economy works and the changes it can bring over time are essential to be a responsible adult, and as I am a part of the Hispanic community, financial literacy is not common. I will use my new understanding of the economy to build generational wealth with my family and my Latinx community, so we can make better choices with our money and change the income status of Hispanics. Ms. Myles showed us data and statistics that, Latinx and African American families tend to retire with no money and no bonds or form of income other than their daily job. She has taught me to make a difference in my family even if I am low-income. She has taught me the importance of making decisions and being clear. I used to think that I needed to use large words to prove my point and struggled to make decisions. She showed me the three-step method, TED, Talk, Explain, and Decide. To speak exactly what my mind thinks, if there is a misunderstanding or elaboration is needed I can explain what I am saying to help everyone understand. After speaking my point and being well informed on the pros and cons, then decide. Never decide without obtaining the proper information first, if not you may be miss informed or can risk making an error. She learned TED from her father before she left for college to be able to make it through difficult situations and still be successful. This advice has helped me be more prepared for my own college experience and has helped me connect with Ms. Myles. I wasn't sure if college was for me or what career I should pursue. She helped me see that college s just the experience I need to uplift my family and be able to be the best version of myself. My career will be in nursing with a minor in economics this way I can still help my patients and continue to share financial literacy and help others have it too. Thank you, Ms. Myles, you changed my life. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    iMatter Ministry Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Williams Foundation Trailblazer Scholarship
    My name is Jose Mejia, I am a first-generation, Honduran American student, with a passion for helping others live their best life. I was a clinical assistant at Northbrook middle school and was able to love and help all the students there. I oversaw distributing all the first aid kits, menstrual products, needles, thermometers, and making sure the band-aids and the medical files were organized. I made sure the other students knew the classes they were going to, they understood that what other students shared with them was private, and to treat everyone with respect, as well as help them if they need it. This experience reaffirmed my belief that honesty is the best policy and to always have patience with others. This is because you do not know who they are inside or what they are going through. Being able to share time with people younger than myself made me realize that we think little kids have it easy, but their mental health is worse than ours. These young minority students live insecurely and depressed every day because of their body insecurity, mental insecurity, and not receiving the right treatment just because of how their ethnicity. Being the leader for the other students showed me that just taking a moment to ask, “how are you” and “how was your day” really helps make a difference in these student's lives, it helps create a relationship they can count on and makes a difference. Showing love and support in small ways can make a huge impact on their everyday lifestyle and help them become better human beings. This belief has helped me make an impact in my everyday life. I am a manager for Northbrook's Varsity Volleyball team. We would go up against elite volleyball teams from all over the district. Every time we would have a game, unfortunately, we would lose. The players would say " It's ok, they have been playing private club for years, they have more experience than us.” The teams we would go against did not look like us or were considered more financially stable than we were. The athletes on my team felt that the color of their skin kept them from winning or that because the other teams were considered wealthier than us, were what kept them from winning. I told her "The game is what you make of it. Your desire to play and your dedication are what make you an athlete. Your skin or financial situation does not stop you. It will make the journey a bit more difficult, but that only makes the victory sweeter.” She spoke with me afterward, expressing her gratitude because my advice helped her understand how to be an amazing athlete. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Mark Caldwell Memorial STEM/STEAM Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to surpass and be successful in any challenge or difficult moments in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried, and I could only hear in sadness wishing to help her. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom get better, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I made sure she drank her medicine and eat her food. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. I would stay for tutorials and retake any assignment below a 90. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time jo with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. It has been 5 years now and my mother has made a full recovery and works a full-time job now. This experience proved to me that hard work is essential to reach your goal. My future college career as a nurse practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and survive anything. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Lotus Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my single mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. That regardless of my financial situation I can make her proud. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make to live the best life that we can, even when money is limited. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born, to raise me giving me the best she could give me, even if it limited what she could have. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion for medicine, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the mistake of dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. Indeed, hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard-working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first-generation student.
    @Carle100 National Scholarship Month Scholarship
    Dante Luca Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to step up and be successful in any challenge or difficult moments in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried from the pain, and I could only hear her in sadness wishing I could help. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom recover, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. I began to work out to show my mother that workouts and therapy are meant to help you be your best self. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time job with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. I also learned how to cook a bit, to make sure she was eating the proper nutrients and proteins, for her to be stronger. It has been 5 years now since the stroke and my mother has made a full recovery, she has complete control over her body and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to be successful, and that even in near-impossible situations, all you need is strong faith. My future college career as a Family Nurse Practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, strong faith, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and survive anything. I can make a difference in the world just by working hard and being courageous. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his "fight" to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to "fight" the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that families do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families "fight" to get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Medicine is the right to "fight" your ilness and it is our job as health proffesionals to help you win. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Glen E Kaplan Memorial Scholarship
    1. I am passionate about healthcare and helping others. Ever since I was 6, I can remember being ready to help anyone who needed it, always having my first aid kit ready. When the moment came, I was finally able to help someone, I disinfected their injury/wound and put a band-aid on it. I had never received any training on how to clean wounds, it felt so natural, I kept going. That moment proved to me, I was meant to be a healer and that being in the medical field was my calling. I began thinking I would become a doctor, more specifically a pediatrician. I then realized it takes a very long time to get there and was very expensive. I began to explore other careers in the health field and found that nursing was a great way to help people, it was in high demand, was more affordable and took a fraction of the time of being a doctor. I fell in love with being a Family Nurse Practitioner, they have the same power as a doctor, they can assign medicine, and get paid a good salary. I finally found the perfect job to keep helping people. 2. I am a very determined person, when I put my mind to something, I get it done. I have learned to be patient, that not all goals can be achieved from day to night, and that hard work is essential to succeed. I am determined to become an FNP, for myself and my family, to be able to make a difference in my community. I cannot fail at my goals because if I fail, what kind of example would I be setting for my little brothers? All the hard work my mother did for me and my family would be for nothing. My entire family in Honduras would be disappointed in me, I would not be able to be the first in my family to graduate from college. I would not be able to go back and help my community in Honduras and would not be able to help my Hispanic community here. All the hard work I put into school, every day I practiced my sport, everything I have done leading to this moment would fail. That is why I cannot fail and I have faith I have what it takes to overcome any obstacle that comes my way. 3. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, and infants, with illnesses whose parents do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, we must help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank You, Jose Mejia
    Another Way Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. In middle school, I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, and to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I am blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life.
