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Jada Carroll

1335

Bold Points

2x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I'm a Graduate of Edna Karr High School, in New Orleans I plan on gaining an Bachelor's in Chemistry, then gaining a PhD! I am a straight A student, I'm in Student Government, and I'm a public speaker. Help me gain the ability to change the world one person at a time.

Education

Louisiana State University

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2028
  • Majors:
    • Medicine
    • Chemistry

Edna Karr High School

High School
2021 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Chemistry
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      I want to become an Anesthesiologist!

    • Stocking and Unloading

      Walmart
      2021 – 20221 year
    • Barista

      Starbucks
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    Cheerleading

    Varsity
    2021 – 20221 year

    Awards

    • Cheerleader of the Week

    Public services

    • Public Service (Politics)

      Student Government — Vice President/ Senator
      2021 – 2024

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Brandon M. Greber Memorial Scholarship
    So many people around me have joined the military to improve their futures. For example, my brother joined the Marines after high school so he could have the ability to attend college debt-free. My father was in the army years ago, wanting to travel and take a break from Louisiana. Even my boyfriend joined the Navy a few days ago, starting his adventure on a new path. I believe that the military is an opportunity. The military allows people to attend college, travel free of charge, and gain new experiences overall. Protecting the country does not mean jumping straight into war; instead, countless other tasks. Protecting the country means helping gain recruits for the future. Protecting our country could also mean helping with technical information. Overall, “Protecting our country” does not automatically mean putting your life in danger. The basis of the military is not sacrificing your life. Instead, it is working with other soldiers to be a part of something bigger than yourself. Though the military has always scared me, I know the opportunities it can provide are incomparable. After attaining a Bachelor’s degree in chemistry, I planned on joining the Navy. Ironically, I can not swim, but this branch seemed to suit me best. I wanted to take the opportunity to receive financial aid during medical school. I also looked into programs that would help me become a physician, and in return, I would complete a few years of service. The military would make all my dreams accessible, including becoming a doctor, traveling the world, and helping people. Throughout high school and even during the beginning of my undergraduate years, I have constantly been motivated by the world around me. My most significant motivations are my family and our current financial situation. My family has yet to graduate college (and a few have not even graduated from high school). Being a first-generation college student encouraged me to obtain a bachelor’s degree and a higher level of education, such as a medical degree. Financially, my family is not the best, so I strive to obtain a job and salary that will allow me to remain comfortable. In addition to my family, the idea of helping people motivates me. I wanted a job where I could work hands-on with a team and achieve a bigger goal. The medical field reflects this ideology since most doctors work together to help one person. The military also reflects this idea since soldiers combine their jobs and strengths to make up the entire military. In high school, I was also motivated by failure. While in high school, I was not in the “Top 10’s”, which pushed me academically to graduate with high honors in college. Losing classmates to gun violence also influenced my desire to help the world around me. Best of all, I also motivate myself. I have always believed that I was born to achieve impossible goals. Though attaining a bachelor’s and a medical degree has not yet been done in my family, I would be the one to accomplish the impossible. The military could be a stepping stool to achieving your goals, and one day, I’ll use the military to reach mine.
    Henry Bynum, Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    As a Louisiana resident, I have always struggled with having a steady home. A hurricane would completely displace my family every other year, and I would attend a new school for the remaining year. However, hurricane Ida destroyed my house while I was still in high school. During this time, my family began to struggle financially, and we lived with family members and in hotels until we could find stability. My family finally found a cheap apartment east of New Orleans during my sophomore year. I switched to a new school, Edna Karr High School, and struggled to make friends. For multiple months, I sat alone and lost connections with people at my original school. I also began working at Walmart to help my family financially during this process. The community I lived in was dangerous and faced extreme neglect. Even the apartment we rented was infested with rodents. While in New Orleans, I began to understand the day-to-day lives of other families. While at Edna Karr, I also experienced the gravity of losing a classmate. Every year at Edna Karr, at least one