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Imoree McGregory

1045

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Graduating from college, specifically from an HBCU, is crucial as it will allow me access to more opportunities and provide options for my life’s journey. I will continue to take pride in my journey, recognizing the advancements I've achieved while managing academic stress and overcoming the challenges. Completing my college education will symbolize achievement and mark the transition when I can autonomously balance my well-being and career. I yearn to be one of the few Black female criminal profilers with the aspiration to lead an FBI department. Studying criminal behavior allows me to understand the intellectual motivations behind violent actions. My career choice is rooted in my desire to view things from a different mindset and leverage the advantage of analyzing a person’s thought processes in order to apprehend them. My high ambitions are underscored by my realization that I possess a deeper purpose that is driving my aspiration to attend and graduate from college.

Education

North Carolina A & T State University

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2028
  • Majors:
    • Criminal Justice and Corrections, General
  • Minors:
    • Psychology, General

Saint Mary's Academy

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

    -
  • Transfer schools of interest:

    -
  • Majors of interest:

    • Criminology
    -
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Law Enforcement

    • Dream career goals:

      FBI Criminal Profiler

    • Administration

      Team Derek Fisher
      2024 – Present5 months

    Sports

    Basketball

    Varsity
    2020 - 20244 years

    Awards

    • All-League
    • Coaches' Award
    • Defensive Player of the Year

    Research

    • Psychology, General

      Saint Mary's AcademyCoordinator
      2024 – Present
    • Psychology, General

      Saint Mary's AcademyCoordinator
      2023 – 2023
    • Psychology, General

      Saint Mary's AcademyCoordinator
      2023 – 2023

    Arts

    • Saint Mary's Academy

      Photography
      Yearbook Pages
      2022 – 2023
    • Saint Mary's Academy

      Visual Arts
      Teacher Awards, Class Pages, Club Pages, Sports' Pages
      2022 – 2023

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Urban Scholars AcademyTutor
      2024 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Toddler Tech UniversityTeacher's Assistant
      2018 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      Santa Monica Police Activity LeagueOversight
      2023 – 2023

