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jessica gibson

4785

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

4x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I'm here to shatter barriers and clear the path for others to stride alongside me towards our shared aspirations. Together, we can forge a future where our collective dreams take flight! Hello there, My name is Jessica Gibson. I am a foreman at a machine shop located in SE Michigan. I can run every machine in our building. I am also an adjunct professor at a local community college. I have been in the manufacturing industry for almost 14 years now, I have been teaching for just over 8. I am incredibly passionate about my career. After excelling in the field of manufacturing I was fortunate enough to be given a life changing opportunity. I was offered a position at a local community college to teach the trade of manufacturing. This has led me to change my career goals, I now want to become a full-time professor! My passion has spread to teach other people about the manufacturing world. I strive to make my classroom a welcoming and inclusive space where everyone is accepted. I make sure to let LGBTQ+ ,and underrepresented peoples, that they can achieve their goals.

Education

Ferris State University

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Minors:
    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other

Macomb Community College

Associate's degree program
2009 - 2013
  • Majors:
    • Industrial Engineering
    • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Minors:
    • Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas
    • Education, Other
    • Engineering Science
    • Industrial Engineering
    • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      College Professor

    • Dream career goals:

    • Adjunct Professor

      Macomb Community College
      2016 – Present8 years
    • Foreman

      Vancho Tool
      2010 – Present14 years

    Sports

    Dancing

    Intramural
    1994 – 19995 years

    Tennis

    Intramural
    2004 – 20051 year

    Research

    • Aerospace, Aeronautical, and Astronautical/Space Engineering

      Science Olympiad — Team Lead
      2007 – 2008

    Arts

    • Macomb Community College

      Painting
      2009 – 2011
    • Suzettes

      Dance
      1994 – 1999
    • High School

      Acting
      2004 – 2008

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      4-H — President, and Club member
      1999 – 2009

