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Jamie Ross

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Bio

My name is Jamie Ross. I am member of the University of Connecticut's Class of 2027. I am majoring in Physiology and Neurobiology with a minor in Political Science and plan to go to Medical School. One day I would like to become a pediatric neurologist.

Education

University of Connecticut

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Neurobiology and Neurosciences
  • Minors:
    • Political Science and Government

Columbia High School

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Neurobiology and Neurosciences
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

    • Counter help

      Palmer’s Bakehouse
      2022 – 20231 year

    Sports

    Tennis

    Club
    2018 – 20235 years

    Arts

    • Marching Band

      Music
      2019 – 2024

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Alpha Phi Omega — Assistant New Member Educator
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Girl Scouts Heart of New Jersey — Girl Scout Memeber
      2010 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
    Picking a college major is a declaration of what you have decided is important. My choice was relatively easy once I landed on what I could not live without. I chose art. Life without art is not worth living. To be alive is to discover and explore the beauty life has to offer. To be alive is to find beauty that evokes thoughtful contemplation and feelings of awe. Growing up in Northern New Jersey I have been lucky enough to absorb many different forms of art that New York City has to offer. I have soaked in Claude Monet's impressionism in person at the Museum of Modern Art. I recently saw the Lion King on Broadway with its amazing puppetry and musicality. Even though I have chosen to devote myself to a life in pursuit of science I have much love for the fine and performing arts. The most wonderful thing about art is, it is in the eye of the beholder. There is nothing that has ever evoked a stronger emotion than the nervous system does. I find a masterpiece in each neuron that is incomparable to the works prized in museums. The specialization of different regions of the brain is more awe inspiring than the ceiling of the sistine chapel. If I could I would watch synapses fire with more rapt attention than I could ever dream of giving to a stage. There is no work of art that has touched my soul the way neurology does. I find art in the control system of human life. I want to practice by becoming a neurologist where I will be lucky enough to be in its presence day in and day out. Some may find this a false equivalence, but I truly believe that anything someone can find beautiful can be art for them. I am following the passion that fills me when I interact with my art. Choosing another major would be a betrayal to where my heart lies. The difficulty only makes me want to hold onto my dream tighter. I am working toward my art. Life without art is not worth living. That's why I am a Physiology and Neurobiology major. I need my art. STEM careers should be fueled by just as much passion as the humanities are. The drive to know more and become increasingly specialized in a field, no matter the topic, is a beautiful thing. I am a Black woman and I strive to make more spaces in science education where people who look like me or come from a similar background as me can thrive. After I finish my undergrad I am going to continue onto medical school and one day become a pediatric neurologist. I hope to one day pave the way for other young women like myself. So, no matter the background, everyone is free to fall in love with the subject of their choosing.
    Shays Scholarship
    My grandfather is a scholar. He was born in North Carolina in 1943. His family was forced to leave the South and relocate to New Jersey when he was 17 because of the pains of segregation. Because he was Black and graduated high school in 1961, he was not afforded the opportunity as a straight-A student of going to college. However, he told me of his adventures in the Army and how he used that experience to develop mechanical skills, which he then used to gain employment following his service. He explained how one locked door incentivised him to find an open one. Truth be told, fixing machines was not particularly interesting to my younger self, but he didn’t tell me these stories to entertain; he told them because he wanted to share a piece of himself with me, to remind me of the legacy I carry forward. And the pieces he has shared with me created the whole I seek to become — someone who understands the need to create one’s own learning opportunities. Of course, like most knowledge, this understanding was acquired over several years. When I was in elementary school, I would sometimes pretend to be sick so I wouldn't have to go to school; I wanted to stay home and play. My mother, knowing I wasn't actually sick, put me on the phone with my grandfather. He told me I needed to go to school to learn something new every day. As a kid, I reluctantly obeyed on those days, grudgingly climbing out of my cocoon of covers and trudging to school. Even though he was not necessarily right that there was something new to learn each day, I developed my grandfather’s strong work ethic and learning for curiosity’s sake. But there were days I couldn't afford to miss like during my third grade science class when we started our nervous system unit. As I aged into middle school and then high school, the opportunities for learning increased exponentially but so did the expectations for success. Junior year, I considered enrolled in AP Chemistry. Peers and advisors alike cautioned me against taking this class, citing the generally low test scores and my otherwise already burdensome course load. But my grandfather had taught me early on that it's okay if I don't always get an A, but it's never okay not to strive to learn. So I enrolled and chose to learn about the natural building blocks of the world around me each day, even though there were days when I felt beaten down and the rigor of the course tested me both mentally and emotionally. Rather than drop the class, I asked several hundred questions, made myself a fixture in Mr. Stine’s classroom during the conference period, and became a follower of the “Professor Dave Explains” Youtube channel. I didn’t earn an A, but I developed a deeper understanding of the subject and challenged myself as a learner. I'm determined to continue growing as a learner and a person. I want to make my family proud, but more importantly I want to be proud of myself. Over the next four years and beyond, I want to grow as a scholar and share the pieces of myself by expanding my knowledge of the nervous system. I hope one day to create new techniques and treatments that will improve the lives of a countless number of people.