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Philanthropy

    God Hearted Girls Scholarship
    My relationship with Jesus has profoundly shaped my faith, grounding me in principles of love, empathy, and resilience. Through the teachings of Jesus, I have learned the importance of compassion and the strength that comes from trusting in God’s plan. This relationship has been my anchor during challenging times, guiding me to seek justice and maintain integrity in all my actions. The Lord has been like a guiding light, shaping how I see the world and how I want to make a difference in it. Learning from Him has taught me the importance of compassion, forgiveness, and loving others just as they are. His word inspires me to stand up for what's right, to care for those who need it most, and to spread kindness wherever I go. As I continue my educational journey at North Carolina A&T State University, majoring in Criminal Justice, excited to bring my faith along with me. First, I will integrate the values of love and empathy into my studies and interactions with peers and professors. By treating everyone with respect and support, I aim to create a supportive and inclusive environment that reflects the teachings of Jesus. Second, I will rely on my faith to persevere through academic and personal challenges. The Bible reminds us that we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us (Philippians 4:13), serving as my source of motivation. During difficult times, I will turn to prayer and meditation to seek guidance and maintain a positive outlook. In addition, part of bringing my faith into my college life means connecting with other believers on campus. I will actively participate in campus ministry and community service projects. By engaging in these activities, I can live out my faith by serving others and making a positive impact on my community. This will also provide opportunities to share my testimony and inspire others to explore their own faith journeys. I want to be part of a community that supports each other, grows together, and finds ways to serve others. Whether it's volunteering in the local community or just being there for a friend who needs a listening ear, I know there are so many ways to show God's love in action. Lastly, I will strive to be a role model for other students, particularly women of color pursuing careers in male-dominated fields. By embodying the principles of my faith, I hope to demonstrate that it is possible to succeed academically and professionally while staying true to one’s spiritual beliefs. Overall, my relationship with Jesus has strengthened my faith, and I plan to implement that faith throughout my educational journey by promoting love, empathy, perseverance, and service. By doing so, I aim to create a positive and impactful experience at North Carolina A&T State University and beyond.
    Building a Better World Scholarship
    I will be majoring in Criminal Justice at North Carolina A&T State University, pursuing a career as an FBI Criminal Profiler. However, this role is deemed as challenging to myself and other women who look like me. Specifically, women of color, often termed 'double minorities,' face compounded negative stereotypes and biases stemming from both their gender and race. Representation should be more emphasized for teachings and expectations to be passed down through generations. Because of this caste system of race and gender, women of color are both underrepresented and misrepresented in politics, business, career occupations, and the media. The lack of valid representation causes America to view American stereotypes from an untrue and biased White, Heterosexual male lens that excludes the legitimacy of experiences women of color face in this country. Fortunately, I have not been one of the many to adapt to nor normalize this single and false perspective of the bottom half of the strata. I continue to notice that it is not easy finding women of color as an aspiration in a career path, so in response, as a Black woman, I aim to become head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Department. I want to be that motive for people who look and share the same experiences as me as well. I also plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice. By acknowledging and addressing the challenges faced by double minorities, I aim to empower future generations and advocate for inclusivity, equity, and most importantly, correct representation. My goal to create meaningful programs that empower young women of color aims to help them pursue successful careers in law enforcement and make positive contributions to their communities. I want others to understand that the issue is real, the issue is problematic, but also that the issue is worth countering. In confronting these systemic issues, I believe in the power of representation and advocacy from within those affected to avoid the drawbacks rooted in intersectionality. The journey ahead may be challenging and prolonged, but it is one that I am committed to ensuring that women of color can secure their aspirations and go further and expand in holding authority. Through these approaches, I aim to integrate my Christian Baptist faith into my professional life, creating a better world by promoting justice, compassion, and hope. My faith will not only guide my actions but also serve as a beacon of light for others, demonstrating the power of God’s love in our lives. The Bible reminds us that we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us (Philippians 4:13), which has been a source of strength and motivation for me, especially during challenging times. By sharing my testimony of faith and resilience, I hope to inspire others to persevere and trust in God’s plan for their lives. I plan to share my faith not just through words, but through actions that reflect the values of love, empathy, and integrity. By demonstrating these values in my professional conduct and interactions, I hope to inspire others and show the positive impact that faith can have on our work and relationships. My faith will be the foundation of my work, guiding me to serve with integrity, empathy, and a deep commitment to making a positive impact.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    During my junior year, I faced domestic violence from my ex-partner and verbal abuse from his mother right after the situation had ended. Without closure and without justice, I felt alone and misunderstood. Even though my family and friends were there to listen to me, I still felt like I had no one who understood what I was going through, and I felt like I had no way out. For months, I grew numb to everything and ended up going back to him. From an outside perspective, I always thought the girl was so stupid to go back to someone who put them through so much. However, as I was in the same situation as those “stupid girls,” I realized why they went back, which is ultimately unexplainable. At this time, I lost my identity, forgot who I was and all that I stood for, and forgot my sense of self-worth. Unfortunately, mental health is not taken as seriously in the Black community and is often overlooked, which made me feel even more in a dark hole, but it also made me question if I could rely on God. After praying for a way out, I eventually lost interest in my ex and began to reclaim my identity. Not too long after I started to feel better, my best friend at the time had turned her back on me for no evident reason. We talked about the situation and each other’s perspectives, and she admitted that she misunderstood the situation. However, she still planned for me to get jumped by her other friends and allowed them to talk about my mother, even considering all my family had done for her. During my whole junior year, I felt vulnerable. It was marked by vulnerability, loss, and a growing sense of betrayal. I lost some of the most important people in my life. I felt the world turning against me more and more each day. I withdrew from social activities, stopped eating, and lost trust in people. The summer of 2023 felt like days of misery, as I was overwhelmed by suicidal thoughts. Having previously experienced depression after the loss of my grandmother, whom I considered a mother figure, I attempted suicide by taking large doses of unknown medications but fortunately sought help in time. This time, however, the pain was ten times worse, making sleep and calming my suicidal thoughts impossible. After months of fighting the commitment to end my life, I told my parents what I had been going through, called a suicide hotline, and had sessions with a therapist. I realize now that after all of these obstacles, my faith in God was strengthened as He proved to me that He hears me and sees me, and I am indeed, not alone. With faith