    Mikey Taylor Memorial Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. In middle school, I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, and to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I am blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Yvela Michele Memorial Scholarship for Resilient Single Parents
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. In middle school, I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, and to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I am blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia- a future Nurse Practitioner
    Ruthie Brown Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. That is why I am determined to not obtain student loan debt or if I do need to, for it to be a low amount. College is a mountain I want to reach, regardless of how much it costs to get there. I have been applying for scholarships, I have taken the SAT about 3 times now, filed my FAFSA and completed my CSS Profile. I have spoken to my college counselors to reach out to me for any scholarships I may be eligible for. I will not let money stand in the way to build a future for me and my family. I will take part in work-study and get a part-time if I have to. I will apply to all the outside scholarships I can and begin a savings account to be able to save money. I am working a part-time job at the moment and plan to save 50% of my check. My mother and I have spoken about selling food and her famous "pollo con tajadas". This a traditional dish, very well known in Honduras, our country of origin. I plan to have a car wash at my church on the weekend and go clean houses with my mom. We may not be in the best financial situation, and we may not have any assets, but we will not let money be an obstacle for my future. We will also attend my financial workshops and any college preparation courses available. We will trust God and work together as a family to reach my mother's biggest goal: To see me and my brothers all one day as college graduates. The first step is being able to afford my college, and for me to open the doors for my brothers. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia- A determined, future college graduate
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God but also faith in myself. In middle school, I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I am blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    I believe the most urgent crisis in today's society is the continued racism and discrimination in today's world. The civil war was over 150 years ago, minorities have begun to grow, all citizens have the right to vote, and life is better for minorities now, yet we still see this division between races. We still see officers killing or fearing minorities just because of their skin color, there are still people that call u aliens or tell us to go back to where we came from. They tell us that we can't make it, that we don't belong here, and that we take advantage of government aid. We work hard as minorities every day to build a better life for ourselves and our families, just to come back to a world that is so unkind to us. This needs to change because America is a place where the foundation of it was built by immigrants, this country is a beacon of hope for all that wish to succeed, that view themselves as being part of something bigger than themselves. We must work together every day to change this country so it can become a more welcoming place, where anyone regardless of skin, race, ethnicity, or sexual identity, can succeed. Furthermore, I help make a difference in my community by being a student election worker, for the Harris County Elections. Regardless of what spectrum you stand on politically, the right to vote and who is making the decisions in our government is very important. Working in the elections allows me to help others be able to have a great experience when they go and cast their vote. The best part is when I see people that look like me and speak Spanish go to vote. This is because slowly the barriers of different Americans going to vote is breaking, Americans from all different kinds of backgrounds are now exercising their right and helping make the country better. Yes, sometimes I may not agree with their political ideals, or agree with the way they act, but they are using their right to vote as Hispanic Americans. I always make sure to not share my views and to treat the voters with respect. I hope to become an election worker when I get older and be able to see the increasing amount of Hispanic and minorities coming to vote. Regardless of your ethnicity, race, gender, or sexuality, we can all help make America a better place whether it is through voting, protesting, or sharing our different views. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Holt Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers, should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days when I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping families mourn their loss and directing them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and not take advantage of people with life-threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    DeAmontay's Darkness Deliverance Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to overcome adversity in my life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried, and I could only hear in sadness wishing to help her. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom get better, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time jo with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. It has been 5 years now and my mother has made a full recovery and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to overcome difficult situations. My future college career as a nurse practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and overcome anything. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Hearts on Sleeves, Minds in College Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. In middle school I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I am blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Goobie-Ramlal Education Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard-working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first-generation, Honduran American student.