classmate of mine lost their life to gun violence. This adversity was not only internally conflicting, but it also highlighted the current state of the community. During my time in New Orleans, I realized the city was struggling. Living to check to check, having infested homes, and losing classmates were desensitized topics in New Orleans. I overcame these adversities in New Orleans by helping others and myself. I helped my family financially during a time of need. I also helped my school move past the loss of students. Best of all, when I became drained, I sought help for myself through therapy, friends, and family. Usually, after the hurricane ends and my family rebuilds the house, I return to my original school. However, I ended up graduating from Edna Karr High School. I became invested in the struggles of New Orleans, and more importantly, I joined the community. Under the infestations and the violence were humans. I wanted to help my new community change positively. I began making friends with many students at Edna Karr, including classmates who sat alone. I also aided in gun rallies to promote better gun practices in New Orleans. I gave many speeches and wrote many essays to speak for the students who had already passed from the violence. Everything I did was completely free of charge. I enjoyed helping the community and genuinely wanted to see a positive impact. In the future, I want to continue to help New Orleans by promoting better gun practices and providing scholarships for low-income families in New Orleans. I hope that by giving positivity to the community of New Orleans, I changed at least one person’s life.
    Manny and Sylvia Weiner Medical Scholarship
    I want to become an Anesthesiologist one day. At first, I wanted to be a Software Engineer. I had categorized myself as "antisocial" and assumed that I could still feel fulfilled working alone in an office. However, when I acquired an engineering-based internship, I quickly realized that working in an office was not my calling. I quickly realized I enjoyed human interactions, fast-paced work, and the ability to say, "I helped someone today." I began researching other careers, trying to find a field with high salaries but more "hands on" work. Eventually, I researched hundreds of medical-based jobs to find a specialty that would match my personality. With anesthesiology, I can earn a high-paying salary while working indirectly with patients. While my specialty lacks patient interaction, anesthesiologists work closely with nurses, doctors, and other healthcare professionals to ensure quality work. Becoming an anesthesiologist and acquiring a high salary would fund my future and aid my family. As a first-generation college student, money has not always been an accessible item. My entire undergraduate education is funded through scholarships and my job. Despite my parents' deficient credit scores and high debt, they encourage my dreams of becoming a doctor and obtaining a high-paying salary. Given my circumstances, my dreams of becoming a doctor could be more realistic. Neither of my parents graduated college; one did not even graduate high school. In addition, my siblings have not attended college either. College is a foreign and expensive topic in my household and a goal that has yet to happen. Other obstacles include a need for more finance. With the scholarships I have already received, college is possible. My family struggles to obtain loans (due to current debt), and I would not be able to afford thousands alone. Having an unknown future and financial struggles has also greatly affected my personal endeavors. I work at minimum wage jobs to afford my items or help my parents. I sacrifice my own time to ensure our financial burden is manageable. Even in high school, I maintained a high grading average while working at least 25 hours a week, trying my best to secure high scholarships. I get older and realize I did nothing but constantly work in my youth. Every long hour I dedicated to getting into college was worth it. The extra money I acquired through my minimum wage jobs pushes me to claim a higher salary. I hope the scholarships I obtained stay consistent and help me remain debt-free until medical school. Everything I have done contributes to my future practice. The money in my savings will continue to grow and fund my MCAT endeavors. Though pressured, my support from my family will allow me to persevere and become the first doctor within our bloodline. My current financial burden will encourage me to seek more and solidify my future with a higher salary. In a few years, I will become an anesthesiologist.
    Student Life Photography Scholarship
    Norman C. Nelson IV Memorial Scholarship