and time, I became the best version of myself. My experiences have motivated me to carry strength into everything I do and help other people avoid my feeling of hopelessness by putting a smile on their faces every day, fueling my determination to carry strength into all I do and to help others avoid feelings of helplessness by spreading positivity and encouragement. Even though I did not expect it to, my encouragement became acknowledged, and I was chosen by my school community to receive the Student of the Month Award for sisterhood. Additionally, during the Senior Awards Ceremony for graduation, I was chosen for the Carondelet Leadership Award for demonstrating “exemplary leadership qualities, commitment to community service, and a positive impact on their peers.” The award acknowledges my ability to “inspire, organize, and lead initiatives that contribute to the betterment of the school community.” Even though I struggled at some point in time academically, I still persevered and was awarded the highest graduation cord that resembled my 4.05 cumulative GPA. I got into my dream school, North Carolina A&T State University, and will be attending there in the Fall. My experiences have only motivated me to take steps forward and positively impact those around me, ultimately making my relationships with others stronger. To begin turning my future career aspirations into reality as an FBI Criminal profiler, I will be majoring in Criminal Justice. My passion for becoming an FBI Criminal Profiler was strengthened when I became a victim of domestic abuse. I found myself fighting for justice to get back what I felt emotionally and physically. However, even through this unfortunate experience, God enabled me to realize what He expects of me and how I can utilize the abuse I went through to appeal to the vulnerability of other victims and their families. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. Ultimately, my mental health journey has taught me the profound truth behind the cliché, “You never know what people go through.” This understanding drives me to be open and supportive, allowing others to confide in me. My experiences have not only shaped my goals and strengthened my relationships but also deepened my compassion and resolve to make a positive impact on the world around me. I am blessed beyond measure to be able to turn my obstacles into footstools.
    Peter and Nan Liubenov Student Scholarship
    I perceive myself as a positive force in society both now and in the future through my commitment to personal growth, community involvement, and my chosen career path in criminal justice. Currently, I strive to embody the values of leadership, commitment, and dedication instilled in me by my family. These principles enhance my motivation and inspire me to make a difference in my community. Academically, I am dedicated to my studies and personal development, knowing that my education and self-awareness are essential to making meaningful contributions to society. By excelling academically, I aim to lay a strong foundation for my future aspirations. In addition to playing Varsity basketball since freshman year, being a member of my school’s Onward Scholarships program, and many more campus involvement roles, I have taken pride in my culture and have been a committed member of my school’s Black Student Union all 4 years of my high school journey and was elected to be the club’s social manager my senior year. My high school journey has been rewarding, even when the challenges I faced felt impossible to overcome. As a survivor of domestic abuse in my junior year, I used my experience to advocate for others in similar situations through group talks. As I pursue my degree in Criminal Justice at North Carolina A&T State University, my goal is to become an FBI Criminal Profiler. In this role, I plan to advocate for justice and work towards reforming the criminal justice system to be more equitable and effective. My experience with domestic abuse drives my passion for ensuring that victims receive the justice and support they deserve. I aim to establish programs, mentoring young individuals, especially those from underrepresented communities, guiding them towards positive paths and helping them overcome social and economic barriers. By sharing my journey and experiences, I hope to inspire and empower the next generation of leaders who plan to pursue a career in law enforcement. In the long term, I aspire to influence policy changes that address systemic issues within the criminal justice system. Current social norms and the ongoing controversy around justice, equality, and personal empowerment shape my thinking and approach. The increasing awareness, yet continued rejection of systemic inequalities, particularly in law enforcement, motivate me to be part of the change. Social norms emphasizing the importance of diversity, inclusion, and mental health support further reinforce my commitment to advocacy and reform. The shift towards valuing personal narratives and lived experiences in understanding societal issues also plays a significant role in my approach. My personal experiences with domestic abuse and cultural isolation have taught me the importance of empathy, resilience, and advocacy. These experiences drive my desire to contribute positively to society and help others navigate similar challenges. By aligning my goals with these evolving social norms, I aim to be a catalyst for change, ensuring that my contributions today and in the future reflect a commitment to justice, equity, and the well-being of all members of society.
    Kenyada Me'Chon Thomas Legacy Scholarship
    Thanks to the Americanized caste system, structured not by morality but by the distribution of the power and resources available throughout its strata, underrepresentation and misrepresentation are profound. Intersectionality, which is “the interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage,” is, in my opinion, one of America’s most hidden problems. Specifically, women of color, often termed 'double minorities,' face compounded negative stereotypes and biases stemming from both their gender and race. Representation should be more emphasized for teachings and expectations to be passed down through generations. Because of this caste system of race and gender, it is a stated fact that women of color are both underrepresented and misrepresented in politics, business, career occupations, and the media. The lack of valid representation causes America to view American stereotypes from an untrue and biased White, Heterosexual male lens that excludes the legitimacy of experiences women of color face in this country. Fortunately, I have not been one of the many to adapt to nor normalize this single and false perspective of the bottom half of the strata. I am fortunate to have witnessed the American nation’s first Black First Lady, along with the first Black female Vice President. I have looked passed the misperceptions and have instead sought motive and possibility by researching women of color, such as Laphonza Butler and Carol Moseley Braun. I continue to notice that it is not easy finding women of color as an aspiration in a career path, so in response to this hidden issue, as a Black woman, I aim to become head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Department at the least. As these Black women were my proof of the opportunity to be taken seriously in a career, I want to be that motive for people who look and share the same experiences as me as well. I also plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice. By acknowledging and addressing the challenges faced by double minorities, I aim to empower future generations and advocate for inclusivity, equity, and most importantly, correct representation. I want others to understand that the issue is real, the issue is problematic, but also that the issue is worth countering. In confronting these systemic issues, I believe in the power of representation and advocacy from within those affected to avoid the drawbacks rooted in intersectionality. The journey ahead may be challenging and prolonged, but it is one that I am committed to ensuring that women of color can secure their aspirations and go further and expand in holding authority.
    Frederick J. Salone Memorial Basketball Scholarship
