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Julien Odom

1655

Bold Points

2x

Nominee

8x

Finalist

4x

Winner

Bio

My life goals is to serve the community. My passion is activism for I can advocate for marginalized and disenfranchised communities. I am a great candidate because I am community centered, natural born leader, and I genuinely love helping people.

Education

Claflin University

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Political Science and Government
  • Minors:
    • Cultural Studies/Critical Theory and Analysis
  • GPA:
    3.5

Claflin University

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Cultural Studies/Critical Theory and Analysis
  • Minors:
    • Political Science and Government
  • GPA:
    4

Henry M. Jackson High School

Bachelor's degree program
2019 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Urban Studies/Affairs
    • Sociology
    • Political Science and Government
  • Minors:
    • Cultural Studies/Critical Theory and Analysis
  • GPA:
    2.9

Henry M. Jackson High School

High School
2019 - 2021
  • GPA:
    2.9

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Public Administration
    • Social Sciences, General
    • Political Science and Government
    • Ethnic Studies
    • History
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Public Policy

    • Dream career goals:

      To implent and change laws in society and put people over politics

    • Vice President

      NAACP
      2017 – 20214 years

    Sports

    Baseball

    Club
    2009 – 20112 years

    Awards

    • Team Player Award

    Research

    • City/Urban, Community and Regional Planning

      The community depends on each other so that everyone can benefit. — Community Leader
      2011 – 2020
    • Political Science and Government

      NAACP Organization — Vice President
      2017 – 2021

    Arts

    • N/A

      Music
      N/A
      2021 – 2021

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Claflin University — Server
      2021 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      Young Leaders Academy — Member
      2011 – 2017
    • Volunteering

      Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board — Member
      2020 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      NAACP Youth Works Council — Vice President
      2018 – 2020

