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Isabelle Mierau

1485

Bold Points

4x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

My dream career for as long as I can remember has been to become a veterinarian; the only flaw to that plan is that getting an education is incredibly expensive between undergrad and veterinary school. I plan to use this platform to build up finances and begin to pay for this required schooling. At 18 years old and a 2024 high school graduate, I have over 500 animal-related service/volunteer hours and have fostered over 65 neglected, abused, and underprivileged dogs/puppies in the past two years. Additionally, I have accumulated over 150 veterinary hours, 700+ exotic animal hours, 800+ small animal experience hours, and 50+ large animal experience hours. Another thing about me is that I am autistic. In the Spring of 2022, I was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, which simultaneously flipped my life upside down and made my entire childhood make sense. Being autistic gives me a unique perspective on life and my relationship with animals, separating me from other aspiring veterinarians. In Fall 2024, I will attend Kansas State University to study Animal Science on a Pre-Veterinary Track, minor in Music, and compete on KSU's Division 1 Women's Rowing Team!

Education

Kansas State University

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2022
  • Majors:
    • Agriculture/Veterinary Preparatory Programs
    • Animal Sciences
  • Minors:
    • Music

Mead High School

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Zoology/Animal Biology
    • Veterinary/Animal Health Technologies/Technicians
    • Animal Sciences
    • Agricultural/Animal/Plant/Veterinary Science and Related Fields, Other
    • Music
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 29
      ACT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Veterinary

    • Dream career goals:

      To become a DVM, and possibly own my own clinic one day.

    • Guest Engagement Team Member

      Denver Zoological Foundation
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Daycare Attendant

      Rogue's Farm Doggy Daycare and Boarding
      2024 – Present7 months
    • Vet Tech

      Animal Health at Home
      2023 – 2023
    • Animal Assistant

      Anderson Farms
      2022 – 20231 year

    Sports

    Rowing

    Varsity
    2024 – Present7 months

    Awards

    • At Division 1 Level

    Soccer

    Club
    2010 – 202313 years

    Track & Field

    Varsity
    2020 – Present4 years

    Cross-Country Running

    Varsity
    2020 – Present4 years

    Awards

    • Elected Varsity Captain

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2020 – Present4 years

    Arts

    • Mead High School Band

      Music
      2020 – 2024

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Animal Aid of Colorado — Foster Home
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Longmont Humane Society — Junior Animal Care Assistant
      2019 – 2020