    I am Imoree McGregory, a graduating senior at Saint Mary's Academy in Inglewood, California. My journey has helped shape my unwavering dedication to basketball and self-discovery, passions that have been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Proudly, I have played basketball my entire life and have been on my school's varsity basketball team all 4 years with my off-season being spent on Amateur Athletic Union (AAU/Club) Basketball. Consistently playing basketball has taught me the importance of communication, togetherness, and perseverance, regardless of the situation. These important factors are essential to utilize in the future, especially for the career I plan to pursue. I want to become a Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Profiler with the ability to identify perpetrators behind critical and serious crimes. In this field, teamwork is essential, just as it is on the basketball court. Fortunately, basketball being a team sport has given me a head start on what it takes to persevere in my future career, moreover life itself. Additionally, being a student-athlete has taught me time management. At first, I struggled with balancing practices and games with homework and tests. I would stress constantly at night, procrastinating on starting my homework, eventually causing me to stay up late at night just to get up early in the morning and start the same day all over again. Unfortunately, I began to feel like I was falling out of love with basketball, a sport that I had played since I could walk, due to my coaches. I dreaded practicing every day. I felt as if I was in a repeated cycle. However, with experience and motivation through stress and exhaustion, I have now found better ways to balance my priorities. Regarding perseverance, I have played many games where my team and I were either under pressure in a close game with it being tied or with us being down a few points. Luckily, I have learned that with the right strategies and mindset, outcomes still hold the possibility of being in my favor, regardless of adversity and what the outcome may initially seem. Being a student-athlete has taught me that things cannot get done the way they are supposed to unless I start what I need to early. It has also been embedded in my mind that as a human, I cannot do everything at once or alone--life comes with communication and support. As my basketball journey comes to a close, I find myself reflecting on the ways in which it has shaped me as a person. Beyond the court, I've discovered new passions and interests, from music to cooking to digital design. I have developed a deeper interest in music, cooking and using new recipes, digital design, and analyzing behavior. I have also become more involved in my culture as the social manager of my school’s Black Student Union. Ending my basketball season in February was bittersweet; I stopped playing the sport that I’ve loved for a long period of time but in turn, I have discovered more about myself in the process. Being on and off the court has given me an advancement in self-discovery and growth. In the end, basketball has been more than just a game for me; it has been a transformative journey that has prepared me for what I will need to carry with me to have a prosperous future. Though my days as a high school student-athlete may be coming to an end, I know that the values instilled in me through basketball will continue to guide me on my path to success.
    Michael Mattera Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    FBI Director Imoree M. McGregory will be engraved on my office door, marking me as one of the only Black female directors within our nation’s Federal Bureau of Investigators. My dreams will become reality and I will make a difference in my community. My experiences have shaped me. I am and will forever be self-driven. My passion for becoming an FBI Criminal Profiler was strengthened when I became a victim of domestic abuse as a 16-year-old Junior in high school. As a teenage girl, I believed I was in the perfect high school relationship, convinced it would surpass our young ages and convinced that the naysayers would eventually see our never-ending bond for themselves. I felt like I was amidst a rainbow but soon learned I was in the eye of a storm. I was depressed, surrounded by no one with a shared experience. I turned to social media to distract me from what he took away from me– identity and self-determination. Scrolling on Instagram, I stumbled upon a bible verse: “Not my will but Thy will be done” (Luke 22:42). At that moment, I chose to explore God’s purpose of allowing me to experience that storm, rather than letting the storm’s force weaken me. After some time, I found myself fighting for justice to get back what I felt emotionally and physically. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. Studying criminal behavior allows me to understand the intellectual motivations behind violent actions. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. My career choice has been rooted in my desire to view things from a different mindset and leverage the advantage of analyzing a person’s thought process to apprehend them. My high ambitions are underscored by my realization that I possess a deeper purpose that is driving my aspiration to attend and graduate from college. I will be attending North Carolina A&T State University in the fall, a Historically Black College and University (HBCU), where I will be majoring in Criminal Justice, aiming to pursue a career as an FBI Criminal Profiler. However, I understand that not many people of color, nor females, are in this career path which luckily motivates me to be the best at my job. Even so, I also understand that this underrepresentation may dismay others. I continue to recognize the challenges faced by individuals like myself in traditionally male-dominated and predominantly white professions. In response, by providing mentorship, resources, and support networks, I plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice, driven by a passion to make a meaningful difference in the field of law enforcement. As I learned how to navigate through this difficult situation by using it as my footstool, I survived with purpose and meaning again. I now believe no matter who's against me, I’ll always be able to carry the strength I never thought I had to overcome situations both big and small and grow from them. Coming from experience, I carry the motive to transform difficult situations into stimulation. No matter what I experience and how much it hurts, I will always be able to calm my storm, whether I have others to grab onto or not.
    Fernandez Scholarship
    I will be majoring in Criminal Justice at North Carolina A&T State University, pursuing a career as an FBI Criminal Profiler. However, this role is deemed as challenging to myself and other women who look like me. Specifically, women of color, often termed 'double minorities,' face compounded negative stereotypes and biases stemming from both their gender and race. Representation should be more emphasized for teachings and expectations to be passed down through generations. Because of this caste system of race and gender, women of color are both underrepresented and misrepresented in politics, business, career occupations, and the media. The lack of valid representation causes America to view American stereotypes from an untrue and biased White, Heterosexual male lens that excludes the legitimacy of experiences women of color face in this country. Fortunately, I have not been one of the many to adapt to nor normalize this single and false perspective of the bottom half of the strata. I am fortunate to have witnessed the American nation’s first Black First Lady, along with the first Black female Vice President. I have looked passed the misperceptions and have instead sought motive and possibility by researching women of color in male-dominated careers. I continue to notice that it is not easy finding women of color as an aspiration in a career path, so in response to this hidden issue, as a Black woman, I aim to become head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Department at the least. As these Black women were my proof of the opportunity to be taken seriously in a career, I want to be that motive for people who look and share the same experiences as me as well. I also plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice. By acknowledging and addressing the challenges faced by double minorities, I aim to empower future generations and advocate for inclusivity, equity, and most importantly, correct representation. My goal to create meaningful programs that empower young women of color aims to help them pursue successful careers in law enforcement and make positive contributions to their communities. I want others to understand that the issue is real, the issue is problematic, but also that the issue is worth countering. In confronting these systemic issues, I believe in the power of representation and advocacy from within those affected to avoid the drawbacks rooted in intersectionality. The journey ahead may be challenging and prolonged, but it is one that I am committed to ensuring that women of color can secure their aspirations and go further and expand in holding authority.