    Frantz Barron Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to overcome adversity in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried, and I could only hear in sadness wishing to help her. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom get better, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time job with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out occasionally. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. It has been 5 years now and my mother has made a full recovery and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to get through difficult moments in life. My future college career as a nurse practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and overcome anything. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Maureen "Moe" Graham Memorial Scholarship
    Kindness, positivity, and hard work are the foundation to surpass and be successful in any challenge or difficult moments in life. For example, when I was 12 my mother had a stroke, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said it had been a miracle she survived because she arrived at the hospital after the stroke had already hit her hard. He said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. His honesty hit my stomach like a rock, there was a chance she might never restore her body. Hearing this shattered my heart because my mom was such an active person, and her body was a key to this lifestyle. I felt useless since there was nothing, I could physically do to help her. There were days when she cried, and I could only hear in sadness wishing to help her. Although the doctor had scared me and my mom with this horrible news, I knew my crying and depression would not help my mom get better, but only bring her down. It was time I was strong for her and my aunt, to be positive and have faith in God that everything would be ok. I began to comfort her instead of cry with her, I would do all the therapy with her and help her start walking, I began to clean and take care of my aunt's house while I lived there. I began to pray, to have faith in God that my mother would heal and that our lives would go back to normal. I began studying and working extra hard at school so I could bring my mother a report card full of A's. Fortunately, a few weeks after the stroke, she was released to come home, with the only condition to continue attending therapy and could not work yet. I knew this would be a difficult financial situation for us, so I got a pat time jo with my uncle. I would come home from school and would help cut my neighbor's lawns and fix their garden. Even though I did not bring in a lot of money, it was enough for the moment, and I was at least able to take her out once in a while. I continued to get those great grades for her and continued to help my mother on her road to full recovery. It has been 5 years now and my mother has made a full recovery and works a full-time job now. This experience showed me that hard work is essential to be successful. My future college career as a nurse practitioner will not be easy but with hard work, kindness, and positivity, I can achieve my dreams and survive anything. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes it changes course, but it’s important to remain strong and steady. I grew up going to church, and that centered my faith. Not only in God but also faith in myself. To start, in middle school I struggled with my insecurities. During the pandemic, I experienced a spiritual awakening that gave me the confidence to overcome those insecurities. This helped me determine what I wanted to do in my life. As well as being the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church has always been a part of my life. I attended every service and took part in every activity. Yet, I realized I was only doing it out of habit. I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I listened to what everyone else told me, I would feel accepted in society. I was very insecure and needed others' approval to shield myself away from my own body image. No matter how hard I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This is when I had to understand, I was not like anyone else. I was born to stand out. I was always a follower, and I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This is what I strived to change. Insecurities have always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my 2 younger brothers when I was 12. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades in school. I had to mature at a young age, and it allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. Therefore, my dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I’ve been blessed with. This is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can achieve what no one else can. This is what will lead me to success in college and my future healthcare career. The faith I have cultivated allows me to feel prepared and ready to overcome any obstacle and understand that sometimes we must go through difficult situations. I have firm faith and I know I will continue my progress and accept that now I am different, born again, and ready for anything.
    Your Dream Music Scholarship
    Por Eso Feliz Yo Soy from the group Los Voceros De Cristo has the most important message to me. Their message is to feel happiness and joy because God is with me, regardless of my mistakes and failure. That his love is in my heart and that when he is with me only joy can come to me. This song is what got me through the darkest time of my life, this was when my mother had a stroke. I was about 12 years old, and it was the scariest thing I had ever seen. She was paralyzed from her left side and could barely recognize me; I had never seen her in so much pain. I was heartbroken and worried for her because my mom had never lived through something like this. The doctor said she had to rest and began therapy as soon as possible so that she could hopefully restore the left side of her body. Those nights I could not sleep worrying about her, so my aunt introduced this song to me for the first time. It is a Spanish song that says, " I am happy because God has come to my life". She told me to have faith in those lyrics and have faith in God because he was the only one that could heal my mom. To believe the message, that when God is in your life, he will bring happiness to you. Regardless of what point you are in your life or what you have done, he can love you. This is the message I began to believe, to be happy and strong for my mom and my aunt. Thanks to this song and my faith in God, 5 years later my mom has made a full recovery. Thank you.