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    How I embody selflessness, that is a good question. How I define myself is practicing empathy, volunteer my time, give and do not want anything in return, support goals, share my skills, have gratitude, and stay mindful and humble. Selflessness in another way means to give. Giving is the motivation to not only do the right thing but to express concern for another person because that is compassion, love, and empathy. Which these words of expression that I hold dearly, the effect of being selfless is being an advocate as you can possibly mold somebody into direction of service. I mention the word service because apart of growing up, I was apart of programs of color that fostered youth development towards academic education, civic engagement, and personal and social responsibility. Programs like Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program UNCF Portfolio Project were programs aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Attending college fairs, I met with panelists who had careers in various fields and talked about the importance of representation, access to financial mobility, and how to gather resources and tools to create job zones for people and have a skill set. I mention these programs because it was a community effort, the commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. Because of guest speakers talking about their experiences and talking about different career paths and the importance of networking, I began to want to help others in any way I can. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provided me with the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after school clubs and activities that enabled me to become a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important as I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. Also in high school joining an advisory board to work with Mayor Cassie Franklin in Everett as she focuses on addressing city homelessness, creating a healthcare plan for COVID, creating a city budget while allocating money towards aviation and investing in small businesses. As I attend college, I continue to plan to contribute my selfless identity as I become a part of life-changing projects, initiatives, and collaborations as to work with local leaders and officials to transform the world through skill development, civic engagement and social responsibility.
    Strong Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
    What makes you a leader, that is a good question. What makes me a leader is having great decision-making, strategy and vision, communication skills, and emotional intelligence, Though I am working on emotional intelligence and communication skills, as a leader, I have the ability to inspire, motivate, and guide people around me. The traits of a leader I do have are self-awareness, respect, compassion, integrity, courage, resilience, gratitude, influence, collaboration, and learning agility. Self-awareness and humility are paramount qualities of leadership because the better you understand yourself and recognize your own strengths and weaknesses, the more effective you can be as a leader. As a leader it is about your reputation and word for people will view and understand how you show yourself. Respect is key component for me and this is on a daily basis. As a leader the most important thing for me to do is ease tension and conflict and helps foster trust. Respect to me is culture and creating respect into culture truly shows how you value other's perspectives and making an effort to build belonging. Creating a culture of respect is about more than just the absence of disrespect. Compassion is one of the most powerful and important aspects of leadership. It’s more than showing empathy or listening and seeking to understand. As compassion requires me to act on what people learn. After someone shares a concern or speaks up about something, they won’t feel truly heard if their leader doesn’t then take some type of meaningful action on the information. This also leads into vision as a great purpose driven objective to ensure an garnering commitment and direction on were we are headed. Collaboration is key component of leadership, when people value and embrace collaboration, then things increased innovation, relationships, higher performances, and empowerment. This leads into influence as people cannot do this alone and requiring emotional intelligence and trust. Including integrity and courage because you have to a ethical conviction or a moral compass that you live by and speaking up for concerns, reports, and feedback. Lastly, resilience and gratitude, because a leader has the ability to bounce back or adapt from obstacles and setbacks and to project a positive outlook that helps maintain emotional strength and the commitment to the shared vision. With gratitude, it is to be thankful, appreciative, and sincere which creates for me high self-esteem. I mention these leadership traits that personally fit me, because since elementary school, I have join programs of color that taught the important of civic engagement and community service. From feeding the homeless, volunteering at food banks, food server at school events, to even working with the mayor on improving city issues like homelessness, economic zones for jobs and small businesses, creating a healthcare plan for it residents. While in school, I was apart of Black Student Union to tackle issues about staff of color recruitment, access to AP classes, and improving SRO's school safety. Now that I attend Claflin University, it is my time to be apart of clubs that are geared towards personal development and community.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and self-volunteering. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc which was a non-profit organization centered around youth development and civic leadership in their local community. What also got me involved was educational programs for students of color. Organizations like UNCF and YDP from Everett Community College discussed the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and avenues for career networking. These programs took us through the college application process, we meet people in career fields that we were interested in. Nelson Mandela once said education is the powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. From the programs they taught us two quotes. The mind is a terrible thing to waste and education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today, quoted by Malcolm X. These quotes are the inspiration that influence me to carry the torch of leadership and use academic education as a tool and resource to give back to my community. Since high school, I have join the NAACP Youth Work Chapter as we had sit downs with our school SRO's, promoting the awareness of voter registration, and holding youth workshops on colorism and Black culture. Also joining Black Student Union, we meet with our principal to address our public school district on representation for students, staff, and parents of color through DEI initiatives. Later joining Everett Youth Advisory Board and Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board that is centered around youth engagement and solving local issues. During the COVID-19 pandemic, I had the opportunity to work with Mayor Cassie Franklin as she was focusing on reducing the city's homeless population, job creation, saving small businesses, having a healthcare plan, and calling national attention for police reform due to the death of George Floyd. As of lately, especially being at the college, I begin to realize that my passion is centered around community development. Under-invested communities need adequate resources and access to institutional building. The access to education, employment, housing, healthcare, recreational facilities, and public safety is exactly what these undeserved communities need. Joining the PROUD Program last summer, I had the experiences to work with young people who were at-risk youth and we focused on personal development and life skills such as communication, setting goals for yourself, and character building as to re-brand their image of themselves while getting an education. With the influences that have impacted my life, I plan to nurture other needs who just need support, care, love, and awareness which could create decent outcomes for people who experienced poverty, subjugation, and low self-esteem and I believe that community development will save people from their fatalism.
    Career Test Scholarship
    The importance of cultural identity has had a significant impact on people of color to even create educational programs. Due to centuries of colonization and assimilation, programs of color have been designed to meet the future needs for Black youth, families, and students. Though their are for profit organizations for community assistance, my experience growing up was being a part of non-profit organizations that gave me an understanding of my cultural worth, the value of representation, and having access to higher education leads to a door of career opportunities. Organizations like The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, UNCF, NAACP, PROUD Program, and Everett Youth Advisory Board fostered youth and community development. Being a part and working with these organizations display mass amount of support by providing resources , developing leadership and professional skills, and learning other people's background and build sustainable relationships. My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. So with pathways of career development programs, this will allow me to network with other people of color and get myself involved in local public policy. Though I may not know my true path yet, I want my work to be dedicated towards civic advocacy and mentorship through community development. Local civic leadership and continued academic education will further me in educational resources and job opportunities and with poverty being the issue behind the complex psychologies of racism, I do believe that personal development, institutional building, and social change in our political system is the right way forward. These stigmas have affected our way of life, even locally. Our leaders, laws of the land, and an ingrained system that is a relic of dominant Anglo-Saxon European culture and in order to make change, we as a people must change ourselves while critiquing our political leadership to do better. As I attend Claflin University, dual majoring in African American Studies and Political Science, I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access for affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize under-invested communities. With my passion centered on community development is because of the molding influence from community organizations that taught me the importance of community service, cultural identity, and civic responsibility, therefore I will carry the touch that education is power if it is used to change the world.
    Priscilla Shireen Luke Scholarship
    As an intern for the LISC Internship Program is that there is an opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. The LISC internship has helped me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allowing me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. Attending college was the decision to make a positive impact in the world. I attend Claflin University, which is an HBCU, as a Black person, the importance of cultural identity, civic mentorship, and access to economic mobility are very vital to me. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up what he believes in. Programs like the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, YDP at Everett Community College, and UNCF Portfolio Project took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. With the importance of community service, academic excellence, and brotherhood, I chose to go to college to continue to fight the statistics and narratives that support Black people as poor and useless. I will also strive towards creating generational wealth and economic mobility within my family and I believe that getting my degree and putting it to use is how it impacts the future of the world. As the great Nelson Mandela said Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.
    Schmid Memorial Scholarship
    My passion is towards civic engagement, social justice, and community development. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. as this program molded me to become a leader in my community and a productive citizen. This also led me to join another youth program called Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board as it was centered around community service and youth led projects. Other community programs like YDP Everett Community College and the UNCF Portfolio Project took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. This step of networking is how I join the Everett Youth Advisory Board as I had a chance to work with Mayor Cassie Franklin to address the city's homelessness, city budget, the COVID-19 pandemic, and investing in small businesses and job development. As I attend Claflin University, dual majoring in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science, I will use this to gain access to information, tools, and resources to invest in under-invested communities. As I stated before as my passion is in community development while maintaining the fabric of the community, the work will focus on economic and policy initiatives to adequately invest in undeserved communities. If I win this scholarship, the money will go towards HBCU funding. As HBCU student, representation helps strengthen communities of color and improves student outcomes. The primary goals of an HBCU are having access to higher education, creating pathways to careers, an investment in job fairs, keeping over recreational facilities working, and providing economic mobility in the community.
    Joy Of Life Inspire’s AAA Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The main goal for me is public service which I will dedicate to serve and protect the public's trust, needs, and interest in common ordinary people. Throughout my upbringing I was always a part of mentorship through academic education. Programs like the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, YDP Program, UNCF Portfolio Project inspire me to invest in the best of humanity. Joining Black Student Union, NAACP Youth Works Chapter, and Snohomish County Legal Services. This pathway to social networking is to be able to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. I get the chance to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Me embracing the T'Challa one nation speech from Black Panther is how I embody Agape love. Like Martin Luther King and many others, the connection to them is the wise are building bridges and not barriers and to invest in the future of our youth. I think grassroots activism is a form of agape love for you want to see a change in a world full of thunder and fire. Due to civil unrest, we need a call for better leadership and demand policy changes in our current political economy. In the words of the wise, we must not exploit, we must give, for if we hate, we become like them!
    Jerzee Foundation Scholarship
    My goals are to graduate from college, land an intern toward public service, and get a job so that I can save money. This scholarship will help me pay off student loans debt and put money into my school so they can provide resources to college students. My goal or my passion is to provide resources and services to BIPOC students. Being a part of community programs growing up, I hope the path will lead into civic mentorship and community development. The struggle of who has access to resources usually leaves the underclass who are poverty-stricken to die in a concentrated area with no hope of possibility or change in our historical political economic system. My passion is for rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Locally I have participated in community events like my church's health fair, and supporting school workshops, and over the summer I joined a program called PROUD to help direct youth who are on a path of incarceration. This opportunity to work with this program has and will lead me to local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My future work will be working in non-profit organizations. The main goal for me is public service which I will dedicate to serve and protect the public's trust, needs, and interest in common and ordinary people. Throughout my upbringing I was always a part of mentorship through academic education. Programs like the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, YDP Program, UNCF Portfolio Project inspire me to invest in the best of humanity. Joining Black Student Union, NAACP Youth Works Chapter, and Snohomish County Legal Services led to social networking, planning and hosting events, and fostered youth participation in community meetings and local fundraising. As of right now, I am applying for internships, because like a program, internships develop leadership and public speaking skills and learning other perspectives from people who are doing the same work as I am. Community development requires economic mobility, public policy, and institutional building to have a positive impact on culture. In order for change to happen, grassroots activism is a must to address social issues, and as they say, political action is the vanguard for prosperity, power, and peace!
    West Family Scholarship
    I think it is something you feel inside yourself to fight for something that you believe in. Throughout my life as a BIPOC student, cultural identity is very important. This has even allowed me to find what I am passionate about and networking with people, especially those who look like me. I guess the path always starts with being an intern, an intern has the opportunity to work with a variety of people and build sustainable relationships. My passion has always been about community development and institutional building. With a major in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science, public service in the Black community is my religion. Being able to provide tools and resources for under-invested communities while maintaining the identity of the community. I believe cultural representation is the most valuable thing to me as education being the most powerful weapon to change the world, change requires understanding and meeting people where there at. The needs are the most important as cultural development can open the mind of possibilities and becoming productive citizens in their community. Cultural representation starts off with the youth as their foundation of embracing their identity. I recently completed an internship called the Proud Program. As this program is centered around youth development, it is about re-branding your image regarding self-accountability, setting goals, and mentoring young people on communication and how to interact with people. With representation believe stop believing that they are a person who can do amazing things. But due to slavery and the psychologies of racism, culture has become assimilated and appropriated, and with cultural representation starting at our learning institutions, their will be diversity, equity, and inclusion. Civic mentorship is also a big help with community development because under-invested communities lack access to economic mobility to build and sustainable their community's infrastructure and resources. This requires economic building and public policy to see growth in education, health, jobs, and recreational centers. As of now, I am applying for internships towards social justice work and the focus will be set on educational and employment opportunities to open door for people who have deserted from the professional legitimate economy. With my background in community service and academic education, I plan to work with our current institutions from city officials to community foundations to challenge our political leadership and work with other BIPOC coalitions to ensure the resources, tools, and needs to create futures for many generations to come!
    CEW IV Foundation Scholarship Program
    My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. With this passion centered around community development I will dual major in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to focus on job creation, affordable housing, access to health facilities, and economic initiatives for our school districts. I think the key to entering any door is to apply for internships. Internships gives me an opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. Internships will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. Being a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and development of becoming a man. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program opened my mind to the possibility of a career path to network with people of color in different career fields and finding ways to provide resources to create and maintain economic mobility that will revitalize under-invested communities.
    CATALYSTS Scholarship
    My passion is centered around community development and getting a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science will further my political activism that focuses on creating affordable housing, opportunity zones for employment, and investing in grocery stores, medical clinics, and recreational facilities. The difference I hope to make in this world is to pull, gather, and spread resources to help revitalize and stabilize under-invested communities that could potentially put an end to concentrated poverty. What I want to be able to do is rebuild in under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Locally I have participated in community events like my church's health fair, and supporting school workshops, and over the summer I joined a program called PROUD to help direct youth who are on a path of incarceration. This opportunity to work with this program has and will lead me to local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. I think my start of community development started when I was in high school. it started off when I was taking a Civics class and I took a game as being the president and education was an important issue to me and went the hurdles of trying to invest in education. Later that year, I joined the Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board where all we did was community service. Come to find out, the program was partnered with Everett Youth Advisory Board and I had the opportunity with working with Mayor Cassie Franklin as we worked on restoring the economy through COVID, creating more job opportunity zones, investing in Diversity Equity Inclusion initiatives, and working on STEM projects to improve our parks, water, and how we travel. Concentrated poverty is a important social issue because our political system has only produced hyper-exploitation and global homicide and for effective improvement, their has to be a change in leadership and public policy. When I graduated from Claflin University, a year from now, I want to continue the Blueprint of the Ten Point Program goals that guides under-served communities into achieving their political destiny.
    Simon Strong Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University as this program. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. During high school, I was apart of the NAACP Youth Works Chapter in Snohomish County where we held social events including voter registration, participating in church plays, and creating fundraisers to help promote social justice issues. This led to me joining Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson high school where we fully dedicate ourselves to improving education in our public schools. Also, I join the UNCF who I met at a college fair and we also went to Black and Brown summits and other college events to address key issues in the Black community. Furthermore, I joined the Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board where all we did was community service. Writing letters to our veterans, donating books at libraries, and cleaning our public parks. This led to a connection with working with Mayor Cassie Franklin as we worked on financial budgets, restoring the economy, creating more jobs, and working with public school SROs on community policing. If I had to give any advice to someone, is find your support group that value and represent you as a human being and live how you express your ideas because that is what makes you unique from the room.
    TEAM ROX Scholarship
    What led to my development was being enrolled in programs for students of color to provide educational resources and civic services to BIPOC students. The main start was the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., for this organization is for young black males who would become productive citizens in their community. I did lots of volunteer work, like feeding the homeless, checking on elders at local nursing homes, having roundtable discussions with the BR police department, and being a server at Kwanzaa's Pancake festivals. This program was catered for young black males who lived with single mothers and this program was an investment of Black men having an impact on young black boys' lives. With this program I joined other volunteer organizations. During high school, I was a part of the NAACP Youth Works Chapter in Snohomish County where we held social events including voter registration, participating in church plays, and creating fundraisers to help promote social justice issues. This led to me joining Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson high school where we fully dedicate ourselves to improving education in our public schools. This is where I met the UNCF program and I attended a Black and Brown summit and other college events to address key issues in the Black community. Furthermore, I was in AVID in high school and I was requested to join the Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board where all we did was community service. Writing letters to our veterans, donating books at libraries, and cleaning our public parks. This led to a connection with working with Mayor Cassie Franklin as we worked on financial budgets, restoring the economy, creating more jobs, and working with public school SROs on community policing. Joining these organizations and programs has developed, nurtured, and guided me into a leader and fighter for change. With these programs, I dedicate my life towards community revitalization and institutional building. As I worked under the PROUD Program last summer, the importance of school workshops and mentorship training has led me to continue network with coalitions and push for adequate funding to direct our youth into obtaining personal, social, and collective responsibility. This will take me to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials on ensuring community development and systemic changes in our public policy. The key thing with volunteering is having a relationship, for without it, there is no purpose and passion to help bring the best of people.
    Treye Knorr Memorial Scholarship
    My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Through internships, educational programs, and networking will help me toward my career aspirations of politics. This will allow me to further engage myself in grassroots activism and join political organizations that are rooted in coalition programs to improve public speaking, technology innovations & data research, and understanding public policy sectors which requires fluent written communication. The personal journey and educational journey was through programs for students of color. The importance of cultural identity has had a significant impact on people of color to even create educational programs. Due to centuries of colonization and assimilation, programs of color have been designed to meet the future needs for Black youth, families, and students. Programs like UNCF Portfolio Project, The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, and NAACP Youth Development Program gave me an understanding of my cultural worth, the value of representation, and having access to higher education leads to a door of career opportunities. In the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, I embrace the acts of community service and conviction as you stand for something you believe in. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and development of becoming a man. As I moved into high school, I joined the NAACP Youth Development Program in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. What this means to me is being a force for social change and by doing that, I am going to work with outreach programs that are rooted in community development and institutional building to culturally guide our youth into becoming positive role models in their communities that they will serve on day.
    Delories Thompson Scholarship
    My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. The focus on community development, institutional building, and social networking with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. The importance of cultural identity is what it means to be Black. Due to centuries of colonization and assimilation, programs for people of African descent have been designed to meet the future needs for Black youth, families, and students. Programs that I attended like UNCF Portfolio Project, The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, and NAACP Youth Development Program gave me an understanding of my cultural worth, the value of representation, and having access to higher education leads to a door of career opportunities. In the UNCF Portfolio Project, I took the advantage to apply to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. As I attend Claflin University and major in Africana Studies and Political Science, I will use these degrees to advocate for outreach programs that re-envisioned an alternative culture value system that understands, support, and builds Black health in a responsive and effective way.
    Grand Oaks Enterprises LLC Scholarship
    My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. This will provide me the opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been a part of community programs that advocate education. The importance of cultural identity has had a significant impact on people of color to even create educational programs. Due to centuries of colonization and assimilation, programs of color have been designed to meet the future needs for Black youth, families, and students. Programs like UNCF Portfolio Project, The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, and NAACP Youth Development Program gave me an understanding of my cultural worth, the value of representation, and having access to higher education leads to a door of career opportunities. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and development of becoming a man. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. The UNCF Portfolio Project sparked an interest and my exploration to attend an HBCU. I took the advantage to apply to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. As I attend Claflin University, an HBCU, I am majoring in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science. I believe that resources make a difference to help families and communities in need. Though everybody's path did not start in an academic education, fortunately community programs and foundations gathered resources which focused on community development and institutional building. The goal at the end of day is to secure our youth a future and hope and with my academic background, I must use its tools and gather resources to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers."
    Book Lovers Scholarship
    Black Men's Studies by Serie McDougal is the book to read. Diving into how hyper-sexuality is conflated into a multi-dimensional perspective on brotherhood, romantic relationships, sexuality, impact of class, sexism, and race with the development of racial and sexual identity. How it is related to this course is to interpret, narrate, and analyze Black males being strapped in social stratification. I think society should take a sociological, conceptually, theoretical form of theory to approach the duality of Black men's reflection in society. It is the double negro consciousness where the Black male is struggling with complex Black and Euro-American identity, He adopts more so Euro-American traits because of powerlessness and self-destructive fatality. This reflection dives into a cultural perspective, exploring hegemonic masculinity and vulnerability through our social construction theories. These traits that Black men have adopted will affect our relationships with ourselves and others and it is overly critical for our social and cultural programs seek to improve Black male relationships in a culturally responsive way. Relevant to literature is due to the book Black Men’s Studies by Serie McDougal III explaining Black Male culture. Living in an anti-black male world, where society is ruled by racism and hegemonic power affects Black male identity. Masculinity for Black men is often hard and invulnerable as we try to reject the stereotype of the grinning, submissive, and enslaved Black male. Because of racial dynamics, our emotions express tension, distrust, and anger because of the regression and attempted genocide of adopting a dominant culture where power and wealth is unequally distributed which produces cultural marginalization. Because of racism which is a function of capitalism has perpetuated racial exploitation and a struggle for power has affected Black males to have problems becoming positive fathers, lovers, and leaders of their community. Because of this imbalance of power, the writer Serie McDougal advocates a national call to end institutional decimation of Black males as they are removed from the civilian population. Black males must break the cycle of Euro-American masculine ideals of power, not engaging in Black political suicide through hegemonic masculinity, and create alternative methods of masculinity as the navigate in an anti-Black male world.
    Barbara Cain Literary Scholarship
    From reading Black Men' s Studies written by Serie McDougal III makes a critical theory of how society interprets and analyzes Black males. How black boys are brought up in a world where our bodies are trapped in social stratification. This theory would only depict the social and historical relations that obscure the phenomena of Black masculinity in a hegemonic society. With the stakes of being birthed hyper-masculine, Black boys are groomed conceptually and sociologically as incomplete men due to the lack of relative power like white men, they behave like deviants and criminals for being failures in society. As Black males whose humanity is viewed less than, then the ideals of Black manhood are not seen as positives. Black males is a research phenomenon because we multidimensional people and because of the effects of intersectionality, we must understand roles of gender dynamics, material conditions, and racism. It starts from our bodies, as Black males are constructed to be a threat to social and biological reproduction of the white order. This carnalized hatred has criminalizes Black males as sexual threats while constructing them as oversexed and only fetishes the white male gratification through abnormal desires. Then this creates racism as a complex nexus and cognitive architecture to invent, reimagine, and evolve the presumed political, social, economic, sexual, psychologically superiority of the white race while materializing and hastening death of the inferior races. This construction has plagued Black maleness into isolation from the normative maleness that is represented as white which has brought the eunuch to manifest the repression of the social corporeally which means death to Black males. Throughout our historical lens of maleness is to understand the synonymous with power and patriarchy and being racially codified as white. It has no existential content for the Black male, who in anti-Black world is denied maleness and is ascribed as feminine in relation to white masculinity. If masculinity is masculine in relation to Blackness, then Blackness becomes relationally defined as not masculine and feminine, because it lacks the power of white masculinity. Therefore, black maleness becomes a de-gendered negation of white maleness that is feminine because of its subordinate position to white masculinity. This creates a colonized body of a man who embodies the brute negation of an animal, as Black men try to emulate and Black men try to emulate and ultimately creates the Black Macho man, who now has internalized the white man’s obsession with his penis. This consequence was the intent on Black men realizing their own patriarchal power by asserting their manhood which became a detriment to the Black community. Which later became the ultimate prize for Black men to sexual conquer white women. This then creates the flawed logic of Black Male Privilege as the privilege class by the virtue of sex while disadvantage by their race. This leads into a mission to overturn racism as his masculisnt quest to take his rightful place in white male heterosexual patriarchal rule. Notions of aggression, hyper-sexuality, and toxicity has systematically, culturally, and historically ground the study of the lives of black boys to men through their principles, values, performances, behaviors, and outward manifestations. Due to assimilation into American society, Black men have been reduced of their manhood and seek to reclaim it by domination. This absence of power has created the Black male to become an exercise of his own demise. Though every action that he takes of self-defense, politics, or love will only become an exercise of his attempt to realize patriarchy has denied him his own reality of Black manhood.
    Boun Om Sengsourichanh Legacy Scholarship
    My passion is for rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Locally I have participated in community events like my church's health fair, and supporting school workshops, and over the summer I joined a program called PROUD to help direct youth who are on a path of incarceration. This opportunity to work with this program has and will lead me to local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. What led to the path was my mother enrolling me in programs of color usually educational to provide resources and services to BIPOC students. But my main start was the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., for young black males would become productive citizens in their community. I did lots of volunteer work like feeding the homeless, having roundtable discussions with the BR police department, and being a server at Kwanzaa's Pancake festivals. This program was catered for young black males who lived with single mothers and this program was an investment of Black men having an impact on young black boys' lives. With this program, it led me in high school to join other programs that fostered youth development. Programs like NAACP Youth Works Chapter, Everett Youth Advisory Board, and Black Student Union. My career path would be directed toward community development and mentorship. The struggle of who has access to resources usually leaves the underclass who are poverty-stricken to die in a concentrated area with no hope of possibility or change in our historical political economic system. As having goals of improving our social programs, public infrastructure, technology innovations and data research, this leads me to believe that the importance of higher education is important which will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. This welcomes the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of connecting with communities and their cultures. I believe through mentorship which is the important structure for community development gives me my commitment to dedicate my life in public service. The hope of sparking change is to work on projects that invest in under-resourced communities so that we as a society can eliminate concentrated poverty.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. As I am working to earn my degree in Africana Studies and Political Science, these degrees will help me understand that culture and public service have an significant impact on representation and having higher access to career development and educational growth. Through my leadership programs, the Young Leaders of Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board, AVID, and Black Student Union all have molded me into becoming a community helper. Volunteering at food banks, feeding the homeless, visiting children at elementary schools, and being in the forefront of pushing for diversity in our school district. Being a part of the Black Student Union made me believe that I am a rebel for social justice and progressive change. I had the opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. I believe that community service is a pathway to grassroots activism and it has inspired me to join other organizations participating in the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural identity. Joining the UNCF Portfolio Project was the driving influence of me to apply to an HBCU. At the time of living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. My passion is centered around community development and getting a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science will further my political activism that focuses on creating affordable housing, opportunity zones for employment, and investing in grocery stores, medical clinics, and recreational facilities. The difference I hope to make in this world is to pull, gather, and spread resources to help revitalize and stabilize under-invested communities that could potentially put an end to concentrated poverty.
    Black Leaders Scholarship
    Andrew Jackson Young Jr. is someone who often gets overlooked.  Young grew up in the church, eventually became a pastor, and served as Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. After moving to Georgia, Young met, became friends, and lieutenant to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  Young became active in politics, serving first as a U.S. Congressman from Georgia, then United States Ambassador to the United Nations, and finally Mayor of Atlanta. However, Young displayed acts of political courage in how he faced adversity while accomplishing those achievements. Young was affected by Jim Crow laws which enforced racial segregation in Southern states until 1965.  Young was important to the Civil Rights Campaign movement as a strategist, negotiator, and registrar of black voters in Birmingham, St. Augustine, Selma, and Atlanta.  Young was jailed for his participation in civil rights demonstrations. However, the Civil Rights movement is what opened the door for passage to Congress for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  Young was with Dr. King when he was assassinated in Memphis, TN in 1968. Even though times were hard, Young ran for Congress in 1970, elected in 1972, reelected in 1974 and 1976. Though he was threatened, he still caused controversy as Young went on to fight for political prisoners. I bring up his story because a quote from my high school quoted from Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. My teacher who also was the program coordinator taught me the importance of education to represent Black people' history and their value to society. As I attend an HBCU, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes. As I close, these demonstration of political courage reminds me to continue to carry the torch and follow the blueprint for social justice and change.
    SWANA Cultural Heritage Scholarship
    As the pursuit of knowledge is challenging, knowledge is also fun to learn. Learning something new will help me encounter more challenges and differences in the global education system. Also, navigating my surroundings while not speaking the language, and learning personal safety and security protocols. To face these challenges, I will embrace my curiosity. As an African Studies major having some knowledge about African cultures will assist me with perspectives on my stay in Tanzania. I hope to use my base of knowledge to understand the tapestry of African Americans as part of the tapestry and cross-interactions between ethnic tribes and native/indigenous roots. I will explore and keep an open mind to new challenges that allow me to expand my knowledge of my host country's culture. An opportunity in which I was able to engage with someone from an African culture was back in high school, where I was enrolled in educational programs designed for students of African Descent. At this program called Youth Development Program at Everett Community College, one of my mentors was Senegalese and she talked about her culture and her experience as an immigrant in the United States. The opportunity to participate in the Critical Language Scholarship program would allow me to connect to my heritage as part of the African diaspora outside the United States. The plan is to immerse myself in the culture in which the language is spoken. I plan to be interactive in the environment and learn from the culture from the people. With my African Studies major, I can make the connection of how African culture exists and operates with connection to their language. After this program, I will use my degree in African studies to be a part of programs related to that country. I will continue to develop my target language by networking with those in connection with that culture and making career choices that leverage my cultural knowledge and language skills. I think learning about SWANA cultural heritage furthers better outcomes in global relations. As an child, I was intrigued by movies like Nelson Mandela's A Long Walk to Freedom, Hotel Rwanda, Blood Diamond, and Black Panther. These movies made me believe that Africa is an vibrant continent filled with creativity, passion, and determination. The connection I made with these films inspired me to become an African Studies major. On a deeper note, studying Swahili in Tanzania resonates with my desire to learn and study within the African diaspora. So being an outsider to learn diverse cultures will dispel some of the myths about SWANA culture.
    Brotherhood Bows Scholarship
    Was I born with this destiny or did my choices in life lead me down this path is a sentence I remind myself everyday of. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Due to NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center, they helped me regain my sense of cultural identity. I began to join other organizations like Communities of Color Coalition and Black Student Union as I contributed to school events of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district through many organizations that I am apart of. Through this process I learned how to network, advocate for yourself, and create group strategies when it was time for projects. The main important lesson I really learn was balance and take care of your health because if you are stress, how can you achieve anything! These support systems made me have a strong sense of culture , to be an advocate for the underrepresented, and how diplomacy is the door to representation and resources.
    Eleanor Anderson-Miles Foundation Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Netflix and Scholarships!
    The best sporting movies are about more than the contest itself. Take Rocky, for example, a million-to-one shot gets a chance to fight for the world heavyweight title. Rocky himself tells us, as he tells Adrian late in the movie, that it’s not about winning for him. It’s about mattering. It’s about a person who’s never had anything in his life finally finding his self-worth. Cobra Kai is a tale of characters who doesn’t have much in life, gets relentlessly bullied and struggles to maintain his self-respect. Also, Cobra Kai tells the story of the underdog to gets a chance to contest for something important and learn something about themselves. In that journey and in that sense, we can relate to the protagonist. They are a reflection of our own often unsteady journey in life. We’re all battling to get somewhere. We all are facing obstacles. There are many times that the odds seem overwhelming and out of reach. Yet we continue to endure the struggle. We fight the good fight and we keep striving because we’re always reaching for something greater. All the characters are not one-dimensional, like for example, we learn that Johnny’s adolescence wasn’t as pampered as we had thought it to be. Further, we discover that in adulthood he’s estranged from his ex-wife and his son, Robby. To make ends meet, Johnny works as a handyman. Although his surly defiance sees him drifting from job to job. When Johnny begrudgingly saves teenager Miguel from a beating, Miguel then pesters Johnny to teach him karate. This setup and outcome are a nice reversal from the movie. Johnny and Miguel bond and Johnny becomes a father figure for Miguel. As a result, Miguel becomes a surrogate son. Throughout, Miguel, who’s dealing with being bullied in high school, struggles with his own identity. The lessons Cobra Kai initially teaches him, infuse him with confidence that then grows into arrogance. On the other side of the valley, Daniel is the owner of a car dealership who’s lost touch with his roots. He’s married to a confident, successful woman, Amanda, and has a teenage daughter Samantha, and a spoiled adolescent son Anthony. Daniel develops a relationship with Johnny’s son, Robby, and begins teaching him life lessons through karate. Robby, who’s involved in petty crime and has a couple of nefarious friends, finds a role model and father figure in Daniel, and an opportunity to make a life for himself. Though I only mention two people who are the main characters, Cobra Kai exemplifies a great job of extrapolating from their pasts and building credible presents. As Johnny is secured in insecurity and lives in a facade, while Daniel is a smug yuppy who grows complacent from his karate roots, the two characters find motivation and justification in who they want to become.
    Ryan T. Herich Memorial Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been apart of community programs that advocate education. Because of cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. Historical, their has global independence movements of certain groups of people to achieve their own image through their being. As I live in this Black body, I hope to explore my image through this scholarship essay. Trans-nationality is the impact of the cross-cultural interactions and exchange between neighboring and foreigner countries. Trans-nationality often deals with trade from the Old and New World for the growth and expansion of these nation’s empires. I been taught more the European contact of the New and Old World because of the transition from African to being labeled Black. Also from world trade, cultures learned from each other and did business. Being a part of the African Diaspora means to spread out. The multi-dimensional of identities being molded from another country while fighting to preserve their own African identity. African culture in the transcontinental era is centered on survival, dignity, and freedom. Consequently, though African people were brought, migrate, or flee, but the effect of African culture has transformed their achievements across the world. The creative innovation of African people is what amazes me who have been historically subjugated, exploited, and terrorized, we still struggle to achieve African independence and the remembrance of our history. The concept of nation to African people is centered around nationalism constantly evolving from regional tribalism to more of an ethnocentric viewpoint of socialism due to the decolonization movement in the 20th century. As African people inhabiting a cosmic world of the living and unliving is how we process our methods of communal living. Though assimilation and attempted annihilation of African culture proceeds, the ancient traditions of African culture are kept to preserve the memory and cultural making of their ancestors. So as an African American Studies major, trans-nationality and the Diaspora is a continued story of seeking truth and connection with African culture. Though my relationship may be distant, and I do cling to my Black identity, but I am African who believes who is lost. So with that being said, the lesson of making the world a better place is to knowledge so that I can live, spread, and tell my own story of navigating through an Anti-Black African world.
    Combined Worlds Scholarship
    My experiencing in traveling has not yet been fulfilled, but as someone who wants to learn other world cultures, it would be as a American citizen to diversify cultural knowledge. As I study abroad as a citizen diplomat, I will be able to engage in foreign relations and develop professional and personal relationships to connect with people. My mission for studying abroad is to learn about other cultures and how those cultures shaped their ways of living. With diversifying culture will help shape the conversation about the impact that both countries have on each other. This connection helps the exchange student see from different perspectives about life, and create an open mind to various cultures. Upon return, exchange students also serve as diplomats of their host countries. Having the inspiration to make a difference in a world is the crucial step to begin connecting with others. Study abroad also leads to professional collaborations, joint initiatives, and civic mentor-ships that will further develop ideas and create better outcomes for foreign relations. I think these ideas start at school, because school is so diverse it makes you want to open up to learn about other people and grasp the value in their culture. Though the challenge as a traveler would be of how to be a different language or adopt their customs and know their laws, but a traveler wants to enhance their knowledge. This is how I begin to navigate in an environment foreign to me which I can be able to dive and understand tapestry of cross-cultural and foreign relations between other nations and themselves. Since I major in African American Studies, I will be welcomed the opportunity to engage in African culture. In high school I had An opportunity in which I was able to engage with someone from an African culture was back in high school, where I was enrolled in educational programs designed for students of African Descent. At this program called Youth Development Program at Everett Community College, one of my mentors was Senegalese and she talked about her culture and her experience as an immigrant in the United States. Now as I enter college, I plan to apply for the Critical Language Scholarship program for this would allow me to connect to my heritage as part of the African diaspora outside the United States. The plan is to make an connection of how African culture exists and operates with the connection of cultural language. I believe language helps us relate to their country we visit or live in and as a person, I believe that having a diverse mind creates a new reflection of culture and new perspectives removes preconceived beliefs into truth.
    Veerappan Memorial Scholarship