    I am Jada Carroll, a Edna Karr High School graduate from New Orleans, Louisiana. I will attend Louisiana State University in the fall on a "full ride" scholarship. I plan to major in chemistry on a "pre-medical" track to eventually participate in medical school. I strive to get into Stanford School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. I plan to specialize in anesthesiology and become a general anesthetist. As for hobbies, I enjoy singing, painting, and arts and crafts. While in high school, I was a cheerleader and a prominent member of the Student Government. I advocated for gun safety in New Orleans through speeches and essays. I come from a low-income household, so I always have some form of personal income. I currently work at Starbucks and pay for necessities or school-related fees. I plan to become financially stable and provide significant scholarships for the community of New Orleans. Before becoming an anesthesiologist, I wanted to be an engineer. I always enjoyed math and wanted to continue learning advanced math in college. Engineering would be engaging, where people worked in large groups to create projects. Except, I took an internship at an engineering firm and hated it. The office was quiet, with cubicles, and for an entire summer, I organized papers. I felt lost and conflicted about entering a field without direct human interactions. My advanced math teacher, Ms. Gordan, helped me rearrange my future. She explained that while attending Xavier University, she majored in chemistry. Ms.Gordan emphasized that the complex math within the courses encouraged her to obtain a Master's in Mathematics. She continued to explain that the medical field would suit me. She said it would challenge me, provide me with human interactions, and include plenty of math. Ms.Gordan inspired me to major in chemistry and look into the medical field.  There are many reasons why I chose anesthesiology. For one, as a low-income student, anesthesiologists get paid very well. The money could not only aid my family and me, but I would also gain the financial ability to help other low-income students. In addition to the income, anesthesiologists use math quickly and daily. They perform immediate calculations during surgeries to determine the appropriate dosage for any patient. Anesthesiologists also get to work closely with other doctors. Many even have their own Assistant Anesthesiologist to help throughout the day. Not only will I have direct human interactions, but I can positively change lives with a high income.
    Hester Richardson Powell Memorial Service Scholarship
    Despite my own accomplishments, I have struggled plenty. Throughout highschool, I struggled with my mental health and making connections with people. I was diagnosed with both depression and anxiety, and even seeked therapy. Even the environment I was raised in was hard on me. I had to work for my own necessities and the things I needed. I faced the pressure of gaining scholarships for school because if not, I feared I would not be able to further my education. Now, after graduating, I still find myself looking up ways to save money for my own future. Many do not realize that with so much opposition, even applying to college becomes a challenge. The depression, the worry, and every other obstacle weighed me down. I could name every obstacle that has tried to slow me down, but what matters is that I never let these obstacles stop me. If someone asked me “what is the best thing you ever did in highschool?”, I would tell them about my speeches. At my graduating highschool, Edna Karr, at least one student passed away from gun violence every year. After realizing this horrible phenomenon, I began developing speeches and poems to combat the violence. I spoke out for the students, Courtney, Thomas, Ricky, and Claleb, because they could no longer speak for themselves. I spoke at churches. I spoke at gun rallies. I spoke at funerals. I spoke to any crowd that would listen. I also wrote essays, essays that I submitted to colleges and scholarships around the world. While there’s so many interesting topics, nothing felt as important as the lives lost at my own school. Feeling the changing atmosphere after someone has passed was horrible, and I wanted everyone to understand the pain. Through my own challenges, I still spoke out for my classmates, who can no longer speak at all. While giving speeches, I always wondered if anyone listened. I was surprised at how many people reached out to me after every speech I gave. Families who lost their children thanked me. Students commended my performance. Teachers and staff recognized me. Even my own school recognized me, awarding me with “The Legacy Award”. Except, nothing satisfied me more than knowing that I had conveyed the words that Courtney, Thomas, Ricky, and Caleb wanted me to say. I had solidified their messages and their legacy through my words. Their circumstances inspired me to change the community around us. In turn, my words inspired the members of the community. I have always been told “Words have Power”. Hopefully, my words had the power to inspire every person within every crowd.
    Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
    Throughout my academic career, I have always found a way to help the people around me. My aid was especially prominent in high school. While at Edna Karr, I tutored my peers on complex topics. I designed custom class gear for my graduating class. I aided in bringing back the Yearbook, a long tradition at Edna Karr. I even completed mundane tasks, such as organizing classwork for busy teachers. However, I am most proud of my ability to speak out for my classmates. Every year, a student at Edna Karr loses their life to gun violence. Knowing this, I organized multiple speeches, poems, and essays to combat the violence. I spoke at gun rallies, prep rallies, churches, and even funerals to solidify the names of the lost children. I declined any payment or reimbursement because that is not the moral of my messages. I have had both children and adults commend my pieces and the morals I instill through each world. I believe the people I spoke