    Servant Ships Scholarship
    The books I have read and the films I have seen are commonly surrounded by the Black community. These books and films have either negatively portrayed the Black community or have shown its authenticity. However, both portrayals have shaped who I am and who I want to become. The overall takeaway I have gotten from what I have read and seen is that my community is not represented enough under any discussion. I am Imoree McGregory, a senior at Saint Mary's Academy in Inglewood, California. As a senior, my high school journey has helped shape my unwavering dedication to my hobbies and interests, as well as my self-discovery. Proudly, I have played basketball my entire life and have been on my school's varsity basketball team all 4 years with my off-season being spent on Amateur Athletic Union (AAU/Club) Basketball. Being on and off the court has given me an advancement in self-discovery and growth. I have developed a deeper interest in music, traveling, cooking and using new recipes, digital design, and analyzing behavior. I have also become more involved in my culture as the social manager of my school’s Black Student Union. The thought of beginning my high school journey online due to the pandemic grew overwhelming while I grew pessimistic. However, receiving such a small letter with a larger impact led me to shift my mentality. Thankfully, I was one of twelve students chosen out of an applicant pool of over 100 8th graders seeking to claim a spot in the Onward Scholars Program. The Onward Scholars Program was exactly what I needed. It is a competitive program that focuses on scholarship, enrichment, leadership, and mentorship. As an Onward Scholar, I've met the requirement of maintaining over a 3.5 grade point average, while engaging in meetings, activities, and volunteer opportunities from tutoring kids in need to beach clean-ups. OSP has allowed me to view my community from a different perspective and opened my eyes to reveal that there is so much I have taken for granted. I plan to major in Criminology and be an active participant in clubs and organizations in which all people can shine and elevate their voices. I then aspire to be one of the only Black female FBI Agents and future Directors, empowering other young people to set, strive, and accomplish their dreams. In line with my passion to give back to my community, I intend to design a program that uplifts, educates, and networks young Black students who aspire to major in Criminology/Criminal Justice. It would be an absolute blessing and honor to receive this scholarship to further my education in an effective way, and I am committed to using this opportunity to make a positive impact on my family, community, and the world at large.
    Gregory Chase Carter Memorial Poetry Scholarship
    A Perfect Day With not a thing to look at me differently With not a thing to comment on my imperfections To comment on the difference in my hair To comment on the difference in my skin A Perfect Day Where my skin is seen as an expectation Where my hair is seen as a triumph Where my imperfections turn to perfections Where I am seen as a different standard A Perfect Day With all the eyes of others glued to me unapologetically With all the eyes of others screaming at my elegance To focus on my stride To focus on the way my lips form an upside-down rainbow A Perfect Day Where jealousy disappears Where backstabbing commentary ceases to exist Where everyone around me is full of support Where everyone around me prays for my success A Perfect Day With my parents’ tearing up from pride With myself being the standard of the family To be the one my siblings look up to To be the one my oldest brother tells everything to A Perfect Day Where I am not reminded of myself as a victim Where I can’t recall the marks Where the manipulation vanishes into thin air Where the gaslighting dissipates A Perfect Day With heart attacks not in my genetics With cancer not being passed down To where I could meet people I never met To where those stories of memories turn into stories of the present A Perfect Day Where my grandma can reappear Where my Poppi can let me play in his hair again Where I can finally meet my grandpa Where my cousin got the chance to turn 23 A Perfect Day With my eyes focusing on only my perfection With my thoughts forming only positives around my body To love myself without second thoughts To post myself without fear of judgment A Perfect Day Where I can finally get some sleep Where I can finally feel like myself again Where I can take away the decisions I made Where I can finally be proud of myself A Perfect Day With validation not mattering to me With my emotions not being an interruption To where I can move on easily from things To where I can move on easily from people A Perfect Day Where I can stop myself from eating sweets Where I can get myself to work out again Where I can rebuild my confidence Where I can show off my body with pride A Perfect Day With A Perfect Day not just existing as a poem
    San Marino Woman’s Club Scholarship
    As a student aiming for a Criminology/Criminal Justice major in college with aspirations to become an FBI Criminal Profiler, I've found myself inexplicably drawn to mathematically and scientifically demanding courses. In my junior year, I unexpectedly placed myself in Physics. I am not a science person at all, but I felt it was much deeper than the subject itself. The thought of utilizing my feelings toward Physics as a step forward into challenging myself in everyday life motivated me to do well in this class. This motivation not only brought an A to my report card but also brought me confidence as a young lady. Seeing that A at the end of it all and realizing how well I was doing in a class that I felt was not for more pushed me to understand that I can excel in any endeavor I choose, regardless of my initial certainty about it. This new mindset I carried convinced me to take AP Calculus, even though math was not my strongest subject. I thought that if I could pass a subject I thought I could not in one period of time, I could do it again. I am currently in my last month of AP Calculus and I have passed every quiz and test thrown at me. At times, I struggle but this does not discourage me. Because of my experiences, I continue to hold faith in myself and my capabilities overall because of what I have accomplished.
    Big Picture Scholarship
    "Home," starring Rihanna is more than just a movie to me; it is an escape from reality that places me into a world of adventure and no worries. From the moment I grab my remote to lead me into Netflix so that I can click “Home” once again, my outside stresses finally go away and the overwhelming features of social media get put down. This animated film allows me to reconnect with my inner child and get a break from adult-like responsibilities. “Home” provides me with the motive to view the real world in a different way with the disregard of the need to belong in a new world, similar to Oh trying to force himself into other Boov and human tendencies. With this film being one of a few animations that perceive a girl who looks like me in a wondrous way, I have looked up to this film and the validation it brings to me. Tip is a very determined and loving girl who will do anything to protect the people she loves, and that is what I personally prioritize. In addition, Rihanna is one of the people I look up to, and her voice, being of Tip, brings warmth and calmness, making the movie even more addictive. Rihanna's portrayal of Tip not only adds depth to the character but also infuses the film with a sense of familiarity and comfort. What sets "Home" apart from other animated films is its ability to strike a perfect balance between humor and heart. From Oh's differences that make him who he is to Tip's touching moments of vulnerability, the film offers something for everyone, regardless of age or background. Rihanna's portrayal of Tip adds an extra layer of familiarity to what the movie overall brings, infusing her with grit and a fierce determination that is impossible not to admire. The movie itself produces an adventurous plot that could never get tiring of looking forward to. Through its engaging storytelling and memorable characters, the film inspires viewers like me to embrace their uniqueness and celebrate the bonds that unite us all, as Oh and Tip bonded with each other, even though they were different species. It's astonishing how films like "Home" can provide that much-needed escape from the daily grind and remind us of the wonder and imagination we often lose touch with as adults. In a world filled with chaos and uncertainty, "Home" is a beacon of hope, reminding me that, no matter how far I may stray from my roots, there is always a place where I belong. It never fails to serve as a reminder of the joy and wonder we often overlook in our daily lives. It's a refreshing escape, allowing me to momentarily shed my worries as a new adult and rediscover the gratefulness of being a child at heart. It's a reminder that, sometimes, the greatest adventures are the ones that lead me back to myself.