    My parents has always provided me with a affordable low middle class living. Though I do not live in poverty, my parents thrive for a middle class living and they believe that academic education is the key to economic mobility. Mainly my mother enrolled me in educational programs designed to serve specific needs for students of African descent for educational resources are vital to their success. And to answer how this scholarship will lead me to achieving my dream is through the representation of higher education which will give me access to career opportunities and student engagement. To me my dream is seeing a world move forward into the future and for me public service through non-profit work will guide me to see the work through. Legacy equals leadership, which means to take advantage of opportunities when they are presented, lead with the idea of service in mind, and to help people along the way. Leadership considers networking with people who have similar goals to improve the lives of self and community. The legacy of leadership is an unfinished race because leadership repeats itself. Leadership inspires a generation of people to be ambitious, determined, and have faith to persevere towards progress. To me the beginning of my career would be a focus of my non-profit work as I will get involved in internships. Internships are a bridge between programs and organizations that to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. With my faith and hope in rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills, get involved in public policy, practice data research, and understand other's people backgrounds. As a result, I have been given a good start in life as my dream is to positively effect society is to systematically change our political economy. The work will be focus on economics, municipal politics, and redefining modern culture. Everything that I was centered around at a young age, especially for young people of color was focus on improving diversity in education, civic engagement, and dismantling racism. This battle for the marginalized will prosper as we will all see the land filled with the river of milk and honey.
    Redefining Victory Scholarship
    Success to me is about the people like Bob Marley would say. Success to me is going a voice to the unheard and inspiring humanity with peace, hope, and a future. My passion is towards rebuilding under invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. From the LISC internship, this will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. This opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. I think if programs were centered around youth engagement, cultural identity, value of representation, and financial literacy this would lead people to invest in community service, personal development, and social networking and communal bonding. The goal has already been about one love, one nation, and one destiny in this journey called life. And in life, life is about relationships which are connected with people. And since my passion is towards rebuilding under invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking and further my career aspirations of engaging in grassroots activism and get politically involved to help be apart of the solution of improving our public policies and invest locally. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This program molded young African American males to help shape them into becoming productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that it was imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. With that being said, all I am saying is that humanity sometimes can be at the brink of depravity, it is the depravity that makes us our humanity change course and seek a better way of doing things to save the nation and that is what success to me!
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    Winner
    My plans for the future is to work for either non-profit organizations or a political advisor or legislator. The main goal for me is public service which I will dedicate to serve and protect the public's trust, needs, and interest in common ordinary people. Throughout my upbringing I was always a part of mentorship through academic education. Programs like the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, YDP Program, UNCF Portfolio Project inspire me to invest in the best of humanity. Joining Black Student Union, NAACP Youth Works Chapter, and Snohomish County Legal Services led to social networking, planning and hosting events, and fostered youth participation in community meetings and local fundraising. One of my biggest plans was to get an internship that could open the door for career opportunities. I believe Internship programs will provide me the opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My passion is towards rebuilding under-invested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. I get the chance to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. This will be the baston of engaging in grassroots activism which will improve my public speaking and communication skills but also learning new creative perspectives from other people, investing in data research, and finding new ways in the technological advanced world in creating diverse, thoughtful, and modern solutions. As of my third year at Claflin University, this scholarship will help my school invest in resources for their students and staff on campus. This could be a pathway on creating economic mobility programs that are centered around community development. This will increase the value of higher representation at BIPOC institutions for the value of higher education will open the mind to other possibilities of different career paths and possible changing the narrative of BIPOC people to make their own story of success. Claflin University is about transforming the world and in order to do that people need resources. Resources should not be disposable, they need to be reuse-able, so through civic engagement and political action through organizing, lobbying, mobilizing, etc can lead a new world of hope for like Sam Cooke said Change Gone Come.
    Zendaya Superfan Scholarship
    I admire all of Zendaya's multifaceted career. I grew up watching her on Disney and watched Zapped and K.C. Undercover, my crush! I also like the evolution of her acting career, films like Malcolm and Marie, Dune, Dune Part II, the newer Spiderman movies, and the number one hit show Euphoria. And of course, I like her grounding-breaking icon activism in fashion. Zendaya is the woman of my dreams. Her film Malcolm and Marie express the pressures of work and relationships. Malcolm who is an upcoming film director has ego problems. He is constantly basting in his glory and complaining about nobody understanding his work, and then he is a Black artist, so his art is often overlooked. However, Marie, his girlfriend is upset he forgot to thank her in his speech at the movie's premiere hours earlier. Marie plays the supporting partner by listening to him ramble on about film criticism, even joining in at times to soothe his ego, and taking care of all the daily duties of running a household that go unnoticed. Needlessly to say the movie explores emotional abuse in relationships. The film also explores the toxicity of self-accountability, for example, Marie overdosed in a market and was rescued by Malcolm, who then sent her to rehab. Ever since, he has held the act over her head as a reason for her to be eternally indebted to him, thus placing himself in an eternal god complex. Also, Malcolm is a manipulative partner who seeks young and vulnerable women. Malcolm calls Marie broken, mocks her addiction, and suicide attempt and Marie is trapped with a man who only her of what he can process and profit from her. She was nothing but Malcolm's story and to relate to society there are many unhealthy relationships. Her groundbreaking tv show Euphoria explores how high schoolers have their problems with excess drugs, drinking, and sexuality. The story focuses on pain for Rue Bennett the main character struggles with substance abuse disorder while trying to have a romantic relationship with a closeted transgender. The stories show the brutal reality of crime, for many young people are mired in dysfunction and damaging self-medication which only leads to tragic results. So her adult-theme films are what I admire the most because now mental health is recognized. Thank You, Zendaya!
    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. My continued engagement with community programs will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. Academic education has assisted me in becoming an intellectual scholar, however, in academic education, I struggled with grades, identity, and balance. In high school, I felt dumb because I was always failing, then being the only or few Black kid in class, and struggling with how to be socially acceptable and presentable put weight on me as a young man. I hated that I never joined things until my junior year when I began volunteering at food banks, feeding the homeless, and attending and participating in social events slowly made me connect with people. Especially in school, where I did not communicate at all with my teachers when I was struggling which dates back to elementary and is something I need to work on. My math teacher is the one who inspired me to get help after school because he saw that I was trying as a student and he talked to me like a person. This led me to join more after-school programs, make new friends, and try a new perspective on life called listening to what other people have to say. While in school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who looked like me as well as being surrounded by those who looked like me. Which is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. My goal and dream is to contribute to community development starting with mentorship. The people who invested in me took time to get to know me and invest in me as a resource, so I will also carry the torch of helping people who are socially outcasted by mainstream society.
    Reginald Kelley Scholarship
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences has created a passion for me to help rebuild and revitalize underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. I believe that networking through local programs, internships, and studying abroad will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. My career path is based on being a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man who embraces community service and stands up what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African-American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service and brotherhood. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. I chose to go to college to be a part of transforming the world through the improvement of investing in people and not profit. I will fight for the poor and create a bridge of hope to ensure an international change in our political economy. With issues of employment, health, education, housing, and lack of recreational facilities, this is a great way to instill pride in a community. As I am still learning this journey called life, I want to try new things, learn new things, connect with people and build relationships. As well as to get my degree and put it to use. I need to be able to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials to create systemic changes in local, regional, and national policies to foster growth and development in underinvested communities.
    Spider-Man Showdown Scholarship
    That is a great question, but the original Spiderman. The original Spiderman illustrates the New York experience for New York displays diverse ethnic culture, everybody is grinding, and very crowded. Spider man to me is an emblem of being the neighborhood guy and Spiderman reduces crime, unlike the other Spiderman movies. Tobey Maguire's Spiderman went through the evolution from a teenager to an adult. The original Peter Parker started in high school as he lived with his elderly and retired grandparents in a New York City residence. Peter Parker was considered an outcast at school and mostly hung with his best friend Harry Osborn. Peter went to class, his favorite subject was science so he studied, participated, and attended everything. Peter liked a girl that he only wished he could talk to and have a girlfriend. Peter Parker as a teenager was trying to navigate three identities in one person, especially as a hero. Fast forward to the second Spiderman, he struggles to hold on to a job, his Aunt May, the widow of Uncle Ben is behind her bills and is forced to sell her home, he struggles with the balance of superhero, being a broke photographer, and having a relationship with Mary Jane Watson. In the second world, he saved New York City. Then the third film of Spider-Man deals with the alter ego of Peter Parker. Peter Parker battles consciousness as the alien symbiote creates the opposite of Peter Parker. Though Peter lives with great power, comes with great responsibility, he is tired of not only continuing his duty to save the world but also struggling as an adult. Peter Parker has a hard time paying rent, his girlfriend Mary Jane has feelings for his best friend Harry due to Harry being there when she was vulnerable, and Peter decides to take the law into his own hands to catch the criminal who killed his uncle. He pursues vengeance for unhealed trauma but after meeting the criminal face to face, he realizes that forgiveness is the right choice and his path to redemption.
    Servant Ships Scholarship
    Books like Native Son, A Lesson Before Dying, and The Blueprint all books that explore the human experience through the perspectives of BIPOC people. How these struggles are now being redefined in academic fields who historically institutions are failing to dive into understanding culture that dives into the conceptual categories to explain the cross interactions that BIPOC people had to endure with themselves, others, and the environment. A book by Micheal Eric Dyson called Tears We Cannot Tears shaped my goals in exploring the complex and dynamic racial relations and the long history of injustice and discrimination against African American individuals in the United States. With issues of Black people suffering but the perseverance and possibility of social change, we need white Americans with white privilege to join the struggle with us to battle injustice and discrimination. And now since I attend an HBCU, this idea of whiteness is a social construct that reinforces racism and thwarts America’s sociopolitical progress. Dyson's sermon objective is to engage white Americans in a productive conversation about race and the country’s historical past. Since then the fight for social change to change our societal institutions to improve many underprivileged communities. But this progressive mindset starts at the top of leadership which is the forefront of politics. With the climate of diversity, equity, and inclusion, I believe that we still battling the ingrained system which is a relic of dominant European culture. This culture has created a fascist, capitalistic political economy that enflames poverty, war, and terror. So, to even have a chance of national change is through revising our education system. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; that education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So as a college student, true success is always challenging our political leadership to be better. Challenging our political leadership has been happening ever since the Birth of America. Though America has been divided by race in this country, the problem can be solved. The work requires dissociating from the mythology of whiteness for this could lead to acknowledging the attachment of power and privilege to see a deconstruction of whiteness. White grief persists in keeping control of their historical narrative and excluding and erasing other people's history and culture. The humanity of BIPOC resistance will constantly confront America's racist past and current present. To end the legacy of slavery and systemic racism, we must affirm the bastion of democracy, for that is through the global construction of media, programming, and strategies all to offer a voice of social justice and empowerment for the vanguard of humanity.
    Financial Literacy Scholarship Award
    An important lesson that I have been told as a college student is to save your money. But how can you is the main question when there are so many amazing things and social events to attend to. But with societal pressures of inflation, I as a student face this burden along with critical thinking college courses, how can I make that balance? Without a steady income, I have to ration or the financial term is budget my money. But I like to spend money on food and though I have no financial obligation yet, my parents get on me when I am careless with my money. Therefore, I have been forced to reduce my spending on certain items, for this usually comes with a consequence. In an attempt to save more, is having to grow in maturity. To think about bills, groceries, and insurance, so that I spend most of my time grinding. Saving money is important to prevent spending too much money, in case of an emergency, the money also could be taken out. With money, I am going to have to cut things off to try to save money and know what is a priority. Like joining a club, working overtime, and being actively involved in my studies and career field so that I will have a chance for upward mobility. Tough times call for tough measures and money is urgent. So saving every month is the lesson I have been told for you do not have to depend on anybody. It’s often easier to plan and stick to a budget every month when you reframe the choice as investing in a better financial future, rather than a sacrifice. Now I do not think of it as skipping drinks with friends to save money. Consider it an investment in the house you’re going to buy or a meal you’ll have on the vacation you’re saving up for. Doing the foundational work of understanding what you’re saving for will help make budgeting feel more productive and intuitive. Creating a budget or other financial plan is one way to take some power back. While there will always be expenses that are mostly outside of your control, like your rent or insurance premiums, you can control how well you’re prepared to deal with them. Because it is about creating a plan for emergencies to be able to enjoy my financial freedom.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    My personal experiences come from community programs dedicated to provide educational resources and civic responsibility to help improve their community. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man who embraces community service and stands up for what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African-American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. These ideals of brotherhood, community service, and personal development were transforming when I moved to the state of Washington and became more enrolled in programs like the NAACP Youth Works Chapter, Youth Development program, and UNCF Portfolio project all taught me the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding the importance of your identity. Local civic leadership and continued academic education will further me in educational resources, job opportunities, and the ability to travel. With the value of representation and my journey of applying for the college application process and being at college, college students are faced with student loan debt, time management skills, and self-discovery. Therefore College students need a community of advisors because the advisors can provide the resources we need. College students will be successful if they have access to wellness and mental health services, adequate housing, decent education, food, and advanced technology. Especially with the climate we are in today, society is evolving, moreover with social change. Social change is changing our societal institutions and therefore many underprivileged communities are now being served and being at the forefront of politics. Furthermore, with social change, schools are now partnering with our schools to achieve equity, and diversity, and eliminate systematic racism. I believe that college students only succeed when society succeeds. With the issues of poverty, crime, racism, and sexism, our college students will not succeed. These stigmas have affected our way of life, even locally. Our leaders, laws of the land, and an ingrained system that is a relic of dominant Anglo-Saxon European culture. So, for college students to truly have success, it is challenging our political leadership in power to make critical changes. Nevertheless, I stated traveling is a way for college students to be successful only because I feel like that is freedom. It is to get away from the old world and learn a new world that will change your perception of life changes and you become a different person. This is what makes me a successful college student.
    Novitas Diverse Voices Scholarship
    The power of diverse voices in public relations will improve shaping the public narrative of everybody being highlighted in society. The world is a melting pot full of distinct cultures which are different types of people. But I would say that it matters because of the impact culture and identity of people's cultures. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. In reality, education is supposed to mean helping your community where you come from, being a force for social change, and understanding, valuing, and connecting with all walks of life. Being a force for social change would require the significance of why cultural identity matters. Most cultures were stolen due to colonization and assimilation, so there have been programs and organizations that have pushed and fought for national recognition and celebration of their people's cultural worth and value. I would also say that the impact of Study Abroad is a chance for global networking which gives a special connection to how we have open relationships with other nations. As people, we should tackle the world's greatest issues in creating future solutions that help humanity. People's exchanging of ideas should not only be used to promote society development but also for cultural transformation, to learn various cultures and how they should be applied to our lives. But this takes global programs to inspire the practice of deliberately managing the spread of information between an individual or an organization and the public, as well as understanding the history of a race and people and their culture. This path involves diplomacy, public service, and employment in international business, government, and international agencies. Furthermore, the impact of diversity will only lead to improving more opportunities for change in the world. As the saying goes, my vote counts as well for everybody is included to have the rights, privileges, and duties as a human citizen. Everything that America is and will ever be, comes from a collection of other nations, ideas, and the people that brought and bring those ideas with them. And with cultures, everybody is a guest of someone's culture, but the idea is to learn and connect, and I want to be a part of that idea. As a student and as an American citizen it is my responsibility to remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." T'Challa (Black Panther). This is an inspiring quote that reminds us all of the importance of working together to create a diverse egalitarian society.
    STAR Scholarship - Students Taking Alternative Routes
    Winner
    My career path would be directed toward community development and mentorship. The struggle of who has access to resources usually leaves the underclass who are poverty-stricken to die in a concentrated area with no hope of possibility or change in our historical political economic system. What led to the path was my mother enrolling me in programs of color usually educational to provide resources and services to BIPOC students. But my main start was the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., for young black males would become productive citizens in their community. I did lots of volunteer work like feeding the homeless, having roundtable discussions with the BR police department, and being a server at Kwanzaa's Pancake festivals. This program was catered for young black males who lived with single mothers and this program was an investment of Black men having an impact on young black boys' lives. With this program, it led me in high school to join other programs that fostered youth development. Programs like NAACP Youth Works Chapter, Everett Youth Advisory Board, and Black Student Union. My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Locally I have participated in community events like my church's health fair, and supporting school workshops, and over the summer I joined a program called PROUD to help direct youth who are on a path of incarceration. This opportunity to work with this program has and will lead me to local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. With career aspirations of running for political office, this would also allow me to further myself in grassroots activism. With the goals of improving our social programs, public infrastructure, technology innovations and data research, this leads me to believe that the importance of higher education is important which will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. This welcomes the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of connecting with communities and their cultures. Mentorship will continue to deny the stereotypical narrative and statistic that the poor are just useless and violent, therefore my commitment to humanitarian service will be towards creating projects that will help revitalize and stabilize the disadvantaged and underinvested communities for this transform our political economy even internationally to become the bastions of democracy, healing, and progress.
    Pratibha Pandey Merit-Based Scholarship
    My start as a community helper has come from being a part of community programs. Most programs for youth of color instilled leadership qualities which has led me to such experiences in extracurricular activities. Programs like Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, NAACP, Youth Development Program, UNCF and Communities of Color Coalition all invested in my well-being as they instilled leadership traits, higher education, and cultural integrity. This led me to join other activities including school clubs like the Black Student Union, and Mock Trial Club and programs like Mill Creek and Everett Youth Advisory Board has led to me working at food banks, helping the homeless, and most importantly contributing to events about education. I was at the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. Another leadership program was the PROUD program, an organization to help court-referred youth avoid a path of recidivism and rebrand a new image as students, athletes, and visionaries. Now how I was able to maintain schooling and my GPA was my parents, tutors, and my determination to excel in class. As a Black man, I have to transform to meet everyone's expectations constantly, but the thing is I am not one thing and being groomed from an environment that was invested in me as a resource, now it is my time to become a mantle of resource which is through my public service. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; that education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihoods. So as I attend Claflin University and have a degree in Political Science I dedicate my life to serving others expanding my leadership skills and promoting the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world leadership consists of ideas that people can create as solutions through civic engagement, diversity, and social responsibility to be able to serve all communties.
    Abu Omar Halal Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. So, let’s get to Julien’s story. There’s not a whole lot to tell, because my journey is incomplete. My mother put me in programs and organizations that would mold me into becoming a young man and instilled with higher education, community service, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Though I had a difficult moving to a new state where I struggled to adapt to a new culture, my mother enrolled me in programs that would help guide students of African descent. Being in programs like YDP and UNCF opened my eyes. It was opened One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors are second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. The idea was to help students of color and other low-income students to help them become educated scholars to produce change in their community. My start is in the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc as this great organization helps Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. The positive impacts of the programs are feeding the homeless, having community conservations with police officers, working at food banks, contributing to special events around social issues, and being at the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project, I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community.
    Hyacinth Malcolm Memorial Scholarship
    Attending an HBCU where I major in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science provides the academic education as a tool to assist me in becoming a mentor, community leader, and advocate for those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; that education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The main pursuit of education is resources and as I attend an HBCU, I am student-invested in college resources to help students and their communities. Resources as mentioned are towards representation in higher education because they improve student outcomes, give students equal opportunity, and give them the chance to achieve economic mobility. At an HBCU, they not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in higher education is important because it helps strengthen communities and reflect the demographics of the student body that they serve. This ties in with being taught by people who represent me because my survival as a Black man is paramount. As stated about my minor in Political Science, I want to make my mark in public service. My whole life has been a part of public service through community programs and organizations that fostered youth development and transformation into productive leaders. And the one thing that I have learned about HBCU’s and organizations like UNCF, NAACP and YDP have in common, is to provide educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures and to spread the knowledge and resources in the Black community. The mission is to help people of color acquire higher education so that we can be an integral part of the American social order. Having these college degrees will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. The social force of education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. Also, the value of higher education and its representation will open my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with other people of color in different career fields. This determination will help me develop new skillsets into effectively being a community leader to promote economic development and address social issues by building bridges to create a better future.
    Dr. Clarence Flanigan Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    My name is Julien Odom, I am a junior at Claflin University. I major in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science. But throughout my life, I have been a part of youth development chapter programs that have transformed the young man that I am today. Various organizations like NAACP Youth Works Chapter, UNCF Portfolio Project, Youth Development Program, Young Leaders of Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, and recently the Proud Program. What I want to do with my degree is to make a career in public service. My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. I think the first step is becoming an intern for that is the first step to the career door. It provides an opportunity to work with organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships. This also furthers other professional relationships with other leaders such as I grow in leadership and collaboration skills. As I mentioned before programs that are created for young people in their communities are centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, understanding cultural heritage, and identity. Particularly with the Proud Program, it is about rebranding your image regarding self-accountability, setting goals, and mentoring young people on communication and how to interact with people. Though this is my first start, I do not plan on stopping As I am still learning this journey called life, I want to try new things, learn new things, connect with people and build relationships. As well as to get my degree and put it to use. Also, my passion is centered around community development. To tie in with public service, this has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access for affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities. I attended college trips and career summits to promote educational and employment opportunities and mobility and I believe that is key to opening doors to bring resources to people who do not have them. I am the best candidate for this contest because I am ready to provide resources, advocate for the disadvantaged, and truly become a force for social change by using academic tools that taught me so I can transform my community and possibly the world.
    Jillian Ellis Pathway Scholarship
    My passion for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community is how I became resilient in the Black struggle to progress. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up for what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and the development of becoming a man. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington State demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as be surrounded by those who look like me. This is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. As you can see my passion is centered around community development. This has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access to affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities. Right now I am applying for internships and entering community programs there is an opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    Community programs that fostered education, mentorship, and public service are how I got involved in my community. I have been a part of programs ever since the 3rd grade when I joined the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. The program is dedicated to young Black males to nurture and produce productive and positive role models in their community. The work we did was feeding the homeless, participating at local clinics to help the elderly, volunteering at food drives, back to school supplies, and working with Baton Rouge Police Department about community policing. Another program called the Youth Development Program partnered with Everett Community College and UNCF to help students of color and poor people have access to specific needs and representation in academic and higher education. The transition to high school for me was very taught especially when moving from Louisiana to Washington where it was a new culture. As I struggled in high school, my mother put me in this program to help my cultural identity, life skills, and personal responsibility. We also learned about financial literacy, the college application process, going on college tours, and belongingness. Washington was the influence to make me fight for change. I joined Snohomish County NAACP Youth Works Chapter where we advocated for voting rights, academic education, and civic engagement. Another organization was the Everett Youth Advisory Board, a program backed by Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board, where youth who were in high school advised our mayor about a city budget, creating a jumpstart economy, and improving on diversity and mental health issues. Also, I worked with the Communities of Color Coalition which fought for people of color who were juvenile-referred, also helped with improving education in public schools, and hosted after-school events and fundraisers. This led me to join Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson high school to advocate for students of color and join Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board to volunteer and be a part of causes like addressing homelessness and hunger. All of these life-changing programs and organizations have provided me with the skills of being a community leader. I live my life believing that education is the most powerful which you can use to change the world. Lately, I joined an internship called Proud Program which helps at-risk youth from entering the prison pipeline and escaping gangs and drugs as we teach them to set life goals, rebrand their image, and personal responsibility. And for that, to the programs that looked out for me, thank you.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    I see myself graduating college and getting a degree in urban planning where I can become a part of the solution in my community.
    Reasons To Be - In Memory of Jimmy Watts
    My volunteer experience influences my core values of higher education and representation. My life has always been about community life-saving programs that led me to see that academic education is the tool to change the world. My philosophy comes from the great late leader Nelson Mandela saying that education is a powerful weapon that you can use to change the world. My first experience was joining the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, the importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, having community conservations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. Though my transition in high school may say I am not a leader. Again a life-saving community program called Youth Development Program at Everett Community College taught me financial literacy, career networking, and instilling the importance of higher education. this led to me joining several other life-changing programs through collaborations or attending college and social events. This lead me to join the NAACP Youth Chapter of Shnomhish County as we worked on voter registration, improving relations between students of color and SROs, improving mental health, and patronizing Black businesses. This led to other collocations with non-Black organizations and mixed intergroup organizations. I worked with Everett Youth Advisory Board as I worked with Mayor Cassie Franklin on how to the city's economy on afloat during the COVID 19 pandemic. We also worked on financial budgets, jumpstart local businesses, and improve diversity and training in the school and workforce while trying to create jobs. Also working with Communities of Color Coalition led to working with my Henry M. Jackson High School Black Student Union to improve educational and other specific needs for students of color. We focused on AP courses, creating a Black history class, hiring more people of color, and providing nutritional needs for students who lived in poverty. Working with these life-changing organizations has led me to become a fighter for change and how I continue to give back by supporting fundraisers, and promote Black businesses, and catering at school events.
    Priscilla Shireen Luke Scholarship
    Community programs have always been a part of my life. I been giving back ever since I joined the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, the importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, having community conservations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males not become statistics and to make a difference in their community. During high school, I was a part of the NAACP Youth Works Chapter in Snohomish County where we held social events including voter registration, participating in church plays, and creating fundraisers to help promote social justice issues. This led to me joining Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson high school where we fully dedicate ourselves to improving education in our public schools. Also, I join the UNCF who I met at a college fair and we also went to Black and Brown summits and other college events to address key issues in the Black community. Furthermore, I joined the Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board where all we did was community service. Writing letters to our veterans, donating books at libraries, and cleaning our public parks. This led to a connection with working with Mayor Cassie Franklin as we worked on financial budgets, restoring the economy, creating more jobs, and working with public school SROs on community policing. Joining these organizations and programs has developed, nurtured, and guided me into a leader and fighter for change. Service is important to me as I worked at food banks, help feed the homeless, and most importantly contributed to events about education reform. I was at the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being a part of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continuing to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Charles E. Nettles Continued Graduate Scholarship
    I plan on contiuning my education through completing both degrees African American Studies and Poltical Science. My passion will be towards urban planning and community development and making a career in the Social Sciences/ Humanities as either study aboard, part time teacher, or an lifelong intern because solutions and problems are complex and never one dimensional. My main reason for being apart of education was because of mother is college educated believed that education was the academic tool to me through leadership and community programs. Advocating for people is an conviction and energy that has influenced me to go make a difference in the world. Nelson Mandela Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. As mentioned about me being apart of community programs, programs like Young Leaders Acadmey of Baton Rouge Inc, NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. As I learned about cultural identity, represenation, the possiblity of college, and community service has opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Networking is one of the biggest reason why I pursuing higher education because it is not what you want, it is who you want in order to make change around the world. Many underserved communites need adquate resources, funding, fair represenation, and equitable opportunity to become something great. Especially with representation for that improves diversity and the possibility of race relations as it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable as being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. Academic education is my pathway to advocate for others. The importance of contiuning my education may be incomplete, but the journey of building bridges is a pathway to collective progress.
    Dr. Alexanderia K. Lane Memorial Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. The impact of this quote means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been a part of community programs that advocate education. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Cultural identity is significant to people of color because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. The UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above-stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate for those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating high school, I now attend Claflin University, an HBCU that is proudly dedicated to valuing black people’s history and promoting the importance of education. The mission of Claflin University is the continuing investment of providing resources, community spaces, and pathway initiatives, all of which help our students get access to wealth, representation, and opportunity. I will use my education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." T'Challa (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us of the importance of showing our humanity and creating our political destiny.
    DRIVE an IMPACT Today Scholarship
    Moving to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was adapting to life in Washington State. My family and I moved to Washington State over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program is aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. As I left those programs, I remembered the motto from UNCF and it is said a mind is a terrible thing to waste. Their influence came from a great leader named Nelson Mandela as who said Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. Attending an HBCU, though in recent years it seems like HBCUs are falling. Through a culture of resiliency, HBCUs dedicate themselves to valuing black people’s history and promoting the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCUs not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the torch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. Joining various school clubs and outside organizations to address homelessness, volunteering at food banks, and pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. Resources, jobs, and leadership are the keys to progress. Thank You!
    Strong Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
    The very act of courage means to stand in the face of adversity, face your fears, and have strength in the face of pain.  However, political courage requires something more. Political Courage tests your beliefs, morals, social views, your character, and maybe your political position. To achieve this type of leadership is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.  I draw strength from past leaders, such as Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did.     But I believe the most important lesson that I think is that Leadership is a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone from the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihoods. America needs new legislation, a new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers. So as I worked towards creating solutions for society, I am attending Claflin Univeristy as I major in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science to reevaluate my psyche while engaging in community development.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    My greatest accomplishment has yet to be realized. Though I have graduated high school, attend college, and can get part-time jobs, I have not made any significant contributions to the world. I would hope my greatest accomplishment is getting involved in public policy and government to work with local to global organizations. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My experience in community-based programs led me to advocate for underrepresented communities. Programs like The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, Youth Development Program, UNCF Portfolio Project, and many others have paved the way for me to become a community leader. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means being responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. The program was a six-year commitment, I started the program in third grade and graduated during the summer after finishing my eighth-grade year. Cultural identity is significant to people of color because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Other programs like Mill Creek and Everett Youth Advisory Board, Communities of Color Coalition, NAACP Youth Chapter, and Black Student Union were other organizations that led and have programs in place to foster youth engagement in local politics. Engaging with our public school district to address educational issues, advising our city mayor on financial budgets during the pandemic, and getting young vote access to vote. What I hope to achieve in the future is to become a mentor, join advocacy firms, and become an educational resource to the next generation. Because of these life-changing programs, I am acquiring professional development skills, I value representation in education, and with the power of higher education, I want to improve underrepresented communities by creating economic development and sufficiency. I hope to leave a legacy of greatness!
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    Being a part of community programs, my mother, and living around a communal family-like bond made me selfless and care for others. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned out to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was adapting to life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington State over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The program was called Youth Development Program and the program aimed to instill the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With these programs, I joined Communities of Color Coalition to partner with my high school Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson High School. Then joining other organizations like Mill Creek and Everett Youth Advisory Board, NAACP Youth Works Council, and Jubilee Church of God in Christ where I became involved in community activism. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the torch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after-school clubs and activities that enable me to become a leader and a fighter for change. Service is important to me as I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was at the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunities, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being a part of life-changing programs and communicating with our city leaders, and by attending Claflin University I will have an opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials and ensure local, regional, and national policies, systemic changes that broadly foster community development.
    Henry Bynum, Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to life in Washington State. My family and I moved to Washington State over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The Youth Development Program partnered with Everett Community College and the Snohomish County Branch of NAACP taught skills such as financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, and HBCU panelist discussions, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs like the UNCF Portfolio Project, Communities of Color Coalition, and the Youth Works Chapter of NAACP I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked the desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCUs not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. As I attend Claflin University, I will dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science so I can have the opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that communities. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. This will be a chance to improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up for what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This program taught me community service, brotherhood, and the development of becoming a man. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. This scholarship will help me in my future because education is the key to changing the world. Education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. This scholarship will lead me into my career pathway of advocacy as I invest in people and give resources so that we can help underinvested communities.
    GTF Book Scholarship
    The last book I read was Barracoon. The Prolific writer Zora Neale Hurston tells the turbulent story of the African slave character Kossala. Zora Neale Hurston’s perspective of the African Diaspora began when Kossala was first captured and sold into slavery on a Southern plantation in Mobile, Alabama. Kossala details the atrocity of the Isha people of West Africa due to the Portuguese conquest led by King Dahomey. After arriving in America, Kossala’s name was changed to Cudjo Lewis. This change of his name was meant to strip away his African identity. While in Mobile, Alabama, Cudjo worked on the plantation as a slave; mostly to generate wealth for the state and plantation owners, but also to further strip away any African identification. Europeans also forced European culture through assimilation. These texts from the passage touch upon the cultural exchange of slavery which brings forth its power structure, religion, and ideas of American assimilation. Even though, Kossala’s name was changed to Cudjo he never used that name when speaking about himself to other Africans. This meant that Kossala was removed from Africa, but Africa was not removed from him. As previously read Micheal Gomez’s Diasporic Reader related to the African Diaspora in comparison to Zora Neale Hurston’s Barracoon displays differences and similarities. This paragraph will focus on the similarities. Both stories connect with the impact of colonialism that has affected the global continent of Africa. The native people of these countries have become slaves for profit and have brought their skillsets to either combine or assimilate into European culture. Both books analyze the effects of the exploitation of African people, and the evolution of slave trading which has affected African identity, cultural values, and concepts. Throughout this essay, you have seen examples of how Hurston uses power structure, religion, and marriage as a development of the African Diaspora. Gomez also included examples of the Diaspora through religion. Gomez emphasizes the importance of African religion in the Americas, due to its resistance to slavery, rebellion led the African people to take a consideration into changing their circumstances and behaviors to navigate the New World. This broadened my perspective on the power structure of slavery, the struggle of assimilation, and fighting your identity that is deemed inferior. Kossla pointed out that the Europeans believed that being African was primal and savage. Europeans wanted to influence Africans by demonstrating their religious ceremonies. Even the freedmen suggested that Kolassa and the other Africans become a part of the European religion. However, Kolassa and some of the other Africans believed that the Europeans were unethical therefore they decided to form their own Black Baptist church and create African-centered ideas on religion. With this connection, I too as a Black person struggle with my identity, but I do not stop until I have achieved freedom.
    Kim Moon Bae Underrepresented Students Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to life in Washington State. My family and I moved to Washington State over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington State demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as be surrounded by those who look like me. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. Whether internships or joining organizations, this will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. There is an opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. This has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science at Claflin University. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access to affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities.
    Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
    How I plan to make a positive impact in the world is by having the opportunity to work with local organizations and community foundations to help provide resources and build sustainable relationships with government officials. These relationships will help me develop leadership and collaboration skills to ensure local, regional, and national policies, and systemic changes that broadly foster community development. My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that community. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. The LISC internship will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up for what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington State demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as be surrounded by those who look like me. This is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. I chose to go to college to continue to fight the statistics and narratives that support Black people as poor and useless. I also strive towards creating generational wealth and economic mobility within my family. As I am still learning this journey called life, I want to try new things, learn new things, connect with people and build relationships. As well as to get my degree and put it to use. As you can see my passion is centered around community development. This has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access to affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities.