    Gomez Family Legacy Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences, and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hardworking, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Blaine Sandoval Young American Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    David Michael Lopez Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Charlie Akers Memorial Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences, and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hardworking, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Freddie L Brown Sr. Scholarship
    "Pollo con Tajadas" The Best feeling is coming from a rough "dia" Then just sitting down and eating the best Pollo con Tajadas" The amazing flavor of one of the finest cuisines de "mi tierra" The richness in the "Guineo Frito" brings this "Maciso" feeling to my soul To where I can be anyone and do "cualquier cosa" The power of my ancestors and the strength of my culture make me "quien soy" To eat this all day I would and would never " cansarme de ello". To enjoy or to leave even without time there is always time for "tajadas" The happy times I spent with my " Abuelita" just from these "tajadas" alone This plate has brought us together like glue, making us happy "siempre" This can one day cause me to be as big as a "pelota" This can cause my life to be cut like weeds in the "tierra" Then I would meet those who brought life and foundation to "Honduras" This can make me regret all my choices in " la vida" This can tear me away from what I love in my life "mi familia" To let go of everything I have loved and worked harshly " por nada" This wont matter "ya" This plate is one I love and helps me be close with my "familia" This will cause me to risk it all just to be happy with them " para siempre"
    Share Your Poetry Scholarship
    "Pollo con Tajadas" The Best feeling is coming from a rough "dia" Then just sitting down and eating the best Pollo con Tajadas" The amazing flavor of one of the finest cuisines de "mi tierra" The richness in the "Guineo Frito" brings this "Maciso" feeling to my soul To where I can be anyone and do "cualquier cosa" The power of my ancestors and the strength of my culture make me "quien soy" To eat this all day, I would and would never " cansarme de ello". To enjoy or to leave even without time there is always time for "tajadas" The happy times I spent with my " Abuelita" just from these "tajadas" alone This plate has brought us together like glue, making us happy "siempre" This can one day cause me to be as big as a "pelota" This can cause my life to be cut like weeds in the "tierra" Then I would meet those who brought life and foundation to "Honduras" This can make me regret all my choices in " la vida" This can tear me away from what I love in my life "mi familia" To let go of everything I have loved and worked harshly " por nada" This won't matter "ya" This plate is one I love and helps me be close with my "familia" This will cause me to risk it all just to be happy with them " para siempre"
    Ruthie Brown Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. That is why I am determined to not obtain student loan debt or if I do need to do, for it to be a low amount. College is a mountain I want to reach, regardless of how much it cost to get there. I have been applying to scholarships, I have taken the SAT about 3 times now, filed my FAFSA and completed my CSS Profile. I have spoken to my college counselors to reach out to me to any scholarships I may be eligible for. I will not let money stand in my way to build a future for e and my family. I will take part in work study and get a part time if I have to. I will apply to all the outside scholarships I can and begin a savings account to be able to save money. I am working a part time job at the moment and plan to save 50% of my check. My mother and I have spoken about selling food and her famous "pollo con tajadas". This a traditional dish, very well known in Honduras, are country of origin. I plan to have a car wash at my church on the weekend and go clean houses with my mom on the weekend. We may not be in the best financial situation, we may not have any assets, but we will not let money be an obstacle for my future. We will also attend my financial workshops and any college preparation courses available. We will trust God and work together as a family to reach my mother's biggest goal: To see me and my brothers all one day as college graduates. The first step is being able to afford my college, and for me to open the doors for my brothers. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia- A determined, future college graduate
    AHS Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Tim Watabe Doing Hard Things Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences, and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hardworking, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    John J Costonis Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Science Appreciation Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes we change course, but we keep going strong and steady. I grew up in the church, and that centered me in my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. In middle school I struggled with my insecurities, but I experienced a spiritual awakening during quarantine that gave me the confidence to overcome my insecurities and, as the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church had always been a part of my life. I would go to every service and take part in every activity. Yet, I was only doing it out of habit, I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I did what everyone else did, I would feel accepted in my society. I was very insecure and believed I needed others' approval to shield myself from my own body image. But no matter how much I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This was when I had to understand, I was not like everyone else. I was born to stand out. Since I had always been a follower, I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This I what I strived to change. Insecurity had always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my two younger brothers when I was just twelve years old. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades at school. This made me mature faster and allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue on my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. My dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I blessed with. It is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can do anything and achieve what no one else can do. This is what will lead me through college and my overall life.
    Joe Cruz Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Minority/Women in STEM Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Sikora Drake STEM Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. AS well as being able to inspire my patient that a Hispanic nurse practitioner exists and that it is not impossible. This is because when went to the doctor, we only saw Caucasian doctors, and this caused my mom to only understand half of what he said. I now a Hispanic doctor will help patients like us be able to feel more confident asking questions and really understanding the situation. When people look like us, it helps us feel more comfortable and be able to see ourselves one day reaching their position. This is something I want my patients to feel, that anyone can follow their passion and be successful, regardless of looks. This is why I really wish to be successful in doing what I love and make a difference in my community. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Yet, I hope my work will help bring change Thank you for your time and consideration, Jose Mejia
    Affordable College Prep's First Time Winners Scholarship