    Top Watch Newsletter Movie Fanatics Scholarship
    "Home," starring Rihanna is more than just a movie to me; it is an escape from reality that places me into a world of adventure and no worries. From the moment I grab my remote to lead me into Netflix so that I can click “Home” once again, my outside stresses finally go away and the overwhelming features of social media get put down. This animated film allows me to reconnect with my inner child and get a break from adult-like responsibilities. “Home” provides me with the motive to view the real world in a different way with the disregard of the need to belong in a new world, similar to Oh trying to force himself into other Boov and human tendencies. With this film being one of a few animations tha perceive a girl who looks like me in a wondrous way, I have looked up to this film and the validation it brings to me. Tip is a very determined and loving girl who will do anything to protect the people she loves, and that is what I personally prioritize. In addition, Rihanna is one of the people I look up to, and her voice, being of Tip, brings warmth and calmness, making the movie even more addictive. Rihanna's portrayal of Tip not only adds depth to the character but also infuses the film with a sense of familiarity and comfort. What sets "Home" apart from other animated films is its ability to strike a perfect balance between humor and heart. From Oh's differences that make him who he is to Tip's touching moments of vulnerability, the film offers something for everyone, regardless of age or background. Rihanna's portrayal of Tip adds an extra layer of familiarity to what the movie overall brings, infusing her with grit and a fierce determination that is impossible not to admire. The movie itself produces an adventurous plot that could never get tiring of looking forward to. Through its engaging storytelling and memorable characters, the film inspires viewers like me to embrace their uniqueness and celebrate the bonds that unite us all, as Oh and Tip bonded with each other, even though they were different species. It's astonishing how films like "Home" can provide that much-needed escape from the daily grind and remind us of the wonder and imagination we often lose touch with as adults. In a world filled with chaos and uncertainty, "Home" is a beacon of hope, reminding us that, no matter how far we may stray from our roots, there is always a place where we belong. It never fails to serve as a reminder of the joy and wonder we often overlook in our daily lives. It's a refreshing escape, allowing me to momentarily shed my worries as a new adult and rediscover the gratefulness of being a child at heart. It's a reminder that, sometimes, the greatest adventures are the ones that lead us back to ourselves.
    Grand Oaks Enterprises LLC Scholarship
    I am Imoree McGregory, a senior at Saint Mary's Academy in Inglewood, California. As a senior, my journey has helped shape my unwavering dedication to my hobbies and interests, as well as my self-discovery. Proudly, I have played basketball my entire life and have been on my school's varsity basketball team all 4 years with my off-season being spent on Amateur Athletic Union (AAU/Club) Basketball. Being on and off the court has given me an advancement in self-discovery and growth. I have developed a deeper interest in music, traveling, cooking and using new recipes, digital design, and analyzing behavior. I have also become more involved in my culture as the social manager of my school’s Black Student Union. As an 8th grader unexpectedly transitioning into high school during a global pandemic, I was yearning for belonging and connection. My excitement of starting high school was extinguished at the thought of online schooling. I was very nervous and anxious about how it was all going to work until I received the notification that I'd been selected as an Onward Scholar. Thankfully, I was one of twelve students chosen out of an applicant pool of over 100 8th graders seeking to claim a spot in the program. The Onward Scholars Program was exactly what I needed. It is a competitive program that focuses on scholarship, enrichment, leadership, and mentorship. As an Onward Scholar, I've met the requirement of maintaining over a 3.5-grade point average, while engaging in meetings, activities, and volunteer opportunities from tutoring kids in need to beach clean-ups. OSP has allowed me to view my community from a different perspective and opened my eyes to reveal that there is so much I have taken for granted. It has allowed me to realize that I am my community and my community is me. Growing up in Los Angeles instilled in me the strength and courage to navigate through challenging situations while building compassion and love for all people. My village of family, friends, neighbors, teachers, support staff, and church members have collectively shaped me into the young, strong Black woman I am today. I am because of the sacrifices others continue to make so that I can have opportunities to impact the world. This scholastic blessing would help me reach my goal of financing college debt-free. The Grand Oaks Enterprises Scholarship will allow me to take a step further into turning my dreams and hopes into reality. During my four years of high school, I have always known that I wanted to be the first in my family, being the youngest, to attend an HBCU across the country. Coming from two Catholic institutions with predominantly Hispanics, the yearning to be surrounded by people who look like me and share the same experiences as me has grown. When presenting this idea to other people, they usually claim I should get used to not being around many Black people as it is how it would be in the real world. However, attending an HBCU will allow me to further my confidence in my identity and understand where I and other young Black students come from, benefitting me to walk into the world with an unyielding mindset. Confiding in my identity that I have continuously understood and have taken pride in will allow me to not be bothered by others around me not looking like me– I will understand that I am underrepresented and will strive because of that due to the esteem I gained at an HBCU. I plan to major in Criminology and be an active participant in clubs and organizations in which all people can shine and elevate their voices. I then aspire to be one of the only Black female FBI Agents and future Directors, empowering other young people to set, strive, and accomplish their dreams. In line with my passion to give back to my community, I intend to design a program that uplifts, educates, and networks young Black students who aspire to major in Criminology/Criminal Justice. It would be an absolute blessing and honor to receive this scholarship to further my education in an effective way, and I am committed to using this opportunity to make a positive impact on my family, community, and the world at large.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    I am Imoree McGregory, a senior at Saint Mary's Academy in Inglewood, California. As a senior, my journey has helped shape my unwavering dedication to my hobbies and interests, as well as my self-discovery. Proudly, I have played basketball my entire life and have been on my school's varsity basketball team all 4 years with my off-season being spent on Amateur Athletic Union (AAU/Club) Basketball. Being on and off the court has given me an advancement in self-discovery and growth. I have developed a deeper interest in music, traveling, cooking and using new recipes, digital design, and analyzing behavior. I have also become more involved in my culture as the social manager of my school’s Black Student Union. Thankfully, I was one of twelve students chosen out of an applicant pool of over 100 8th graders seeking to claim a spot in the Onward Scholars Program. The Onward Scholars Program was exactly what I needed. It is a competitive program that focuses on scholarship, enrichment, leadership, and mentorship. As an Onward Scholar, I've met the requirement of maintaining over a 3.5-grade point average, while engaging in meetings, activities, and volunteer opportunities from tutoring kids in need to beach clean-ups. OSP has allowed me to view my community from a different perspective and opened my eyes to reveal that there is so much I have taken for granted. It has allowed me to realize that I am my community and my community