for, Courtney, Thomas, Caleb, and Ricky, heard my speeches. Hopefully, I articulated what they could no longer say and left the legacy they deserved. Besides the things I did at Edna Karr, I can confidently say I positively changed the lives of many families by keeping their children’s legacy alive. When I asked someone, “what do you wanna do when you grow up?”, they usually said they wanted to “save lives.” Even as an aspiring doctor, I still do not yearn for that goal. Instead, I want to change lives. I understand that not every patient I care for will survive. Yet, if that patient passed, knowing I did everything possible to save them, I achieved my goal. I want to give families security, knowing I am helping their loved ones as accurately as possible. I also want to give back and provide significant scholarships to low-income students like myself. I want the ability to lift the financial burden off of children so they can obtain higher education. In addition to my future goals, I want to maintain my current beliefs. I will continue to advocate for gun safety and denounce gun violence. I want to continue to say Courtney, Thomas, Caleb, and Ricky’s names. I never want to lose sight of my morals because they drive my positive actions. I believe that by acting selflessly, I can continue to leave a positive impact, one family at a time.
    Schmid Memorial Scholarship
    My name is Jada Carroll, and I attend Edna Karr High School in New Orleans, Louisiana. I strive to become a doctor specializing in anesthesiology. I am a very driven and determined student, maintaining high honors throughout my high school career. While in school, I did many extracurriculars, such as cheerleading and choir. I even held leadership positions, such as being a member of “The Principal’s Cabinet” and President of the Yearbook Committee. Edna Karr allowed me to unleash my full creative potential, leading me to design the official “Class of 2024” Senior Gear. While realizing my artistic talent, high school also highlighted my vocal ability. While singing in my school’s choir, I was allowed to sing multiple solos in front of large audiences. During my Senior Year, I also became somewhat of a teacher. For my dual enrollment English and Math class, I taught students complex topics they did not understand. Throughout these teaching moments, I enjoyed human interactions. I found through my artistic talents and my teaching abilities, I was able to help people through difficult moments. In a way, this epiphany has directed many future actions. Due to my perseverance, I will attend Louisiana State University on a “full-ride” scholarship in the fall. I plan to major in chemistry on a “pre-med” track and hope to eventually attend medical school. Despite my many milestones, my speeches and essays are my proudest accomplishments. The scariest thing about New Orleans and attending Edna Karr is the number of people lost each year. Every year I attended Enda Karr, at least one student was lost to gun violence. These students, Thomas, Courtney, Caleb, and Ricky, pushed me to speak up against the violence. I developed speeches that stated the words my peers could no longer say. I spoke directly to my school, reciting original poems that moved children to tears. I spoke at a gun rally at Xavier University in front of hundreds. I spoke on the World Wide Radio to thousands. Even more so, I spoke directly to families at funerals and churches, speaking to the heart of the community. Strikingly, I never met any of these children. Yet, when I attended school after the news of their deaths, the entire atmosphere shifted. I did not know these children, yet I knew something had to be done; something had to be said. I may not have known these children, but I needed everyone to know their legacy. Through my desperate fight against gun violence, I was awarded “The Legacy Award” at Edna Karr High School. I realized that while planting those children's legacy into the community's hearts, I developed my own legacy. I found a way to use my voice and change lives. This scholarship will aid in my eventual goal to attend medical school. Even the application is very costly, and saving money in advance is a large goal of mine. Sustaining scholarships such as these continue to pave the way for my future in medicine.
    Marie Jean Baptiste Memorial Scholarship
    My name is Jada Carroll, and I am an African American from the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. Being African American in a city with massive amounts of violence is truly a saddening experience. I understand the rich culture African Americans posses (especially in a city such as New Olreans), but the violence does nothing but solidify stereotypes. I graduated from a predominantly black school in the heart of New Orleans, Edna Karr Highschool. Every year I attended Enda Karr, at least one student was lost to gun violence. These students, Thomas, Courtney, Caleb, and Ricky, pushed me to speak up against the violence. I developed speeches that stated the words my peers could no longer say. I denounced every form of gun violence and advocated for ways we could change and better the city of New Orleans. I spoke directly to my school, reciting original poems that moved children to tears. I spoke at a gun rally at Xavier University in front of hundreds. I spoke on the World Wide Radio to thousands. Even more so, I spoke directly to families at funerals and churches, speaking to