    Charles Cheesman's Student Debt Reduction Scholarship
    My parents have always wanted me to succeed more than either of them could. Neither of my parents graduated from college, but it was not for lack of trying. Unfortunately for both of them the financial cost was deemed to be too great and they had to withdraw from their respective degree programs. My entire life I have had to watch them carry the guilt of not being able to supply me with the resources and financial support my peers readily have access to. But in truth I am thankful for their never ending encouragement and belief in me. Without them uplifting me I would have never had the confidence to pursue the rigorous Physiology and Neurobiology major. Even at my lowest I know my parents are always going to be in my corner. I intend to be both the first person in my family to earn a Bachelor’s degree and the first to earn a Medical Doctorate. I aspire to be a pediatric neurologist who can work toward creating new techniques and treatments to improve afflicted children’s quality of life. During my remaining time at the University of Connecticut I'm determined to continue growing as a learner and a person. I want to make my family proud, but more importantly I want to be proud of myself. I know the path I undertake is not an easy one. There are too few racial minorities in graduate programs and the STEM workforce. The National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics estimates that less than ten percent of people in master’s programs and less than six percent of people in doctoral programs are black. The STEM fields as a whole needs to be diversified. I am a Black woman and I strive to make more spaces in the field of neuroscience where people who look like me or come from a similar background as me can thrive. Being provided with scholarship funds would most immediately alleviate the burden of financing my own education with loans. In the long term, not having to worry about how to cover my fee bill will allow me to devote more time toward my academics and extracurriculars. I would not have to allocate time for a job to my schedule. My personal interests are broad so I would appreciate any opportunity to explore them further. I currently intend to declare a minor in Political Science, a field that greatly interests me, but with additional time I could seriously consider declaring a double major in a field such as Cognitive Science or Speech Language and Hearing Sciences. Outside of academics I will be able to pursue other extracurriculars. Last semester I was interested in trying out for the mock trial team, but unfortunately my schedule did not allow it. Next semester however I can structure my schedule in a way that allows me to explore different aspects of student activities. Along with new activities I could spend more time working with Alpha Phi Omega. If I do not have to find employment I will be able to run for a position on the Executive Board, specifically the position of Recording Secretary.
    Simon Strong Scholarship
    Starting college feels as if you have been shoved into freezing water with no hope of a timely rescue. Swimming is the only option. Being a first-generation college student feels the same way, except you do not know how to swim. Fighting twice as hard just to keep your head above water while your peers acclimate with ease is isolating. In theory, having parents that did not experience college is not a factor in your own college experience. But in practice not having parents that understand how to live in a dorm or how to manage college workloads can be detrimental. It does not feel fair that your peers have a wealth of knowledge you will never have access to, and that is before the actual classes start. The worst thing about inadequacy is that it’s not a mere emotional state that will pass with some time. It takes root and festers. The only way I could move forward was to face it head on and work to improve myself. My insecurities about college became a detriment to my academic success. I had to take responsibility for my own study habits and course load management. But more importantly, I had to take responsibility for my own mindset. Once I recognized that I was as capable as any other student and I did have the ability to comprehend the material both my work ethic and grades improved immensely. I pushed myself to truly put in the work and went the extra mile by going beyond just attending lectures and doing assignments. Attending office hours of my professors, going to group tutors sessions, and doing extra review problems were the key to success. I also sought guidance from the advisors available to me. Support in difficult subjects, especially content heavy courses such as chemistry, is essential to a student's success. However, it is not only the availability of supplemental help that is important to ensure everyone is included, it is the confidence to go in the first place. All the chemistry resources in the world could be available, but if a student does not feel comfortable using them they are worthless. Feeling out of place and othered while pressuring a STEM degree hinder performance. There are already too few racial minorities in graduate programs and the STEM workforce. The National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics estimates that less than ten percent of people in master’s programs and less than six percent of people in doctoral programs are black. The STEM fields as a whole needs to be more diverse. I am a Black woman and I strive to make more spaces in science education where people who look like me or come from a similar background as me can thrive.
    Kenyada Me'Chon Thomas Legacy Scholarship