is me. Growing up in Los Angeles instilled in me the strength and courage to navigate through challenging situations while building compassion and love for all people. My village of family, friends, neighbors, teachers, support staff, and church members have collectively shaped me into the young, strong Black woman I am today. I am because of the sacrifices others continue to make so that I can have opportunities to impact the world. This scholastic blessing would help me reach my goal of financing college debt-free. The Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship will allow me to take a step further into turning my dreams and hopes into reality. I plan to major in Criminology and be an active participant in clubs and organizations in which all people can shine and elevate their voices. I then aspire to be one of the only Black female FBI Agents and future Directors, empowering other young people to set, strive, and accomplish their dreams. In line with my passion to give back to my community, I intend to design a program that uplifts, educates, and networks young Black students who aspire to major in Criminology/Criminal Justice. It would be an absolute blessing and honor to receive this scholarship to further my education in an effective way, and I am committed to using this opportunity to make a positive impact in both my community and the world at large.
    Anthony Bruder Memorial Scholarship
    I am Imoree McGregory, a senior at Saint Mary's Academy in Inglewood, California. As a senior, my journey has helped shape my unwavering dedication to basketball and self-discovery, passions that have been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Proudly, I have played basketball my entire life and have been on my school's varsity basketball team all 4 years with my off-season being spent on Amateur Athletic Union (AAU/Club) Basketball. Consistently playing basketball has taught me the importance of communication, togetherness, and perseverance, regardless of the situation. These important factors are essential to utilize in the future, especially for the career I plan to pursue. I want to become a Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Profiler with the ability to identify perpetrators behind critical and serious crimes. In this field, teamwork is essential, just as it is on the basketball court. Fortunately, basketball being a team sport has given me a head start on what it takes to persevere in my future career, moreover life itself. Additionally, being a student-athlete has taught me time management. At first, I struggled with balancing practices and games with homework and tests. I would stress constantly at night, procrastinating on starting my homework, eventually causing me to stay up late at night just to get up early in the morning and start the same day all over again. I felt as if I was in a repeated cycle. However, with experience and motivation through stress and exhaustion, I have now found better ways to balance my priorities. Regarding perseverance, I have played many games where my team and I were either under pressure in a close game with it being tied or with us being down a few points. Luckily, I have learned that with the right strategies and mindset, outcomes still hold the possibility of being in my favor, regardless of adversity and what the outcome may initially seem. Being a student-athlete has taught me that things cannot get done the way they are supposed to unless I start what I need to early. It has also been embedded in my mind that as a human, I cannot do everything at once or alone--life comes with communication and support. As my basketball journey comes to a close, I find myself reflecting on the ways in which it has shaped me as a person. Beyond the court, I've discovered new passions and interests, from music to cooking to digital design. I have developed a deeper interest in music, cooking and using new recipes, digital design, and analyzing behavior. I have also become more involved in my culture as the social manager of my school’s Black Student Union. Ending my basketball season in February was bittersweet; I stopped playing the sport that I’ve loved for a long period of time but in turn, I have discovered more about myself in the process. Being on and off the court has given me an advancement in self-discovery and growth. In the end, basketball has been more than just a game for me; it has been a transformative journey that has prepared me for what I will need to carry with me to have a prosperous future. Though my days as a high school student-athlete may be coming to an end, I know that the values instilled in me through basketball will continue to guide me on my path to success.
    Monroe Justice and Equality Memorial Scholarship
    Winner
    Some may argue that implementing implicit bias training within law enforcement agencies could be a step toward addressing issues of prejudice and bias. However, it's crucial to recognize that training alone may not be sufficient to bring about lasting change. Once the training concludes, there's a risk that law enforcement agents may revert to their previous mindsets regarding prejudices and biases. To truly enhance relationships and build trust between law enforcement and Black/African American communities, agencies must come up with a multifaceted approach aimed at fostering understanding, inclusivity, and accountability. This crucial approach involves key initiatives that a true agent, who holds pride in what their job is actually about–safety, will take. To begin with, law enforcement agencies must prioritize community engagement as a cornerstone of their operations. This involves actively seeking opportunities to connect with and serve the needs of Black/African American communities at various levels. Agents should participate in community events, engage with residents aside from being on duty, and collaborate with community leaders to address local concerns. By demonstrating a genuine commitment to understanding and serving these communities, law enforcement can begin to build meaningful relationships based on mutual respect and trust. Furthermore, cultural competence training is essential for law enforcement officers to ensure that interactions with Black/African American communities are effective. The training should go beyond awareness of cultural differences to hold a deep understanding of the historical context, social dynamics, and lived experiences of these communities. By equipping agents with the knowledge and skills to recognize and address implicit biases, agencies can promote fair and equitable treatment for everyone, regardless of race or ethnicity. In addition to individual training, law enforcement agencies must also acknowledge and confront systemic racism and inequalities within their criminal justice system. This requires a commitment to addressing disparities in law enforcement practices, sentence rulings, and prejudices that disproportionately impact Black/African American communities. By confronting the unfair treatment Black/African American tend to historically and presently face, agencies can begin to address the root causes of mistrust and resentment within these communities. Promoting diversity within law enforcement agencies is another crucial component of building stronger relationships with Black/African American communities. Recruiting and retaining a diverse workforce, including agents from these communities, enhances understanding and experience but also fosters empathy and cultural competence within law enforcement agencies. Furthermore, diverse perspectives can lead to more effective and responsive policing strategies that better serve the needs of all community members. Enhancing communication and outreach efforts is also essential for transparency, accountability, and mutual understanding. Law enforcement agencies must ensure that Black/African American communities are well informed about their rights, responsibilities, and available resources, such as establishing open channels of communication, soliciting feedback from community members, and actively involving them in decision-making processes related to policing and public safety. Additionally, partnerships with local community organizations, faith-based groups, and advocacy organizations can amplify the impact of law enforcement efforts and facilitate meaningful dialogue and collaboration. By working together towards shared goals and priorities, agencies can build stronger, more resilient communities that are empowered to address issues of crime, violence, and social injustice. Overall, improving relationships between law enforcement agencies and Black/African American communities requires a proactive approach that addresses underlying issues of bias, inequality, and mistrust. By prioritizing community engagement, cultural competence, diversity, accountability, and collaboration, agencies can begin to build a foundation of mutual respect, understanding, and cooperation that benefits all members of society. Similarly, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. articulated, a group of oppressors cannot fix the injustices without the inclusion of the oppressed.