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Dr. G. Yvette Pegues Disability Scholarship
    Autism Spectrum Disorder is an incredibly isolating neurological difference; being a developmental disability that primarily affects social communication and interaction, those with Autism often have significant difficulties connecting with basically every person around them. This is something that I can confidently tell you is accurate, seeing as it has been my life for the past 18 years. Social situations that appeared to be basic for other children my age would always be scary, overwhelming, and incredibly stressful, and my only defense to these emotions was to shut down. This often manifested as my inability to speak. Growing up, I was consistently silent around my teachers, coaches, and peers, which only made those social situations that much harder. It was a self-destructive cycle. With humans relying so heavily on verbal communication and speaking being so difficult for me, to say making friends was challenging would be an understatement. For as long as I can remember, I have depended on my pets to be my closest friends. Aside from not needing to be spoken to, pets use a very straightforward set of rules and patterns in their body language to express themselves. Since I don’t see speaking as the sole form of communication, I can better understand the body language of animals and address their needs, pain, and emotions. So, while I struggled immensely to connect with other people, I’ve always been able to understand animals with ease. Speaking with veterinarians taught me that a critical factor of Veterinary Medicine is the social connection with clients and that your knowledge of animals and medicine means little if you cannot also appeal to clients. I realized that if I could not push myself to confidently engage in social situations, becoming a veterinarian would be out of the question. This led me to get my first job in 2022 as an Animal Attendant at Anderson Farms, where I engaged with children and spoke with them about the agricultural importance of farm animals while maintaining sanitary conditions of the animals' enclosures. Then, in the spring of 2023, I got a job at the Denver Zoo, where I spoke to hundreds of families daily about exotic animals, their habitats, and conservation efforts, while facilitating human-animal interactions. Finally, in June of 2023, I began working as a Veterinary Assistant at an animal hospital, which confirmed that vet-med is my true passion. During this time I was also volunteering at a local animal shelter, Animal Aid of Colorado in Berthoud, where I accumulated over 500 volunteer hours with abandoned and abused dogs. Putting myself into each of these positions was initially uncomfortable and anxiety-inducing. Still, I believe that leaving my comfort zone was necessary in the long run to eventually become an excellent veterinarian. Applying to college is a similar situation. Attending a school away from my home is miles out of my comfort zone, but if the last year of my life has taught me anything, it’s that leaving my comfort zone will allow my potential as a veterinarian to flourish and not attempting to take the opportunity to further my education in animal science would be a disservice to myself and the animals I intend to help in the future.
    Ventana Ocean Conservation Scholarship
    “Inspiring Communities to Save Wildlife for Future Generations” For the past 14 months, I have proudly worn this mission statement on my back every time I work as part of the Conservation Alliance at the Denver Zoo. When people think of zoos, their minds may first go to land animals such as elephants, giraffes, zebras, and so on. However, many people don’t realize the role that zoos play in the lives of marine animals. The Denver Zoo is home to over 100 species and 1,400 fish specimens alone! Over the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to learn about, interact with, and care for many of these animals. All my life I have planned on becoming a veterinarian, however, with so many different pathways in vet medicine, I didn’t know exactly what I planned on specializing in. After my work experience as a part of the Denver Zoo Conservation Alliance, I believe that exotic vet medicine, specifically in a zoo setting, is where I am meant to be. I will be able to use my degree to help care for, heal, diagnose, and do so much more for the underrepresented population of marine wildlife. There is no protection for our oceans without protecting those living there. So, veterinarians with extensive knowledge of aquatic life are necessary for many species to survive and thrive. In a few short years, I will be one of them. Unfortunately, vet school and college are notoriously expensive, so I could use any help to fund my education. Without an education, I can do little to help our oceans and those in them who call them home. While I can acknowledge that I lack experience compared to other applicants due to my age and fewer years of opportunities, I believe that my age is a factor that makes me a competitive applicant. While others have had years to get awards, internships, and other flashy titles for their resume, I was only old enough to get my first job two years ago, having just turned 18 in June. Yet in my two years, I have gained over a year of wildlife and conservation work experience, over 700 hours of it, to be specific, and I have worked closely with a veterinarian as a veterinary assistant to gain medical experience. I also accumulated over 500 hours of volunteer work with animals during this time. I have repeatedly put myself into a position to gain exposure to my future field and never turned down an opportunity to better prepare myself for my career. In the fall of 2024, I will begin studying Animal Science on a pre-veterinary track at Kansas State University. During my time there, I will also minor in music to expand my education and continue engaging my creativity. After college, I plan to attend vet school and do anything necessary to become the life-saving veterinarian I know I can be!
    To The Sky Scholarship