    Future Interests

    Philanthropy

    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    Losing a loved one is something that is indescribable. The void of their lifeforce in your heart will ache for the remainder of your life and it will have changed the way you look at life from that moment on. I lost my father when I was 19 years old, on my birthday actually. The way it shook my world was so deep and profound that it has taken years to recover. I was in my first semester of college when this happened and I ended up failing all but one class. I made the decision to slow down my schooling until I was more sound of mind. What I did not do was quit. I never gave up my goal of being the first in my family to go to, and graduate, college. I used the pain from losing him to fuel my passions. I was able to rise above and realize that I was strong enough to finish and that I was driven enough to end up thriving. I ended up graduating with an associates degree in Applied Sciences and used that to open up a plethora of doorways. One of the biggest doorways was becoming an adjunct professor at the same school I graduated from. My Dad would be so elated to see me teaching manufacturing and teaching people the same trade he loved. I am at the point now where my passion has transitioned over to teaching. I want nothing more than to become a full-time professor and continue to share the knowledge I have gained and pass on a fruitful trade to others. The focus I now have is to graduate with honors and to become the person I needed when I first went to college. My achievements have made a difference, my nieces and nephews now want to go to college after seeing that I was able to return to school after such a tragic loss. They see me thriving as an adult learner and that you can’t make excuses for not pursuing what you love. I am humbled to see them thriving in their own endeavors and reaching their milestones. The profound loss of my father still resonates deeply, and its impact continues to unfold in my life. Yet, with the passage of time, I've come to realize that his legacy has also created a pathway for others to follow. As I reflect on the lessons I've learned and the experiences I've had, I'm grateful for the opportunity to pay it forward and help pave the way for those who come after me.
    John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
    Several years ago I was fortunate enough to be presented with an opportunity to teach at my local college part-time. Since then, I have developed a passion for sharing knowledge, especially in the field of manufacturing. I deeply love this field and getting younger people interested in it, so much so that I decided to go back to college to gain my bachelor's degree in engineering, and possibly a master's degree in post-secondary education. Being a female in a highly male-dominated field has given me the chance to show that no matter who you are you can become what you want and thrive. I have met so many students who have made me a better human, and I can only imagine that it will continue expanding my views of the world. I wish to give that back to my students, ten-fold. I want them to see that this field is inclusive and welcoming and for them to see that they can make changes in the world. My goal is to create a more welcoming environment and to help change the stigma of manufacturing only being for white males, one student at a time if necessary. My vision is to see a highly cultured workplace and expand people's views of what is possible. I also aspire to be the person I needed when I first went to college. I am a first-generation student and having someone there to help guide me would have been such a game changer for myself, so I hope that one day I can be that person for someone.
    Dr. William and Jo Sherwood Family Scholarship
    I have been fortunate enough to have the option of attending college to complete a four-year degree. Being that I have that option and ability, I feel as if it would have been a waste not to take that route. I have been working in the field of manufacturing my whole adult life, and I have completely immersed myself in this trade. I am a foreman in a shop and an adjunct professor at a local college, where I teach various types of manufacturing classes. My goal right now is to finish my bachelor's degree in Industrial Technology Management to up my chances of becoming a full-time professor. My love of sharing information related to manufacturing has led me here. I want nothing more than to be the best professor I can be. I want my students to feel welcomed and safe in my classrooms by offering an inclusive and open classroom. Everyone is capable of learning this trade. When I first began college for my associate's degree I was lucky enough to qualify for some aid and did not end up with any substantial student debt, that is not the case this time around. I am attending school full-time currently, meaning I am taking 12 credits per semester. I have had to take out some large student loans this time, but I have not hesitated because I know this will help my future in a massive way. While I understand that I can continue to take out loans until I am done with school, it’s not ideal. This scholarship would significantly reduce the amount of loans that I will need to take out in the coming semesters. This would cover more than a class and it’s booked, which is huge. It would enable me to take classes full-time without any worries about the future payments I would need to make. It would help ease my mind and allow me to focus on the here and now, to work harder on my class work. All of this helps me put all of my energy into succeeding and putting my best foot forward. While I have full intentions of maintaining my full-time student status regardless of what happens with this scholarship, the amount of worry I have could significantly be reduced if I were to get the help I need. I can’t wait to walk across the stage and receive my degree, and with the help of this scholarship, I could obtain it in a far less stressed-out fashion. With any luck, I will be an amazing college professor who can share the love of my trade for generations to come!