the heart of the community. As for my family, I have contributed financially to my parent’s futures. I do not come from a very rich household, so I planned to minimize my college debt as much as I could. By sustaining high grades and applying for countless scholarships, I can confidently say I will be attending Louisiana State University on a “full ride” scholarship. I understand that I have eternally aided in helping my parents achieve their own financial goals. Once I graduate college, I have massive plans to continue to help my community. First, I plan to attend medical school and become a doctor. Not only will these expand my education, but also increase my financial abilities. Once financially stable, I plan to provide at least one “full-ride” to a Senior at Edna Karr High School. I want to push children to change their own communities, and speak out for anything they deem as important. I want to grant the ability to expand a child’s education, and to eliminate financial burden. Most of all, I want to eliminate the negative stereotypes, and encourage a positive climate within my own school.
    David Foster Memorial Scholarship
    When I came to Edna Karr High School, I expected to hate it. Instead, on the first day, I met my advanced math teacher. Though loud and sometimes "mean," she welcomed me. She was excited to have such a young student as a pre-calculus sophomore. Instantly, we became close, and I learned of her master's in mathematics. She graduated with honors from Xavier University and continued to Loyal University for her master's degree in mathematics. She is the only math teacher at Edna Karr High School who teaches a Dual Enrollment mathematics course. She is also the head Senior coordinator and mandates the senior budgets, senior trips, senior gear, and other necessities at Edna Karr. Though minded solid, she provides realistic advice to anyone who comes to her. Over my three years at Edna Karr, I have taken every one of her classes. She has allowed me to gain four dual enrollment credits from Calculus to Statistics for my future endeavors. She has paved the way for many African American students in New Orleans and Southern University. She teaches a strong work ethic and allows students to understand complex concepts such as calculus. She is Jacade Gordon, the Advanced Mathematics Teacher at Edna Karr High School. I could have chosen someone well-known, like Rosa Parks or Martin Luther King, but none of them directly changed my life. Ms. Gordon has influenced my life more than any other teacher I have met. For example, she aided in deciding my major. As a sophomore, I had claimed I wanted to major in aerospace engineering and design spaceships for NASA. Before realizing it, Ms. Godan told me, "We'll see what you major in at graduation." Over time, I realized while completing her assignments I loved advanced math. I wanted a field that would keep me on a "pre-med" track while incorporating mathematical concepts. Sure enough, as a Senior, I had decided that engineering was not for me, and I wanted to study chemistry. She explained that she has a Bachelor of Science in chemistry and has always incorporated mathematics into science. It intrigued me, and she inspired me to major in chemistry. Gordon has also pushed me to become the public speaker I am today. She helped me gain massive opportunities to speak at significant events, such as a gun rally at Xavier University. Gordon even wrote my letter of recommendation to multiple colleges. She continues to provide opportunities for me, even in my Senior year. I had the chance to design the Senior Jackets, Shirts, and Sweaters for the Edna Karr class of 2024. Ms. Gordon is a strong African American influence who has genuinely changed my life. Thank you, Ms. G
    Janie Mae "Loving You to Wholeness" Scholarship
    My name is Jada Carroll, and I attend Edna Karr High School in New Orleans, Louisiana. I strive to become a doctor specializing in anesthesiology. I am a very driven and determined student, maintaining high honors throughout my high school career. While in school, I did many extracurriculars, such as cheerleading and choir. I even held leadership positions, such as being a member of “The Principal’s Cabinet” and President of the Yearbook Committee. Edna Karr allowed me to unleash my full creative potential, leading me to design the official “Class of 2024” Senior Gear. While realizing my artistic talent, high school also highlighted my vocal ability. While singing in my school’s choir, I was allowed to sing multiple solos in front of large audiences. During my Senior Year, I also became somewhat of a teacher. For my dual enrollment English and Math class, I taught students complex topics they did not understand. Throughout these teaching moments, I enjoyed human interactions. Even more so, I was proud of my ability to positively change students. I found through my artistic talents and my teaching abilities, I was able to help people through difficult moments. In a way, this epiphany has directed many future actions. Due to my perseverance, I will attend Louisiana State University on a “full-ride” scholarship in the fall. I plan to major in chemistry on a “pre-med” track and hope to eventually attend medical school. Despite my many milestones, my speeches and essays are my proudest accomplishments. The scariest thing about New Orleans and attending Edna Karr is the number of people lost each year. Every year I