    Scholarships are free money to pay for college and be able to have sometime of financial support. These scholarships help you have less to pay when choosing your institution. After having applied to some scholarships I have learned how to make essay s on the spot, how to be able to write the essay under a certain time limit, and how to really speak to your audience. I used to write my essays by jut restating the prompt in different ways and explaining it, yet that whole process would take me about half an hour. This caused me to lose so much time on the draft and that would cost me a lot when it came to writing the final draft. These scholarships now allow me to understand the prompt faster and be able to begin wring my thoughts immediately. I used to spend so much time writing my essays, I would be the one to run out of time; it would be a great essay but would look incomplete since I did not finish it. This caused to not be able to be as efficient, so applying for more scholarships and writing different essays allows me to be able to now write/type faster and still be able to completely explain my thoughts. When you write essays, regardless of what it is for or what the objective is, one of your main purposes is speaking to your audience and persuading them to connect with your idea. In my essays before I really struggled with putting my complete thoughts on my paper, thinking I had to make them all fancy and difficult to understand. This caused me to lose points since I was trying so hard, and this caused me to confuse my readers. With more and more practice with application essays, I finally learned to express all my thoughts and be able to put to write them down and completely easy to understand. Applying to scholarships really helped me learn what a college essay looks like and how it should be written, as well as how rigorous it can be. This will allow me to be more prepared whenever I get to college and put me ahead of others. The most important thing I feel I learned was, regardless of whether you win the scholarship or not, you wrote an essay you can save for future reference and you prove your dedication to colleges. This means your head and your heart is in the right place and that you will be successful. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia
    Analtha Parr Pell Memorial Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Barbara P. Alexander Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Seeley Swan Pharmacy STEM Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Learner Statistics Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately, since I could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. Thank you, Jose Mejia
    Do Good Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old.He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was.I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    My life has been like a train ride - there are bumps on the road and sometimes it changes course, but it’s important to remain strong and steady. I grew up going to church, and that centered my faith. Not only in God, but also faith in myself. To start off, in middle school I struggled with my insecurities. During the pandemic, I experienced a spiritual awakening that gave me the confidence to overcome those insecurities. This helped me determine what I wanted to do in my life. As well as being the oldest child, to become my mom’s right hand. Church has always been a part of my life. I attended every service and took part of every activity. Yet, I realized I was only doing it out of habit. I was not ready to commit to something so important in my life. I believed that if I listened to what everyone else told me, I would feel accepted in society. I was very insecure and needed others' approval to shield myself away from my own body image. No matter how hard I tried I could not fit in; there was no space for me. This is when I had to understand, I was not like anyone else. I was born to stand out. I was always a follower, and I had to learn to be bold, to be firm, to understand not everyone was going to like me, and that’s okay. My insecurities stemmed from comparing myself to others and wanting their approval. This is what I strived to change. Insecurities have always been a part of my life but being a responsible son was also an important part of my identity. I began taking care of my 2 younger brothers when I was 12. I would take care of them, clean the house, and provide them with meals. This allowed me to become more independent, which helped me improve my grades in school. I had to mature at a young age, and it allowed me to stay out of trouble and continue my college path. Being my mother’s right hand allowed me to see the world differently and showed me that I needed to have a plan going into senior year. Therefore, my dream is to become a Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP because taking care of my brothers revealed to me that helping people is the gift I’ve been blessed with. This is what I was born to do, to help those that still feel insecure and bring them into the light of confidence. Ensuring everyone has access to health care, regardless of their race or gender, is my passion. These experiences and ideals are what have shaped me into who I am today. This has allowed me to see the world in a different context and understand I can do anything. Since I am unique and different, it means I can achieve what no one else can. This is what will lead me to success in college and my future career in healthcare. The faith I have cultivated allows me to feel prepared and ready to overcome any obstacle and understand that sometimes we must go through difficult situations. I have firm faith and I know I will continue my progress and accept that now I am different, born again, ready for anything
    Learner Scholarship for High School Seniors
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Olivia Vada Camacho Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old.He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was.I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Francis “Slip” Madigan Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    Maida Brkanovic Memorial Scholarship
    When I was younger, I asked my mother if she had gone to college. She, with hesitation and sadness, responded “no.” With this, my mother made the ultimate sacrifice by devoting her time and energy to raising me instead of pursuing a post-secondary education. Since this conversation took place, a sense of guilt has plagued my conscience. Now, I wish to fulfill her dream by attaining a college degree myself. The older I get, I have learned that when difficult situations arise, they must be dealt with difficult solutions. Ultimately, there are choices we have to make in order to live the best life that we can. And, sometimes, these decisions are made for the betterment of our loved ones– like the decision my mother made when I was born. I am extremely grateful for that sacrifice, which is why I am determined to go to college. As soon as I understood my passion, I made it a part of my identity and who I wanted to be when I got older. Undoubtedly, there are going to be people who will try to discourage me or tell me to drop out because school might be challenging, not worth my time, or not meant for “people like me.” Yet, there are also people who have told me to stay in school because they have lived through those same experiences and they have made the same mistake by dropping out. But, most importantly, because I AM worth it. This advice has helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted. Children from Honduras, where my family originated, wish they had access to the educational opportunities that I currently have. However, their schools are significantly underfunded. As a result, they are living in poor conditions that sometimes do not even meet their basic needs. This is why I desire to go to college to be a nurse. After becoming an RN, I will be able to help my people through healthcare access. Furthermore, I will be able to demonstrate that they, too, can be successful and become someone important in life. Overall, no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. It is true that hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life. This process will not be easy but, with motivation and determination, you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today: a hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, achieve a BSN degree, then elevate to a DNP, and, ultimately, become a Family Nurse Practitioner. Taking that first step of going to college is a resource that will help me reach my end goal of being able to make my family proud, create inspiration, and help the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you for considering my application, Jose Mejia – a first generation student.