    Tim Watabe Memorial Scholarship
    My Father passed away on my 19th birthday. His name was Thomas. He was only 56 years old when he left us. I graduated high school only 5 months before, but on that day we all found out he had cancer. The way that we found out was my brother going to visit him and a nurse was helping him learn how to use a feeding tube. To say it was a shock does not even begin to scratch the surface. He had told us that he was going up north for a week or so at a time for about 3 months before that. What he was doing was getting treatment and surgeries to try and stop cancer from spreading. I am trying to keep this story relatively short, so excuse me for jumping around a little. I will back up. I have an exceptionally vivid memory of being 4 years old, crying, telling my Dad I didn't want him to die. I was 4. I knew then that he would not live long enough to see me get married or any big success that may come my way. He was a heavy drinker. He drank at least a 12-pack per night. He was not violent in any way, but it was so distressing seeing my father fall down drunk. My Mom divorced my Dad because of his drinking after 24 years of marriage This happened when I was 16. It was a very isolating time. I was going between their houses and trying to take care of my Father because he was not doing it himself. He would not eat until after drinking a significant amount, because the buzz was better on an empty stomach. I had to force him to eat daily. Back in 2008, after finding out he was ill. I know it will sound harsh, but we were making light of the situation and joking about him getting better. I jokingly said to him one day, "You better make it to my birthday!" To which he promised he would. Well... He did not let me down there I suppose. He had to have one last little kick before he passed I guess. His death was due to a lifetime of drinking, those are the words his doctor said. I was in my first year of college when this all happened and I ended up failing a class, dropping two others, and barely passing the last. I almost took off the next semester, but my friends talked me into sticking with it, and I'm so glad I did. It was tough to get away from all the turmoil I had just gone through, but I knew this would be a defining moment for me. I had two options: 1. Drop out and work and struggle like he and my Mother did for so long. 2. Stick with school and try to better myself. I choose the latter. I was the first in my family to attend college. I was the first to graduate college. I am the first to have an actual career vs. a job. I am now at a point where I can further my education and become a college professor, and that is exactly what I will do. I am a firm believer that we can decide our fates. We can alter how our lives will flow. Making the active choice to move forward is the only option that I see.
    Eden Alaine Memorial Scholarship
    My father didn’t tell us he had cancer. We walked in on his home nurse showing him how to use his new feeding tube and figured it out for ourselves. He had told us a few weeks earlier that he was heading up north for vacation. What he was really doing was undergoing surgery and other cancer treatments. He died five months later. He left us at 11:58 p.m. on my 19th birthday. I always knew my father would not live long enough to witness the big moments in my life. One of my earliest and exceptionally vivid memories is my four-year-old self crying and telling my Dad that I didn’t want him to die. He drank at least a 12-pack of beer every night. Even at such a young age, I knew what would eventually happen if he didn’t change his lifestyle. After 24 years of marriage, my mom decided to file for divorce. His drinking didn’t make him violent in any way, but he let it slowly destroy his health and his marriage. At 16 years old, I lived an extremely isolating existence of bouncing between the homes of both of my parents while also attempting to act as my father’s caretaker. There were times when he wouldn’t even eat because the buzz was better on an empty stomach. I hadn’t even graduated high school yet and I had to deal with forcing a grown man to eat so that he could stay alive. When all this happened, I was in my first year of college. I dropped out of half my classes, failed one, and barely passed another. I almost dropped out of school altogether until my friends convinced me to stick with it. I’m so glad I did. It was extremely hard to get past this traumatic event in my life. At that moment, I knew it would be a defining moment in my life. As far as I saw it, I had two options: 1. Drop out and struggle 2. Fight for my education and thrive I chose to fight. I was the first person in my family to attend college. I was the first person in my family to graduate. I am now at a point in my life where I can make the choice again to fight and further my education. I will do this and continue to fight to reach my goal of becoming a full-time college professor. I have learned how to face hard situations and emerge from them as an even stronger person. As a college professor, I intend to make a classroom that is inclusive and welcoming. I want my classroom to be a safe space for students to feel like they belong while thriving. I want students to feel as if they can speak to me if they are struggling with anything, be it homelessness, an addiction, mental illness, etc… The loss of my father helped shape me in a way that is unprecedented. I became stronger, more determined, and relentless. I will push forward and continue to overcome any obstacle in my path.
    Above the Peak - Ama Dablam Kesel Family Scholarship