attended Enda Karr, at least one student was lost to gun violence. These students, Thomas, Courtney, Caleb, and Ricky, pushed me to speak up against the violence. I developed speeches that stated the words my peers could no longer say. I denounced every form of gun violence and advocated for ways we could change and better the city of New Orleans. I spoke directly to my school, reciting original poems that moved children to tears. I spoke at a gun rally at Xavier University in front of hundreds. I spoke on the World Wide Radio to thousands. Even more so, I spoke directly to families at funerals and churches, speaking to the heart of the community. Strikingly, I never met any of these children. Yet, when I attended school after the news of their deaths, the entire atmosphere shifted. I did not know these children, yet I knew something had to be done; something had to be said. I may not have known these children, but I needed everyone to know their legacy. Through my desperate fight against gun violence, I was awarded “The Legacy Award” at Edna Karr High School. I realized that while planting those children's legacy into the community's hearts, I developed my own legacy. I found a way to use my voice and change lives.
    James T. Godwin Memorial Scholarship
    Winner
    Four years ago, my older brother wanted to enlist in the military. Always seeking a challenge, he chose the Marines as his branch of service. Soon, he realized he would have to overcome obstacles before completing basic training. He was then faced with his first challenge, losing weight. Together, I and my brother began eating what we described as “turtle food.” From literal lettuce to fruit salads, we jokingly ate like herbivores to support his diet. Even at restaurants, we’d be sure to each eat a salad, which favored his weight loss. Combined with his consistent workout routine, my brother drastically began to lose weight. The next challenge faced him. He needed to make the most of his hometown before he left. This challenge was partially complex since COVID-19 was among us. My brother was stationed in California and wouldn’t return to New Orleans until four years later. Knowing this, my brother and I became tourists. We visited places like Canal Street as if it were our first time in the area. We ate king cake as if we didn’t buy it every year. Yet, it wasn’t the sites or the king cake we wanted; it was the memories we solidified. My brother had then overcome another challenge. The most complex challenge yet had then faced my brother. My brother, Bernard, had to leave. He had graduated high school, lost weight, and made memories. Knowing he had to cut his hair, he let me take the first action. I cut his dreadlocks (very poorly) before he received his actual haircut. They cut the rest relatively short, looking clean and formal. We drove him to his recruiters and took many photos before formally saying goodbye. While at basic, my family and I sent my brother letters and often called him to encourage him. Despite losing the opportunity to congratulate him on his transition from basic training to the military (due to COVID), we were proud of the state of Louisiana. Now, I am facing my challenge. It’s been four years since my brother left. I’ve gone from a first-year student to a senior in high school, and now I’m leaving. While I attend college, my brother will return home to continue his life outside the military. Despite his return, I sadly won't be seeing much of it. I’ll now be facing my challenges and my endeavors. Hopefully, he’s here to help me the way I hopefully helped him.
    Kenyada Me'Chon Thomas Legacy Scholarship
    If I could change the world in one way, I would change the world's mindset on climate change. Many people around the world do not understand the severity of climate change. People constantly waste meat, use plastic, and travel unknowingly, destroying the planet. Many claim that climate change "isn't serious" or "is out of our control." Instead, I would push people to change at least their mindset. People need to understand that change is possible. Climate change continues to grow and worsen because people lack understanding or do not care. Climate chnage impacts future generations, who must either live with our consequences or solve our problems. Living in a sense of hopelessness harms the future of all of humanity. People believe they, on their own, "can't change anything." Instead, humans should consider, "If I change my actions, then one less person is harming the planet." If humans could change their mindsets, they could impact their lifestyles. If people could change their mindset on climate change, humans could begin to change the planet. People can change one home at a time by being aware of the global issue. If everyone understands that there is an overconsumption of meat, then more people can reduce their eating habits. Since humans also lead their governments, countries could begin enforcing laws and limitations that lessen climate change. Countries can limit meat production, decrease fuel usage, and reduce plastic. While this would impact each nation's economy and industrial aspects, it's worth it to maintain the planet's health. Factories in developed countries such as America and Canada would have to lessen production to save fossil fuels and reduce plastic and other environmental aspects. If not, then current industrial usage and development will eventually consume Earth. Overcoming challenges starts after gradually changing your mindset. I could easily change the Earth's resources and provide more. However, humans would face another issue if it weren't for climate change. Humans need to understand that to overcome a challenge, they must change their mindset and understand the situation. Climate change is a massive issue due to exploitation and overconsumption that humans cause. Once the mindset shifts, people can better change their circumstances through small steps, like planting trees or using less plastic. Humans can also use this adapted mindset in other areas of their life. A positive mindset could influence the populations physical and mental health. The world can change if humans decide to change their perceptions.