    No You Did Not Win An Emi, But You Did Win This Scholarship
    My name is Jose Andres Mejia. I am a Honduran American, so my name was pronounced in Spanish. Since most of my school did not speak Spanish, I felt like an outsider. I wanted to fit in so I told them my name was Andrew( which is supposed to be Andres in English). This is way it was easier to pronounce and I would be more “American”. It is really crazy how others words can have so much power over you, to even want to hide your heritage. Then I went on to middle school and understood the real value of my name, Jose is from my grandpa and Andres is the name of my mother’s lovely aunt Andrea, who unfortunately had passed away. My name connected me so much to my Honduran roots and I was over here being Ashamed of it, when in reality it really connects me to my Honduran roots. I learned to never be ashamed of where you come from, because you may not be exactly from there, but your blood came from there and that place will I always be tied to you. That it is a part of you, an important part pf you, not the only one but it does help make who you are. In high school, I began to meet people who were actually born in Honduras. They were lovely people and told me that my last name was one they had never heard. I told my mother this and she told me that it was because our last name has special meaning in Spain. Mejia is suppose to be one of the royal last names back when the Spanish were still in Central America. This made me even more happy of my last name. That it connected even more with my ancestors and made me appreciate my heritage. Overall, what my name means to me is a little different. My name is what others no me as and what gives my morals. My morals ,my past, my present, my future, make me who I am. My name is the title of my story and without it I could not be the same. In high school people do not know what to call me. Jose, Andres, or Andrew, I tell them it does not matter. These 3 names are what make up my identity, and these 3 names make me who I am. With the most important one being my beautiful last name, Mejia. Thank you, Jose Mejia
    Etherine Tansimore Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Larry D Parker Sr.’s Legacy Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old.He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. This is because he is my hero. Although he had limited resources, he did not live in the best conditions, he was still happy and enjoyed his life. He is why every time I get an opportunity I take it because I want to live the best life I can for him. To be the athlete, the genius, to be able to live for him the life he would have wanted to have. He was the reason I found my calling , he helped shape my life and to obtain the strength to not fear the unknown. He is my hero and thanks to him I know what the world must change. In our modern world, even with all the technological advances, healthcare for kids like my brother should be available everywhere. Regardless of the country or the financial status of the family, kids that need surgeries or special medical assistance should be given the help they need. I understand the US cannot just go into every country and provide these resources. What we need to do is come together as a world and see the treatments we need for each country to be able to help as many kid as we can. I know that some people will only worry about the money, but there is more to life and health than just money. Thank you Best Wishes, Jose Mejia
    Cariloop’s Caregiver Scholarship
    I have taken care of my brothers since I was 12. My mother after 2016 had lost her job and was trying to obtain clients for housekeeping services. Due to her financial hardship, she could no longer afford a babysitter, so she told me it was time for me to start caring for them. At first I was super nervous, I did not have the most confidence at the time due to my weight insecurity. I had been really skinny all my life and had been teased about it, so I felt like I could not do anything right. Yet, I really enjoyed it and was able to grow as a leader. I was able to learn how to work with my brothers without arguing and still be able to get my point across. It also allowed us to get closer as a family, and allowed me to learn how to cook proper meals for my family members. It is such joy to be able to welcome my mom from a tire day of work with a plate full of nutritious food. My journey to becoming my mother's right hand came a few months after. Unfortunately my mom got a stroke, and half of her body froze and she was not able to move it. She would try to get up but she couldn't, she would just fall, over, and over again. Thanks to God we were able to make it to the hospital on time and God saved her life. I was really scared that my mom would not be able to walk again or that she would not be able to move at all. This is where I came in, I took care of her and help her with her therapy. She would have her therapy session with her doctor and she would have a therapy session with me. Thanks to God, with time she was able to obtain full control and strength in her movement and has made 100% recovery. This experience really taught me to be patient and hopeful always. Regardless of the situation or the chances of success we trust ourselves and God that he will make the miracle happen, all you need to have is faith. Faith is what gave me the courage, the hope, and the power to keep going and help my mom recover. Without this I would not be who I am today. Overall, I feel like I have been able to become a more responsible, mature, and intellectual son due to these experiences. They have helped me shape my morals and my beliefs. I am ready know for what is next, college. All I have to do now is get there. Thank you
    Wieland Nurse Appreciation Scholarship
    I dream of providing healthcare to underrepresented communities. However, what is now a dream began as a harsh reality. As a young child, I witnessed my older brother lose his life to a sickness known as Hydrocephalus myelomeningocele. Throughout his diagnosis, the disease prohibited him from talking, walking, and carrying the life my family so desperately wanted him to have. Unfortunately, he was unable to experience a happy childhood due to the multiple surgeries and treatments that consumed his days. Then, I met him for the first time at 8 years old. He was in his wheelchair half asleep and could not wave at me or hug me. He could not realize who I was or what we were to each other. Although he was older, it did not feel like he was. I could see the pain in his eyes of all he had gone through. Unfortunately since he could not really interact with him, I did not really acknowledge him as I should have. Being just a child, I wanted to engage in play activities like running, sports, and swimming; however, he was unable to do so. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have. The creation of beautiful memories, like all brothers should have, is absent from my childhood. And, when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There were days where I could not breathe because I could not accept the reality of losing a brother. His death made me realize that he was only one of the victims, who died from Hydrocephalic myelomeningocele, due to the poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire family originates and, since my mother could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the United States of America for support. When he died, she was not able to say goodbye and, to this day, has not been able to go to his casket to pay her respects. My mother continues to face the ultimate challenge of supporting her family. To ensure that something like this never happens again is why I want to pursue a career in healthcare. By learning how to manage medicines and help those who are sick, I will save the lives of generations of families. Once I am able to achieve an increased understanding of helping patients and assisting them back to health, I will then go to Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. There are children, just like my brother, with illnesses that do not have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who wants to feel better, and live their best life. Healthcare is my passion because, regardless of the stress and the responsibility, it is our duty to help all our patients and families get better. We, as healthcare professionals, must also accept and respect the reality of losing a patient by helping the families mourn their loss and direct them to the most beneficial recovery resources. Most important of all is to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as for-profit but, instead, as a resource that belongs to all human beings. Thank you for your time and consideration with my application, Jose Mejia
    Dog Owner Scholarship
    I owned a dog back in may, he was a chihuahua mixed with a golden retriever. He was my sunshine and I looked forward to seeing everyday I would come from school. He played the role of a friend a mental support animal. Whenever I would have a bad day or was stressed from classes, I would just sit there and just play with him. He was the way I would cope and stay happy. Yet it was difficult to give him the attention he needed since, my mom worked all day and we were at school. So we had to make the difficult decision to give him to a trusted family friend. This was one of the hardest decisions I have ever made in my life. I could feel his absence the first few days, could not sleep, or even eat. I was in a total mental stress and felt everyday that he was gone. Yet, I knew I had to move on and feel happy for our family friends family. The dad did not work so they were able to take the dog on more walks doing the day, taught him tricks, and fed him more properly than us. The dog was happy and this is what matters the most. I learned that sometimes the best for those you love is more important than what you feel. To not just think about yourself but also that his happiness was better. A year after this we had gotten a call from our friend and found out that the dog had died. His name was "Blanco" and he had died in his sleep. Apparently he had ate something he wasn't supposed to and that killed him. I felt completely devastated and felt like I could never get over him. Yet I fully understood the purpose of a dog in your life. They are meant to be there for you and give you the support and love you need. regardless of whether they are there or not, they gave you love and that is what they want you to feel. They want you to feel happy to live the best possible life that you can. As well as knowing they will always be there for you and that you are loved. Also, to give that same love that you feel to others and help them connect to a dog or pet to be a happier person. Thank you
    Cedrick'a Jackson Memorial Scholarship
    I want to be able to provide health care to under represented communities. I grew up seeing my older brother lose his life to his sickness. He had Hydrocephalic myelomelingocele and this disease did not allow him to talk, walk, or carry the life we wanted him to have. He missed out on on a happy childhood due to his surgeries and treatments. Then I met him for the first time at 8 years old. I as a little kid just wanted to play around, run and take part in little kid activities. This caused me to not spend as much time with him as I should have and make the beautiful memories, all brothers should have. So when he passed away in 2015, I felt completely devastated. There was days where I could not breathe and I could not accept this loss. I realized that that he was only one of the victims who die from this disease due to their poor healthcare for underrepresented communities in Honduras. This is where my entire my family is and since my mom could not afford the medicine or the treatments, she had to leave him and come to the US. When he died she was not able to say goodbye and to this day has not been able to go to his casket, she has had to keep going to support us. This is why I wanted to go in to healthcare, learn how to manage medicine and help those who are sick. Once I am able to have a solid understanding of helping patience and assisting them to get better, I will got o Honduras and help those who need medical assistance. This is because there are kids illnesses like him and don’t have the funds to afford the medicine or treatments to help them survive. Medicine is not just about the money but about helping everyone who needs it, who want to feel better and live their best life. Healthcare is my place because regardless of the stress and the responsibility , it is our job to help all our patients get better. As well as accept when we lose a patient and help the families be able to mourn their loss and help them get better. Most important of all to hold our morals to the highest level, stay true to to them, and to not take advantage of people with life threatening diseases. Medicine should not be seen as money but it should be scene as a resource that everyone who needs it, gets it. Thank you
    Second Chance Scholarship
    I want to make a change in my life because I want to be happy. When your insecurities get in the way of your personal life, when others comments drill in to your head, when even your best friends betray you, it hurts it teals your happiness. I you do not give yourself confidence and self respect, people will take advantage of that and just walk all over you. These insecurities have followed me since I was in elementary due to my body weight. As a skinny male you would always hear, "why are you so bony", " why are you so skinny", " you should try to eat more". These few words begin to drill into your head until they become all you think about. These later become your insecurities because they are you think people will say about you. This scholarship will open those doors for me to go to the college of my choice, a place of free judgement, a place where I can build my character, my confidence, my self love. This scholarship will help me get to a place of worship to our Lord and Savior. He is the one who created a "second chance" when he gave his son on the cross for us. I want to use that second chance to just be happy to praise him, to give him the honor he deserves. Yet, I cannot love him with all my heart until I have full love for myself. I wan to be the best me I can be for him and really give myself a second chance. This will be the new approaches to friendships, avoiding toxic relationships, and not letting anyone bring me down in any way. Once I am fully restored and am in the right place mentally, I will look for others with the same mental insecurities or feeling of self doubt. To bring them upwards , to tell them to be kind to others, but more importantly to herself. That sometimes it is ok to be selfish, to put yourself before others because a second chance only comes once and if we don not use it we will miss it, and regret it. As well as providing counseling services to be able to help them find this new mindset that they may not be familiar with, confidence. One of the most important factors to loving yourself and being able to feel in full control of your mental life. Thank you