    As long as I can remember I have had to deal with various types of mental health issues. From a young age, due to a traumatic childhood, I have dealt with anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Suffering from mental illness, especially at a young age, can alter how you see the world. When I was eight I was diagnosed with anxiety disorder, at 12 when I was diagnosed with depression, and at 15 I was diagnosed with ADHD. To say that I had a few things working against me during school would be an understatement. Struggling through primary school and college, creating healthy relationships with people, and navigating the world are all different when you struggle with mental health. I struggled to maintain good grades all through primary school. I had tutors for as long as I can remember and always needed extra time on tests. My goal, then, was to graduate on time, no one in my immediate family had done it thus far and I was determined. I did it! But not without a lot of work and stress. During my first year of college, my father passed away on my birthday, this just added to the issues I was already dealing with, and I ended up failing all but one class. Luckily I have a good circle of people who helped me pull out of that dark place and ended up thriving in my field. I graduated with a 3.0, which was like reaching Mt. Everest. I struggled to stay in healthy relationships with, not only friends but significant others. It was a tumultuous time until I met my now husband. He helped me see my worth and that I deserved unconditional love. This helped me eliminate all the toxic relationships I had in my life up to this point. I am forever thankful for him helping me grow so much. After growing up in a home that restricted my ability to be who I truly am, suffering the loss of my father, and struggling through infertility and a miscarriage, it has been my mission to be the most authentic version of myself that I can be. I have been working to do the things that bring me joy and make me feel whole, which has led me to where I am now. I have now found my way wanting to further my education to become a full-time professor. It is a long way away from where I was when I was a teenager. I am working as a foreman at a machine shop and teaching as an adjunct professor, all while taking classes toward my bachelor's degree. I am working as hard as I can to graduate with honors as well. I will continue to work on keeping my mental health in check and advocating for others to seek help if they are in need. I aim to be the person I needed when I was younger and try to be that person for others. Once I become a full-time professor I will ensure that my classroom is an inclusive and welcoming one where students can be themselves and express their feelings without ridicule all while receiving an excellent education.
    Marilyn J. Palmer Memorial
    “A native or citizen of the United States.” What an overly simplistic way to explain what ‘American’ means. It’s not wrong, but it fails to define what it takes to actually be an American. This is one of those things that is constantly evolving for me, the way I define it is always changing. When I was a kid, it meant wearing red, white, and blue on the fourth of July. When I was a teenager it meant standing for the pledge and thanking those who fight to protect our freedoms. At this point in my life, it is so much more than any of that. It’s a term so deep with meaning it’s almost impossible to only have one interpretation. Being an American means standing up for your beliefs, standing up for your rights, and living a life worth living. While deciding how I wanted to answer this question, I prompted my friends via social media with this question, and not one answer was the same. Everyone viewed this differently. That right there is a part of what it means to be an American. We all have the freedom to express our opinions and feelings. Asking my friends' opinions helped me answer this questions for myself. The way I see things now is so different than when I was younger, I see things from an educated and understanding point of view, a view of inclusivity and unity. I see being American as being someone who advocates for the ones without a voice, someone who advocates for righteousness, advocates for equality, and advocates for love, which are great traits of a true American. The hope I have in America is that we are all treated equally and that we take care of the ones who can’t take care of themselves. Never leaving anyone behind. That we can rise above all of the hate and stand together to prove we can do amazing things when we put differences aside. Being an American is a blessing, but not without a burden. We carry the burden of our history and the burden of making the future better for all. If we wish to see this happen and make being an American something worth bragging about, we need to come together. Joining rallies to support the injustices, joining local community service groups to help those in need, joining together to rise above oppression, and speaking out against those who stand in the way of freedom for all.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    “It takes a village to raise a child.” This phrase is so incredibly accurate, especially for myself. On my 19th birthday, my father took his last breath. He allowed alcohol to dictate his life, and consequently, his death. This loss almost caused me to drop out of college, but I was fortunate enough to have a village backing me up and encouraging me to continue to pursue my education. This village was comprised of family, friends, my 4-H family, and most importantly, my husband. I met my husband just two years after my father passed away, while his own father was nearing the end of his life. The connection we made, while a sad one, was so incredibly powerful. I had someone supporting me who, not only understood the pain I was enduring but was able to show me the strength I did not know was feasible. My husband opened up a world to me that I had not known existed. The field of manufacturing. My husband asked me to come work with him for a short-term position at his shop, but I never left. We worked together for several years, during which I was still attending college. I began taking classes to learn more about machining, and I thrived. I graduated with my associate's and I became a full-time employee at the shop I started at, where I am now the foreman. I was fortunate enough to be asked by the community college I graduated from to become an adjunct professor. This is where I found my true calling. I have made the choice to go back