    My grandfather is a scholar. He was born in North Carolina in 1943. His family was forced to leave the South and relocate to New Jersey when he was 17 because of the pains of segregation. Because he was Black and graduated high school in 1961, he was not afforded the opportunity as a straight-A student of going to college. However, he told me of his adventures in the Army and how he used that experience to develop mechanical skills, which he then used to gain employment following his service. He explained how one locked door incentivised him to find an open one. Truth be told, fixing machines was not particularly interesting to my younger self, but he didn’t tell me these stories to entertain; he told them because he wanted to share a piece of himself with me, to remind me of the legacy I carry forward. And the pieces he has shared with me created the whole I seek to become — someone who understands the need to create one’s own learning opportunities. Of course, like most knowledge, this understanding was acquired over several years. When I was in elementary school, I would sometimes pretend to be sick so I wouldn't have to go to school; I wanted to stay home and play. My mother, knowing I wasn't actually sick, put me on the phone with my grandfather. He told me I needed to go to school to learn something new every day. As a kid, I reluctantly obeyed on those days, grudgingly climbing out of my cocoon of covers and trudging to school. Even though he was not necessarily right that there was something new to learn each day, I developed my grandfather’s strong work ethic and learning for curiosity’s sake. But there were days I couldn't afford to miss like during my third grade science class when we started our nervous system unit. As I aged into middle school and then high school, the opportunities for learning increased exponentially but so did the expectations for success. Junior year, I considered enrolled in AP Chemistry. Peers and advisors alike cautioned me against taking this class, citing the generally low test scores and my otherwise already burdensome course load. But my grandfather had taught me early on that it's okay if I don't always get an A, but it's never okay not to strive to learn. So I enrolled and chose to learn about the natural building blocks of the world around me each day, even though there were days when I felt beaten down and the rigor of the course tested me both mentally and emotionally. Rather than drop the class, I asked several hundred questions, made myself a fixture in Mr. Stine’s classroom during the conference period, and became a follower of the “Professor Dave Explains” Youtube channel. I didn’t earn an A, but I developed a deeper understanding of the subject and challenged myself as a learner. I'm determined to continue growing as a learner and a person. I want to make my family proud, but more importantly I want to be proud of myself. Over the next four years and beyond, I want to grow as a scholar and share the pieces of myself by expanding my knowledge of the nervous system. I hope one day to create new techniques and treatments that will improve the lives of a countless number of people.
    Ron & Janell Lunan Black Girls in STEM Scholarship
    My grandfather is a scholar. He was born in North Carolina in 1943. His family was forced to leave the South and relocate to New Jersey when he was 17 because of the pains of segregation. Because he was Black and graduated high school in 1961, he was not afforded the opportunity as a straight-A student of going to college. However, he told me of his adventures in the Army and how he used that experience to develop mechanical skills, which he then used to gain employment following his service. He explained how one locked door incentivised him to find an open one. Truth be told, fixing machines was not particularly interesting to my younger self, but he didn’t tell me these stories to entertain; he told them because he wanted to share a piece of himself with me, to remind me of the legacy I carry forward. And the pieces he has shared with me created the whole I seek to become — someone who understands the need to create one’s own learning opportunities. Of course, like most knowledge, this understanding was acquired over several years. When I was in elementary school, I would sometimes pretend to be sick so I wouldn't have to go to school; I wanted to stay home and play. My mother, knowing I wasn't actually sick, put me on the phone with my grandfather. He told me I needed to go to school to learn something new every day. As a kid, I reluctantly obeyed on those days, grudgingly climbing out of my cocoon of covers and trudging to school. Even though he was not necessarily right that there was something new to learn each day, I developed my grandfather’s strong work ethic and learning for curiosity’s sake. But there were days I couldn't afford to miss like during my third grade science class when we started our nervous system unit. As I aged into middle school and then high school, the opportunities for learning increased exponentially but so did the expectations for success. Junior year, I considered enrolled in AP Chemistry. Peers and advisors alike cautioned me against taking this class, citing the generally low test scores and my otherwise already burdensome course load. But my grandfather had taught me early on that it's okay if I don't always get an A, but it's never okay not to strive to learn. So I enrolled and chose to learn about the natural building blocks of the world around me each day, even though there were days when I felt beaten down and the rigor of the course tested me both mentally and emotionally. Rather than drop the class, I asked several hundred questions, made myself a fixture in Mr. Stine’s classroom during the conference period, and became a follower of the “Professor Dave Explains” Youtube channel. I didn’t earn an A, but I developed a deeper understanding of the subject and challenged myself as a learner. I'm determined to continue growing as a learner and a person. I want to make my family proud, but more importantly I want to be proud of myself. Over the next four years and beyond, I want to grow as a scholar and share the pieces of myself by expanding my knowledge of the nervous system. I hope one day to create new techniques and treatments that will improve the lives of a countless number of people.