    Black Leaders Scholarship
    When I came to Edna Karr High School, I expected to hate it. Instead, on the first day, I met my advanced math teacher. Though loud and sometimes "mean," she welcomed me. She was excited to have such a young student as a pre-calculus sophomore. Instantly, we became close, and I learned of her master's in mathematics. She graduated with honors from Xavier University and continued to Loyal University for her master's degree in mathematics. She is the only math teacher at Edna Karr High School who teaches a Dual Enrollment mathematics course. She is also the head Senior coordinator and mandates the senior budgets, senior trips, senior gear, and other necessities at Edna Karr. Though minded solid, she provides realistic advice to anyone who comes to her. Over my three years at Edna Karr, I have taken every one of her classes. She has allowed me to gain four dual enrollment credits from Calculus to Statistics for my future endeavors. She has paved the way for many African American students in New Orleans and Southern University. She teaches a strong work ethic and allows students to understand complex concepts such as calculus. She is Jacade Gordon, the Advanced Mathematics Teacher at Edna Karr High School. I could have chosen someone well-known, like Rosa Parks or Martin Luther King, but none of them directly changed my life. Ms. Gordon has influenced my life more than any other teacher I have met. For example, she aided in deciding my major. As a sophomore, I had claimed I wanted to major in aerospace engineering and design spaceships for NASA. Before realizing it, Ms. Godan told me, "We'll see what you major in at graduation." Over time, I realized while completing her assignments I loved advanced math. I wanted a field that would keep me on a "pre-med" track while incorporating mathematical concepts. Sure enough, as a Senior, I had decided that engineering was not for me, and I wanted to study chemistry. She explained that she has a Bachelor of Science in chemistry and has always incorporated mathematics into science. It intrigued me, and she inspired me to major in chemistry. Gordon has also pushed me to become the public speaker I am today. She helped me gain massive opportunities to speak at significant events, such as a gun rally at Xavier University. Gordon even wrote my letter of recommendation to multiple colleges. She continues to provide opportunities for me, even in my Senior year. I had the chance to design the Senior Jackets, Shirts, and Sweaters for the Edna Karr class of 2024. Ms. Gordon is a strong African American influence who has genuinely changed my life. Thank you, Ms. G
    Eddie L. Smith Sr. Memorial Scholarship
    I always believed that if I gave the world positive energy, it would soon return to me. My name is Jada Carroll, and I am a senior at Edna Karr High School. From my earliest memories of elementary school, I have always been a hard worker. From all A’s in academics, to working jobs in the evening, I can’t remember a year where I “stood still”. I did many extracurricular activities throughout highschool, including cheerleading, yearbook, student government, and other clubs. Even on a smaller scale, I try to positively impact my peers each and everyday. I tutor in multiple subjects, I assist people with homework assignments, and I am extremely involved throughout my school. Walking in, you may find me taking pictures of an event, or even speaking at events. Sometimes I even act as a teaching assistant in my Dual Enrollment classes. Originally coming from a small school, New Orleans has provided many opportunities for me to impact others my age on a larger scale. Though there's so many things I could say about me throughout school, my actions should speak louder than my words. Originally, I wanted to study aerospace engineering. I love mathematics, and decided that a technical field would suit my endeavors. Except, when I took an internship at an engineering firm, I surprised myself. I realized that I wanted to be integrated with people. I felt myself seeking interactions, instead of crunching numbers. I wanted to assist people, and constantly be surrounded by opportunities. I realized that I wanted to become a doctor. I plan on going to medical school and receiving a medical degree in anesthesiology. With this degree, I plan on working directly in the hospital and providing extensive care to all of my patients. In addition, I will become the first doctor within my family, and hopefully open doors for future generations. I plan on attending Centenary College of Louisiana, where I’ll be able to travel and share my talents around the world. In the fall, I’ll be visiting Paris to hopefully tour hospitals and medical systems in France. My medical degree is not only a financial investment for me, but also my family and community. I hope to provide medical assistance during crises, such as another pandemic. I also want to aid people within the emergency room, even in the early mornings. Though many patients will not see my work behind the scenes, I still want to positively influence the lives of people within my community.