to college to get my bachelor's degree. It has been several years since I was last in college and this time around I am paying out of my own pocket to attend. This is the 2nd time my husband has supported my educational journey. I have been working two jobs and am out of the house about 15 hours a day. On top of that, I am taking four courses through Ferris State. He did not even bat an eye when I told him I was doing this, he picked up my slack at home. He takes care of our pets, and the household chores, and he also makes sure that I am fully taken care of. I come home to hot, homemade, meals and an abundance of love and compassion. Before he entered my life I was not aware that this much love could be felt by an individual. I was a lost soul roaming the earth with little to no cause. He showed up when I was in my darkest days and there is little that has come close to making my heart feel so full. We have gone through some very trying times, several years of infertility struggles that came to a head when I experienced a miscarriage. We have recovered from this and decided to live our lives childless. We are happy and content with this finality, we intend to live a life that is full. His love has pushed me forward, not only in daily life but through my educational journey. It has been a long road to get here, but I know that I would not be at this point had he not grabbed my hand and pulled me from the darkness. He continues to support me. He is my biggest cheerleader. I am forever grateful to him and his ability to bring out the best in me. It is with his love and support that I know I will succeed and thrive.
    @GrowingWithGabby National Scholarship Month TikTok Scholarship
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    Self-discovery can be a mountain to climb if you aren’t given the proper tools or opportunities to climb it. I have been on an uphill mission for the past several years to rediscover who I am, but in these last 12 months, I have made leaps and bounds toward that goal. The biggest way I have grown over the past year is by accepting the things I can not change, and changing the things I can. I grew up in a very conservative home where self-expression was not always tolerated. That being said, I am a very colorful and unique person. I have been working towards being the person I needed when I was a child. I have moved away from some very negative feelings and I have made it my goal to make sure that the generational trauma ends with me. This past year I did something that I had been dreaming of doing for years, about 15 years to be more accurate. I shaved the sides of my head. I know this doesn’t seem like a big deal, but I was told for most of my life that my beauty relied on my hair being long and natural. I cried while I was getting it cut, I was fortunate enough to have a compassionate hairdresser to help reassure me that I, in fact, was not any less beautiful. This likely seems really silly to most. The thing I wish you could understand is what a pivotal moment that was for me. I did something to make me who I envisioned when I was 15 years old. I did something I was told would make my spouse no longer be attracted to me, which was false. He supports me on my journey. I now surround myself with people who strive to be the best versions of themselves, which encourages me to do the same. The only physical aspect that changes is your hair, but what happens in your head and heart is where the biggest changes occur. The way you see yourself is not a physical aspect, but it’s so vital. Some things that did not change for me are that I am still loved unconditionally, I am supported by those who truly care about me, I am strong, I am hard working, and I am more me than I have ever been. My hair may be gone and some may think I have changed, and that is because they are right. I am not the same person I was when I was a teenager. I am strong. I am bold. I am unique. I am unapologetically me.
    ALS Family Scholarship
    Winner
    Imagine being in your body, fully aware of what is going on around you, unable to move, unable to talk, unable to escape. You are a prisoner trapped in your own body. This was the sad reality for my father-in-law. After a three-year battle, he succumbed to ALS. For all of us who loved him, his loss is a stain that our memory will never let fade. Not only do we grieve his loss, but we are also left with uncertainty about how this illness will trickle down his family line. Watching someone you love slowly stop talking, moving, and breathing on their own is the worst thing I have ever had to witness. Watching his wife, children, and grandchildren experience this was torture. My husband lost his dad, just two months before we got married. We tried to rush the wedding so he could witness it, but ALS was a force too strong to be ignored. We reserved a seat for him in the front row of our ceremony, and we always make sure to celebrate his life on special days. While it has been over 10 years since my father-in-law passed, the sting is still there. My husband and I decided not to have children out of fear that the disease would claim them as well. I live with the knowledge in the back of my mind that it may steal someone else away from me – maybe even my husband. This daunting terror will remain until a cure is found. Thanks to the “Ice Bucket Challenge,” funds were raised and used to discover from which area of the brain ALS stems. This is a huge step, and I can only hope that someday there is another major breakthrough. My husband and I now travel as much as possible. We want to enjoy our time together, no matter what the future holds. We live in the here and now. We have become more loving towards, not only each other but, others. We enjoy the small things. We do not let minor setbacks get us all fired up. These are the upsides to losing someone you love in such a terrible way. Your eyes open and you see the world with more clarity. I am working towards getting my bachelor's degree to better the lives of myself and my husband. I am currently an adjunct professor, but with this degree, I can earn a full-time position at my college. I am hopeful that I can find a good enough career that I will be able to retire at an early age if it becomes necessary. While we will not know if this is something we will have to face, we understand it is a possibility. This scholarship will help speed up the process of my becoming a full-time professor by allowing me to be a full-time student. It is my hope that we continue to research and develop new strategies for fighting, and possibly ending, ALS. I fear for not only my husband's life but for both of my sisters-in-law, my nieces and nephews, and future generations of his family. We will continue to live and love no matter what the future holds for all of us, but not without that ever-present fear in our minds and hearts.