    Social Change Fund United Scholarship
    In developing effective care and management strategies, we need a paradigm shift that conceptualizes mental illness in jail and prison environments as a public safety/public health issue. The rationale is that individuals with mental illnesses are more likely to be arrested, convicted, and move through a relentlessly revolving door between incarceration and the community. Mentally ill offenders, for example, may refuse pre-release continuity of care planning or, after release, fail to show up for their initial appointment with a community provider. Also, they are often unable to access community treatment because of limited access to community programs, and a reluctance among providers to treat them, because community mental health centers are unprepared to treat people who have a criminal record or all of the above. The optimal solution to curbing recidivism of the mentally ill would be to conceptualize mental illness as a chronic illness and extend public health services into the prisons immediately upon individuals’ incarceration. By managing mental illness as a chronic illness - where the severity of the symptoms waxes and wane in response to genetic and congenital vulnerabilities, environmental influences, and individual behavior - public health and safety officials can collaborate in developing more effective and efficient strategies for managing mentally ill inmates in America’s jails and prisons and after release into their communities. I believe that the Supreme Court should provide a system of ready access to adequate medical care, including mental health care. There is no doubt that federal and state governments have a mandate to provide access to adequate treatment for the mentally ill in America’s jails and prisons. But in addition to providing access to necessary care, the critical issue for mental health programs is to "get smart on mental illness" by utilizing metrics that identify maladaptive inmate behaviors that often result in threats to institutional security, inmate and staff safety, and are costly in terms of human and financial resources. Quality assurance, utilization, management and risk management programs may be important in assessing the efficacy of mental health delivery systems,, but it is vital to begin incorporating new metrics that measure the impact of mental health programming on reducing disciplinary reports, use of force, self-injurious behaviors, cell extractions, placement of mentally ill inmates in restrictive housing, and reducing recidivism. States must embarked on an initiative to reduce and close their publicly-operated mental health hospitals, a process that became known as deinstitutionalization. Advocates of deinstitutionalization envisaged that it would result in the mentally ill living more independently with the treatment provided by community mental health programs. So we need our federal government to provide sufficient ongoing funding for community programs to meet the growing demand instead of state reduction of tax budget cuts. So, as I conclude, we as Americans must do better with those individuals who are affected by mental illness. We must repair our communities, heal our families, and hold our national leaders and big corporations accountable. Everybody needs health services, but the people who have been incarcerated need all the resources they need to not conform into an animal, but human being who made mistakes and is trying to atone for them is the proper cure.
    “Be the Change” Essay Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned out to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was adapting to the state of Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. Fortunately, I was given a chance to become better. I joined after-school clubs and activities that enable me to become a leader and a fighter for change. Service is important to me as I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was at the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being a part of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continuing to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day. My motivation for this happening was because of community programs that reached out for youth engagement. Going to college fairs, and summits, and learning about career networking which instill diversity, crafting skills, and gaining economic security. These programs go far back As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and the development of becoming a man. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. as it was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington state demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. This is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that communities. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. The LISC internship will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. I chose to go to college to continue to fight the statistics and narratives that support Black people as poor and useless. I also strive towards creating generational wealth and economic mobility within my family. As I am still learning this journey called life, I want to try new things, learn new things, connect with people and build relationships. As well as to get my degree and put it to use. As you can see my passion is centered around community development. This has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access to affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    My passion is for rebuilding underinvested communities while maintaining the fabric of that communities. This path will lead to career networking, as I will get to collaborate with various organizations, learn about other people’s backgrounds, and get involved in public policies starting locally. The LISC internship will help me toward my career aspirations of holding a political office, as well as allow me to further engage in grassroots activism. Joining this program will improve my written communication and public speaking skills. I welcome the opportunity to get to know my local leaders, practice data research, learn local laws, and further my understanding of technology innovations & data research. I have been a part of several community organizations that have helped develop me into the kind of man that embraces community service and stands up for what he believes in. As far back as 3rd grade I was a part of the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a six-year program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens and local leaders who serve their communities. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, brotherhood, and the development of becoming a man. As I moved into high school, I continued participation in community service programs. The NAACP Youth Development Program is in Everett, WA. and was centered around the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and understanding cultural heritage, and identity. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value of higher education and the value of representation in higher education. Living in Washington State demonstrated that I needed to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. This is why I attend Claflin University, a Historically Black College. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. I chose to go to college to continue to fight the statistics and narratives that support Black people as poor and useless. I also strive towards creating generational wealth and economic mobility within my family. As I am still learning this journey called life, I want to try new things, learn new things, connect with people and build relationships. As well as to get my degree and put it to use. As you can see my passion is centered around community development. This has led me to a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I will use this degree to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap for BIPOC, as well as create access to affordable housing, health, education, community and recreational facilities, public safety, employment, and other projects that help to revitalize and stabilize underinvested communities.
    Opportunity for Our People Scholarship
    An unpopular opinion that I have is what is my greatest accomplishment? My greatest accomplishment has yet to be realized.  Though I completed high school and some college, I have not made any significant contributions to the world. So, how can I honestly answer this question?  I can say that I am a helper, a leader, and an educator among my peers.  I can also say that I am a community activist and volunteer; but are these considered great? My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science, and one day run for political office to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate for those that are disadvantaged.  Yes, that sounds great!  However, the reality is that it has not happened yet.   To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.   I draw strength from past leaders, such as Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did.     So, my greatest accomplishment is taking advantage of the opportunities given to me.  Sometimes, opportunities appear out of the blue or you discover a brochure for a program that could benefit you and the deadline to apply is not until next week.   Although great opportunities might seem like a stroke of luck, I believe that being in the right place at the right time happens less because of chance and more because of preparation.  This includes actively creating new opportunities for myself.   Opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help my people succeed and to leave a legacy for the next generation. I did not come this far not to finish my race.  I now carry the torch of past leaders until I have achieved my greatest accomplishment.
    Novitas Diverse Voices Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. The power of representation values the fabric of communities, gives people resources, tirelessly works in eliminating racial gaps, and gives everybody equal opportunity. Representation helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable as being taught and being surrounded by people who look like you give you a sense of dignity, respect, and self-worth. America needs new legislation, a new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." T'Challa (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us of the importance of working together and the beauty of diversity.   For example, my family and I moved to the state of Washington during my high school years. And my high school years were a mess as I struggled with my identity, Washington culture, the area, and my grades. Fortunately, with my mother's background in education, I was able to be put into programs for students of color and I was taught financial literacy, the value and representation of education, civic engagement, and ancestry. Therefore representation is important because of my survival as a Black man. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked the desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. As I attend Claflin University, a proud HBCU student, I will have a dual degree in African American Studies and a minor in Political Science to better understand how to serve diverse backgrounds.
    Xavier M. Monroe Heart of Gold Memorial Scholarship
    At a time in my life, my family and I moved to the state of Washington. Adapting to the culture, new school, area, and people were all foreign and difficult for me. Before moving I lived in Louisiana as I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). Though I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me, the transition to public school in Washington was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. While joining the Youth Development Program, a partnership with the NAACP Snohomish County chapter and Everett Community College, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, and HBCU panelist discussions, and met with black professionals in different career fields. The other communities of the color program were the UNCF Portfolio Project and Communities of Color Coalition as they taught me not only the value of education but representation and civic engagement within education. With these two programs, I partnered with NAACP, joined Mill Creek and Everett Youth Advisory Board, and Black Student Union at Henry M. Jackson High School which fostered youth leadership and engagement in their communities. Though my journey started rocky in the state of Washington, my commitment of racial identity made me advocate for marginalized people. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked the desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. As I attend Claflin University, I will have a dual degree in African/African American Studies and a minor in Political ScienceI want to further this education so that I can better understand how to serve others. And for paying this forward, is becoming an intern this summer working with K-12 students.
    McClendon Leadership Award
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned out to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was adapting to life in Washington state. My family and I moved to the state of Washington over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent to help me along my journey. Throughout my programs, I have instilled the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after-school clubs and activities that enable me to become a leader and a fighter for change. Service is important to me as I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was at the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I think a leader is someone molded by struggle, perseverance, faith, courage, and decision-making as I stand in front of the world sacrificing my interests for the greater good of humanity.
    CEW IV Foundation Scholarship Program
    Between the COVID-19 pandemic and social unrest in the past year, many cities have either begun or expanded their outreach to marginalized communities. However, many states have struggled to identify which groups in particular are marginalized. Sometimes it may be obvious, with common examples of the homeless, impoverished, and new immigrants, although it is more difficult for those who lack technological access, civic literacy, and mobility. Developing an understanding of how certain groups are marginalized is a necessary condition for local leaders to successfully engage and assist them. Broad approaches to engagement, financial assistance, and other programs may fail to reach those who need help most desperately, meaning that the best intentions often fall short of producing results. In other words, for assistance programs to be successful, local governments must meet the targeted groups where they are. Marginalized communities include those who have been historically excluded from involvement in our cities, as well as those continuing to face other barriers to civic participation. This includes those marginalized by factors like race, wealth, immigration status, and sexual orientation. As such, local leaders are obligated to thoroughly understand the landscape of their particular community so that they can respond effectively. In practice, this means that cultural competence is crucial, as cities must be able to understand and resonate with those they serve. While cities may strive to help marginalized residents, some fail to tailor their efforts to the needs of the marginalized. This can happen because the needs of those who face racial discrimination, for instance, differ significantly from those who are physically disabled. The same holds for community members who are homeless compared to those who lack technological literacy. As resistance to lead a better tomorrow, the first step is developing an understanding of the community landscape. Questions regarding; Who is in my community? What are the challenges these groups are facing? What is their relationship with the local government/my department? How can I overcome any lingering hurdles from their previous interactions with the local government? What do we have to offer to meet the specific needs of this group? When stepping into an engagement process, it is important to recognize that communities trust people who connect with the community. Building relationships is part of the initial step because of the role relationships play in building connections with the entire community. Facilitating conversation with marginalized communities allows local government leaders to understand their challenges, as well as the underlying causes. This transition in the public engagement process shifts the focus from identifying and understanding problems to pursuing meaningful solutions. Community input can guide the best engagement modality for the community. Marginalized individuals also tend to share a resonance with the broader marginalized community they belong to, serving as a spokesperson to explain what they have experienced and what changes may help. What this does is that the marginalized should be included in the discussions that directly affect them. Giving these groups a seat at the table is a major step in overcoming historic marginalization, but genuinely listening to and considering their ideas is also necessary and even obligatory. Look Community is not simply an abstraction, as it embodies the shared environment, experiences, customs, ambitions, and hopes that bring neighbors together. The fabric of the community is alive and vibrant, requiring consistent care and understanding in weaving it together. The marginalization of some dilutes the beauty and centrality of the community as a whole, as it excludes those who may have much to offer if given the opportunity.
    Academic Liberty & Free Speech Scholarship
    Free Speech means to influence or empower the mind toward change. I particularly believe that Free Speech is not only important but necessary. Free Speech allows an individual or group the opportunity to tackle issues that affect communities of color. During the era of the Enlightenment, many educators thought about the purpose of human existence. Understanding the virtue between man and law applies to our moral character and intellectual thinking. The Enlightenment era created radical thinkers; to become more aware of a complex world and understand the mysteries of what science gives us. This created the ideal of Free Speech so we can attain enumerated rights from “natural law.” The Declaration of Independence was written by our nation’s leaders because of Enlightenment thinking. The word free speech is to articulate your voice, your opinion, bias, or fact without facing any consequences. In history Free Speech has been violated due to the state’s aggression towards taxation, oppression, and lack of government leadership. Our leaders (Presidents) created the Constitution because of Enlightenment thinking, but these rights are constantly being violated. Take slavery for instance. Slaves had no say in their freedom until a Civil war between two regions decided their fate. Even then blacks were not free. Blacks and other communities of color still were not able to use their free speech to change their situation. Jim Crow laws and segregation kept blacks from attaining education and job opportunities. It wasn’t until the Civil Rights movement that Free Speech regained its voice. Implicit biases, Systemic and Institutional racism have long plagued the educational system that affected generations; which in turn took away the ability to create generational wealth. Not only do history books not teach global history but predominately white universities tend to employ Professors/Instructors and staff that are a part of the majority population. The term institutional racism was first coined in 1967 by Stokely Carmichael and Charles vs. Hamilton in the Black Power: The Politics of Liberation. Carmichael and Hamilton wrote that while individual racism is often identifiable because of its overt nature, institutional racism is less perceptible because of its “less overt, far more subtle” nature. Free Speech to openly challenge the status quo gives power to those communities whose voices typically go unheard. Institutional racism must be challenged to change effect policy change and the laws of government. However, that history should not just be learned by communities of color, but all communities. Global History is American History. Without it, America would not have gained its independence from the British. Natural Law provides a balance between the laws of man and the laws of nature. Free Speech falls under the law of nature. Secular hierarchy denies certain groups of people their natural rights. Why should our “God-given right”; Free Speech be suppressed? Freedom of Speech has always been challenged. In the case of Schenck vs. United States case, where two brothers spoke out against the corruption of the government leading to their decision not to join the military. They were killed for speaking out against the establishment. Freedom of speech was also denied when college protestors were killed due to boycotting and holding rallies against the Vietnam War. Furthermore, women could not vote, work, or be seen in the public eye until the 19th Amendment was written, but women are still denied equal pay and still face gender discrimination. Freedom of speech creates awareness of a call to action. Our freedom of speech is being threatened because with it we gain the power to liberate our minds from an institutional way of thinking.
    Stacy T. Mosley Jr. Educational Scholarship
    I chose to further my education because I believe that progressive education can transform democracy and our political economy. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and a lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. America needs new legislation, a new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. One of the biggest reasons for going to college is to keep the tradition going because I come from generations of educated people making something of their lives. My parents tell me the benefits of getting a degree if I put it to use and get opportunities to make opportunities. I have a reputation to uphold and I was raised to be an illiterate fool when there are resources out here for me. Another reason why I am in school, well as the good book says, my people perish because of a lack of knowledge. Knowledge is information that creates the power to control one's destiny. At a time in my life, I moved to the state of Washington from Louisiana and from there I had no support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, and HBCU panelist discussions, and met with black professionals in different career fields. The last reason why I'm in school is because of economic mobility. As I attend Claflin University, yes a proud HBCU student, I want to see the prosperity of milk and honey. I believe this because this happens through representation. The most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates itself to valuing black people’s history and promoting the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCUs not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man.
    Private (PVT) Henry Walker Minority Scholarship
    Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. What this means to me is that education means giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. I emphasize education because of the importance of education as representation. As I attend Claflin Univeristy, which is an HBCU, the generational mission values black people’s history and promotes the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. If given the opportunity, I will follow the blueprint of what my ancestors fought off. The goals that are valued are to help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. The reason I pushed for the pathway of education is because of the social programs and organizations that I have been part of. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. This program taught me the value and worth of my cultural identity and family heritage. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above-stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be.
    Glenda W. Brennan "Good Works" Memorial Scholarship
    Staying in the community and advocating is how I give back. I have been a part of social programs that invest in the critical needs of marginalized people and it is up to us to take the knowledge and create change. A change that I think is a great start is by working with our school's district to push racial equity and diversity around our school. Also contributing to food banks, feeding homeless people, and social activities at churches. As stated, it was community programs that taught me about humanity and to care about people. An organization called The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Cultural identity is significant to people of color because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. As for my travels go, with me double majoring in Africana Studies and Political Science, I will be traveling sound. It is good to travel for your psyche, and your way of thinking, and trying new things creates a well-rounded person. Traveling for self is to seek revelation and people usually get it and become a better version of themselves. Even with my biggest fear of never coming back or will I accepted in a particular space, I believe in my leap of faith because it is a journey that must be proceeded.
    Dan Leahy Scholarship Fund
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. This means that I give back to my community, be a force for social change, and value all people. The Young Leaders Academy is one of the organizations that inspired me to pursue education and motivation in participating in speech. The pursuit of education was to transform the lives of Black males to not let their circumstances define them. Their mission was to create positive role models and productive citizens and leaders. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. This program shaped me into becoming the man I wanted to be. Another organization was NAACP youth organizations like Youth Development Program for this gave me the power to speak about my cultural heritage and identity. I remember presenting my family history and I learn new things about myself. The program was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project taught me the value and representation of education I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. During these programs, I began public speaking. I started in church, plays, rallies, and formal events where I spoke to people and people love my aura for speaking. Not here to brag, but even in my class Intro to Public Speaking and now Intro to Theather it has been a joy to work on expression and to me, that speech is about. All the above-stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. I hope to be a mentor, community leader and advocate for those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. Currently, I attend Claflin university and I am double majoring in Africana Studies and Political Science. I want to be following the blueprint of radical freedom and for starters use education to change systemic laws that have kept communities in bondage. I am looking forward to building bridges and not building barriers for our generation and the next to come.
    Career Search Scholarship
    While I am in the field of Social Sciences and the School of Humanities, I am varying my options as I professor, mentorship program, activist, or internships around history and politics, a traveling man I say. However, I do not want to be a professor, grading papers, seeing who is even interested in my class, who is grasping the knowledge, attending school meetings, etc. I like history ever since I history books, but since I became woke and I analyzed more ethnic history, there is so much to unravel and I do not think that unraveling will comfort me. The mentorship to me is like fatherhood and with the climate and trajectory, we are headed to and in, I probably burn out. So I am thinking about activism in the labor coalition. I want to continue the mission of A. Phillip Randolph and many others advocate for exploited workers. Time and time again, it is the workers who produce everything and gets no benefit or the work we are doing has nothing to show for it. Demanding better and decent working conditions is like a civil rights movement all to rebel against the ills of capitalism. But you would burn out too because activism is soul-breaking work, but with my ability to public speak to people and do local work in the community, I might as well! Look, the career path I hope to take is either between history or politics. Politics because change starts in the local government, then the state, and the federal. I was born in the neighborhood and you want to fight for something worth fighting for. The history, I get to travel the world and see other scholars search for their enlightenment or reawakening of their psyche. I say this because in my African Studies classes which is my major, I am learning so much about African culture, I am lost because I cannot connect back with the people before me. So traveling should be good because I will learn more than one culture, so nothing should hold me back, right? Consequently, I do not know right now because I suppose to be enjoying college and yeah applying for internships, studying abroad, joining an organization, etc, but is my mind ready to tackle what reality is about to throw at me? However, with group support, finding and crafting my talents, and joining social programs, I would lean towards activism/mentorship and start off advocating for at-risk youth and see them become productive citizens.
    STAR Scholarship - Students Taking Alternative Routes
    While I am in the field of Social Sciences and the School of Humanities, I am varying my options as I professor, mentorship program, activist, or internships around history and politics, a traveling man I say. However, I do not want to be a professor, grading papers, seeing who is even interested in my class, who is grasping the knowledge, attending school meetings, etc. I like history ever since I history books, but since I became woke and I analyzed more ethnic history, there is so much to unravel and I do not think that unraveling will comfort me. The mentorship to me is like fatherhood and with the climate and trajectory, we are headed to and in, I probably burn out. So I am thinking about activism in the labor coalition. I want to continue the mission of A. Phillip Randolph and many others advocate for exploited workers. Time and time again, it is the workers who produce everything and gets no benefit or the work we are doing has nothing to show for it. Demanding better and decent working conditions is like a civil rights movement all to rebel against the ills of capitalism. But you would burn out too because activism is soul-breaking work, but with my ability to public speak to people and do local work in the community, I might as well! Look, the career path I hope to take is either between history or politics. Politics because change starts in the local government, then the state, and the federal. I was born in the neighborhood and you want to fight for something worth fighting for. The history, I get to travel the world and see other scholars search for their enlightenment or reawakening of their psyche. I say this because in my African Studies classes which is my major, I am learning so much about African culture, I am lost because I cannot connect back with the people before me. So traveling should be good because I will learn more than one culture, so nothing should hold me back, right? Consequently, I do not know right now because I suppose to be enjoying college and yeah applying for internships, studying abroad, joining an organization, etc, but is my mind ready to tackle what reality is about to throw at me? However, with group support, finding and crafting my talents, and joining social programs, I would lean towards activist/mentorship and advocate for at-risk youth and raising boys to become productive men.
    Delories Thompson Scholarship
    To be honest, I do not know what to do for my career path. There are so many avenues of social justice work that have to be done. While I majored in Africana Studies and Political Science, I am grounded in engaging in local politics. Local politics to me is important because how we push for our needs and the demand of democracy is our power. From diverse ethnic, socio-economic, and gender-identity backgrounds, marginalized people have been a part of the political process, established a non-Western culture, and engage in community development. From issues to gentrification to policing, we must address the problems that are often run by the dominant minority. As a Black male, I have to become the political process to systemically change laws, policies, and initiatives that are anti-Black. What Black means to me is complex aesthetics. Being Black is not monolithic as Black people are of various sexualities, thinkers, and leaders. The one thing I think we have in common is the value of the expression. Expression is our freedom to express our humanity through storytelling, art, or a unique belief system that we feel connected to. Being Black also represents beauty, pride, progress, and resilience. As Black people continue to resist the cultural trappings of Americanism, Black people have created their own social spaces, political institutions, and to maneuver in this system called capitalism. Though Black people have different goals and ambitions, we are constantly looking for freedom and how and what it look like!
    Sean Carroll's Mindscape Big Picture Scholarship
    I believe everybody has a divine destiny or a road that leads to the energy you fully possess. As a college student in the field of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, a particular class that I learning about is the Black LGBTQ experience. Sexual Orientation and Identity defines the acronym of the LGBTQ community and it is bigger than understanding people's physical and sexual attraction towards that same gender. What's the need for all this theory, well, the main problem is identity, and people are trying to figure that out, but it does start with an expression of how to define yourself and who is there for you when you are vulnerable. Also, it is about inheriting traits for you to be asexual, bisexual, or pansexual, or because this decides your physical and emotional attraction. The challenge to me at first, being Black Christian, as being gay is an abomination, it is not natural. Even though I am heterosexual, I do not want to be a bully. While my sister is transforming into being lesbian, and in the wake of the movement I had to create neutral zones so I would not be cast as homophobic because that is not my space. As to relate to the Black LGBTQ community, I am learning a complex and intersectional theme of social structures, governance, movement and memory, ways of knowing, science and technology, and cultural making that defines the Black queer experience. I was naive that gay people did not exist in earlier civilizations as there were people who expressed their sexuality as a different identity. It is based on the existence of essence and inner identity that determines its members and is working toward inclusion within the accepted norms of society. Queer people recognize the contingent and constructed experiential and discursive realities of the lives of those who aren’t normatively heterosexual. Also, it includes within that group not only those who are of a different sexual orientation but also those who don’t fit into the normative gender binary of man or woman. Or about not only masculine/feminine gender expression and relation to biological sex as it refuses normalization. It recognizes itself as a danger and as a challenge, to the implicitly limiting goals of the heteronormative paradigm, forced monogamy, the two-parent family unit, monosexuality, and fixed gender identity. I saw all to say that expressing and embracing a new identity is freedom and freedom is the universe. Freedom is the power of a human being to exercise their will. This freedom expresses the fundamental notions of sexual desire and activity, therefore your identity becomes your energy just like the universe.
    Martha Mitchell Truth Scholarship
    The U.S. Constitution has a unified common goal to achieve, freedom. The constitution states that states form a perfect union, establish justice, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure blessings and liberty to ourselves and our prosperity. This proclamation is to have people live in a democracy and have a republic government. The constitution is more of a union as we battle not only for the soul but the hope of a nation to create generational leaders to stand the test of time. The greatest human power is hope as we strive to create a greater good for the impact of democracy. I will continue to fight for civil rights as I follow the mantle of leaders before me. Fighting to end poverty, finding citizenship and emancipation, and getting rid of the structures of white supremacy and other imperialist forces is for the greater good. With providing people, the basic needs to survive has been the fight for over a century, better working conditions and benefits, fighting against racial discrimination, and political corruption, and creating unions during economic ruin. Furthermore, the redistribution or reallocating of wealth into families and broken communities is progress. Years of systemic oppression, capitalist enterprises, and racial subjugation is real and the effects of chattel slavery have led to other forms of racism and oppression that have come through redlining, the War on Drugs, underfunded schools, limited to no access to survival or prosperity, etc. In addition, the allies who can we trust whether from intra or interrelations because of the historical position that Black folks are kept under in the American empire. Therefore, we need our own social and political institutions, but also need to look at people and allies like business because politics is business. Without money, there is no mobilization of power, so as a Radical egalitarian, I will be a part of seeing major changes within the ideology and use history to correct, continue, and change the movement for economic, political, and social liberation. The main goal is universal suffrage. Giving people the right to vote and be part of fair election events. It is defined as an alienable right like the 9th amendment, to guarantee citizenship. The 19th and 20th century was to resist the societal affirmation of white supremacy and address the practices of racial domination. It is about democratic citizenship within a political system that people will continue to fight for. It is central to address racial domination and the inequalities that Black people continue to suffer through. I believe in this responsibility for racial redress through faith, progressive character, and American polity.
    Coleman for Patriots Scholarship
    I have been in programs and organizations that deeply care about their community. My whole life I have been in these programs because my mother believed I needed a male role model in my life. My first experience was joining the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This was a non-profit organization and its mission was to nurture young black males into becoming productive citizens. While attending this program I was involved in community fundraisers, having roundtable discussions with the BR police department, feeding the homeless, and checking on our elders at local clinics. While moving to another state, I attended a high school where the culture, environment, and representation were different. I struggled with identity and my grades, fortunately, my mother worked at a community college and I was enrolled in a Youth Development program that met the specific needs of students of African descent. I learned about financial literacy and business marketing, did i presentation about my cultural heritage, and attended college fairs. This program made me recognize who I was as a Black man. Speaking of the college fair, my mother, thank God for our moms, was talking to the UNCF Portfolio Project was hosted the event. Yes, another helpful program, because this program was a community effort. I learn about the importance of networking and finding career paths similar to what I did in my AVID program, touring colleges in the state of Washington, very funny by the way. Also, I finally wrote essays, got recommendations, wrote a cover letter, created a resume, and applied for scholarships, a lot of work. Speaking of more work, I worked at food banks, and churches that were centered around homeless people contributed to special events around education and was at the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district through many organizations that I am a part of. These organizations like NAACP, Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board, Everett Youth Advisory Board, and Communities of Color Coalition. A powerful quote that Nelson Mandela once said Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. So the reality is, what education to me means is giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU which I currently attend dedicates itself to valuing black people’s history and promoting the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCUs not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. As attending Claflin University, I will a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science and continue to promote, engage, and advocate for political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and making systemic changes that have kept underrepresented communities in bondage.
    Larry Darnell Green Scholarship
    My mother graduated from college before she had me. She instilled in me that access to education is the pathway to success. Though growing up in a single-parent household, my mother grew fearful of seeing young black males without fathers or a father figure will turn out as statistics. My mother enrolled me in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, the importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, having community conservations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. But that's not all, as my mother who eventually got married wanted to move to the state of Washington. As a freshman in high school, adapting to a new school, new place, and new culture was a culture shock. Back in Louisiana, attended a predominantly school for African Americans. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors are second to none. The time and effort that went into the program were apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. I believe running for political office is a way for me to become an asset to invest in the future of underrepresented communities.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    After graduating from high school, I am attending Claflin University which is an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, and also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness of injustice, inequality, and inequity. Before I answer that question, I believed somebody must mold you into the direction to be a direction for others. As you grow, people are still by your aid to help nurture you grow until your growth stops, but growth never stops. However, how I contributed or grew personally in the community, well I receive help first. At first, my difficult challenge was adapting to life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors are second to none. The time and effort that went into the program were apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the torch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me with the skills to be a community helper and during my time at Jackson, I gave people who I was. I showed responsibility, accountability, decisiveness, grit, teamwork, and friendship knowing that somebody is out there to help me. With helping people, I begin to join many programs that partnered with Henry M. Jackson High School to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, and churches that were centered around homeless people contributed to special events around education and was at the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continuing to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Eleven Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) Class President during my 6th-grade year of Middle School.  This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character-building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, presidential addresses to the nation, and local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone from the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihoods. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past years, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and a lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. America needs new legislation, a new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." After graduating from college, I will dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science which will allow me the opportunity to deliberately manage the spread of information between individuals, organizations, and the public. This path involves diplomacy, public service, advocacy, civic engagement, and community development. This is how my contributions will influence progress in the world.
    NE1 NE-Dream Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Due to being a leadership program. I owe my life to serving and advocating for underprivileged communities. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means being responsible for my brother and holding one another accountable for our actions. Cultural identity is significant to people of color because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. So, I value my representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as be surrounded by those who look like me. This is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Programs like the UNCF Portfolio Project and NAACP Youth Development Program were designed to meet the specific needs of students of African descent. The programs taught me the value of higher education as took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above-stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate for those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and make contributions all over the world. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." T'Challa (Black Panther). This an inspiring quote that should remind all of us of the importance of working together and the beauty of equality.
    Ruthie Brown Scholarship
    As attending an HBCU, getting a degree in the Social Sciences and Humanities is the major step. While I attain my degree in Political Science, Public Policy and Administration, and cultural studies I need to find internships, go abroad, and travel to the research institute. Though I have not joined an organization that fosters civic engagement and leadership, there have been public events that I have attended that have inspired me to become a part of the solution. What hits the hardest are the young people who are fighting for student loan debt relief, a relief that can knock down the burdens of educational disadvantages. Plus the value of representation and understanding cultural worth is also very important. As a young person, I say the youth need access to educational resources that give up an opportunity to network with people in the career fields we pursue. These ventures can help them as they worked on the corporate ladder, trade, and entrepreneurship. The goal is mobility, which means it meets the needs of these students to make something out of themselves. In addition to leadership, I have been part of leadership programs ever since the third grade. The programs I attended were the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, NAACP, Communities of Color Coalition, and Everett/Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board. What these programs have in common is that the youth are involved in their community and has politically gotten involved to create systemic changes in our public policies, laws, and economic structures. The Young Leaders Academy molded me to become a productive citizen, and local leader, and always serve their community. NAACP, I performed plays about police brutality, hosted a Martin Luther King Gala, and was a sponsor at local food banks. The Communities of Color Coalition I was a Youth Ambassador who attended public school district meetings to address diversity in AP classes, SRO's training, and funding our Black Student Union. The Everett Youth Advisory Board, a group of students advises the mayor on how she can boost and budget the economy by addressing COVID and its disparities, employment, infrastructure, and community policing. To address my student loans getting a job that I have on campus is a start. As I am working, save my money and start to invest in local projects. Also, as a community host fundraisers that pulls everybody together and host town halls to demand job creation, climate change solution, reforming our justice system, and abolishing gentrification because as a person who is a part of the BIPOC community, we need community ownership for that is a way to address our circumstances and conditions.
    Financial Literacy Importance Scholarship
    A lot of college students are not aware of how important money management is for them. Nowadays, the student spent their money on unnecessary things. The importance of money management helps students to achieve goals in their life without any difficulty in the future. There are three ways college students can manage their money having a budget, avoiding bad debt and saving more. First of all, having a budget is a way of managing their overall expenses. Students have to establish discounts with their student ID. For example, Some computer sellers, restaurants, and commercial transit service providers have special student discount programs. They also can borrow books from the school library to avoid buying new textbooks. Besides that, students should account for their expenses weekly and as a result, they may control their money efficiently and effectively. College students must be avoiding bad debt that affects their finances. They can use student loans to pay school expenses like tuition fees, books and for buying groceries. Moreover, College students also should reserve themself an allowance for avoiding overspending and have a limit on their expenses. Furthermore, Students should avoid borrowing loans from friends or unknown people which causes them to become debtors although they are still a student. Bad debt does not preserve or grow your earnings potential, it does not help to make money, add value, or produce wealth in the long run College students must save the funds that can help them in the future times. Even those students who do work during college must often use the money to pay their tuition and living expenses. College students must save the funds that can be helping them in the future times. Even those students who do work during college must often use the money to pay their tuition and living expenses. According to a recent study, 76% of students struggle to make ends meet since many students have little money. However, even on a tight budget, you can take control of your finances and start learning how to manage them effectively. There are many ways to save for the future or pay off debt without a regular paycheck. Taking control of your money now will make it easier for you to manage your finances in the future. Even if you are on a tight budget, you can save for important things or help pay down your debt. This reverts to the point of investing in a financial plan and setting up goals that help you save money, continue to budget, and value your capital gain.
    @normandiealise #GenWealth Scholarship
    Generational wealth is about more than how much money you have. My parents budgeted, and I learned that it was just part of growing up. I came from a very stable background and the importance was to help Black families reach the middle class. Generational wealth refers to any kind of asset that families pass down to their children or grandchildren, whether in the form of cash, investment funds, stocks and bonds, properties or even entire companies. One of the most common ways that people inherit and pass on generational wealth is with real estate which was the way my parents were able to get home ownership. Equity makes a difference: When you sell or refinance your home, you can draw on your equity and leverage it to grow your wealth more or improve your life in other ways. This could include moving to a more expensive house, making home improvements, padding your retirement, paying for your child’s college tuition or investing in a business venture with the potential to increase your income. This allows for a kind of social mobility and risk-taking that people without wealth simply can’t afford. generational wealth comes in the form of education, too and my parents taught me about budgeting and helped me understand borrowing and credit so that I would become confident when I set out to the world and build my wealth through homeownership. The passing of wealth has renovation costs and has increased my parent's property value, say no more. Another reason is because of millennials. Millennials, who are the biggest generation in the workforce, control just 5.19% of U.S. wealth and would have to quadruple their wealth to match what Baby Boomers had at their age. In addition to age-based wealth disparities, the racial wealth gap in the U.S. is larger today than it was in 1960 due to the legacy of redlining, a practice in which banks impose obstacles like higher APRs, fewer loan approvals and higher risk profiles for mortgage applicants in historically Black communities. While homeownership is on the rise across the board, Black Americans still have the lowest rate of homeownership compared to other racial groups. According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, white Americans have a homeownership rate of 76%, Hispanic Americans have a homeownership rate of 51.4% and Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders have a homeownership rate of 61.4%. That’s compared to the 46.4% homeownership rate for Black Americans. My point is that due to redlining and discrimination, I must become my people's wildest dream and that is through economic mobility.
    Mohamed Magdi Taha Memorial Scholarship
    Before I answer that question, I believed somebody must mold you into the direction to be a direction for others. As you grow, people are still by your aid to help nurture you grow until your growth stops, but growth never stops. However, how I contributed or grew personally in the community, well I receive help first. At first, my difficult challenge was adapting to life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight of who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year, I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication of the students, staff, administrators, and mentors are second to none. The time and effort that went into the program were apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply for scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the torch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me with the skills to be a community helper and during my time at Jackson, I gave people who I was. I showed responsibility, accountability, decisiveness, grit, teamwork, and friendship knowing that somebody is out there to help me. With helping people, I begin to join many programs that partnered with Henry M. Jackson High School to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, and churches that were centered around homeless people contributed to special events around education and was at the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district through many organizations that I am a part of. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continuing to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Ryan T. Herich Memorial Scholarship