    Stand and Yell Community Impact Scholarship
    I have volunteered at the middle school I had gone to. This was a beautiful experience since I was able to work with the nurse, the sweetest faculty in the school. As well as the fact that I would be working in a health related environment, since I wish to be nurse in the future. You would think I would just be giving out bandages and giving ice bags, but in reality it is so much more. Students with different accommodations and medicines would come in and you really got to see how much they relied on the nurse, how important our task. There would be student who would come to speak with us because their mental health was failing and their classes were too difficult for them. Our job became so much more important to the community, we were able to speak to make an impact to every student that came in that the door. To strive for better grades, but to also understand that the effort you put in is the grade you will receive. To never give up on themselves, to stand up for their beliefs and to understand, as well as respect those with other beliefs. That middle school, as much as it felt like torture to them, was some of the best years of their lives, where there was no stress about where to go next. That this was the place you would build your community around, that the people you worked with there would be your community. Thanks to the counseling and mental help we aided them with, they were able to make better relationships with other students, the grades they desired were finally reached. Since then I have strived to make this feeling anywhere I go. I am now a senior in high school, and attempt to make this same impact and feeling of community in my National Honor Society volunteering. To love and respect regardless of race, language, color, belief, or gender. That what we do represent us and what we believe in. That with our hard work we can help bring different people together, that every task we are assigned can be done and that it makes a difference. It is our task as volunteers to bring this feeling of a loving community anywhere we go. I hope to be able to take this initiative anywhere I go and be able to make the difference in my generation. Thank you
    Sloane Stephens Doc & Glo Scholarship
    I value honesty, respect, and happiness. Honesty is the quality where you speak your mind, you state the situation as is and not how you wish it was. Honesty can make the difference when you are going through difficult situations, it can help set your reality for what it is and start you on the path to accept it and be successful in it. Sometimes we think what we want to hear is the best but in reality what will help us is hearing what we need to hear and that is the truth. That is why the saying goes, " and the truth will set you free" and this something I work hard to live up to every day of my life. Respect is something I have learned to value since I have had negative experiences when it does not come from other people. I used to be bullied for my weight and understood that respect is the foundation for love and great relationships. Those who do not give it to you tend to be people that will bring you down and make you feel like less of a person. This is why I make the attempt to always e respectful, I am not perfect since I am human, but I work hard to offer my respect and kindness to everyone I meet and share time with. Happiness is something different people view in different ways. Everyone has a certain way they wish to be happy, we tend to judge for their ways to feel happy. Even if they are not the best choices to be happy we need to give them help and support instead of pointing at them or making them feel less. It is important to make those mistakes because when you make a mistake you have the opportunity to get up and make the right decisions. Yet, when we make those hurtful comments it slows down their process to repair themselves from their mistakes and makes them feel like changing is not worth it. These different morals and values are what will pave the road for me going to college and be able to meet new people from different backgrounds. All my morals will be shown here and I know they will open doors for me to go far. This is because a good foundation, leads to a good plan, which leads to a great project. Thus, don't forget your values, attempt to live up to them as much as you can, but also understand that mistakes will happen and that's fine. They will hep you grow and growth is what you want in your life. Thank you
    #Back2SchoolBold Scholarship
    My best tip to go back to school is to go to sleep early a week before school starts. I know this may seem like a small detail but it can really make a difference when you start school. We tend to complain that it is too early, our sleep schedule is messed up since we aren't use to it, and with bad sleep it tends to lead to a tire day. Therefore this small detail can help your productivity, learning and engagement at your school. As the school year continues, you will be grateful you made this choice that seemed small but made the transition from summer to school. Thank You
    Jose "Sixto" Cubias Scholarship
    When I was younger I asked my mom if she had gone to college. She told me no because she had to leave in order to take care of me and feed me. This made me feel like I owed my mom the opportunity of going to college since I felt it was my fault. As I got older I learned that when difficult situations come up it must be dealt with difficult solutions, there are choices we have to make to live the best life that we can. I extremely grateful for the sacrifice my mom made for me and that is one of the biggest reasons why I desire to go to college. As soon as I understood that, I made a part of my life and who I wanted to be when I got older. There would be people who would try to discourage me or to drop out because school was too difficult or that it wasn't worth it. Yet there was also people who told me to stay in school because they had made the wrong choice to drop out of school and now have to work hard labor. This helped me value everything I have and not take it for granted, there are kids in Honduras( where my family originates from) who wished they had the quality of education that I have. There schools are underfunded and they are living in poor conditions that sometimes even the basic needs are met. That is why I want to go to college to be a nurse, this way I can help these people through healthcare. As well as show them that someone that looks like them and comes from a beautiful country can be successful and be someone important in life. That no matter what you look like, where you come from, or what you have gone through does not define you. All your hard work pays off and college is just the doorstep to a successful life that won't be easy, but if you work for it you will reach your goal. This has been my mindset since I was in 6th grade and has made me who I am today. A hard working, Honduran American, who wants to go to college, get that BSN, then that DNP, and be a Family Nurse Practitioner. That going to college is a resource that will get me there, be able to make my family proud, and give inspiration and help to the lower-income students in Honduras. Thank you
    Femi Chebaís Scholarship
    I want to be Family Nurse Practitioner with a DNP( Doctorate of Nursing Practice). This what I wish to accomplish to help my community and be able to provide quality of healthcare for underrepresented communities. Like mine where people rather suffer and deal with their pain, instead of bearing the pain of a hospital bill.