    Autism Spectrum Disorder is an incredibly isolating neurological difference; being a developmental disability that primarily affects social communication and interaction, those with Autism often have significant difficulties connecting with basically every person around them. This is something that I can confidently tell you is accurate, seeing as it has been my life for the past 18 years. Social situations that appeared to be basic for other children my age would always be scary, overwhelming, and incredibly stressful, and my only defense to these emotions was to shut down. This often manifested as my inability to speak. Growing up, I was consistently silent around my teachers, coaches, and peers, which only made those social situations that much harder. It was a self-destructive cycle. With humans relying so heavily on verbal communication and speaking being so difficult for me, to say making friends was challenging would be an understatement. For as long as I can remember, I have depended on my pets to be my closest friends. Aside from not needing to be spoken to, pets use a very straightforward set of rules and patterns in their body language to express themselves. Since I don’t see speaking as the sole form of communication, I can better understand the body language of animals and address their needs, pain, and emotions. So, while I struggled immensely to connect with other people, I’ve always been able to understand animals with ease. Speaking with veterinarians taught me that a critical factor of Veterinary Medicine is the social connection with clients and that your knowledge of animals and medicine means little if you cannot also appeal to clients. I realized that if I could not push myself to confidently engage in social situations, becoming a veterinarian would be out of the question. This led me to get my first job in 2022 as an Animal Attendant at Anderson Farms, where I engaged with children and spoke with them about the agricultural importance of farm animals while maintaining sanitary conditions of the animals' enclosures. Then, in the spring of 2023, I got a job at the Denver Zoo, where I spoke to hundreds of families daily about exotic animals, their habitats, and conservation efforts, while facilitating human-animal interactions. Finally, in June of 2023, I began working as a Veterinary Assistant at an animal hospital, which confirmed that vet-med is my true passion. During this time I was also volunteering at a local animal shelter, Animal Aid of Colorado in Berthoud, where I accumulated over 500 volunteer hours with abandoned and abused dogs. Putting myself into each of these positions was initially uncomfortable and anxiety-inducing. Still, I believe that leaving my comfort zone was necessary in the long run to eventually become an excellent veterinarian. Applying to college is a similar situation. Attending a school away from my home is miles out of my comfort zone, but if the last year of my life has taught me anything, it’s that leaving my comfort zone will allow my potential as a veterinarian to flourish and not attempting to take the opportunity to further my education in animal science would be a disservice to myself and the animals I intend to help in the future.
    Connie Konatsotis Scholarship
    Autism Spectrum Disorder is an incredibly isolating neurological difference; being a developmental disability that primarily affects social communication and interaction, those with Autism often have significant difficulties connecting with basically every person around them. This is something that I can confidently tell you is accurate, seeing as it has been my life for the past 18 years. Social situations that appeared to be basic for other children my age would always be scary, overwhelming, and incredibly stressful, and my only defense to these emotions was to shut down. This often manifested as my inability to speak. Growing up, I was consistently silent around my teachers, coaches, and peers, which only made those social situations that much harder. It was a self-destructive cycle. With humans relying so heavily on verbal communication and speaking being so difficult for me, to say making friends was challenging would be an understatement. For as long as I can remember, I have depended on my pets to be my closest friends. Aside from not needing to be spoken to, pets use a very straightforward set of rules and patterns in their body language to express themselves. Since I don’t see speaking as the sole form of communication, I can better understand the body language of animals and address their needs, pain, and emotions. So, while I struggled immensely to connect with other people, I’ve always been able to understand animals with ease. Speaking with veterinarians taught me that a critical factor of Veterinary Medicine is the social connection with clients and that your knowledge of animals and medicine means little if you cannot also appeal to clients. I realized that if I could not push myself to confidently engage in social situations, becoming a veterinarian would be out of the question. This led me to get my first job in 2022 as an Animal Attendant at Anderson Farms, where I engaged with children and spoke with them about the agricultural importance of farm animals while maintaining sanitary conditions of the animals' enclosures. Then, in the spring of 2023, I got a job at the Denver Zoo, where I spoke to hundreds of families daily about exotic animals, their habitats, and conservation efforts, while facilitating human-animal interactions. Finally, in June of 2023, I began working as a Veterinary Assistant at an animal hospital, which confirmed that vet-med is my true passion. During this time I was also volunteering at a local animal shelter, Animal Aid of Colorado in Berthoud, where I accumulated over 500 volunteer hours with abandoned and abused dogs. Putting myself into each of these positions was initially uncomfortable and anxiety-inducing. Still, I believe that leaving my comfort zone was necessary in the long run to eventually become an excellent veterinarian. Applying to college is a similar situation. Attending a school away from my home is miles out of my comfort zone, but if the last year of my life has taught me anything, it’s that leaving my comfort zone will allow my potential as a veterinarian to flourish and not attempting to take the opportunity to further my education in animal science would be a disservice to myself and the animals I intend to help in the future.