    “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) Class President during my 6th-grade year of Middle School.  I lost but ran a campaign that promotes character-building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized that these issues were important to me and that being a leader was my calling.  I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a Leadership program for African American males and was a member of this program during that time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President.  Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. To invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities that will help reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow disadvantaged students to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. I will attend an HBCU and dual major in African American Studies and Political Science with a concentration in Public Policy and Administration. Programs like UNCF, NAACP, Communities of Color Coalition, Youth Development, and Black Students Union all taught me the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. As I travel to different college fairs, attended summits, meet with school districts, and fundraise for events to create a better tomorrow. Because of the people who invested in my future, I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth.
    Normandie’s HBCU Empower Scholar Grant
    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is the representation of all students. Therefore HBCUs dedicate themselves to valuing black people’s history and promoting the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCUs not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and allow black students to obtain higher education. As I attend an HBCU I am majoring in African African American Studies and Political Science as these degrees will develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and engage political power and economic mobility. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and surrounded by people who look like me is important because it is my survival as a young black man.
    Holt Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been a part of community programs that advocate education. Programs such as the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc had a big impact in my childhood years. A program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, and local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means being responsible for my brother and holding one another accountable for our actions. In high school, my family and I moved to the state of Washington and I was exposed to a new culture that I did not fit in. However, my mother worked as a program manager at EVCC community college and there was a program for students of African descent called the Youth Development Program. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value because Black people's cultural identity was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. Other programs like the United Negro College Fund Portfolio Project, Communities of Color Coalition, and Black Student Union all focus on the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. I must learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. These programs took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply for scholarships, and opened my mind to the possibilities of different career paths by allowing me to network with people of color in different career fields. With all of the contributions these programs have made in my life, I want to find a career path that advocates for the unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education is the tool that assisted me and I already attend Claflin University, earning a dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science with a concentration in history and government.
    Financial Hygiene Scholarship
    I plan on educating yourself by staying involved with city affairs in regards to management, budgeting, and expansion. Also investing into franchises, industries, and other mobile companies. As well in staying in financial literacy programs and listening to an economist. City Budgeting in today's climate is equity and recovery. Many inclusive networking opportunities to keep the economy stable from collapse. I have always been about performing the duties of a citizen especially with the transaction of goods and services. However , it is more than that and I would like to know more, City budgeting is a sense of urgency for if cities are struggling to get stakeholders, management becomes in desperation. Capital budgets and improvement plans are critical to economic development as it presents exceptional opportunities for governments to drive equitable outcomes in municipalities, particularly when budgeting for recovery. The power of spending has been historically lacking for poor areas who have never been invested in from the public and private sectors. I believe with city affairs, job creation is necessary to complete these projects that offer workforce and economic development opportunities for residents and businesses. Most cities have no structured mechanisms to incorporate equity considerations into their capital investment planning. Equity is an approach to funding, project selection, and community input that rapidly operates in budget allocations. Even with corporate investments, even entertainers are now investments in capital enterprise. Without money, you are in poverty. Investing is an effective way to have your money work for you and build wealth. With cash and bank savings accounts are considered safe strategies, as investing your money allows it to grow in value over time with the benefit of compounding and long-term growth. Whether you invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, futures, precious metals, real estate, or small businesses, investing is important to generate future income, increase value and equity, and build wealth. And that is the thing about investment, it is about monetary gain for your benefits. Lastly, the financial programs especially for at-risk communities. They need all of the financial literacy that they can get. Communities of color have it the hardest and any shot of economic mobility that is progress of creating generational wealth and fixing historical injustices that have plagued Black wealth. Lessons like the value of money, needs vs wants, how to avoid debts, scams, how to become financially independent, and the future is coming is what disadvantage people need to overcome their circumstances.
    John J Costonis Scholarship
    My goals for the future are undecided but anything on community development, economic mobility, and political power, will be my goals. How to achieve them will take work but if people plot, plan, strategize, organize, mobilize, and lobby there is a shot at greatness. The work I have done is not yet fulfilled as I attend Claflin University and I am planning to study abroad, apply for internships, join community organizations, and find possible employment. Attending an HBCU could a door that opens me resources for in return I become that same resource. However, before my great pathway to careers, cultural and professional networking my earlier challenges were high school. Adapting to life in Washington state was a struggle. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Education is about representation for bringing the hope of possibility for change. Today young people are fighting for student loan debt forgiveness, wealth gaps, educational barriers, all that discriminate against certain groups from opportunity, self-reliance, and development. Representation helps strengthen communities and improve student and youth outcomes as they reflect the demographics of the student body they serve. What I am trying to say is that being taught by and surrounded by people who look like me is important because being Black is a movement and the movement cannot die.
    Lotus Scholarship
    Before I answer that question, I believed somebody must mold you into direction in order to be a direction for others. As you grow, people are still by your aid to help nurture you grow until your growth stops, but growth never stops. However, how I contributed or grown personally in the community, well I receive help first. At first, my difficult challenge was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Being born into a single-parent household does affect you, fortunately my mother made connections with these organizations that fostered young men of color who were or becoming at-risk statistics. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provides me the skills to be a community helper which I advocate for those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. An academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be and as I attend Claflin University, I will major in Public Policy and Administration with a concentration in History and Cultural Studies. Education is the powerful weapon you can use to change the world.
    Hearts on Sleeves, Minds in College Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. The collaborative effort by all individuals particularly the mentors was amazing. This collaboration was a way to invest in our future. UNCF’s community mission to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community is why I love this organization. I came back to the Portfolio Project my senior year and have learned so much. They are committed to investing in my future and the future of all the students they serve. Because of UNCF I have applied to and completed the application process to over 10 colleges and universities. I have applied to and am still applying to scholarships as well as applied for internships. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community..
    CATALYSTS Scholarship
    The important issues for Black people are gentrification, police genocide, lack of access to wealth, miseducation, and mass incarceration that has impacted the Black community. Grassroots movements have led to gradual social and political change, but I believe through non-profit organizations have a philanthropic impact on social activism. Social Activism is requires strategy, financial support, and development to ensure the social change that we see fit.I think a solution could be create a joint bloc of organizations to be leaders and providers of the community, so I think leadership is what keeps Black resiliency and triumph to only go further in this Black Experience in North America. To tell a little about myself, I have been in community organizations all of my life. The role models were organization like Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc, Youth Development Program, United Negro College Fund, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People have all made an impact on my life as a scholar, leader, and one day a mentor. My focus is always being a resource to my community and to never let the revolution die. With lessons of cultural identity, representation in higher education, and the purpose of civic engagement, I have to carry the torch that our past leaders carry. With this torch, I am attending an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African African American Studies and Political Science with a concentration in Public Policy and Administration and History. It is all about creating our stories, letting our voice matter, and that policies, practices, and systems which we change to not deny us human right, greatness. With attending an HBCU, I will advocate for, by, and to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." Even though the road for liberation is not easy, with our humanity, a shot at opportunity, and people who are abolitionists that will die on the hill for us is the positive impact of addressing critical social issues. Thank You!!
    Lifelong Learning Scholarship
    Learning is a continuous process that happens throughout your whole life. It is what continues to encourage people to acquire knowledge and develop new skills. Continuous learning is a great asset in your professional career. It can be a sure way to increase your income and your status, it enhances your desirability within the job market as well as allowing you to find jobs that suit you! The desire to learn is innate but following through on that desire is a skill that anyone can develop with enough determination. Learning prompts personal development, which leads to professional development. Learning expands your mind and allows you to pursue your full potential. Learning has a huge influence over the rest of someone’s life as what they learn plays a role in where their life ends up. It gives an individual the chance to take part in new experiences, which in turn lead to new opportunities. The knowledge and skills that we acquire have a direct effect on the things that you are offered both professionally and personally. It builds self-confidence, when you have a desire to learn, this builds self-esteem. Learning is creativity for it aids in you making connections with people who challenge the odds. A willingness to learn is one of the most sought-after attributes in the professional sphere. This doesn’t always necessarily refer to a degree or educational background relevant to the job, either, although they are usually advantageous. Instead, employers seek transferable skills, knowledge, and an eagerness to progress. Learning is a tool that you can use to build up other aspects of your life. It can lead to the acquisition of knowledge or experiences that can help when addressing certain challenges in life. It encourages an individual to stay motivated and increase their confidence, self-reliance, and helps develop leadership skills. These skills are used to help your workforce to become their own government party because globalization is in your hands! As we continue to learn, I believe it is a necessary and vital part of human existence. It opens your mind and can change your attitude by allowing you to have a deeper understanding. Knowledge is so easily accessible today there simply is no excuse for not taking advantage of it. Those who decide to not make use of their opportunities will find themselves stuck, their skills languishing and their importance diminishes. Curiosity is perhaps one of the most important traits you can demonstrate; curiosity has led to almost every major advancement throughout history.
    Sean Carroll's Mindscape Big Picture Scholarship
    Because we as human beings will be extinct. I want to live and coexist with nature because nature is already beautiful, it's our job to keep it well-kept. It's like a house because nature is a resource and to deplete our resources, there will be nothing to re-use. That is why many nations are investing in science and technology to make a better future. Nature is everything we are surrounded by like the water we drink, the air we breathe, the sun we soak in, the birds we hear chirping, the moon we gaze at and more. Above all, it is rich and vibrant and consists of both living and non-living things. Nature has the ability to protect us, it is also powerful enough to destroy the entire mankind. Every form of nature, the plants, animals, rivers, mountains, moon, and more holds equal significance for us. Absence of one element is enough to cause a catastrophe in the functioning of human life. We fulfill our healthy lifestyle by eating and drinking healthy, which nature gives us. It provides us with water and food that enables us to do so. Our children have to breathe the air we consume and in order to conserve nature, we must take drastic steps right away to prevent any further damage. The most important step is to prevent deforestation at all levels. Polluting ocean water must be strictly prohibited by all industries straightaway as it causes a lot of water shortage. The excessive use of automobiles, AC’s and ovens emit a lot of Chlorofluorocarbons’ which depletes the ozone layer. Therefore,we must invest in solar energy to replenish our natural resources. Impact like no rain, droughts, scarcity of water, global warming is already on rise due to our irresponsibility and the way we behave and treat the environment. Cutting trees and deforestation has led to bad quality of air and other harmful chemicals in the air. Many natural resources are diminishing slowly due to human behavior and selfish needs. If we do not act to protect the natural resources, we are going to face a huge loss in terms of our survival. Future generations are going to suffer a lot due to scarcity of water, non availability of fresh air to breathe and non availability of proper and fresh food due to lack of vegetation. Therefore, let's invest in science because science saves lives and our ecosystems
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    I am pursuing my college degree and going to study abroad and completing internships to bring back resources back in underrepresented communities. I attend college and what I am learning is the importance of networking. Networking is a cross cultural exchange of ideas, perspectives, and decision making that determines the collective will, good, and soul of society. Over the past years we have seen civil unrest, poverty, and the risk of climate change continues to affect everybody. What led me to this was seeing the news, or listening to people who traveled, and my interests in cultural and political studies led me to understand how the world works internationally. Issues like climate change, imperialism, political coups are issues that need to be addressed. What has changed is that I would like to go to someone beside countries in Africa and the Caribbean and visit places that are non-Black. Countries like Thailand, Japan, England are places I would like to go to. Japan i am very interested in for I think it is international New York City, but also their culture I am intrigued by. But my main cause is to stop industrial pollution, create affordable housing, and clean energy jobs that will sustain the nation. Even with Thailand I think it is another Vietnam country that depends on agriculture to survive. I want to visit England and visit their museums, capitols, and eateries while understanding their political systems and state customs. But my main focus is climate change and we need to reduce fossil fuels and create solar energy jobs. What has stayed the same is going to West Africa and learning my Yoruba culture and becoming part of that tribe. I want to focus on sending aid for climate disasters, investing in biotechnology, and creating economic mobility in poor areas. I also want to go to Haiti and Jamaica. Knowing that Jamaica and Haiti has had a history of annexation from war led empires to multinational corporations and world banks affect them economically, failed democratic leadership, and increase of poverty and crime has radicalized me to see change. I think public speaking is my self-discovery because I find power in my voice. I am shining light when I speak and I am very well-spoken and very thoughtful. There is this glow, this energy that I have and I am led by the spirit so it is bound to happen.
    #Back2SchoolBold Scholarship
    My best back to school tip was to know my college campus. Knowing the college campus can lead to employment, access to scholarships, internships, and providing resources to at-risk communities. The work is your legacy and when I leave this earth I want to remember for doing something good and to inspire others to continue the good work. Instagram handle: soul_rebel.fl_
    Femi Chebaís Scholarship
    My goal in life is to continue the mission of uplift and perseverance for marginalized communities through financial literacy programs that insures economic development and access to political power.
    Samuel L. Goodman Educational Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. My mother said to me that leaders are educators and educators run the world. My mother is also a big believer in education as she graduated from college to provide me with educational enrichment as well. My mother saw I needed a role model in my neighborhood and she saw a program named the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. My reason for pursuing education is when I moved to the state of Washington during my high school years. I had a hard time adapting to the state's culture, practices, and ideals of education. Most importantly of all those struggles was not having a support group and struggling to fit in. Because of this I was not doing well in school and I lost my identity. By my tenth-grade year, my mother started enlisting me into programs that helped communities of color and youth. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Another program is called the UNCF program where I was taught about the importance of career paths, networking, how to write college essays, and how to apply for financial aid. Because of these programs and my mother taking the time to invest in my future, I now want to be a mentor and teacher to low-income students and their underprivileged communities through education enrichment. By doing this , I am attending Claflin University and I dual degree in African +African American Studies and Political Science to network, travel, and learn from other mentorship programs to make critical changes in the Black community.
    Marie J. Smith Esq. Social Sciences Scholarship
    How I plan to make a positive impact on the world in my social sciences field is through study abroad, internships, networking with organizations of color, and the importance of mentorship and public speaking. Public speaking has helped with inner confidence but also gave me strength to fight for hope and operate in faith. The inspiration of public speaking is through mentorship for I have been in various programs that engaged and promoted leadership characteristics. To be honest this made me want to help people and see a brighter tomorrow for the world. Also my mother is also college-educated and I have a family who vouches for the pursuit of education, higher education to be exact. My mom always told me that education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world, a quote from Nelson Mandela she said. So I never took this for granted and with most of my family being in social services, the path to education was there. My main reason that I wanted to be a leader is because of the leaders who came before me. The Martins' and the Malcolms' of the world. They were also educated and had a conviction to fight for justice, freedom, and peace, therefore I wanted to join. As I said before, I was in the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. This is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. Other programs of color, I also joined. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. Cultural identity is very significant to people of color, and since our culture is stolen due to colonization and assimilation and not having support groups, this program was created. Also the UNCF program which fostered higher education, community development, and civic leadership. They were about investing in students of color and poor people to afford us access to resources, opportunities, but importantly the possibility of hope. How I plan to make a positive impact through my social sciences field is through mentorship. I want to be an advocate, a leader, a role model to the underrepresented and underprivileged youth. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be and that is helping our youth educationally, economically, and politically. Thank You.
    TeluguPeople for America Scholarship
    I am from Louisiana and my family carries a culture of family, education, and God. I was born in a single household as my mom graduated college. My mother was the one to invest in me as I grew up I became a part of non-profit organizations. My favorite organization was the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. It is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. My mother said I was becoming a leader. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana where I attended a private Christian school, I was taught by people that looked like me and were surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. Enrolling into programs for color, I was taught cultural identity, financial literacy, leadership, and community development. That is when I became involved in my high school, joining other activities like Black Student Union. Even outside schools like NAACP, Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board and Everett Youth Advisory Board to get youth active in their communities and fight for systemic change. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. So I say of all of that to say, my dream is to be a part of solutions of revitalizing marginalized communities. Since I attend college, I will join programs that advocate inclusion, civic engagement, and social mobility because all these communties want is resources, equal opportunity, and access to wealth. Thank You.
    Supermom Scholarship
    I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned out to be. My mother always pushed the importance of education as I she attended and graduated college for this provided better opportunities and resources as I attended private school in middle school. While in middle school, my mother enrolled me in a leadership program called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. My mother stayed in childcare services and worked at a community college when we moved to the state of Washington. But as I attended high school, I had a hard time adapting to school, the culture, or the people who lived there. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. My mother constantly enrolled into these educational enrichment but cultural support to help me become a leader that she knew that I would always become. Because of this, I will be attending Claflin University which is an HBCU for I will have a dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science. I want to be apart of the solution towards Black progress and to be a service towards the poor, working class, and middle class Black people and eradicate student debt, health and school inequities, improve our criminal justice system, and eliminate economic neglect. Thank You mom for being a supermom!
    Your Health Journey Scholarship
    Going to the gym, playing basketball, and eating healthier had been the changes to my lifestyle. I just left college by gaining 15 pounds and something needed to be done. My sister is the one who decided that we go to the gym because it is summer time and this was a time to evaluate and that matters. Feeling good about ourselves is good for the soul. I have taken the steps to self love and self promote and let me tell you, you will find inner peace. Building confidence and self esteem is something that you are in control of. Finding a sensible diet plan that will work for you as I have done this to build my self confidence. I saw my body transform over the weeks and I feel healthier each day which empowers me to keep going. I also done Meditation for this clears the mind and promotes awareness. A calm mind equals a calm soul. Everything is being created within you, including a healthy body and mind. Take time out everyday to practice mindfulness. Feeding your soul, honoring your body, mind and spirit will provide you with a healthy body and healthy soul. Another thing I did was get a journal inspired by people who write their secrets to themselves. Expressing yourself to a blank page will clarify your emotions, alleviate stress and solve problems in a calm and creative way. Everyone has a story, and to sort it out on paper by writing sends relief and sorts all kinds of emotions out, releasing trapped energy. Just like expressing yourself in a journal is good for the soul, so I guess writing your food choices is a good step. Studies show that those who write down what they eat are much more likely to have success when losing weight. But the most important thing I have ever done was enhance my soul to take away my fear of failure. I had to ditch my anxiety about making the wrong decision. I suggest that people Throw out your self doubt. Once you do, you will be able to make such a difference for your own well being and the rest of the world. Trust that you are capable of much more than you think. I challenge everybody to eat in a healthy manner to ensure you that you are in control and can take charge in changing your body and well being. Peace.
    Mind, Body, & Soul Scholarship
    What excites me about college is networking. Exchanging perspectives for perspectives that changes both parties perception of life and both parties have a desire to achieve common goals. People at school have a conscious, intelligence , and ambition therefore people can relate or work themselves to become their asset to the product. At my school, their are people who are interested in business, sports health and management, musician, and marketing, so people network their ideas to create opportunities and generate money. But how to maintain healthy relationships is knowing how to walk away, find things that make you happy, and stay on your purpose. Knowing how to walk away is the main thing for that is your mental health on the line. Never argue with people that do not see the bigger picture or have a broader perspective on things. We all start off with a different transition in life, but the way we care for our bodies and carry ourselves through everyday life does indeed send a message to the rest of the world. Taking care of our health and well being make us feel better about ourselves which in turn, makes us feel better about other things in the world. When you establish a healthy relationship with food your overall stature will change along with it. You will find that a few minor changes in eating habits add up to big results, hence, you feeling much better about yourself both mentally and physically. Doing things you love gives you the opportunity to get in touch with your soul. The more you give your soul the things it loves, the stronger it becomes and the more connected you will feel to it. The way we treat our bodies is a reflection of our own selves. The better we treat our bodies, the better we are to ourselves as a whole. Find healthy foods to eat and you will see how much better you feel. Energy will be up, sleep will be better and your overall being will improve. Also, moving and exercise enables us to be free of all other issues. Exercise is a stress reliever and enables us to think more clearly about our lives. If we give time to ourselves, we can think more clearly and release painful emotions. The main thing is knowing how to take a break, find a hobby, and connect with people to not lose yourself.
    Learner Higher Education Scholarship
    The word higher education is one's drive to pursue the benefits of knowledge. As a college student, I want to keep the mission going by becoming educated to bring back resources that improve marginalized communities. I attend an HBCU and I see the impact of what education has brought upon people. People became doctors, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and teachers to maintain the fabric of their culture of excellence but to be the model of uplift and resilience. Education is ambition to escape victim-hood and become better than your conditions and circumstances were. Although, I am not denying systemic racism because that exists, however our effort to fight for something that is fundamentally ours should not be taken away. The most important thing about education is that it derives from leadership. Leadership is where we continue to carry the torch for those that were before us. The characteristics of a leader have determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and are very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead. The leaders who I look up to are Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Frederick Douglass. These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did. How leadership ties towards higher education is to take advantage of opportunities that are given to you. Although great opportunities might seem like a stroke of luck, I believe that being in the right place at the right time happens less because of chance and more because of preparation.  This includes actively creating new opportunities for myself.  Opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help my people succeed and to leave a legacy for the next generation. I did not come this far not to finish my race. Therefore this fight is for progress. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihood. So my plan towards becoming a learner for higher education is to dual degree in African Studies and Political Science that will expand my leadership skills and engage in community development for education is the fabric of uplift and resiliency.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    Before I answer that question, I believed somebody must mold you into direction in order to be a direction for others. As you grow, people are still by your aid to help nurture you grow until your growth stops, but growth never stops. However, how I contributed or grown personally in the community, well I receive help first. At first, my difficult challenge was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper and at my time at Jackson, I gave people who I really was. I showed responsibility, accountability, decisiveness, grit, teamwork, and friendship knowing that somebody is out there to help you. With helping people, I begin join many programs that partnered with Henry M. Jackson High School to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, churches that were centered around homeless people, contributed to special events around education, and being in the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district through many organizations that I am apart of. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our marginalized communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers. I hope one day that our struggle for liberation pays off.
    Ruthie Brown Scholarship
    How I plan to address my student loan debt is to continue to apply for scholarships, grants, and internships. One of my main focuses would be paid internships in which I could use that money to pay off some of the debt. Also, having internships under your belt grants you doors you have not see before and can broaden your networking abilities. This will help me enhance my career path towards Social Sciences and Humanities that engages in leadership, civic engagement, and job training. Furthermore applying for scholarships because this provides me opportunity to go to an institution and receive its resources that are available. Moreover, I believe the money I win actually goes to a bigger cause than eliminating student debt. I attend a rural college named Claflin University and they are focusing on improving educational programs for students of color, investing in solar panels and fixing pipelines, and building cultural institution that creates a safe space for students of color which will influence others to come. But truly, winning this scholarship will go towards a worthy cause for my school as we engage in entrepreneurship, NASA training, and community policing so whether the cause that is where the money is going. Nevertheless the grants. Grant money is good for that will go towards student aid. My parents are pitching in and sacrificing themselves to help me go to college and become somebody. The grants you apply for and it is guaranteed and it covers a good portion of tuition and unlike loans I do not have to pay that back. Now I am working part time at school, for I work as a food worker. To me it pays for what it is worth, it is a low gig of feeding people and to me it is a service. I do not mind baking pizzas, frying wings, filling up the ice machine, taking our garbage, and washing dishes. This job is very productive and I be busy most of the time so all i have to do is concentrate on my school work and I am okay with that. To add, I will be about school organizations and programs that focus on financial literacy and achieving social mobility. The program is going to teach me how to invest in your skill sets and talents, network with others, and build a business as a start of creating wealth and paying off student debt.
    JoLynn Blanton Memorial Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been a part of community programs that advocate education. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. I was taught the importance of leadership, brotherhood, and community engagement. In my transition from high school, I struggled with isolation for I had to adapt to a new culture who did not accept me. My mother found a program catered to students of African descent. This program focused on cultural identity, for it is significant to people of color. Due to effects of assimilation and colonization, the NAACP Youth Development Program wanted to create a safe space for students of color and to meet their needs of financial literacy and cultural empowerment. Attending a summit at a profound high school, their was a group hosting the event. The host was the UNCF Portfolio Project which my mother enlisted me. The UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. How education shaped my worldview was when their a guest speaker who looked like me and told the class the importance of collegiate education. I was taught the college application process, applying for student aid, and opening my mind to different career paths. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The networking of people of color opened my eyes for I saw that we can come together and produce the change we want to see in our communities. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. My main focus would be to use my education to eliminate systematic laws that keep I will use education to change systematic laws that keep communities in bondage. We must bridges for people to live a life of decency and dignity not build barriers to criminalize one group of people.
    Dr. Samuel Attoh Legacy Scholarship
    Legacy is to take advantage of the opportunities to help people succeed or vice versa. It is a unfinished race for I am carrying the torch of leaders before me. To strive for legacy you must have ambition, determination, faith, and be dependable. It is about completing the task before you because you are going through a rites of passages. Legacy is a journey that never stops because generations of generations depend on progress. Who I draw progress from my civil rights leaders like Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because something needed to be done and the opportunity of leadership could inspire progress.  Anytime there was a boycott, speech, march, they were about legacy to keep the next generation fighting for change, justice, and liberation. Similarly, my mother told me she gave birth to a leader in her womb. My mother had me involved in leadership and community programs that served people of color. The first organization that I joined was the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc, a pivotal point in my leadership development. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. As I transitioned in high school, I struggled to adapt to the life of Washington State. Public school was difficult for me because I had no support group, struggled with my identity, and bringing a southern culture in the Northwest was taboo. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. I joined other organizations like NAACP Youth Development Program, The UNCF Portfolio Project, NAACP Youth Works Council, Communities Color Coalition which made joined my high school Black Student Union all focusing on equity within higher education, dismantling racism, and civic engagement. These organizations are constantly helping people of color and low-income families by transforming them to become scholars to produce change and give resources to their communities. I have a good start for my college career. Applying for colleges and receiving applications. What I have learned is that I am a resource and I plan to put it in marginalized communities. I want to be a leader for other young black boys and underprivileged youth. I must be a service and by earning a dual degree in Humanities and Social Sciences , I will run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    In my development stage of leadership, I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. However even a leader can lose itself. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. These collaborative efforts fro these community minded programs wants to help people of color and people in need. Their mission is to help low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community. Therefore I have been inspired to attend an HBCU. I do want to become a leader and a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. As I close, my true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community..
    Bold Financial Freedom Scholarship
    The most helpful piece of financial advice I ever received was I need to get a financial advisor . A financial advisor is my finance professional who can help you with all forms of financial planning, from budgeting to saving for retirement and more. They also can be wealth managers and investment advisors. The reasons why to get a financial advisor because they listen to what matters to you. Your goals are for your future and where you are in your financial journey they will guide you and help you with your concerned questions. Also financial advisors teach you about options. Financial companies are pros that help you understand what mutual funds are, IRA's, 401(k)'s and 529 college savings accounts. This process helps with wealth planning. Another thing financial advisors do is that they serve while keeping you in charge of your money. You have ownership and you can invest, manage your financial plans, or save, but they know that it is your money and they will put your goals first. But the best advice I ever gotten from a financial advisor is to be intentional and specific about your finances and investments. They always told me to write a plan down. I must start with my needs, assets and intent over the short and long term. Also creating a plan that identifies lifestyle, wealth transfer and philanthropic goals. I also should build specific portfolios that enable achievement of these goals and can weather inevitable market volatility. The key is I must withstand the ups and downs of the financial market without drastic reaction to short-term market fluctuations. This advice is what apply to my life.
    Bold Caring for Seniors Scholarship
    To improve the lives of elderly people in my community needs adequate funding for programs, institution, and homes. Elderly people must improve on their health, have a decent place to stay, have money in their bank accounts, and never become institutionalized. That would be my primary focus, because elderly people are the forgotten people and they release into depression. So I fund more arts centers for elderly people can live a life instead of just existing. More performing arts, field trips across the world, and going to social events. I believe the elderly just want to feel young again, people who younger are discovering their lives and identities, why should the elderly not do the same. To me the art centers is about their rebirth to help them find meaning in life and to find clarity in a world that has pushed them to be outcasts. So I will fund art projects and cultural centers for the elderly because life is a fun adventure.
    Amelia Boynton and S.W. Boynton Scholarship
    The Robinson's taught rural African Americans how to improve their farming methods and home economics. They also talked about the importance of politics and education in improving their lives. They encouraged people of color to register to vote and to buy land. Even though Jim Crown laws and customs kept Black people from voting, that did not stop them from running an insurance agency, real estate office, and employment agency in Selma. These businesses served African American communities throughout southern Alabama. They also expanded the grassroots network of the Boyntons. Amelia had a sign in her office, "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People." Ms. Boynton was there when Congress passed the Civil Rights Act for Ms. Boynton was ready to challenge Jim Crow head on. Ms. Boynton registered as a Democratic candidate for a seat in the US House of Representatives. She was the first Black woman and the first woman to run for Congress from Alabama. Although she did not win, she did receive 10 percent of the vote. Amelia Boynton continued to fight for Civil Rights, as the church organized a march at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, state and local police attacked them with tear gas and billy clubs. Police beat Amelia unconscious for refusing to retreat. Television and newspaper cameras recorded the violence. Over seventy marchers were beaten and seventeen hospitalized. The event became known as Bloody Sunday. These marches resulted in the Voting Rights Act of 1965. These stories have led to me pursuing an education my ancestors just wanted equal opportunity to become somebody. Black people have always been fighting for their humanity, and they just want democracy, a democracy that protects their rights and serves their community.. But as much respect I do have for our civil rights leader, I will take a different approach. Voting comes down to power, and with voting Black people needs to focus on group economics and group politics. For example, the great Martin Luther King Jr. wanted to end poverty, racism, and militarism. Through voting rights we need to demand candidates, leaders, and politicians to hold them accountable and do something for our vote. We need to boycott, support Black interdependent unions, and have political allies. The point is the Boynton have set the blueprint for Black economics and political representation, but we have to do more because civil rights does not overcome wealth, power, or "military terrorism".
    Larry D Parker Sr.’s Legacy Scholarship
    I plan on making a positive impact on the world by attending college and earning a dual degree in African African Americans Studies and Political Science. This degree can be contributed to me becoming a resource to under-serve communities. Furthermore, I could use this degree for political connections and running ti become an elected official as I hope to spark necessary change and be the beacon of hope for those who do not have boat on a rising tide. I do not have a specific person in my life to consider a hero, because I have many. But for these scholarships, I will talk about my community programs. The investment from these organizations has influenced me to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My first step towards leadership was I joined the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled the importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching young Black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for Black Lives Matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Another program was the NAACP Youth Development Program. In my high school years I had no support group, a lost of identity, grades were bad, and I was a follower of wrong crowds. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. This program focuses on higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Within this same program, I attended the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort for Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. What I learned was that Black students who attend college are the possibility of hope which could inspire their community to value leadership, excellence, and difference. With that being said, if their was one thing I could change about the world is racism. Racism is a system of where one group of people do not have access to opportunity, resources, jobs, and or anything vital to keep a community sustained. Racism has impacted our schools, our communities, and the global world for the programming of anti-Blackness is a disease. Without economic reconstruction, political power, social awareness, and a unified culture, freedom would be futile. Keep Liberation Alive!!!
    First-Year College Students: Jennie Gilbert Daigre Education Scholarship
    Was I born with this destiny or did my choices in life lead me down this path.  When I think about my childhood, I think about my life. What messages I was taught at home, school, and by other outside influences. There was this constant inner voice about who I should be. However, struggled with always viewing things in life as Black or White, there were never any gray areas.  Meaning I made decisions out of logic and reasoning, instead of feelings and emotions.  However, I have learnt, I am still learning that people are made up of more than logic, but rather emotions and feelings.  I realized that when I said things my comments had an effect on the feelings of others; but as human beings, we tend to respond out of our emotions. I came to understand the impact of my words when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School.  I lost, but ran a campaign that promotes character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized that these issues were important to me, and that being a leader was my calling.  I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a Leadership program for African American males and was a member of this program during that time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President.  Being under the guidance of leadership, earning a degree in Political Science and African American Studies to expand my leadership ability. What I have learned through researching both these programs are that both Political Science and African American Studies gives an outlet to public service, employment, and joining other organizations that value people over profit. One day I can run for political office and engage in community advocacy.    As I close, I leave you with the answer to the question.  Did I choose the path or did the path choose me?  The path was chosen for me. However, I had to choose to fulfill the purpose that God has given me. 
    Alexis Potts Passion Project Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. What led me to this belief was when I ran for SGA Class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School.  This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation Particularly as a BIPOC person, an HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Jimmy Cardenas Community Leader Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The program Youth Development was aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provides me the skills to be of becoming a leader. In high school I joined school clubs and activities that enabled me to serve and be a fighter for change. Service is important as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will attend Claflin University in Fall 2022 and I will continue to be apart of life-changing programs, study abroad, internships, and communicate with our nation's leaders to create change in disadvantage communities.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been apart of community programs that advocate education. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. The program was a six-year commitment, I started the program in third grade and graduated during the summer after finishing my eighth-grade year. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." T'Challa (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equity. 
    Bold Speak Your Mind Scholarship
    My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper. . With helping people, I begin join many programs that partnered with Henry M. Jackson High School to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, churches that were centered around homeless people, contributed to special events around education, and being in the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district . Being a voice in the community is how I stay true to myself.
    Bold Reflection Scholarship
    My most difficult challenge was adapting to life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. I want to attend an HBCU to further this education so that I can better understand how to serve others. This is my way of paying it forward.
    Bold Success Scholarship
    My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community. To achieve my goals is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.   How to truly achieve success is networking, getting resources, and create your own market that moves society forward, but particularly your community. A community must mobilize, organize, stragetize, plan, and execute for as a Black person I want the Black community to invest in things that have value, own your value, and demand value for the values are jobs, banks, hospitals, supermarkets, schools to have a redeveloped community.
    Bold Mentor Scholarship
    I joined a program in high school called the UNCF Portfolio Project. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. This program had a collaborative effort by the students and mentors. The program's mission is to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community;this is why I love this organization. I came back to the Portfolio Project my senior year and have learned so much. They are committed to investing in my future and the future of all the students they serve. Because of UNCF I have applied to and completed the application process to over 10 colleges and universities. I have applied to and am still applying to scholarships as well as applied for internships. Because of the UNCF program, I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and African American Studies and Political Science to run for political office so that I can make a change in the Black and Brown community.
    Bold Persistence Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. I want to attend an HBCU to further this education so that I can better understand how to serve others. This is my way of paying it forward.
    Bold Encouraging Others Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in African /African American Studies and Political Science, to one day run for political office to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. This process is still in motion. But the way that I encourage people is showing them the possibility of hope. Particularly in a disadvantage community it is hard for people to be encourage when schools are inadequate, lack of jobs, crime is rampart, absence of family, political powerless, lack vision of economic development it is hard to say that people can ever be encourage to do something. Especially our young generation, where they need leadership, development, and guidance to escape the victim mentality and keep pushing for the change you seek. We as a society need to invest in the children for if grown up in a chaotic environment they are more likely to become chaotic themselves and it is my duty to as a college student to invest and represent these communities for to encourage others that somebody out their to lift them up by the bootstraps and give the chance to better their lives.
    Bold Fuel Your Life Scholarship