    Alcázar Legacy Scholarship
    My father didn’t tell us he had cancer. We walked in on his home nurse showing him how to use his new feeding tube and figured it out for ourselves. He had told us a few weeks earlier that he was heading up north for vacation. What he was really doing was undergoing surgery and other cancer treatments. He died five months later. He left us at 11:58 PM on my 19th birthday. I always knew my father would not live long enough to witness the big moments in my life. One of my earliest and exceptionally vivid memories is my four-year-old self crying and telling my Dad that I didn’t want him to die. He drank at least a 12-pack of beer every night. Even at such a young age, I knew what would eventually happen if he didn’t change his lifestyle. After 24 years of marriage, my mom decided to file for divorce. His drinking didn’t make him violent in any way, but he let it slowly destroy his health and his marriage. At 16 years old, I lived an extremely isolating existence of bouncing between the homes of both of my parents while also attempting to act as my father’s caretaker. There were times when he wouldn’t even eat because the buzz was better on an empty stomach. I hadn’t even graduated high school yet and I had to deal with forcing a grown man to eat so that he could stay alive. When all this happened, I was in my first year of college. I dropped out of half my classes, failed one, and barely passed another. I almost dropped out of school altogether until my friends convinced me to stick with it. I’m so glad I did. It was extremely hard to get past this traumatic event. At that moment, I knew it would be a defining moment in my life. As far as I saw it, I had two options: 1. Drop out and struggle 2. Fight for my education and thrive I chose to fight. I was the first person in my family to attend college. I was the first person in my family to graduate. I am now at a point in my life where I can make the choice again to fight and further my education. I will do this and continue to fight to reach my goal of becoming a full-time college professor. I have learned how to face hard situations and emerge from them as an even stronger person. As a college professor, I intend to make a classroom that is inclusive and welcoming. I want my classroom to be a safe space for students to feel like they belong while thriving. I want students to feel as if they can speak to me if they are struggling with anything, be it homelessness, an addiction, mental illness, etc. The world currently is in a very scary state, I want to encourage all my students to keep their heads up and keep an eye on the future.
    Pride in Diversity Scholarship
    Greg Lockwood Scholarship
    The world is constantly changing, a lot of good is coming but there is also a lot of negativity. I grew up in a very conservative home. Racism, homophobia, and sexism were all things I grew up to see as acceptable. There are many people who grew up in similar situations but never changed how they viewed the world. There is the problem. I am thankful for being in a position to be able to go to college for my associates degree. My eyes opened up. I saw the world from a different perspective. It was a culture shock, honestly. I was so embarrassed at how small my world was before, and how little I knew about the negative side effects of being blind to injustices of the world. After graduating and becoming an adjunct professor, in a male dominated field at that (machining/manufacturing.) I am lucky enough to have cultured and diverse classrooms. All different genders, races, religions, and backgrounds. I have had homeless students striving to do better, I have had refugee students so thankful for their freedoms here in the US. The stories I have heard have had such a profound influence on myself. I am not the same person I was in my adolescence, I am changed and better because of this. I am now in a stage where I have realized I want to become a full-time professor. I love being a safe spot for students in the minority. I always express how much I appreciate them stepping out their safe spaces to join a field that is so dominated by, white, strait, males. It can be very intimidating if you aren't prepared. To give myself better odds at getting hired, I have taken the big leap of going back to college. I am ready and excited to make this next move. I strive to see a world where people are legitimately treated as equals. Where what you look like, where you're from, or who you are as a person does not dictate your worth. I am saddened far too frequently with the news in the past few years. The world needs a lot more love and much less animosity. The way people close off anything that is different than what they are used to, has to change. Needs to change. I have a platform, being a queer female in this field, and I fully intend to use it. I am seen, and am lucky enough to have an audience that is willing to listen to me. I have students that come in and feel that. They have told me how comfortable they feel. You can see the light in their eyes once they realize that my classroom is a safe space for them to learn and be who they really are. No masking in my classes!! My hope is with my education that I can bring light to the issues I witness in my field and make some sort of change for the better. The changes need to happen much sooner than later and I will do my part to make that happen.