    Shays Scholarship
    For my entire life, money has always been a pressing issue. My family rarely went on vacations, and we hardly ever ate at restaurants. My mother never graduated college, and my father worked as a firefighter. So, I would be lying if I claimed that I was not seeking higher education for its financial aspects. It's more than the money though. What especially moved my passion for higher education was my mother's life. She had always dreamed of going to medical school and becoming a certified doctor. Instead, she had gotten pregnant. Despite this setback, my mother has worked every day to ensure that my brothers and I always stay healthy. My mother sacrificed her own meals so we ate. My mother sacrificed her own happiness for ours. My mother's actions have set the course of my life. Ever since freshman year, I have devoted my grades and time to ensuring that college would be as cheap as possible for my family. And with all the funding I receive, I hope that I can change the life of someone else, the way my mother has changed mine. If I had the ability to change the life of at least one person, then everything I lived through would have been worth it. When I go to college, I plan on majoring in Chemistry on a "pre-med" track. I eventually want to graduate from medical school as an anesthesiologist. At first, I planned on becoming an aerospace engineer. Eventually, I realized that I wanted to help people on a physical level and work with others to change lives. What's exciting about chemistry is the idea of using math in my desired field. Of course, I could major in Biology like most aspiring doctors, but the combination of math and science seems more interesting. Furthermore, I cannot wait to experience a clinical. A Clinical seems like an introduction to the medical field. I am also excited by the idea of actually working hands-on with patients during medical procedures. It excites me knowing I'll constantly stay working, instead of sitting in a quiet environment. It excites me knowing that I'm not only changing my future but also the futures of others. Overall, the general challenging idea of the medical field excites me. I crave a challenge, and the idea that medical school is hard pushes me to achieve what's unachievable. Chemistry and anesthesiology are both fields that will serve as a challenging boost for my future.
    E.R.I.C.A. Scholarship
    Chemistry was not a major I would have chosen four years ago. I originally wanted to become a technical engineer, probably working with data or hardware. I participated in coding classes and joined robotics. I even have certifications in related engineering fields. Now, I plan on majoring in chemistry on a pre-med track. This entire career shift was due to a single internship. I have always told myself that If I could change the world for at least one person, all would have been worth it. I interned at Woodward Design + Build in New Orleans, Louisiana. I sat at my desk and realized engineering was not my field. Of course, the hospitality was lovely. I was welcomed with open arms and encouraged to pursue a field in engineering. Yet, the building was always quiet. Throughout the summer, I quietly sat alone at my desk and filed paperwork. My supervisor never talked much. We probably spoke a total of five times. My job was to create work binders. For two months, I began to grow restless. I questioned what the world of engineering even entailed. Most of all, I asked myself, Am I even helping anyone? I began to consider other fields besides engineering. I began to consider majoring in medicine. Medicine would provide noisy environments, stressful work, and plenty of social interactions. Of course, this seemed perfect. I began to research and explore scientific fields. Though many doctors gain bachelor's degrees in Biology, Chemistry caught my attention. In high school, I have shown to be exceptional in math. These math courses include include Pre-Calculus, Trigonometry, and Calculus. My teacher for each of these Dual Enrollment math courses was a female Professor named Ms. Gordon. Before I even realized engineering was not my field, she claimed engineering did not suit me. This woman holds a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry and serves as a graduate from Xavier Louisiana. Ms. Gordon claimed she saw herself in me. Her influence further pushed me into world chemistry. Now, I could not imagine majoring in anything else. Chemistry provides the opportunity to work with others in busy environments. Chemistry allows students and people to solve complex problems. Best of all, I feel like I am helping someone. Studying antibiotics means I will have the ability to influence the world of medicine. Even deducting what anesthesia is best can save the life of at least one person. With the help of real-world experiences and the influence of my professor, a passion for science has risen within me. I may have found out how I will help people, so everything was worth it.