    What fuels my life is the importance of education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. So as a fight for representation, I will be re-enrolling in Claflin University which is an HBCU to earn my dual degree in African /African American Studies and Political Science. Their goals are to teach Black people their past history, promote higher education, invest in resources, and build a community of leaders to help their community reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. These goals have fuel my drive toward activism and public speaking for it is my responsibility to reach the people as Claflin University did for me.
    Bold Empathy Scholarship
    I ran for SGA class President in middle school. I was very prejudiced towards another race and this got me in trouble at school and home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I ran for the position to embrace anti-bullying, character building, and responsibility but students were not buying that. Though I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me, my teachers still encouraged me. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. as a person who values social change, I must embrace and value everybody because at the end of the day, we are the human race and we should work together to bring bridges instead of barriers. The lesson is never discriminate against people. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community.
    Bold Bucket List Scholarship
    The things on my bucket list is to travel, make a million dollars, and buy a house. I have not bought me a house nor have I made a million dollars. But I have travel to some states like Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Washington, Nevada, Georgia, and I have been to Mexico and I will go back in a year or two. Traveling for me is more than vacation, it is cultural appreciation of someone else's heritage, their customs, and their livelihood for it shows how America is different from other countries. I enjoyed Mexico and I would like to go to Hong Kong for another country that has a past and proud history of Chinese civilization and meditation is key to my health! Traveling makes me feel free and transparent with the world and that is how I think life should be viewed. Travel please!
    Olympians Academy Leadership Wings Scholarship
    Born into a single parent household, my mother told me that I was born to be a leader. However, as a child I needed to be groomed, molded , guided, and nurtured into becoming a leader. My mother enlist me in the Young Leaders Academy for my environment around me had nor role models in the community and many of the children I know where statistics and my mother did not want that for me. The Young Leaders Academy was a program for young African American males to provide male leadership, education, community service, and brotherhood. As I attended school, I was interested in the debate which I ran for SGA Class President. However, I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. One day in class, I made a prejudiced remark about another race and I was isolated form my peers and was labeled a radical. But with caring parents, supportive teacher, and a leadership program, they guided to use my voice for something good which turned out to be public service. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone form the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihood. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world.
    Bold Learning and Changing Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosanna Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With these community investments, my drive is community activism to mentor young black males and other underrepresented communities.
    Snap Finance “Funding the Future” Scholarship
    I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. Some of these programs include the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. The program was a six-year commitment, I started the program in third grade and graduated during the summer after finishing my eighth-grade year. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. At an HBCU, it is not only value education, but helps people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give Black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man.
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    Moving to Washington, one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. In my freshmen year of high school, I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The program was called the Youth Development Program and this instill unity in African American teenagers. It's aimed to instill the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, how I will contribute your true selflessness is to attend an HBCU where I will continue the work that I have aspired to become apart of. I will dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science all to engage in community development, leadership, and public service.
    Ms. Catherine Gipson Scholarship
    I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.. These people inspire me to attend an HBCU for I am apart of my ancestor mantle of leadership. They were the beacon of hope and with Black leadership it comes with determination, faith, humility, integrity, but also change. This is the reason why I want to pursue a degree at an HBCU to continue the work of tearing down oppressive systems and social structures that dictate our social, economic, political, and individual autonomy and authority. What social justice means to me is social change and I will push social change through education. Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. With education we are more open to resources, opportunities, and possibilities of a better future. But the reality is to give back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. So to give back to my community, I must join the fight. My fight would be public speaking and community leadership as to fight for the control of the votes, holding our candidates and elected officials accountable, forming our own political unions, and continuing organizing youth and student engagement. Our voice, vote, and freedom count so we must do in our power to assure Black progress.
    M.H.M.A Black Excellence Scholarship
    As a child my first stage of leadership was being involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. In my years high school, my mother enrolled me in community minded programs due to rough transition into public school. It was a community college program aimed for students of African descent which instilled the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF program was a community effort for guest speakers to share encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. To add on I join organizations like NAACP, my high school Black Student Union, Mill Creek and Everett Youth Advisory Board all catered into creating a community helper, leader, and a fighter for change. My contributions are working at food banks at local churches, feeding the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. Because of the organizations that invested in me I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community. My plan for the future is to engage in politics to address issues like infrastructure, policing, education, jobs, and health in rural and urban america.
    Bold Community Activist Scholarship
    During my high school years, I joined community minded programs like NAACP, United Negro College Fund, and Everett Community College Youth Works Development, locally I have become an community helper. During my time in high school joined after school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Bold Climate Changemakers Scholarship
    A positive impact on the climate is putting heat pumps under public green spaces. I want to add more heat pumps under public green spaces so that society could help tackle climate change, improve air quality and generate income for councils and park authorities to re-invest locally. Using the heat pump would also avoid the contribution to local air pollution that a new gas boiler would make. Because of having clean heat pumps under peaks and public green spaces will further climate action. We must explore ground source and water-based heat pumps in parks and green spaces to generate sustainable energy from heating. Also support initiatives like for example the Powering Parks Project for being able to switch from using fossil fuels and save money or generate income for city council. I advocate for Solar Schools Project to help school boost budgets, cut carbon emissions by raising money to install solar panels, and build a relationship with the community. What I hope to see as a positive impact on climate is improving our public green spaces by supporting local projects, boosting budgets, and everybody cutting down carbon emissions which would generate money and a desire for re-investing in their community.
    Bold Financial Literacy Scholarship
    To be honest, as a college student at an HBCU I am still learning. As stated there is a student debt crisis that is affecting the opportunities and access to wealth of our students. Also being Black I have been shown how to create wealth and also being denied opportunities to better myself. Now what I am learning is budgeting and community investment. I believe it is organizing, partnerships, and our community constantly building for the future of HBCU's. Community investment towards STEM, entrepreneurship, and real estate is part of the investment so that we can own our resources, capital, and labor. Especially with STEM mainly engineering and technology jobs for that is the way that the world is moving towards. So at an HBCU, we have to become advanced and by doing that is to get these jobs to generate wealth. So after working in the field, we can create our own jobs in our community to build generational wealth. So community investment is the important financial lesson that I am learning and still will learn.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    My greatest accomplishment has yet to be realized.  I have not even graduated from high school, I have not been accepted to any colleges, nor have I made any significant contributions to the world. So, how can I honestly answer this question?  I can say that I am a helper, a leader, and an educator among my peers.  I can also say that I am a community activist and volunteer; but are these considered great? My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged.  Yes, that sounds great!  However, the reality is that it has not happened yet.   To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.   I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did.     So, my greatest accomplishment is taking advantage of the opportunities given to me.  Sometimes, opportunities appear out of the blue or you discover a brochure for a program that could benefit you and the deadline to apply is not until next week.   Although great opportunities might seem like a stroke of luck, I believe that being in the right place at the right time happens less because of chance and more because of preparation.  This includes actively creating new opportunities for myself.   Opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help my people succeed and to leave a legacy for the next generation. I did not come this far not to finish my race.  I now carry the torch of past leaders until I achieve my greatest accomplishment.  So my greatest accomplishment would be leadership because they make decisions and inspire people to be apart of the movement for hummanity.
    Bookman 5 Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Bold Optimist Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School.  This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. So with my experience in leadership, I plan to create mentorship programs and become apart of student government associations to become a social change in my community.
    Bold Future of Education Scholarship
    COVID-19 is a pandemic that illustrates how globally interconnected we are – there is no longer such a thing as isolated issues and actions. Successful people in the coming decades need to be able to understand this interrelatedness and navigate across boundaries to leverage their differences and work in a globally collaborative way. Another one is students being able to gain access to knowledge, and even learn a technical skill, through a few clicks on their phones, tablets and computers, we will need to redefine the role of the educator in the classroom and lecture theatre. This may mean that the role of educators will need to move towards facilitating young people’s development as contributing members of society. In this ever-changing global environment, young people require resilience and adaptability – skills that are proving to be essential to navigate effectively through this pandemic. Looking into the future, some of the most important skills that employers will be looking for will be creativity, communication and collaboration, alongside empathy and emotional intelligence; and being able to work across demographic lines of differences to harness the power of the collective through effective teamwork. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in educational institutions across the world being compelled to suddenly harness and utilize the suite of available technological tools to create content for remote learning for students in all sectors. Educators across the world are experiencing new possibilities to do things differently and with greater flexibility resulting in potential benefits in accessibility to education for students across the world. So I believe we can make education better through a global perspective, mainly to hear and seek the problems that the marginalized oppressed and make solutions towards the funding, the laws, and the change of curriculum. The curriculum must be change so students can learn about financial literacy, career development, leadership, and joining social organizations that works on improving our education systems.
    Bold Great Books Scholarship
    My favorite book is A Lesson Before Dying is the narrative is about a black man named Jefferson who is wrongfully accused of murdering a man named Mr. Grope. Jefferson is sentenced to death. His attorney advocates for his release, claiming no justice will be served by executing him. A local schoolteacher, Grant Wiggins, also works for his release. This book celebrates the rural culture of the South, as well as traditional African American religious beliefs and philosophies. For instance, the novel stresses the importance of respect for elders and loyalty to family, which are important aspects of the Southern folk tradition. The novel also emphasizes common-sense morality. My favorite part of the story is when Grant visits Jefferson, and finds that he has been writing his thoughts down in a notebook that Grant gave him. He urges Jefferson to pray, since it will make Miss Emma happy and might give him some peace of mind, although Grant himself is a non-believer. Jefferson is very afraid of death and wonders what his execution will feel like. The novel then switches from Grant's narration to "Jefferson's Diary," which is written with very flawed grammar and spelling. It includes memories from his childhood, as well as musings about dignity and whether God prefers white people to black people. From the diary, we learn that Grant has had the schoolchildren and many townspeople come to visit Jefferson, and Jefferson is deeply touched by their concern for him. So what i got from that was a lesson before dying as to die as a man and restore my leap in faith in God for society wants me gone.
    Bold Great Minds Scholarship
    I admire Malcolm X. Malcolm X embraced black separatism shaped the debate over how to achieve freedom and equality in a nation that had long denied a portion of the American citizenry the full protection of their rights. It also laid the groundwork for the Black Power movement of the late sixties. His entire struggle for democracy and Black liberation is his legacy. His legacy defines a modern day revolutionary Black nationalist exodus. Millions of people throughout the world, the name Malcolm X is identified with the cause of African-American liberation, anti-imperialist solidarity, and socialism. His life and legacy are connected to the fight against oppression, exploitation, colonialism, and racism. Malcolm was fiercely honest. His genius rested in that he grasped the truth that the revolutionary potential inherent in the fight for Black liberation could only be realized as a result of the solidarity of all oppressed and exploited humanity. Solidarity was for him mutual aid between forces fighting a common enemy. His mind became his most powerful weapon and that which the enemies of Black freedom feared most. He carefully developed the tools of logic and rhetoric in order to penetrate and demolish the lie of white supremacy. Malcolm, however, was most interested in the histories of revolutionary struggles and the lives of revolutionaries. He drew lessons from the American Revolution He attempted to understand the methodologies of guerrilla warfare as a means of self-defense and liberation of an oppressed people to overthrown colonialism. But what really draws me to Malcolm is his knowledge that within the struggles of the masses of African Americans rested the solution to racial oppression. Freedom and justice by any means necessary means to never compromise on your destiny and we as Black people must create a Black nation for us and by us.
    Bold Deep Thinking Scholarship
    America’s involvement in World War II had a significant impact on the economy and workforce of the United States. This negative outcome would be the development of nuclear warfare and the cold war. These things have adverse effect on the environment and ecosystem which I will introduce climate change as the biggest problem the world is facing. Some of these changes have been due to natural causes such as volcanic eruptions, floods, forest fires etc., but quite a few of them are due to human activities. Human activities such as deforestation, burning fossil fuels, farming livestock etc., generate an enormous amount of greenhouse gases. This results in greenhouse effect and global warming which are the major causes for climate change. the current situation of climate change continues in a similar manner then it will impact all forms of life on the earth. The earth temperature will rise, the monsoon patterns will change, sea levels will rise, and storms, volcanic eruptions and natural disasters will occur frequently. The biological and ecological balance of the earth will get disturbed. The environment will get polluted and humans will not be able to get fresh air to breath and fresh water to drink. Life on earth will come to an end. So solution to climate change is to follow the path of sustainable development to effectively address the concerns of climate change. We need to minimize the use of fossil fuels, adopt alternative sources of energy, such as hydro-power, solar and wind energy to make a progressive transition to clean energy. Another way is government initiatives create awareness about climate change, and help capacity building for adaptation measures to to make the forest land more green and fertile. In other words, human risk factor needs to decrease.
    Bold Goals Scholarship
    Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African Studies and Political Science to develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. "Education is the is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued.
    College Showdown Scholarship
    Debra Victoria Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. So, let’s get to Julien’s story. There’s not a whole lot to tell, because my journey is incomplete. However, I can tell you about my beginning and what Julien is doing now. As I mentioned before I was born in Louisiana, in the city of Lafayette. After my mother graduated from college, we moved further south to Baton Rouge, LA. Baton Rouge is where I spent my elementary and middle school years. As I transition in my development stage of leadership, I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. My career goals stem from community based programs. At a time in my life I moved to the state of Washington. In this state where I attended high school, I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Because of the people who invested in my life, I have decided to be a leader in my community. I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth for my true passion is community activism. So by engaging in community development, I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in African Studies and Political Science to become a resource, to provide opportunity, and create economic mobility and political progress.
    Bold Bravery Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. How I adapted to my bravery was joining a Black Student Union at my high school. From the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and many others that are Black, their had to be change. Change that starts from our schools and it's systems. You see education is just Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. At an HBCU, which I attend because of a legacy of social activism, representation strengthens a community and improves student outcomes. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in education is my survival to make a difference in the world. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African Studies and Political Science. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. This is how I plan to be brave by becoming a leader in the community.
    Bold Gratitude Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. As I attend an HBCU, representation, excellence, legacy, and community is what i am grateful for. I appreciate an HBCU's dedication and mission to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU's not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Also with representation in education it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. I appreciate that their are institutions and communities that serve the needs of people of color to make historical and necessary changes out of their bleak circumstances.
    Bold Career Goals Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in African Studies and Political Science. One day I will use these degrees to run for a political position to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. To achieve my dream is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  A quote that I live by is that Education is the powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. What this quote mean to me as an upcoming leader is that true progress takes open ideas, different perspective, and valuing all humans. I have been apart of community based programs that are invested in leadership and education and I will continued to pass that culture to the next generation for without struggle their is no progress and the progress I want to achieve is social change.
    Bold Hope for the Future Scholarship
    Racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 20% of all public elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. By comparison, 51% of all public elementary and secondary school students in the U.S. were nonwhite, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. What this data says to me is that when they teach us (ethnic minority students) they are teaching their history and leaving out the most vital parts of our history. I know that because I am in the public-school system; which was designed for the white majority population. It is my responsibility to take “Two Sets of Notes”. One set of notes to pass the class and the other set to learn the truth. After graduating high school, I want to attend a Historical Black College/University (HBCU). This is because representation is important to me. I was born and raised in Louisiana; brought up with traditional Southern values, surrounded by African Americans, and taught by African American teachers. Until the summer of my first year in high school, when my parents decided to move us to the Pacific Northwest. After the first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. The next year my parents enrolled me in the NAACP Youth Development Program. It was in this program that I realized how imperative it was for me to be educated on my history and understand my cultural identity. Growing up in Louisiana, I took the privilege of being surrounded by black people, black teachers, and black students for granted. Even though, I am more adapted to my environment; I now understand the importance of representation. College is a pivot point before becoming a productive member of society and that pivot point is crucial to my survival as a black male in America. After earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy/Administration, I want to practice International Law and eventually run for a political office in my community. This career path will allow me to do organizational and community work for the public which involves diplomacy, advocacy, and civic engagement.  I am the best fit for your college/university because of my unique upbringing, cultural experiences, and my character that compels me to be determined, successful, respectful, passionate, and demonstrate integrity and self-discipline in everything I do.
    Bold Meaning of Life Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. I came from an environment where I was represented by people who look like me, so by my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. My mission in life is to invest in education, fighting systemic racism, and eliminate gap that deny people opportunities. The reason why because positive change improves people's outcomes and with representation it helps strengthen communities.
    Bold Selfless Acts Scholarship
    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Snap Finance “Funding the Future” Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. So after graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. But how I truly plan to make a difference in the world is being apart of leadership programs mainly for people of color, for their is a need of Black leadership to engage and advocate for resiliency, self-determination, pride, integrity, faith, brotherhood, and a commitment towards social, economic, and political change.
    Bold Talent Scholarship
    My talent is leadership. How I practice leadership is engaging in leadership programs that advocate progress for their community. At a very young age I was enrolled in the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. where young Black males became productive citizens in their community. The activities we done were feeding the homeless, attending roundtable discussions with Baton Rouge police officers, and fundraisers for charity events. However, after graduate from that program, my family decided to move from that environment. As my family and I moved to another state, I instantly lost my leadership skills. my difficult challenge was adapting to the life in Washington state especially in high school. My grades suffered, I was surrounded buy people who did not look like me nor advocated for me, and most importantly not having a support group. Therefore my mother enrolled me in a community programs catered for students of color for I was taught the importance of education, community leadership, financial literacy. and cultural identity and belonging, I felt worthy as I attended programs like NAACP, Communities of Color Coalition, UNCF Portfolio Project all dedicated towards my leadership skills and ability. Moreover, I began to join other programs and engage in networking, problem solving, and teamwork. With the help of these programs, as I graduate from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU for the need of cultural representation, the importance of Black leadership, and to create economic mobility in poor urban and rural communities. With my leadership, I plan to leave a legacy of hope, power, and a commitment to social, economic, and political change around the world.
    Ginny Biada Memorial Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The program was Youth Development Program partnered with NAACP. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. The next program was the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Last but not least was Communities of Color Coalition. The coalition partnered with NAACP and our Public schools. We advocate for change in our institutions that did not serve you but also within ourselves. We need to organized for our Black agenda to be heard and put forward to use. It focus was to help youth of color through education, incarceration, and cultural identity. But with all the help of these programs, if it was not my mother who have networked and enlisted me in these programs, where would I be?
    Bold Wisdom Scholarship
    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. As I attend an HBCU, they valued education and culture. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. I believed this is important this can inspire youth of color that there is a possibility of hope and if we can transformed them to become resources in their community, then their is hope for the future for the next generation after them.
    Bold Joy Scholarship
    Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. So what I am trying to say is that education is my joy. I am able to inspire, grow, and nurture the development of our youth to make a positive difference in the world we live in.
    Bold Loving Others Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. NAACP Youth Development Program was aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Then other programs were a community effort like UNCF, Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board, Everett Youth Advisory Board, and NAACP all committed to train leaders into leaders, innovators, and role models of the community. How I made people happy was being a community helper as I volunteered at food banks, feeding the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. My mom knew a leader was born!
    Charles R. Ullman & Associates Educational Support Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been apart of community programs that advocate education. My impact of helping my own community so far is being apart of community organizations. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. In Young Leaders Academy we attended police roundtable discussions, create fundraisers for social events, feed the homeless, visit our elders at local clinics, and were servers at Kiwanis Pancake Festival. Another program I joined was The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. When my parents moved from Louisiana to the sate of Washington, in high school I had no support group and I struggled academically and socially. Therefore my mother enlisted in a me people of color program to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent like cultural identity, community support , financial literacy, and higher education. Another program was another program for students of color, called the UNCF Portfolio Project. NAACP's Youth Development Program took students to a college fair in Seattle where UNCF where the host of the event. My mother network and I was enlisted in my junior year. I was taught the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African/African American Studies and a minor in Political Science. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." An inspiring quote from Black Panther that should ensures that we can only move as a nation if everybody has resources, opportunity, representation, and power withing their community.
    Bold Best Skills Scholarship
    Was I born with this destiny or did my choices in life lead me down this path.  When I think about my childhood, I think about my life. What messages I was taught at home, school, and by other outside influences. There was this constant inner voice about who I should be. However, struggled with always viewing things in life as Black or White, there were never any gray areas.  Meaning I made decisions out of logic and reasoning, instead of feelings and emotions.  However, I have learnt, I am still learning that people are made up of more than logic, but rather emotions and feelings.  I realized that when I said things my comments had an effect on the feelings of others; but as human beings, we tend to respond out of our emotions. I came to understand the impact of my words when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School.  I lost, but ran a campaign that promotes character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized that these issues were important to me, and that being a leader was my calling.  I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Therefore I have been apart of leadership programs that are dedicated towards helping the people in my community.
    Bold Motivation Scholarship
    My greatest accomplishment has yet to be realized.  I have not even graduated from high school, I have not been accepted to any colleges, nor have I made any significant contributions to the world. So, how can I honestly answer this question?  I can say that I am a helper, a leader, and an educator among my peers.  I can also say that I am a community activist and volunteer; but are these considered great? My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.   I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did. So my motivation is to take advantage of a leadership opportunity and lead the people toward progress, determination, and humility. I did not come this far not to finish my race.  I now carry the torch of past leaders until I achieve my greatest accomplishment. 
    Bold Know Yourself Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association class President in the 6th grade. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race.  This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation.  I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way.  So, I embraced my radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change.  I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Leadership is being for the people and what I have learned is that through education I can give back and become a force foe social change so everybody in life is valued. Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world, so having education can change laws and better peoples' livelihood.
    Bold Legacy Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community.  I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged.  Yes, that sounds great!  However, the reality is that it has not happened yet.   To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable.  A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead.  As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships.   I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr.  These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by.  Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did.     Opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help my people succeed and to leave a legacy for the next generation. I did not come this far not to finish my race.  I now carry the torch of past leaders until I achieve my greatest accomplishment. The legacy that I want to achieve is having a community mobilize, represented, and served and that's all I can ask for.
    Bold Helping Others Scholarship
    Being provided the skills of a community helper. Examples of my service are school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. I volunteered and participated at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. But the reason that I am a giver is because of community program. My first community program was the Youth Development Program where it is helps students of color transition into high school, the workforce, and community leadership. Being exposed to panels, community events, and class discussions where I learn to network, put ideas into action plans, set goals, and finding your passion. My passion is education reform, and during my high school years, Black Lives Matter push an agenda that needed to be heard therefore I had to serve the needs of those who could not be served. How I help others was engaging with our city leaders, leading protests, meeting at a town hall where people voice their issues and partnering with other organizations that were about the same thing to create global change.
    Bold Perseverance Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities.
    Bold Books Scholarship
    A Lesson Before Dying is the most inspiring book because it explains that every death means something plus being as the Black man has been enslaved so long he feels like his intelligence is primal and we as Black people must break that. The black man named Jefferson was accused, tried, and arrested for murder. Although he did not do it, he was in the crime scene and with his lack of knowledge, they took advantage of him. The criminalization of Black man has shown how myths, stereotypes, and racist ideologies led to discriminatory policies and court rulings that fueled racial violence in a post-Reconstruction era and has culminated in the exponential increase of Black male incarceration today. The misconceptions and prejudices manufactured and disseminated through various channels such as the media shows negative imagery of Black men as being brutes and criminals. As Jefferson calls himself a hog and a poor fool which explains that America's racist agenda is to exterminate the Black men from being a king in the world. With reading this book I have been inspired to change the narrative, our social structures, and taking personal responsibility which has led me to take and be apart of Black leadership programs to instill a leader in Black men.
    Lo Easton's “Wrong Answers Only” Scholarship
    1. I deserve this scholarship because I will be fortunate to pay off college debt and possible give back to the school, but also enjoy the experience of college. 2. My academic and career goals is to attend an HBCU and earn a dual degree in African/African American Studies and a minor of Political Science. Having these degrees will expand my leadership skills as I engaged in social representation, economic development, and political accountability. 3. One of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. I became apart of NAACP Youth Development Program and the UNCF Portfolio Project where I was instilled the importance of leadership, higher education, and cultural identity.
    Bold Equality Scholarship
    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. I believe that education support diversity and equality by giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. Therefore I am attending an HBCU where they valued Black people's black people’s history and to promote the importance of education..The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration because I will use these degrees develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote equality and diversity for I believe it provides hope for the next generation to achieve anything that they can and become anybody that they want to become.
    Bold Acts of Service Scholarship
    From transitioning into high school in the state of Washington, I had no support group and struggle in school. However, my mother found programs directed for students of color and with the help of the NAACP Youth Development and UNCF Project, they instilled in me leadership, education, and cultural identity. Therefore I begin to become a helper in my community as I joined after school clubs and activities. These organizations have enable me to become a leader and fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Bold Self-Care Scholarship
    How I practice self care is working out, going to parties, and watching movies. Even though I do not have the economic means of truly taking care of self, but my motto is to live life to the fullest. Plus I loved being active, playing neighborhood sports, going to trampoline parks, skating rings, bowling, go karts at times, but mostly importantly swimming. I love to swim, that water is everything. I build muscle, it reduces heart risk, and it is least amount of contact so I can avoid pain; ha. Swimming though helps me clear the mind and forget negativity. It gives me comfort, their is a discovery when I swim and I think about the horizon that has set my destination on earth. It seems weird, but I like it. Plus swimming in the cold water helps when you are getting cooked by the sun, so more power to the water!
    Mary P. Perlea Scholarship Fund
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana, I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining NAACP Youth Development Program, I learned to refocus. I was taught financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. At my high school, I joined our Black Student Union to address systemic racism in education,student to prison pipeline, and the lack of race bias training from staff to school resource officers. As though our numbers were low, the political climate that transformed 2020 of the killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, the racial disparities of Black and White people affected by COVID, and the youth's rage towards our political systems, and social -economic structures; their had to change. Even though I graduated from high school, I will still partnered with the school to continue to fight for racial progress and social advocacy for students and staff of color. So how I plan to give back to others who are underrepresented, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. I will join the school's agenda to help people reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. I valued representation in education because it helps to strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Having these degrees will develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to advocate and engage in economic mobility, political power, and racial pride all for the prosperity, determination, and survival for the next underrepresented group.
    Bold Turnaround Story Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. From transitioning from a state that was surrounded by people who like me, live with and by, and those who invested in me were I looked up to. In the state of Washington I did not have a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. I was taught exploring career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, these programs provide me the skills to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, churches that were centered around homeless people, contributed to special events around education, and being in the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district. So I am proud of people investing me to become a resource to a community who needs investing and I want to be apart of agenda.
    Bold Giving Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. The transition to public school was difficult and my main challenge were not having a support group. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught financial literacy, the importance of higher education, and most importantly, belongingness and cultural identity. I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for it's mission is to invest in students of African Descent and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. How I will give back is being apart of the marathon, the agenda of Black Liberation. I want to fight for jobs, ending recidivism, and advocate for Black political unions to engage in community ownership. By doing this, I will dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration to achieve economic power, political justice, social advocacy, and cultural empowerment.
    Bold Passion Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Bold Make Your Mark Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community. I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. The reason why I receive this passion was during my high school years in Washington state. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. I want to attend an HBCU to further this education so that I can better understand how to serve others. This is my way of paying it forward.
    Bold Driven Scholarship
    After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes.Representation in higher education is valuable because being taught and surrounded by people who look like me is important but also my my survival as a young black man.
    Bold Longevity Scholarship
    My definition of healthy living is creating a lifestyle where you feel balanced mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. Healthy living definitely has it roots in creating and maintaining a healthy body to make it possible to carry out daily activities and have the energy to enjoy special occasions too.I refer to this foundation as the Four Pillars of Health -- nutrition, movement, listening to your intuition (spiritual wisdom) and creating and maintaining loving and supportive community. Nutrition is the first pillar or foundation for healthy living that assimilates food and uses it for growth and for replacement of tissues. My next pillar is movement. I go swimming, walk in the park, lift weights, and do an hour of yoga. When I do this it improves mental clarity, sex drive, improve sleep and lift depression. Healthy living also required that mind and spiritual aspects of your life get appropriate attention as well. This combination of mind, body, heart and soul attention is the key to healthy living. Making an effort to think about changing themselves by taking actions and embarking on a healthy lifestyle can be a challenging process that can take time, However with a clear mind, body, and spirit you are healthy and happy.
    William M. DeSantis Sr. Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations. These programs helped me find my purpose, my gift, and my voice. Attending an HBCU will further my education and help push forward a wave of progress. he mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. I plan on earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills to advocate and engage in economic development, ownership,, political stability, and cultural empowerment, and awareness towards social advocacy.
    Durham-Dodd Dreams Scholarship
    My mother was the one in my life who has been extremely influential in making the person that I am today. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. So my mother invested her energy, time, and love for me to become a community leader to instill the importance of education, leadership, and faith as I strive to achieve economic development, political representation, and social justice in my community.
    BJB Scholarship
    What a community means to me is to have institutions and resources serve you. Having our own education system, control of our police, having a bank, supermarket, and business that generate wealth through a community. A community is able to defend itself against any kind of brutality from natives to foreigners. A community is where people are organized that share common attitudes, goals, and interests. How I plan to give back to my community is to attend an HBCU and be apart of social advocacy and justice. Attending an HBCU, will give me the opportunity to fight for representation, self-respect, and economic power. At HBCU's , I will continue to support social initiatives, join non-profit organizations, and create fundraisers for underprivileged communities How I truly plan to give back is creating an institution that serves the needs of underrepresented communities. A community has a green environment, jobs, and culture and to be apart of that takes leadership. The most important thing in a community is leadership because leaders are responsible for community development. Leadership is about listening to the people's needs, make decisions that benefit the community, and develops allies with people. Our leaders are the platform for change, vision, and determination. Community leadership is all about making and maintaining progress, so for me to make progress I must go to college and get a degree in Urban Studies and Affairs, Political Science, and Black/African Studies and use those degrees to help non- academic communities to bring resources back to the community and compete for political power. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been apart of community programs that advocate education. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. Another program was the NAACP Youth Development Program for it's mission was to provide cultural identity, financial education, and promoting community leadership. My last program was the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. So all these programs that I have been apart have led to me become an activist to advocate for community leadership.
    Hobbies Matter
    My favorite hobbies is public speaking. I grew strength and passion from civil rights activists. The way that a voice can inspire and lead people to fight against injustice. My favorite leader is Malcolm X because he articulate racial pride, self-defense, and Black Power in his earlier years of activism. I get hope when I listen to Malcolm X because he was a man with organized power because he spoke to the pain and triumph of every Black person in America. Public speaking is a form of education but also a skill that to me is not taught. Instead it is molded and groomed so that it can blossom. My mother know the power of my voice when I was a little boy. I was put in community programs that instill leadership abilities, community service activities, and getting and understand why education is important. The same thing with Malcolm X for it was a political push to ensure Black people the education that they need to become self-conscious and self-respect. Malcolm X did his public speaking in the street corners where the masses of Black are at beside church. Malcolm X public speaking gave power to people to get up and go do something for our people, defend our people, and to push Black political power. Malcolm X wanted freedom just like any other Black person wanted. As for me I want to say thing to freedom and by achieving freedom is to end white racism and empower Black people. Malcolm X in his last year of public speaking, he join the Civil Rights Movement in Africa to promote African unity, economic development, international cooperation all to internationalize Black people who have common goals with people in the developing world. Lastly, his voice brought light to human right injustices and while I am here on earth I will make my impact on world by public speaking on the same issues my civil rights activist have fought for.
    New Year, New Opportunity Scholarship
    After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. The mission of an HBCU is to provide educational resources and job opportunities so that our non academic communities can compete for power, put resources back in the community, and be politically represented.
    I Am Third Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. My first program was The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. In my high school years, my family and I moved to the state of Washington. While in school, I lacked representation and a sense of belonging. So my mother enlisted me in a community program called The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Last but not last, the UNCF Portfolio Project for they also advocate and engaged with our low income youth of color and taught us resources and representation is all apart education and getting a higher education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African Studies and Political Science. I want to be a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged, for an academic education was the tool needed to assist me. As I conclude I want to provide educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures and spread the knowledge to the Black community.
    Sloane Stephens Doc & Glo Scholarship
    Was I born with this destiny or did my choices in life lead me down this path. When I think about my childhood, I think about my life. What messages I was taught at home, school, and by other outside influences. There was this constant inner voice about who I should be. However, struggled with always viewing things in life as Black or White, there were never any gray areas. Meaning I made decisions out of logic and reasoning, instead of feelings and emotions. However, I have learnt, I am still learning that people are made up of more than logic, but rather emotions and feelings. I realized that when I said things my comments had an effect on the feelings of others; but as human beings, we tend to respond out of our emotions. I came to understand the impact of my words when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. I lost, but ran a campaign that promotes character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized that these issues were important to me, and that being a leader was my calling. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a Leadership program for African American males and was a member of this program during that time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Earning a degree in Communications with a concentration in Public Relations or a History Degree with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs will allow me to develop the skillsets of not only a writer or publicists, but also expand my leadership ability. What I have learned through researching both these programs are that both Public Relations and International Studies/Affairs is the practice of deliberately managing the spread of information between an individual or an organization and the public. Both paths involve diplomacy, public service, and employment in international business, government, and international agencies. Simply put, my career path is to lead. I want to do so by first practicing International Law and eventually running for a political office within my community. With this career path I want to do organizational and community work for the public which involves diplomacy, advocacy, and civic engagement. As I close, I leave you with the answer to the question. Did I choose the path or did the path choose me? The path was chosen for me. However, I had to choose to fulfill the purpose that God has given me.
    Bold Equality Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Another program I became apart of was the UNCF Project where I meet at a college fair and they were also about advocating for higher education. Being in those programs provide me the skills to become a community helper. In high school I joined Black Student Union to advocate for change in our public school system. We advocated for ethnic studies to be a course, mandatory race training, more students of color in AP classes, an increase of teachers and staff that are people of color, and the main thing is abolishing anti-black programming in our schools.
    Bold Speak Your Mind Scholarship
    Racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 20% of all public elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). By comparison, 51% of all public elementary and secondary school students in the U.S. were nonwhite, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. What this data says to me is that when they teach us (ethnic minority students) they are teaching their history and leaving out the most vital parts of our history. I know that because I am in the public-school system; which was designed for the white majority population. It is my responsibility to take “Two Sets of Notes”. One set of notes to pass the class and the other set to learn the truth. After graduating high school, I want to attend a Historical Black College/University (HBCU). This is because representation is important to me. I was born and raised in Louisiana; brought up with traditional Southern values, surrounded by African Americans, and taught by African American teachers. Until the summer of my first year in high school, when my parents decided to move us to the Pacific Northwest. After the first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. The next year my parents enrolled me in the NAACP Youth Development Program. It was in this program that I realized how imperative it was for me to be educated on my history and understand my cultural identity. With this program, I learned how to be unapologetic black and I have decided to attend an HBCU for where I can find my voice in civic organizations and programs.
    Bold Fuel Your Life Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes.Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. As a young black man, representation is a key component to my survival. So what fuels my life, is education. Education to me is a conviction for you have to mold, shape, and lead somebody and that takes a special kind of person to endure. In a world full of bleak circumstances and opporunites, I still have faith and determination that investing is something that is worth fighting for, you keep going at until you see it through. As I valuable education, I have decided to attend an HBCU for where I will dual degree in African Studies and Political Science and use these degrees to promote political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity in non academic communtites.
    Bold Selfless Acts Scholarship
    Education is the reason why I am selfless. A desire for growth, opportunity, and conscious. Yes having an education increases job opportunities which promotes economic growth and securing higher net incomes. However, education should be use more than achieving the american dream. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. What this quote means to be is being well informed, being critical thinkers, being leaders that make social and political changes. Education means to give back to the community and with my desire for education, the importance of representation and equity. Speaking of representation, I now attend an HBCU. HBCU's have dedicated themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. It's mission is to invest in non academic communities and give back resources. By helping a community, we have to address the wealth gaps, student debt, miseducation for black students to have the opportunity to obtain an higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes. Being surrounded by a demographic that looks like you and serves you is very critical to my survival as a young black man. As I close, After graduating from high school, I have decided to dual degree in African Studies and Political Science in an HBCU. I will use these degrees at an HBCU to expand my leadership abilities to promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Bold Relaxation Scholarship
    How I take care of my mental health is a challenge. As the COVID pandemic hit, as a teenager I lost my freedom and youth because time passes by. Although I go play basketball, I still do not find the energy to work out everyday nor be social with people. I feel trap at home because of the dangers of being a young black male in America, so my parents are very careful of the people I hang with. Plus, I moved to a new state and I do not feel welcomed. As a teenager youth you to explore and their are not many social outlets for youth. So how I relax is watching TV because it is something that I would allow myself to be distracted by instead of my parents. I love them, it's just that I cannot do anything around here. But I follow their rules for the hope is gaining freedom, and I believe freedom is my mental health even though freedom ain't free.
    Bold Hobbies Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community. I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. So my hobbies are reading and public speaking. I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr. These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by. Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did. I believe that my hobbies will be a greatest achievement in my life because as a leader I must follow my beliefs and principles. A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead. As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships. So as I continue to further myself in education, I will dedicate my life to service and being a educator in my community.
    Law Family Single Parent Scholarship
    Racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 20% of all public elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). By comparison, 51% of all public elementary and secondary school students in the U.S. were nonwhite, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. What this data says to me is that when they teach us (ethnic minority students) they are teaching their history and leaving out the most vital parts of our history. I know that because I am in the public-school system; which was designed for the white majority population. It is my responsibility to take “Two Sets of Notes”. One set of notes to pass the class and the other set to learn the truth. After graduating from a PWI, I want to attend a Historical Black College/University. This is because representation is important to me. My journey as a kid, I was born and raised in Louisiana; brought up with traditional Southern values, surrounded by African Americans, and taught by African American teachers. Until the summer of my first year in high school, when my parents decided to move us to the Pacific Northwest. After the first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. The next year my parents enrolled me in the NAACP Youth Development Program. It was in this program that I realized how imperative it was for me to be educated on my history and understand my cultural identity. Growing up in Louisiana, I took the privilege of being surrounded by black people, black teachers, and black students for granted. Even though, I am more adapted to my environment; I now understand the importance of representation. College is a pivot point before becoming a productive member of society and that pivot point is crucial to my survival as a black male in America. After earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy/Administration, I want to practice International Law and eventually run for a political office in my community. This career path will allow me to do organizational and community work for the public which involves diplomacy, advocacy, and civic engagement. As I close, the reason why I need to make a positive impact in my community because I truly believe that education is the powerful world which you can use to change the world and by that I mean being a force for social change, redirect culture in a positive way, and to ensure a legacy of hope for the next generation.
    Bold Empathy Scholarship
    I believed somebody must mold you into direction in order to be a direction for others. As you grow, people are still by your aid to help nurture you grow until your growth stops, but growth never stops. However, how I contributed or grown personally in the community, well I receive help first. At first, my difficult challenge was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. As I attended an college fair hosted by the UNCF, my mother enlisted me in another community program. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. They believe in engaging with non academic communtites from our scholars to provide resources and opportunities to compete politically and bring back money into the community. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper I gave people who I really. I showed responsibility, decisiveness, friendship, and teamwork. I begin partnering with other programs that engage in local service. I worked at food banks, homeless shelters at the church, schools, I wash cars to fund for community field trip, and being in the forefront of pushing equity, better policing, and representation in my high school.
    Bold Deep Thinking Scholarship
    "According to an article called Improving Racial Equity Through Greener Design states for decades that Black Americans have disproportionately lived in unhealthy conditions, due in large measure to unjust policies, inequitable planning, disinvestment, and under-investment in the built environment. Starting in the 1930s, banks and mortgage lenders marked Black and Latino neighborhoods for being uncreditworthy Known as redlining, this process led to financial firms and real estate agents refusing loans, mortgages, and other investments to residents and prospective home buyers in these areas. As a result, Black communities often remained financially stagnant, pushed into industrial zones with poor access to public transportation and inadequate grocery stores, schools, and public buildings." Another claim to this article," According to a 2018 report by the National Center for Environmental Assessment at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Black people in the United States are 1.54 times more likely to live near facilities that pollute, causing them to breathe dirtier air than whites and to develop health problems like heart and lung disease. According to a 2017 report by the Baltimore City Health Department, a nearly 20-year gap in life expectancy exists between Black and white neighborhoods in the Maryland capital, and cities like Philadelphia and Chicago have shown similar numbers." To me the biggest problem is climate change but racial equity within climate change is a huge problem. The damage of redlining has led to discrimination, economic decline, political racism, and environmental hazards was lead to poor mental health treatment and inadequate natural resources. So one way to work on this problem is to reach out to local residents and become partner in developing a greener environment. Working with our civic leaders, politicians, and non profit groups to create land use policies to ensure social and environmental sustainability.
    Bold Happiness Scholarship
    What makes me happy is service. But before I begin, I will tell you a story. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture.My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. What makes me happy is the service of the young generation that are changing the world to ensure progress, self-expression, and radical justice for people of African descent and for everybody.
    Bold Learning and Changing Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone form the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world". So what that quote means to me is to uplift, empower, and to provide resources to the community to create social change.
    Bold Success Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued.However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. As I conclude, I believe that if I go to an HBCU, it is for my own survival because I plan to dual degree in Political Science and African/African American Studies to advocate for economic power, political accountability, cultural representation, and social justice that will give people of color hope, inspiration, and reaffirmation.
    Bold Be You Scholarship
    After graduating high school, I want to attend a Historical Black College/University (HBCU). This is because representation is important to me. I was born and raised in Louisiana; brought up with traditional Southern values, surrounded by African Americans, and taught by African American teachers. Until the summer of my first year in high school, when my parents decided to move us to the Pacific Northwest. After the first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. The next year my parents enrolled me in the NAACP Youth Development Program. It was in this program that I realized how imperative it was for me to be educated on my history and understand my cultural identity. Growing up in Louisiana, I took the privilege of being surrounded by black people, black teachers, and black students for granted. Even though, I am more adapted to my environment; I now understand the importance of representation. College is a pivot point before becoming a productive member of society and that pivot point is crucial to my survival as a black male in America. After earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy/Administration, I want to practice International Law and eventually run for a political office in my community. This career path will allow me to do organizational and community work for the public which involves diplomacy, advocacy, and civic engagement.
    Bold Optimist Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Now as an alumni, I will continue to be a fighter for change. As I close, I need to ensure people of African descent resources, jobs, better healthcare, limiting access to prison pipelines that will ensure hope, influence, and guaranteed opportunity to become leaders to transform the world.
    Bold Reflection Scholarship
    Racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 20% of all public elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). By comparison, 51% of all public elementary and secondary school students in the U.S. were nonwhite, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. What this data says to me is that when they teach us (ethnic minority students) they are teaching their history and leaving out the most vital parts of our history. I know that because I am in the public-school system; which was designed for the white majority population. It is my responsibility to take “Two Sets of Notes”. One set of notes to pass the class and the other set to learn the truth. To reflect upon the data, I too face this same experience of being left out. In the summer, my family and I moved to the Pacific Northwest. first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. So my mother who worked at a community college at the time, found a program for young African American students called Youth Development Program. A partnership with NAACP and Shonomish Branch County that ensures students of African Decent cultural identity, financial literacy, and leadership. After graduating high school, I want to attend an HBCU because representation is important to me. College is a pivot point for me to not only be a productive citizen in society but for my survival as a Black man in America. I plan to dual degree in African/African American Studies and Political Science which will allow me to do organizational and community work.
    Bold Bucket List Scholarship
    My greatest accomplishment has yet to be realized. I have not even graduated from high school, I have not been accepted to any colleges, nor have I made any significant contributions to the world. So, how can I honestly answer this question? I can say that I am a helper, a leader, and an educator among my peers. I can also say that I am a community activist and volunteer; but are these considered great? My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community. I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. Yes, that sounds great! However, the reality is that it has not happened yet. To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable. A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead. As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships. I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr. Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did. As I close, opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help people of African descent succeed in this world and to leave a legacy behind for the next generation. I did not come this far to achieve my greatest accomplishment; service.
    Bold Confidence Matters Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. As I close, Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued.
    Bold Talent Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. However my talent falls into leadership because I have been in leadership programs that valued the importance of education. In middle school I I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. After graduating from high school, I plan to dual degree in Political Science and African American Studies at an HBCU to promote the ideas of a collective union in the world
    Bold Goals Scholarship
    After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. America needs new legislation, new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equality. After graduating from college, I will attend Law School so that I can help change the systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. The career choice of Public Policy Administrator and lawyer will allow me the opportunity to deliberately manage the spread of information between individuals, organizations, and the public. This path involves diplomacy, public service, advocacy, civic engagement, and community development. This is how my contributions will influence progress in the world.
    Robert Lee, Sr. and Bernice Williams Memorial Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. Some of these programs include the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. Another program was the NAACP Youth Development Program It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural identity and achieving self-determination. My third and final program is the UNCF Portfolio Project. This program taught the value and representation in higher education. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. I will use these degrees to help my community as to provide educational resources, invest in our communtites, and spread the knowledge and the ideas of achieving political and economic power and racial pride.
    Bold Nature Matters Scholarship
    World leaders have been gathering at COP26, the UN climate summit in Glasgow, against a backdrop of flooded homes, closed roads and cancelled trains across the UK caused by extreme weather. These conditions are a stark reminder that as well as dramatically reducing our carbon emissions, we must also begin adapting to a climate that is already irreversibly changing. Yet the UK’s third climate change risk assessment report warns of a growing “adaptation gap” between the risks the country faces and the action it’s taking, while the Environment Agency states bluntly that the UK must “adapt or die”. A problem with climate adaptation is that conventional engineering solutions are rapidly becoming unaffordable and unsustainable. We can’t keep on building higher sea walls, extracting more groundwater from our land’s depleted resources to irrigate crops, or installing energy-guzzling air conditioning to fight heat. Instead, nature-based solutions that reintegrate aspects of the natural world into our environment can help sustainably, affordably tackle the climate and biodiversity crises, while supporting local economies and improving people’s wellbeing.
    Bold Persistence Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. After joining this program, I learned to refocus. I was taught skills such as: financial literacy and budgeting, the importance of higher education and the college application process, and most importantly, I learned about belongingness and cultural identity. This program encouraged me to keep moving forward, subsequently, I joined two more academic programs for students of Color and African descent. These programs exposed me to college fairs, HBCU panelists discussion, and met with black professionals in different career fields. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of my culture, I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education.
    Bold Bravery Scholarship
    Racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 20% of all public elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). By comparison, 51% of all public elementary and secondary school students in the U.S. were nonwhite, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. What this data says to me is that when they teach us (ethnic minority students) they are teaching their history and leaving out the most vital parts of our history. I know that because I am in the public-school system; which was designed for the white majority population. It is my responsibility to take “Two Sets of Notes”. One set of notes to pass the class and the other set to learn the truth. After graduating high school, I want to attend a Historical Black College/University (HBCU). This is because representation is important to me. I was born and raised in Louisiana for I was surrounded by African Americans. Until the summer of my first year in high school, when my parents decided to move us to the Pacific Northwest. After the first day of school I knew that I did not belong. I was one of two black students in my class. I felt alone, isolated, and slowly felt my self-esteem begin to decline. So my next year in high school my parents enlist me in program called the NAACP Youth Development Program for where I was taught financial literacy, higher education, leadership, and cultural identity. As a black man, representation is importance because it is not only a crucial point for my survival but also excellence. Bravery is resistance against oppression and after graduating from high school, I will attend an HBCU because they valued representation.
    Bold Career Goals Scholarship
    My dream is to see people invest in nonacademic communtites that will enable them access to resources and creating opportunities along the way. With this statement I believe that higher education is the key to all of this. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. With that being said, I have been apart of community programs that advocate education. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Another program was the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. As these programs that I have listed provided me with academic education, I plan on becoming a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged.
    Snap Finance “Funding the Future” Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone form the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihood. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. As I close, America needs new legislation, new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equality.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Bold Meaning of Life Scholarship
    The meaning of life too me is leadership. In middle school I ran for Student Government Association. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU and majoring in Urban Leadership and Development for to not only expand my leadership skills but engage in community mobilization and social commentary on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world.
    Bold Gratitude Scholarship
    I live with gratitude and appreciation everyday because I am fortunate and able bodied to do and become certain things other people try to aspire to be. For that I believe it is my duty to inspire these less fortunate because the God I served has blessed me and talents and gifts to share upon the world. Being gratitude reminds us how grateful it is to not only see life but to live it towards the fullest. Life is a journey and throughout this journey I have seen the best of myself because people need my services. Too me I believe i am on a quest to provide a ambitious dream that we all are incredible creatures that that can marvelous things. Being grateful for the simple things in life can help you to boost your self-esteem and what I mean by that is a change of perspective upon people and only see the best in them just like people have seen the best in me. Being gratitude has made a focus on purpose for I want to give back to those who could not accomplish their dreams.
    Freddie L Brown Sr. Scholarship
    ou know, yeah Always wanted to have super powers You know, uh This for my people, tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero, of my people, yeah? This for my people Tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero? Uh, now all heroes don't wear capes And all villains don't get away But all limits eventually fade I don't wanna be good, nigga, I'm tryna be great It's hard when your back's against the wall And if you got it all to keep your feet up on the floor That's why I thank the Lord when I wake up in the morn' 'Cause to inform the world the very reason I was born You can see the power when the mic is in my palm When I storm across the room, hit the stage and perform Word is bond, don't be alarmed Don't let me have to sound the horn, and drop a bomb Wanna get my mom a crib, with a lawn Somethin' that my future kids, can run up on That's why I always do my best to carry on Life is like game of chess, don't be a pawn, my nigga This for my people, tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero, of my people, yeah? This for my people Tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero? Look up in the sky, it's a bird, it's a plane No, it's the young black god livin' out his dreams What you mean? I been up on an ultralight beam They don't wanna see you fly, they just gonna shoot your wings Everything ain't what it seem Wishin' all these dirty cops, would come clean Still swervin' on these city blocks, for one thing My man just copped a 30 shot, protect the team, know what I mean? Music is a form of expression I'ma use mine just to teach you a lesson Rule one: this microphone's a weapon I'm shootin' out the actions manifested and my passion Never restin', I'm surpassin' the expectancy Of life in my direction Man the section 8 depressin' Hard to be progressin' through recession and oppression Not to mention that they had us cell blocked ever since an adolescent This for my people, tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero, of my people, yeah? This for my people Tryna stay alive and just stay peaceful So hard to survive a world so lethal Who will take a stand and be our hero? Oh, yeah Oh, mm Oh, yeah
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    As a black man in America, mental health is our social justice. However true social justice among the Black community will remain incomplete until mental health disparities among this group are addressed. Mental health is an essential part of overall physical health and satisfaction. The Black community suffers from an increased rate of mental health concerns, including anxiety and depression. The increased incidence of psychological difficulties in the Black community is related to the lack of access to appropriate and culturally responsive mental health care, prejudice and racism inherent in the daily environment of Black individuals, and historical trauma enacted on the Black community by the medical field. Moreover, given that the Black community exists at the intersection of racism, classism, and health inequity, their mental health needs are often exacerbated and mostly unfulfilled. Issues related to economic insecurity, and the associated experiences, such as violence and criminal injustice, further serve to compound the mental health disparities in the Black population. Research suggests that the adult Black community is 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems, such as Major Depressive Disorder or Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Additionally, Black emerging adults (ages 18-25) also experience higher rates of mental health problems and lower rates of mental health service utilization compared to White emerging adults, and older Black adults. These sobering statistics suggest that despite efforts to reduce disparities among race and class in the US, inequalities are increasing. However, further research is required to clarify these findings and to understand the factors associated with lower utilization of mental health care among the Black community. Lack of trust in the medical system due to historical abuses of Black people in the guise of health care, less access to adequate insurance, culturally responsive mental health providers, financial burden, and past history with discrimination in the mental health system. Also, a fear that these experiences will be repeated is all suggested by research as factors in explaining lower utilization of mental health care among the Black community. It is clear that systematic barriers disproportionately impact mental health in the Black community. Although the Black community roughly constitute 12% of the United States population, they are overrepresented in high-risk populations (a group that is often impacted by specific negative occurrences). For example, the Black community comprises approximately 40% of the homeless population, 50% of the prison population, and 45% of children in the foster care system. Research shows that exposure to violence, incarceration, and involvement in the foster care system can increase the chances of developing a mental illness. Consequently, the Black community, in particular, is at significantly increased risk of developing a mental health issue due to historical, economic, social, political influences that systemically expose the Black community to factors known to be damaging to psychological and physical health. Research consistently shows that these disparities are not a new phenomenon and have been present for generations. Historically, the Black community was and continues to be disadvantaged in mental health through subjection to trauma through enslavement, oppression, colonialism, racism, and segregation. Because of this lack of information about mental health issues in the Black community, it is not always clear when one may need it or where to find help. There is also a need for improved cultural awareness and corresponding responsiveness in the health care and mental health workforce. Research has found that the lack of cultural responsiveness from the therapist, cultural mistrust, and potential negative views from the therapist associated with stigma impact the provision of mental health services in the Black community. As to conclude, cultural responsiveness is one way of addressing the disparities in psychological well being in the Black community. Culture, a person's belief, norms, values, and language, plays a vital role in every aspect of our lives, including mental health. Being culturally responsive is a mental health provider’s ability to recognize and understand the role of culture, both the client and clinician’s and the ability to adapt the treatment to meet the client’s needs within their cultural framework. When meeting with providers, it is essential for clients to ask questions to gain a sense of their level of cultural sensitivity. If this is done correctly, I believe questions will be asked more, acceptance is the norm, and fear will decrease because people will work together to fix our traumas.
    Eleven Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Community Service is Key Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. The Young Leaders of Baton Rouge Inc was an organization that I was apart of serving. I served up to 8 hours per day because it was program that combined service events and training. However the biggest takeaway from that organization was being my brother's keeper, valuing the importance of community service, and learning the qualities of a leader to become a leader in your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. For their mission is to nurture the development of leadership skills of African American males that will assist them with not only changing themselves but having a desire to chance their community. This program was created in 1993 for they saw need to help our ghettos. Our communities being impoverished, affected by gang violence, drug and gun culture, mass incarceration, and decades of unemployment and poor schooling. So people around the community decided let's make a change and create a program that provides community service, civic engagement, homework investment centers, and summer travel experience that exposes our youth to art, culture and education. The Young Leaders Academy truly cares for the next generation to be better than the last generation. They have instill in the youth that education is important. Higher education because of poverty reduction, environmental benefits, career preparation, and an improvement of networking skills. This program is a non profit organization for they care only about the youth to have access to educational resources and civic engagement that can spark progress in the community. Without this program, I would not have a strong sense of culture, unity, nor the foundation of service. I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. Because of the Young Leaders Academy dedication to expose our Black males to education, civic engagement, and art, I believe that as a member of this organization, I will attend an HBCU to ensure higher education and civic engagement will reduce racial wealth gap and give students of African descent an opportunity to represent and strengthened their communtites.
    Dr. Samuel Attoh Legacy Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. Once I left, someone form the campaign told me this that Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. America needs new legislation, new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America. After graduating from college, I will attend Law School so that I can help change the systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. The career choice of Public Policy Administrator and lawyer will allow me the opportunity to deliberately manage the spread of information between individuals, organizations, and the public. This path involves diplomacy, public service, advocacy, civic engagement, and community development. This is how my contributions will influence progress in the world. As I close the legacy I want to achieve is being a service to my community. I want to serve our youth who are at risk, underrepresented and poor. I believe that the people are the life source that gives people strength, hope, and courage to persevere societal obstacles.
    Jameela Jamil x I Weigh Scholarship
    Before I begin, I believe someone has to mold you to become an advocate for somebody else for it takes the energy of another person to invest critical but uneasy time in a world full of disparities. My mother molded me into a direction of service in the community after seeing how bad our community turned to be. However, I left that environment and I thought I moved on from the turbulent South. We moved to Washington State and one of my difficult challenges was was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help I was provided, I began to carry the touch and begin my contributions in life. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper, even when I was in high school. I joined after school clubs and activities that enable me to became a leader but a fighter for change. Service is important to as I worked I worked at food banks, helping the homeless, but most importantly contributed to events about education. I was in the forefront of pushing diversity, inclusion, and equity to ensure students of African descent can get access to resources, guaranteed opportunity, and influence to become scholars to transform the world. To conclude, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Bold Driven Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. As I transition in my development stage of leadership, I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. With the Young Leaders Academy investing in urban black youth, after I graduate from high school, I Plan to attend an HBCU. I want to do this because it reminds of a black organization that promotes leaders, scholars, and other productive role models to groom, invest, and shape underprivileged youth to transform the world and their community.
    Bold Passion Scholarship
    Before I begin, I would like to talk about why education is important. Education is important to increase job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. However, that is just the stuff on the surface. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. Therefore, after graduating college, I plan to attend an HBCU. The dedication of an HBCU's values black people’s history and promotes the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man.
    Giving Back to the Future Scholarship
    I was born and raised from Louisiana. My mother had me when I was in college and she dedicate herself to mold a leader that she was raising. As a child I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. My mother saw the importance of my leadership abilities and wanted me to put them to use. However, my family and I moved to Washington state where I had a difficult time transitioning to high school. I forget who i was, my identity, my values, and my way of life. As stated before my dedicated mother put me in a program for students of African descent to ensure education and financial literacy, cultural identity, and being a leader in the community. The program was called Youth Development Program did projects on entrepreneurship, use PowerPoint on addressing racial wealth gap, and went to college fairs. As attending a college fair, our program saw another Black organization which was the UNCF project. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. How I want to give back to the community is to continue the mission statement of these community programs to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community. Also by giving back, internships with other community minded programs that want to ensure educational equity and social justice. Furthermore attending an HBCU and investing in an HBCU to ensure African Americans resources that will give them access to education, creating wealth, and transforming them to become leaders in their community. For my platform of giving back to the community is making sure money comes back in the Black community, so supporting Black owned businesses. Teaching our youth to invest in our urban communities. Push funding from our lumping proletarians to create our own markets and institutions. Most importantly ,demanding political accountability and stability from our national leaders.
    Larry Darnell Green Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. Born from a single parent household, my mother graduated from college while she had me. The mother received a prophecy from God of how her son was going to be a leader one day. So growing up, my mother enrolled me in leadership programs. I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for Black Lives Matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project was a community effort for guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community.
    Matthews Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    As I transition in my development stage of leadership, I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for black lives matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school (Hosana Christian Academy). I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. The collaborative effort by all individuals particularly the mentors was amazing. This collaboration was a way to invest in our future. UNCF’s community mission to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community is why I love this organization. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project, I know what I want to be in life. a leader and mentor to reflect the character of my community to help young black boys and underprivileged youth. The old African proverb states it takes a village to raise a child and community activism is a way of raising a child to be unapologetic, militant, and conscious to make change in the community.
    Bold Acts of Service Scholarship
    The time that I really cared about my acts of service was when I had to adapt to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. Another project I was apart of was called the UNCF Portfolio Project. This was a community effort for individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Being in those programs provide me the skills to be a community helper and at my time at Jackson, I gave people who I really was. With helping people, I begin join many programs that partnered with Henry M. Jackson High School to be a community helper. I worked at food banks, churches that were centered around homeless people, contributed to special events around education, and being in the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district through many organizations that I am apart of.
    Bold Make Your Mark Scholarship
    My plan is to get accepted into one of the colleges of my choice and dual major in Public Policy/Administration and History with a concentration in Global Studies, to one day run for political office to better serve my community. I want to be able to provide resources and be an advocate to those that are disadvantaged. Yes, that sounds great! However, the reality is that it has not happened yet. To achieve my greatest accomplishment is to follow the beliefs and principles of a leader. A leader has determination, grit, integrity, faith, humility, and is very dependable. A leader has ambition, the ability to push forward to complete the task ahead. As a leader I hope to change our systems in America, the elitist mindset, and improve communities globally therefore improving global relationships. I draw strength from past leaders, such as: Marcus Garvey, Fred Hampton, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King Jr. These individuals succeeded because they did not let opportunities pass them by. Anytime there was an opportunity to protest, rally, write, make speeches, gather others, and educate themselves; they did. This would be my greatest accomplishment by taking advantage of the opportunities given to me. Although great opportunities might seem like a stroke of luck, I believe that being in the right place at the right time happens less because of chance and more because of preparation. This includes actively creating new opportunities for myself. Opportunities remind me of life, it is too precious. I must take advantage of my opportunities to help my people succeed and to leave a legacy for the next generation. I did not come this far not to finish my race. I now carry the torch of past leaders until I achieve my greatest accomplishment.
    Bold Perseverance Scholarship
    My difficult challenge was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With the help of these programs, I will continue to contribute to the community by being apart of life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, continue to reach out and share ideas and perspectives on important topics, and always telling people that teamwork makes a brighter day.
    Bold Loving Others Scholarship
    Helping people and being a hand in community advocacy is what makes people feel loved. I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. One program was called the Young Leaders Academy is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. Another program was NAACP for they a social justice organization designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. And lastly the United Negro College Fund Project for people came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. Other things that I did was running for Student Government Association and I ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. Other works that I worked at food banks, churches that were centered around homeless people, contributed to special events around education, and being in the forefront of pushing diversity and equity in our school’s district. So what really makes people happy from me is being a service to the community for this type of work takes teamwork, patience, and struggle and I represent that for friends, family, and the rest of society I hope.
    Bold Joy Scholarship
    Joy to me is service. Throughout my life I have been apart of programs that instills leadership, literacy, and identity. But what really gave me my joy was moving to Washington. At first I I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Therefore, my transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. I was involved with NAACP and UNCF that instill higher education to change public policies and organize a movement for racial justice. With my background I became apart of my school Black Student Union for now the mission of it is not Black Unity but to ensure educational resources, opportunities, and justice for our students to staff. But what really gave me joy was volunteering at food bank drives. I was accepted into a program called Mill Creek Youth Advisory Board that partnered with Everett Youth Council. I was apart of meetings, city projects, and volunteering for it got youth involved to serve their community and make it better. As I stated joy is service so anything that contributes to life-changing programs, communicating with our city leaders, and creating a social justice initiative is what give me joy for I care about the future of our next generation after us.
    Bold Giving Scholarship
    Well for me education is my example of giving back. Nelson Mandela once said Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. In my perspective this means giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. What I will do to give back is being a resource to my community. Attending an HBCU and getting a degree in Social Sciences and Humanities. With this degree I will give back by being another community leader to help unrepresented and disadvantage communtites. Whether by joining community minded programs, creating a community center, or working with our political leaders to dismantle economic and political racism. How I will give back to the community is by providing educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures and to spread the knowledge and resources in the Black community. The mission is the giving for it is to help people of color acquire higher education so that we can be an integral part in the American social order.
    Scholarship Institute Future Leaders Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association (SGA) class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. Although I lost the race, my campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. My teachers were encouraging me and they recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself; a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning and I watched debates, president addresses, and local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. Although I spent six years in a leadership program for African American males and was a member of the program at the time. I did not make the connection of what it meant to lead until I ran for SGA President. I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs (the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. One of my favorite programs was The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. A program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Joining these programs I learn to refocus on what mattered to me, changing the world. I was taught financial literacy , higher education, and community leadership. Without these programs, I would not have a strong sense of culture nor leadership skills. I would lack networking skills, and I would have lacked a desire to serve the black community and other underrepresented populations So I have decided on attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. Being around of this African descent programs I felt like I was apart of a family. Representation, promoting literacy, and service to your community are examples of examples of leadership. My leadership was joining a after school club and promote educational justice to enable students of color to have resources, opportunities, and restorative justice. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. As stated, these programs contributed to the type of person that I hope to be, a mentor, leader, and a role model to ensure character building, education, and financial progress for disadvantage and at-risk communities.
    Jimmy Cardenas Community Leader Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. The collaborative effort by all individuals particularly the mentors was amazing. This collaboration was a way to invest in our future. UNCF’s community mission to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their community is why I love this organization. I came back to the Portfolio Project my senior year and have learned so much. They are committed to investing in my future and the future of all the students they serve. Because of the people who invested in my future the Young Leaders Academy, the Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project I have a good start toward my young adult life and my college career. I have learned that not only do I want to be a leader in my community, but I want to be a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism. What defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can make a change in the black community. As I conclude, the old African Proverb that my mother always told me that “It takes a village to raise one child.” These cultural institutions have been my village for I will now take the torch and strive for excellence so that I can be a village to someone else.
    Lost Dreams Awaken Scholarship
    Recovery means to you being back on track with life. Recovery is always pushing to go forward, never backwards. It is to battle and overcome demons that stop you from achieving your destiny. Recovery is to restore potential in oneself to achieve great things in life. I know people that have battle from substance abuse, and they needed strong support, being committed to change, having proper resources, and having faith through a weary body. Their parents was also substance abuses and he became just like his parents. Not caring about school, always wanting to get high, and wanted to die. I know that is personal by a third person point of view, but I was their until the end. Always having conversation with this individual and trying to help anyway I can. How he recovered was by people like me being patience, be understanding, not judgmental, and practicing what I preach got this person through and I thank God that I had the chance to save a life because recovery is all about restoring potential to achieve one's destiny.
    Loan Lawyers 2021 Annual Scholarship Competition
    Financial freedom means to me is having enough resources to pay for your living expenses and allow you to afford many of your life goals without having to work or otherwise commit any of your time or efforts to generating money. Financial freedom ensures me being free from debt. Never in my life do I ever want to pay debt. Not for mortgage, student loans, or any loans because I believe debt stops you from achieving wealth. Also, I do not have to depend on people and I have ability to take and provide for my own future. Even though it is good to have for self, but I am person who loves to spread the wealth, so how to acquire financial freedom for people of color. How I want to achieve financial freedom as a Black man is to help build generational wealth in their communities. Their is a racial wealth gap when and after Reconstruction; in 1865 slavery legally prohibited Black people from earning wages. Following emancipation, laws continued to marginalize Black and African Americans by restricting their freedoms and denying them opportunities. Also in 1935, Social Security did not cover most Black Americans as it excluded farmers and domestic workers from benefits. Black people made up 65% of those occupations. Prior to the Civil Rights Act in 1964, Black codes and Jim Crow laws which legalized racial segregation in the South. people in power have created unequal systems which has been difficult to eliminate. They are deeply entrenched into America’s labor, housing, education, healthcare and justice system. These discriminatory policies originally set out to ensure white people could build more wealth than Black people. And over time, it contributed to Black Americans, on average, having considerably less wealth than white Americans. Studies show that since the 1960s, following Civil Rights, Black Americans’ financial stance compared to white Americans' has shown little progress with home ownership, unemployment and overall wealth holdings. So how I want to be apart of ensuring Black people having financial freedom is getting access to home-ownership, employment, and financial literacy classes that teaches about savings account, funds, and paying loans. Also we need to ensure better leadership to create fair policies to contribute to Black opportunities for creating wealth. There are many resources available to help you achieve financial wellness. From programs that improve finance education to scholarships and mortgage financing assistance, these organizations and programs can help you get on the path to success.
    Bold Helping Others Scholarship
    My favorite way to help others is through education. All my life I have been apart of programs that fostered the importance of higher education. These programs were NAACP, UNCF, and the Young Leaders Academy which they represented low-income minorities and help them become productive thinkers, innovators, and game-changers of the world. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Too me , education is about representation and while attending an HBCU, these institutions will dedicate themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man.
    Bold Best Skills Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association class President during my 6th grade year of middle school. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming SGA class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. I then began to understand that Leadership was a privilege, not a right. As I spent six years in that program, they instilled discipline, courage, and excellence in me to succeed in leadership positions. Once I left, someone from the organization reminded us that “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” As I look back now, I believe this quote means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being valuing everybody's education to become well rounded leader and individual.
    Jae'Sean Tate BUILT Scholarship
    I truly believe that my existence on this earth is to be a leader in my community. So, let’s get to Julien’s story. There’s not a whole lot to tell, because my journey is incomplete. However, I can tell you about my beginning and what Julien is doing now. As I mentioned before I was born in Louisiana, in the city of Lafayette. After my mother graduated from college, we moved further south to Baton Rouge, LA. Baton Rouge is where I spent my elementary and middle school years. As I transition in my development stage of leadership, I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. This was a six-year program and a great commitment, but the result created a young leader in society. Things we did in the Young Leaders Academy were feeding the homeless, have community conversations with police officers, checking on our elders at local nursing homes, and community marches for Black Lives Matter. The Young Leaders Academy is a great organization to help Black males to not become statistics and to make a difference in your community. Joining the Young Leaders Academy, helped me to know that my place in society is to be a leader. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. These programs included NAACP and UNCF for they taught me the importance of community, higher education, leadership, and cultural pride. This collaboration I call it was very important to me because I was in a program that invested in my future and well-being. These programs have a community mission to help people of color and low-income families to become educated scholars to produce change in their communities. This is why I love these organization for I found purpose, hope, and dignity. I believe I am a great candidate because with stated, I am inspired to change the world just like my ancestors did. If was not for these programs, I would have not attended an HBCU and majored in African American Studies and Political Science. With these degrees, I will used them to run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Bold Motivation Scholarship
    Service to my community motivates me. The people that I look up to remind me of courage, hope, and sacrifice to ensure the well being of the majority. By proving my service, I will attend an HBCU for their mission is to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. To invest and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. With this service I want to help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Also making sure the community is represented because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes. Nelson Mandela once said "education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world" What this quote means to me is giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So with my service, I will be apart of the HBCU's mission to ensure the opportunities, resources, and power that students of color need in their communtites.
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    A little bit about me is that I was involved in a local organization called the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge, Inc. The Young Leaders Academy instilled leadership principles, importance of education, community service, being your brother’s keeper, and teaching black males to become productive citizens. In high school, I begin developing some educational goals like dual degree in History and Public Administration when I graduate from college. However, before entering my next phase in life, their were obstacles. One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The first program I gotten involved with was The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. My next program was the The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With this collaborative effort , these programs invested in children's future, but most importantly people of color and families of low-income. After completing these programs, I want to be a leader in my community, and a mentor to other young black boys and underprivileged youth. My true passion is community activism and what defines me is being a service to the black community and other communities of color. I will do so by attending an HBCU earning a dual degree in History African and Global Studies and Public Policy & Administration to run for political office so that I can ensure progress, power, and resources in the Black community.
    Pandemic's Box Scholarship
    The pandemic has aspire me to continue to keep pushing and tugging in life, Determination, being active, having a closed knitted family, and my faith has helped me through the pandemic. My aspirations is to a community leader for with COVID 19, the racial disparities have opened up ton the world and now people wanting to participate for change. My goal is to ensure that organization creates mobilization and that is what i aspire to be.
    Bold Wisdom Scholarship
    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” So the reality is; education to me means, giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. Education is thought of as going to school, sitting in a classroom, and being instructed by a teacher on reading, writing, math, and history. However, the most important aspect of education is representation. An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man.
    Willie Mae Rawls Scholarship
    Winner
    I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. Some of these programs include the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. How I plan to make positive impact on the world through my faith is to following the teachings of Jesus Christ for he was about service, brotherhood, and fairness. I want to be a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged, provide educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures and to spread the knowledge and resources in the Black community all because to be apart of America's social order!
    Bold Legacy Scholarship
    I want my legacy to to be apart of the mission statement of HBCU's to in invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. Also help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Why I want because representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable and being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. Too me is is important to my survival as a young black man because education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. The reality that I want to see is that education gives back to my community, being a force for social change, and understanding that all education should be valued.
    Saroya Byrd Legacy Scholarship
    I can make positive changes in my community by being apart of community programs that advocate higher education. Since i attend an HBCU, An HBCU dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. One community program that inspired to go to an HBCU was the United Negro College Fund Project. The UNCF program not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. So how will this impact my children's future, by advocating to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged, provide educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures , and to spread the knowledge and resources in the Black community. The impact is to help people of color acquire higher education so that we can be an integral part in the American social order.
    You Glow Differently When You're Happy Scholarship
    When I turned six years old, I had gotten an action figure from the movie Kung Fu Panda, a birthday cake, and went on roller coasters.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    The change that I would want to see around the world is education. Miseducation is a major issue that first impacts the community. Education in minority areas have been negative for the lack of resources, funding, and organization for that grants community mobilization and authority. Particular in America, education is horrible because many of our workers are not educated, come from poverty stricken environments, and a capitalist system that does not want people to be critical thinkers. With those issues, this leads to mental health problems because of the lack of education that was not provided to address poverty, environmental hazard, and political tyranny. So what I have done locally is participated in several leadership and community minded programs that exist to promote the education and well-being of students of African descent. Some of these programs include the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. As we feed the homeless, had workshops on health, being taught math and history, and volunteer at local organizations that promoted community involvement. Another program was the NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent as they taught financial literacy, job creation, entrepreneurship, banking, and cultural heritage. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. My last program that I was involved in was the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science for provide educational resources to Black students to invest in their futures and to spread the knowledge and resources in the Black community. The mission is to help people of color acquire higher education so that we can be an integral part in the American social order. With those skillsets, I could possibly run for political office and engage in the ideas of mobilization, empowerment, and advocating for justice, equity, and, progress that can turn every nation around.
    Better Food, Better World Scholarship
    I am passionate about natural foods in the environment because planet green matters. We need agriculture to provide for the health and substance for humans, plants, and animals. Also job creation in climate change, and speaking of climate change reducing environmental hazards. Too me it is about protecting our ecosystem, our economy, and human life. How i am learning about these things is groups of people who care about reducing carbon dioxide and its emissions. Wanting to eliminate vender machines, create community gardens, and engaging in providing clean, affordable, and running water to communtites who do not have access to these resources. Healthier foods leads to healthy diet which helps to reduce our chances of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. I believe that to truly inspire people to eat a balanced diet, we need to change the dialogue around healthy food from something that is not only good for us but also tasty – because it can be! But dialogue is just the start. Real change can only come from developing more convenient ways to personalize healthy meals at home, because our kitchens really are the best and most obvious place to start. With healthier foods, it also takes advanced medical, career, and development centers to improve the technology. A healthy diet helps to protect against malnutrition in all its forms, as well as a range of noncommunicable diseases and other conditions. However, increased production of processed foods, rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles have led to a shift in dietary patterns. People are now consuming more foods high in energy, fats, free sugars and salt/sodium, and many people do not eat enough fruit, vegetables and whole grains. Diet can depend on an individual’s food choices, but also the availability and affordability of healthy foods and sociocultural factors. Therefore, promoting a healthy food environment requires involvement across multiple sectors and stakeholders, including government, the public and the private sector. Governments have a central role in creating a healthy food environment that enables people to easily adopt and maintain healthy dietary practices. These effective actions by policy-makers must include coordinating trade, systems and agricultural policies with the protection and promotion of public health. Furthermore encourage the consumers’ demand for healthy foods and meals and promoting healthy nutrition across the life course. So I have donated money to WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health who have a private sector and civil society to take action at global, regional and local levels to support healthy diets and physical activity.
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    My experience with mental health has influenced me to become a public policy maker. Particularly in Black and Brown communtites, mental health is not discussed. Our environments are filled with environmental hazards, being affected by racism and other forms of discrimination, and the violence that affects the community. While people will openly seek treatment for a broken arm or heart disease, their decision to seek treatment for a mental health illness is often kept secret and many times, avoided entirely due to stigma. White early developing like starting school is a clear connection between mental health and academic performance. Helping students make the most of their education is everyone’s goal. Students struggling with depression or other mental illnesses have a harder time feeling motivated, learning, concentrating, taking tests, etc. But with timely and proper treatment, mental health challenges can be addressed and students can reach their academic potential. With mental health awareness it eliminates stigma for these people. Stigma shames the mentally ill and as a community to be closed minded and lead to implications of denial and self-hatred. Awareness can also create new improvements for the mentally ill. As there is more demand from the public, it can produce a flow of attention. This attention can eventually result in great changes for the mentally ill. It can lead to improvements on policy, research, and service development. There is also the attitude that these people are either crazy, possessed by demons, violent, out of control and unsafe. These are negative labels that have been attached due to the lack of awareness. Raising awareness can reduce misconceptions. Imagine your daughter with bipolar disorder being described by these words. How would this make you feel? Why continue to live in a community where there is judgment, if we could promote awareness on the issue. Mental health awareness should not only be for a day or two or even a month. We must be informed about it because it can easily happen to someone close to us. Community awareness for mental health reduces stigma. Mental health awareness increases the chances for early intervention, which can result in a fast recovery. Awareness reduces negative adjectives that have been set to describe our people with a metal illness. By raising awareness, mental health can now be seen as an illness. These illnesses can be managed by treatment. We should not isolate mental illness from the physical heath conditions, such as diabetes, blood pressure, or cancer because having awareness is the education. The more you know, the more power you have for knowledge is power. This power can cause a positive effect in our community and with awareness is key for understanding what mental health is and how families can receive the help they need. Public knowledge is important in accessing community resources because the lack of awareness of mental health is the problem of the community. So with my experience, I want to use my beliefs, relationships, and my degree to make polices that improve socio-economic and political factors that affected communtites that do not have access to efficient and affordable healthcare.
    Bold Turnaround Story Scholarship
    One of my difficult challenges was adapting to the life in Washington state. My family and I moved to Washington state over the summer going into my freshmen year of high school. I had to adapt to a new school, new area, new people, and new culture. Living in Louisiana I attended a private Christian school. I was taught by people that looked like me and was surrounded by people that looked like me. The transition to public school was difficult. My main challenges were not having a support group and I struggled to fit in. My grades suffered and I lost focus and sight in who I was. By my tenth-grade year, my mother found out about a program for high school students of African descent. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a program aimed at instilling the importance of higher education, financial literacy, and cultural heritage. One of our field trips was to the HBCU College Fair at Garfield High sponsored by UNCF. Attending this college fair introduced me to the UNCF Portfolio Project. By my Junior year I became a participant in the UNCF Portfolio Project. The UNCF Portfolio Project is a community effort. The commitment and dedication from the students, staff, administrators, and mentors is second to none. The time and effort that went into the program was apparent. Guest speakers shared encouraging stories and their experiences. Individuals came in to talk to us about different career paths, the importance of networking, how to write college essays, how to find and apply to scholarships, and how to apply for financial aid. With their mission of helping low income minority families, I want to become a mentor to help underprivileged youth and black boys become a resource to their communtites.
    Grandmaster Nam K Hyong Scholarship
    What I have overcome is the statistic of black man not getting his high school diploma. Many students of color do not graduate from high school because of the lack or resources, guidance, and our political leaders and systems that lead our kids to danger. I have excelled in determination for i found my purpose in life. I am very good at public speaking, but the thing I am definitely good at is service. Service is leadership and as a leader you have hear the people, know the people, and have the people's back and interests. My field of study is African American Studies and what i hope to accomplish once I graduate, I plan to use it as activism or teach students of color about the studies of the African Diaspora. African American Studies is about knowing the philosophy, the belief systems, and the experiences of African Americans living in America and how their factors and conditions have influence them to stand up and fight for justice, humanity, and progress. The changes that I am willing to accomplish are graduating from an HBCU and dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science because i want to run for political office. Before getting there I must go to law school, join internships, and be a part of community programs that engage in public policy. For myself, these studies will continue to grow my conscious and my character. What I am willing to do is attending an attending an HBCU, for the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equality. Education matters to me because i was apart of programs who advocate for higher education. Education is an effective way to improve society at all levels. It prepares and qualifies the next generation to work in the economy, integrate people and teach morals. Also educating all members leads to better decision making and solving problems rather than compromises. Under the model of community education, students in local schools to teach about the importance and process of voting. Faculty members in education provides tutoring services for at-risk K-3 readers, assesses the results of her methods, and writes an academic article on the project. Course are often free or low cost because non academic communities cannot afford them. I want the people to determine their own futures and create their own worldview. Education is a complex and diverse process, quality education for all children requires multi-sectorial strategies that are integral to overall development and success. Many partners must join in with education institutions, teachers, and faculty in developing practices and policies that make access to quality education the responsibility of the entire society. This implies the active involvement of a wide range of partners – families, teachers, communities, private enterprises, and government and non-governmental organizations in planning, managing and evaluating the success. Good schools cannot be regarded as a branch of bureaucracy. Instead, they are subsystems, highly interactive with all other parts of the social whole. The point is to give students, parents and teachers responsibility over their learning and provide a framework for shared accountability for success. It must engage people widely and actively as both beneficiaries and contributors. Education development must be seen as the business of families and communities. Engaging communities in education needs to be recognized as a basic principle of action within an overall development strategy. For community education will create equitable access, a breathing community, and central value to our morals.
    Bold Growth Mindset Scholarship
    I keep a growth mindset by reading. Reading is not only fundamental and comprehensive, but it can help me overcome obstacles you may face when learning something new or developing a new skill. When reading you understand the importance of persistence and determination. By changing the way you think, you can change the way you learn. Plus, reading is power and as a Black man higher education can open a small door to create worldwide change. Reading has improved my writing skills, my vocabulary, increase my attention span. my memory, and helps reduce stress. improves your creativity and imagination. Reading has allow me to get in public discussions, class debates, and activities that involved public speaking. When I read, my story of life comes out. My experiences and teachings lead to growth and you continue to learn for knowledge is power to determined for one's destiny. So my destiny is to spread the knowledge to the people who need it most to determined their own futures because that is all everybody grows.
    Bold Patience Matters Scholarship
    Patience helps me analyze things and situations. As a leader, patience requires self discipline and emphatic behavior to lead the people. But most importantly, patience helps me tackle the challenge. During school, family, social activities patience helped me focus on what was important. I begin to think with logic and make rational decisions, always thinking long term, and I was kind to people. Patience puts a smile on people's faces because it helps build our reputations for persistence and improves our relationships with all those around us. Patience has put me in self control with time management for the success is self-possession. I give myself to choose how to respond to a given event, rather than get emotionally hijacked by our emotions. Plus patience is service to give people time, attention, and effort which helps me compromise, reduce stress, and become a better listener. This is patience is important to me because it improves your character, soft skills, and personality.
    Bold Investing Scholarship
    The best investing tip I have taken to heart is starting now. Starting now means you don't have to wait for that one big idea or opportunity to come along. You start with what you have, and create that big opportunity by taking action on lots of little ones. If you want to change the world, don't wait for the world to come to you, start with the bit of world that you inhabit. With me, I always had this conviction on being a leader. I was born to lead and with education being the most powerful weapon that can change the world, I wanted to be a force for social change. With investing in higher education , I plan to help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education because representation helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in school.
    Bold Longevity Scholarship
    The best way to live a long healthy life is to exercise, maintain a nutritious diet, and sleep. I also believe that you should not smoke, get a lot of Vitamin D, and always challenge your mind to do something. This is a life fitness for living a healthy lifestyle can help prevent chronic diseases and long-term illnesses. Feeling good about yourself and taking care of your health are important for your self-esteem and self-image. Maintain a healthy lifestyle by doing what is right for your body. Healthy lifestyle is one which helps to keep and improve people's health and well-being and overcome lots of stress. People around the world, but in America, people are stressed out. We stress out because we feel that responsibilities are overwhelming, facing times of uncertainty, or not having control over the outcome in situation, so humans become depressed and this affects their body image. So to change that, we must first make up over minds, second get the help, and third be consistent and committed to improving your life.
    First-Generation Educators Scholarship
    My community program leaders had a positive impact on me growing up. They were mentors, fathers, and productive citizens in the community and they saw children needing outreach, guidance, and direction. A lot of them were teachers so they saw the importance of higher education and what education can do for a community who is non-academic. They taught me leadership, community responsibility, service, faith, and self-identity. As a first generation student, I plan to attend an HBCU. Living and seeing black and brown factors and conditions I want to improve that. I want to expand my leadership skills that promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, I need to grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and making contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an un-level economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. However, with a COVID shutdown, people have now seen the inequities that people of color have to endure and people want to be apart of that change. An HBCU mission is to dedicates themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools. Representation means that teachers, principals, and other leaders reflect the demographics of the student body in the schools they serve. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. It is important to my survival as a young black man. After graduating from high school, I will earn a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skill sets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity.
    Bold Memories Scholarship
    When I think about my childhood, I think about my life. What messages I was taught at home, school, and by other outside influences. There was this constant inner voice about who I should be. However, struggled with always viewing things in life as Black or White, there were never any gray areas. Meaning I made decisions out of logic and reasoning, instead of feelings and emotions. However, I have learnt, I am still learning that people are made up of more than logic, but rather emotions and feelings. I realized that when I said things my comments had an effect on the feelings of others; but as human beings, we tend to respond out of our emotions. I came to understand the impact of my words when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. Then I ran for SGA class president. Though I lost, my campaigned promoted character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized that these issues were important to me, and that being a leader was my calling. Therefore my mother put me in a leadership program that serve African American in inner city communities. Being in this program has now help my leadership skills and to use these skills I will go to college and earn a degree in History and Public Policy to improve poor, over policed, and undeserved communities.
    Pro-Life Advocates Scholarship
    Being born to a single mother, out of wedlock. Particularly in Black and brown communities, single families families struggle with proving adequate resources and lack of access to opportunities for these children. The children are born out of poverty, live in communities where their are environment hazards, food supply is unhealthy, and having no jobs, no community organizations, skills, and being the victim of policing or prison makes you a target from the beginning. From the stems of slavery and Jim Crow, many of the people were slaves. Slaves had no access to power, money, or influence , just only for chattel property. The actions and activities that I have promoted No Tax Payer Abortion, Respect Life Month, Walking with Moms in NEED, and Joining Respect Life Prayer and Action. These activities promote community healing, service, and empathy. it is like therapy but for free, for the community looks out for their community members.Whether you are a preborn baby, a newborn, an elderly person, or someone with disabilities and special needs, your life matters. At its core, the pro-life movement is about the value and equality of all human beings. All human life is created equal regardless of size, level of development, education, and degree of dependency. Therefore, taking the life of a preborn baby is a violation of the fundamental right to life. For example with women dealing with abortion, Catholic churches began on a mission educated the public about the sanctity of life and the reality of abortion, provided care for pregnant women and their children, served those shattered by abortion, worked to adopt public policies that support and nurture life, and pounded the heavens with prayer. It's about the redemption of those involved in abortion, and about unselfish service to women, children and families. It aims to transform our society into one where people are radically, even heroically, generous to every human life, no matter the personal cost. With pro life populations, we can restore public policy, ensure tax funds to education, and improving family planning. In order to accomplish this, we must require inter alia that abortion facilities be properly equipped to handle complications, registered nurses assist in clinics, and airflow and temperature conditions meet specified standards. These were a legitimate response to real concerns over women's safety, even though improvements may be costly enough for some clinics to see reduced profits and thus reduce their incentive to stay in business. As I close it will take a national initiative of the United States and abroad to help parishes better support and accompany pregnant and parenting women. Joining in this initiative, parishes across the world are embarking on a Year of Service to assess, expand and communicate resources to moms in need in our communities because pro life matters.
    Bold Independence Scholarship
    Great question, being independent to me means to not depend on someone's else livelihood or subsistence. Many times in politics and History, we have seen nations fall apart because they are not independent. You cannot lead an empire and you have no economy, military, alliances, or any sustainable resources for your community. The impact of being independent has on me is to achieve the financial, emotional, social, factors that comes into your life. This independence helps me see my self worth and helped change my perspective on life. Being independent has freedom, rights, privileges all given to you, but the impact it ha son me is nothing because a current political system does not value Black life so my accomplishment is nothing because to improve my self worth means I must make major contributions to changing the world. I believe being independent is about making a difference in your perspective, your behavior, your ideology, all the things that society brings consequences to.
    Bold Influence Scholarship
    I would stand for social justice for everybody deserves equal economic, political, and social rights and opportunities. In today's climate that America is in today is now equity. The fight for the equality of outcome that has been progressed by our youth. The youth who are upset and wants to end our current political systems and as a youth I stand with them. Particularly since I am a Black male in America, Black people need access, rights, and the ability to participate and compete for public policy that benefits their community. Most importantly, for my stance on social justice I believe in the access of equal resources. I need people to not only have access to programs and services but also the unhindered ability to engage in the political process. Every nation must have power to conduct their own governing body for aspects of leadership, alliances, influence, economics, and mostly important service. Social Justice would provide natural resources to sustain, natural resources to help our environment, our economies, and fixing racial wealth gap for that is true progress.
    Bold Community Activist Scholarship
    How I act locally to affect positive change in my community is participating in food banks. At the food banks I am giving free foods to families, homeless people, and organizations that support the mission of giving back. Another impact is school, being apart of school activities to improve our schools. Last year I was apart of the Black Student Union for we pushed for education and police reform. We did this having meetings that created dialogue and questions, getting teachers involved, community organizations joined, and local protests that would not stop us from fighting for change. Lastly, another community organizations that dived into Public Policy and improving our city budget. Having discussions with the mayor, planning social events, and holding the mayor to be accountable for not serving all of its citizens. How I made positive impacts was through church, community programs, and most importantly my family for they saw a leader in me, so they groom, shape, and molded me to be a productive leader in my community.
    Bold Love Yourself Scholarship
    I love that I am a leader. I try to be the person who can see how things can be improved and who rallies people to move toward that better vision. But i want to be a great leader because a great leader posses a clear vision, very courageous, has integrity, humility, and is focus. I want to help people reach their goals, not afraid to hire people that might be better than them and help these people take pride in the accomplishments and be apart of mentorship. I was born a leader, ready to serve others, listen to other people's ideas, and engaging in effective dialogue that will create change. As a leader, I am all about action, I be tired of talking and I just want to do it. Now since I am at college, I now a chance to be a part of presidential school elections, internships, community empowerment, and mentorship because leadership is about passing the torch for others to follow.
    Mark A. Jefferson Teaching Scholarship
    I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs (the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. The program was a six-year commitment, I started the program in third grade and graduated during the summer after finishing my eighth-grade year. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. All the above stated programs have contributed to the type of person that I hope to be. Which is a mentor, community leader, and advocate to those who are unrepresented & underprivileged. Academic education was the tool needed to assist me in determining what I want to be. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skill-sets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equality.
    Jillian Ellis Pathway Scholarship
    I ran for Student Government Association class President during my 6th grade year of Middle School. This idea of being a leader among my peers began when I made a derogatory comment about another race. This comment got me in trouble at school and at home. That derogatory comment put me in a state of isolation. I was not physically isolated from my peers, but knew they viewed me differently. I was labeled the “Radical,” but not in a positive way. So, I embraced my Radical title and decided to use my voice as a weapon for positive change. I lost the race of becoming Student Government Association class President but ran a campaign that promoted and pushed character building, responsibility, and anti-bullying. I realized during that campaign how important these issues were and still are to me. My teachers were encouraging. They begin to recognize something in me that I did not even recognize in myself. They called me a leader. So, I began my journey of leadership learning. I watched debates, president addresses to the nation, local and global news to learn more about what was happening in the world around me. With this burning desire to show the world that I am leader who wants the best for you, I then became resilient of trying to create solutions for people's problems. With my resiliency, I plan to lead and uplift underrepresented communities by I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in African Studies and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skill -sets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. Attending law school would be a huge success for that I know the law and I will the law to protect and restore people civil and human rights. So since i am about making create I would ally with other law firms to fight the criminal legal system, create social programs about understanding the law, and he having a law firm that does not ignore the problems in the community and become an advocate for them. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, I will grow and learn from the community and they will help me make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people and meanwhile creating action that makes progress all over the world
    Bold Mentor Scholarship
    I hope through my mentorship through impacts humanity. Either changing the perception or adapt to other's perspective and find common action among the general public. my mentorship will be all about service to the community. I want people to make positive impacts on people livelihoods and help them without a hand out. Helping people gives me joy, so I want to give others the opportunities to give joy to other people. Examples of this joy are improving our homeless shelters, food banks, donation drives in the community, tutoring children, free medical clinics, food and health programs, teaching youth and adults about agriculture, trade, and banking. But most importantly helping low income families. Through my mentorship, I need willing workers to dedicate their life to improving our urban and rural communities. These neighborhoods are poverty stricken, over-policed, overcrowded, incarcerated, lack opportunities and resources, and the influx of poison in their community. So my mentorship will provide leadership, integrity, courage, and unselfishness because we all owe because everybody needs to pass the torch of service.
    Bold Caring for Seniors Scholarship
    Elderly people need financial security that would provide healthcare, adequate housing, and food. Financial Security reduces poverty and is able to pay for basic expense, so one thing I would do to provide financial security is partner with government resources like the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Supplemental Security Income, and the National Institutes of Health all to improve the conditions of elderly people. Most elderly people still work past 65, with no retirement plan, no pension, and most importantly no expenses that provides the best treatments, quality of food, or living standards. So with financial discussion, we need to become the banks to our elderly so that the elderly can live with resources. The elderly is a part of the community and with resources available in the community to meet the needs of youth, families and the elderly. This will provide a framework for developing and identifying services , solutions and building communities that support and nurture our children, families, but most importantly our elderly.
    SkipSchool Scholarship
    My favorite scientist is Emmett Chappelle because he was a Black chemist who studied natural systems to improve environmental management.
    Bold Climate Changemakers Scholarship
    A positive impact I will have on climate is to engage in Hybrid and electric vehicle production and the electric public transit sector are expected to grow. Another goal is to provide Construction of green infrastructure and more resilient coastal infrastructure could create many new jobs. Boost more money toward science and technology to see how we can intervene more effectively and quickly when their are higher and warmer sea levels. The impacts are to improve the economy and the environment as to rebuild our infrastructure, improve human health , and fix our forestry , fisheries, and agriculture. To improve our agriculture, is to use nano-technology for enhancement of food quality and safety. Nano Technology will reduce the wastage in use of chemicals, minimize nutrient losses in fertilization and will be used to increase yield through pest and nutrient management. Also improve our forestry to restore damaged ecosystems by planting trees on land where forests have been cut down. Establish parks to protect rain forests and wildlife and support companies that operate in ways that minimize damage to the environment. To improve fisheries is to sustain, protect, and increase domestic food seafood supply. Also to maintain and enhance recreational and subsistence fishing opportunities. Sustain, protect, and increase domestic seafood supply. Plus create jobs, support related economic and social benefits, and sustain community resilience. Lastly our infrastructure, support Joe Biden's proposal to 20,000 miles of roads and 10,000 bridges, while also addressing climate change and racial inequities and raising corporate taxes. Also partnership with India's The Eleventh Plan to promote public sector investment in infrastructure in combination with private sector investment. The main purpose is to enhance public health and safety, provide jobs, foster regional economic development, and protect the environment.
    CareerVillage.org Scholarship
    Winner
    I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs (the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentorship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. After graduating from high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skillsets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. Over the past few months, we have seen civil unrest, an unlevel economy, and lack of leadership that stops us from solving these issues in America. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." (Black Panther). An inspiring quote that should remind all of us the importance of working together and the beauty of equality.
    Bold Impact Matters Scholarship
    Leadership is how I make a positive impact on the world. Programs that I have been apart of have all valued higher education. To me these programs were about giving back to my community, being a force for social change, and being educated means understanding that all education should be valued. So, as to be force of change, I plan to attend an HBCU. I choose an HBCU because the mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. Their goal is to eliminate racial wealth gap, give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education, and values representation. Representation in higher education is just as valuable. Being taught by and being surrounded by people who look like me is important. Programs that represented positive impact in the world included Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project which promoted education,, the well-being, and act of service to the community. So with these programs , I will dual degree in African American Studies and Political Science and use these degrees to provide educational resources Black students, promote economic and political power. and create action towards systematic racism and police brutality.
    Bold Dream Big Scholarship
    My dream life is leadership. Not only was I born with the ability of being a leader, I was apart of leadership programs. These programs were for people of color and they advocated education. A quote that I live by is that Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. With my leadership I plan to be a force for social change, giving back to my community, and valuing all people. Ever since then I have been on a path of leadership to ensure people of color have a chance to achieve higher education to change claws and better peoples' livelihood. After graduating high school, I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in African American Studies and minor in Political Science. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skill-sets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. My life is dedicated to serving other, and as a leader, you serve others before yourself.
    Bold Financial Literacy Scholarship
    One personal financial lesson I find important is the saving of emergency funds. During 2020, their was a lot of economic damage that impacted many Americans. So what I did was build an emergency fund of at least one month of spending. First off an emergency fund is a savings account and how to use this in devastating times where their is an unexpected financial blow. This is where a savings account can help prevent you from going into debt. It also provides peace of mind if you lose your job, become too ill to work, or have to cover a major car or home repair. Having an emergency fund is very important because it protects the financial well-being from being impacted by financial consequences. For example, medical bills, you're young, you’re healthy—what can go wrong? A lot, actually. From unexpected illnesses or cavities, to major accidents, one of the many reasons for an emergency fund is so you don’t find yourself with big medical expenses and no way to pay for them. So my point is that we must have an emergency fund to provide for unexpected events and having money over when you are done working.
    Greg Orwig Cultural Immersion Scholarship
    In middle school, I run for SGA class president and I have been apart of programs that were about networking with outside people to make a difference in the world. Plus my teachers had encouraged me to speak in front of people and have kept me informed or educated me about issues in the world. So after I graduate from high school, I plan to attend university earning a degree in Communications with a concentration in Public Relations or a B.A. in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs. Either one of these degrees will allow me to develop the skill-sets of not only a writer or publicists, but also expand my leadership ability and promote the idea that there is value in all nations as long as we decide to learn and grow from each other. However, over the last few years there has been a negative blanket covering the very fabric that makes America great. That blanket is that somehow immigrants are damaging our way of life as U.S. citizens. Everything that America is and will ever be, comes from a collection of other nations, ideas, and the people that brought and bring those ideas with them. I want to be a part of that idea. As a student and as an American citizen it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the negative blanket. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers. So my passion for cultural immersion is to create opportunities for transformational learning through direct interactions with culturally diverse populations. A country I would love to visit is Africa to study abroad in because the African Diaspora impacts and empowers students to better understand the developing world, make an impact, and transform their perspective and make them globally competitive; which is beyond what academia alone can do. I believe that studying Africa would connect me back to my roots, my culture, their traditional, and how their society is ran! Having a study abroad experience creates a global minded leader, it boosts your communication skills, improves your critical thinking skills, and you have a whole different perspective on life. Looking outward makes you realize that there is a world outside the USA which has a lot to offer in the ways of opportunities and culture. Plus I will have the ability to communicate across multiple language barriers. for I would have improve my communication skills.
    Ruth and Johnnie McCoy Memorial Scholarship
    I have participated in several leadership and community minded programs (the Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc., the NAACP Youth Development Program, and the UNCF Portfolio Project). These programs taught me leadership skills, the importance of education, and the importance of service to your community. The Young Leaders Academy of Baton Rouge Inc. is a program for young African American males to help shape and mold them to become productive citizens, local leaders, and always serve their community. My biggest takeaway from the Young Leaders Academy was community service, being my brother’s keeper, and commitment. Being my brother’s keeper means to be responsible for my brother and hold one another accountable for our actions. The program was a six-year commitment, I started the program in third grade and graduated during the summer after finishing my eighth-grade year. Cultural identity is significant to people of color, because our culture was stolen due to colonization and assimilation. The NAACP Youth Development Program was a partnership between NAACP Snohomish County Branch and Everett Community College's Diversity and Equity Center. It was designed to meet the specific needs of students of African Descent. I will always be grateful for the understanding of cultural worth and value. Lastly, the UNCF Portfolio Project not only taught me the value of higher education but taught the value of representation in education. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. Which is why I have applied to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This program took me through the college application process, taught me how to search and apply to scholarships, and opened my mind to possibilities of different career paths by giving me the opportunity to network with people of color in different career fields. Nevertheless, I am most grateful for the mentor-ship aspect of the program. Each participant in the program was assigned a mentor and even though, I have completed this program I am still able to reach out to my mentor for guidance. These mentors took time out of there day every Saturday for eleven weeks to help guide us through the entire process. Mentors reviewed college essay statements, wrote letters of recommendation, and were just there to talk to. This is another example of how service to the community is vital to ensure the success of young people. I plan to attend an HBCU, earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for political office, but also develop my skill-sets and attributes in the community to expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of political and economic power, cultural empowerment, and awareness towards injustice, inequality, and inequity. As a leader, I will promote the value of all education and continue to learn from others. I will make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives of all people, and to make contributions all over the world. I will use education to change systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. We must remember that "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers", for the importance of this quote that I live by is that everybody worked together to ensure the beauty of equality!
    Darryl Davis "Follow Your Heart" Scholarship
    My name is Julien Odom and I am a undergraduate at Claflin University. My goals is to major in African American Studies and minor in Political Science. Another goal is to graduate from college. My last goal is networking with people for being apart of internships, community service, town hall meetings, and school activities. What I hope to achieve in this life is attending Law school so that I can help change the systematic laws that keep our communities in bondage. Being a student, a citizen, and a man in America, it is my responsibility to continue the work of removing the barriers and obstacles in America and I will do this by earning a dual degree in History with a concentration in International Studies/Affairs and Public Policy and Administration. Having these degrees will help me run for not only political office, but also develop my skill-sets and attributes in the community. To expand my leadership skills and promote the idea of community development and social awareness on key issues that affect every community. As a leader, you grow and learn from each other to make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will help improve the lives of the people, and to make contributions all over the world. How I plan to give back to the community is being apart of the solution by creating a new legislation, new system, new leadership, and new ideas that can bring people together. As a leader, I want to be a part of America’s solution, not the problem and "In times of crisis, the wise build bridges while the foolish build barriers." So I how I plan to give back is through education so that the community can be a force for social change, the importance of representation and how all education should be valued. So ever since I have been on a path to higher education to change laws and better peoples' livelihood. Lastly, what excites me about the world is learning. Learning provides you other people perspectives, culture, customs, beliefs, critical thinking and those factors play into our socioeconomic, political, and cultural structure. To learn means to change the mindset of one's perception of things and creates a mindset to promote knowledge, acceptance, and love .
    Bold Financial Freedom Scholarship
    The most helping piece of financial advice you ever received is that people overspend their income on house, car, or entertainment. I made a passing statement to a financial adviser friend of mine one particular evening over dinner. I had no data to back up the claim, it was purely an observation made on anecdotal evidence. I told him that most people I know who are living in debt seem to carry a monthly car payment. That’s when he offered the financial advice above in the form of his own personal interactions. There are outstanding circumstances for sure (medical emergencies, tragedy, job layoffs, etc.). But generally speaking, if you have a hard time living within your income, check your spending on your home, your car, or your entertainment (dining, tickets, trips). I have tried to keep all three modest ever since. With having a financial advisor, I plan to establish goals and commit to financial planning. I also plan to analyze and determine your net worth, become financially successful using a budget, and pay off my debt and build a credit history. Furthermore with budgeting, spend less on what you earn, create emergency fund, and a savings account, and get insured when their are catastrophes. I must budget because this helps create a spending plan and ensures me there is always enough money to pay for food, bills, and other expenses. Lastly, having a budget is a good tool to avoid credit card debt and promotes saving and having the chance to plan emergencies. Basically, save your money, create a budget plan, and invest in things that have profit.
    Studyist Education Equity Scholarship
    Nelson Mandela once said this "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world". Education increases job opportunities, teaches the ability to think critically, promote economic growth, and helps to secure a higher income. Fighting education inequity develops leadership skills and being a service to your community. As I for example have been apart of educational programs that serviced young people of African descent to become productive citizens, local leaders, and game changers. Also with the power of education is representation. It is imperative for me to learn from individuals who look like me as well as being surrounded by those who look like me. This will help you make ethical, logical, and practical decisions that will improve the lives that we impact. Plus getting educated and pushing education to everyone could change systematic laws and public policies that affect marginalized communities. With this, I believe we need mentors to guide us on how to fight this fight. In education, we need to learn about the college application process, being taught how to search and apply to scholarships, and open possibilities of different career paths by giving people the opportunity to network. So my plan for fighting education inequity is to attend an HBCU and get a degree in African American Studies and minor in Political Science to promote political and economic power, cultural empowerment , and awareness towards injustice. "Because Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world".
    Bold Wise Words Scholarship
    The wisest thing I have ever heard was a quote that was said from Nelson Mandela. Mandela stated "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world". As a Black man, using your brain can get you farther than a gun. Education requires the discipline of the mind, the persistence ,ambition, and dedication of the brain. Education also brings out a voice for the ability to critical speak, also know the ins and outs, but most importantly it a gift to use for change. with this quote I have dedicated my life to be apart change, starting in our education system. This work has lead to creating more ethnic curriculum, mandatory implicit bias and race training, hire more faculty of color, and collaborating with Black Student Union to provide school resources to Black Students. So with my conviction I have decide to attend an HBCU for an HBCU will dedicate themselves to value black people’s history and to promote the importance of education. The mission of an HBCU is to invest in the people and give resources to the students so that we can help our communities. HBCU’s not only value education, but help people to reduce student debt, eliminate the racial wealth gap, and give black students the opportunity to obtain higher education. Plus having representation in education is important because it helps strengthen communities and improve student outcomes in elementary, middle, and high schools and the demographics of the student body is served all because having education is the powerful weapon which you can use to change the world!