    A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
    I am Imoree McGregory. I have spent most of my 4 years of high school dedicated to my school's varsity basketball team. However, ending my last season has helped me verify what I aspire to be and who I yearn to become as a Black young lady in America. I have developed even more determination and self-value now that I am beginning to find out what type of society I live in and what I can do to counter its wrongdoings. Thanks to the Americanized caste system, structured not by morality but by the distribution of the power and resources available throughout its strata, underrepresentation and misrepresentation are profound. Intersectionality, which is “the interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage,” is, in my opinion, one of America’s most hidden problems. Specifically, women of color, often termed 'double minorities,' face compounded negative stereotypes and biases stemming from both their gender and race. Representation should be more emphasized for teachings and expectations to be passed down through generations. Because of this caste system of race and gender, it is a stated fact that women of color are both underrepresented and misrepresented in politics, business, career occupations, and the media. The lack of valid representation causes America to view American stereotypes from an untrue and biased White, Heterosexual male lens that excludes the legitimacy of experiences women of color face in this country. Fortunately, I have not been one of the many to adapt to nor normalize this single and false perspective of the bottom half of the strata. I am fortunate to have witnessed the American nation’s first Black First Lady, along with the first Black female Vice President. I have looked passed the misperceptions and have instead sought motive and possibility by researching women of color, such as Laphonza Butler and Carol Moseley Braun. I continue to notice that it is not easy finding women of color as an aspiration in a career path, so in response to this hidden issue, as a Black woman, I aim to become head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Department at the least. As these Black women were my proof of the opportunity to be taken seriously in a career, I want to be that motive for people who look and share the same experiences as me as well. I also plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice. By acknowledging and addressing the challenges faced by double minorities, I aim to empower future generations and advocate for inclusivity, equity, and most importantly, correct representation. I want others to understand that the issue is real, the issue is problematic, but also that the issue is worth countering. In confronting these systemic issues, I believe in the power of representation and advocacy from within those affected to avoid the drawbacks rooted in intersectionality. The journey ahead may be challenging and prolonged, but it is one that I am committed to ensuring that women of color can secure their aspirations and go further and expand in holding authority.
    D’Andre J. Brown Memorial Scholarship
    FBI Director Imoree M. McGregory will be engraved on my office door, marking me as one of the only Black female directors within our nation’s Federal Bureau of Investigators. My dreams will become reality and I will make a difference in my community. My experiences have shaped me. I am and will forever be self-driven. My passion for becoming an FBI Criminal Profiler was strengthened when I became a victim of domestic abuse as a 16-year-old Junior in high school. As a teenage girl, I believed I was in the perfect high school relationship, convinced it would surpass our young ages and convinced that the naysayers would eventually see our never-ending bond for themselves. I felt like I was amidst a rainbow but soon learned I was in the eye of a storm. After my sixteenth birthday, I experienced a violent push to the wall, breathless while glued to the couch as my partner's hands gripped my neck with his eyes inflamed. My tears overflowed as I realized the word “stop” was powerless. I couldn’t breathe. I failed to remove his hands from my neck so I could finally exhale. I couldn’t stop him. Eventually easing as my parents later arrived, I realized I still had to face the damaging aftermath, of what felt like being, alone. I was depressed, surrounded by no one with a shared experience. I turned to social media to distract me from what he took away from me– identity and self-determination. Scrolling on Instagram, I stumbled upon a bible verse: “Not my will but Thy will be done” (Luke 22:42). At that moment, I chose to explore God’s purpose of allowing me to experience that storm, rather than letting the storm’s force weaken me. After some time, I found myself fighting for justice to get back what I felt emotionally and physically. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. Studying criminal behavior allows me to understand the intellectual motivations behind violent actions. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. My career choice has been rooted in my desire to view things from a different mindset and leverage the advantage of analyzing a person’s thought process to apprehend them. My high ambitions are underscored by my realization that I possess a deeper purpose that is driving my aspiration to attend and graduate from college. As I learned how to navigate through this difficult situation by using it as my footstool, I survived with purpose and meaning again. I now believe no matter who's against me, I’ll always be able to carry the strength I never thought I had to overcome situations both big and small. Coming from experience, I carry the motive to transform difficult situations into stimulation. No matter what I experience and how much it hurts, I will always be able to calm my storm, whether I have others to grab onto or not.
    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    FBI Director Imoree M. McGregory will be engraved on my office door, marking me as one of the only Black female directors within our nation’s Federal Bureau of Investigators. My dreams will become reality and I will make a difference in my community. My experiences have shaped me. I am and will forever be self-driven. My passion for becoming an FBI Criminal Profiler was strengthened when I became a victim of domestic abuse as a 16-year-old Junior in high school. As a teenage girl, I believed I was in the perfect high school relationship, convinced it would surpass our young ages and convinced that the naysayers would eventually see our never-ending bond for themselves. I felt like I was amidst a rainbow but soon learned I was in the eye of a storm. After my sixteenth birthday, I experienced a violent push to the wall, breathless while glued to the couch as my partner's hands gripped my neck with his eyes inflamed. My tears overflowed as I realized the word “stop” was powerless. I couldn’t breathe. I failed to remove his hands from my neck so I could finally exhale. I couldn’t stop him. Eventually easing as my parents later arrived, I realized I still had to face the damaging aftermath, of what felt like being, alone. I was depressed, surrounded by no one with a shared experience. I turned to social media to distract me from what he took away from me– identity and self-determination. Scrolling on Instagram, I stumbled upon a bible verse: “Not my will but Thy will be done” (Luke 22:42). At that moment, I chose to explore God’s purpose of allowing me to experience that storm, rather than letting the storm’s force weaken me. After some time, I found myself fighting for justice to get back what I felt emotionally and physically. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. Studying criminal behavior allows me to understand the intellectual motivations behind violent actions. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. My career choice has been rooted in my desire to view things from a different mindset and leverage the advantage of analyzing a person’s thought process to apprehend them. My high ambitions are underscored by my realization that I possess a deeper purpose that is driving my aspiration to attend and graduate from college. As I learned how to navigate through this difficult situation by using it as my footstool, I survived with purpose and meaning again. I now believe no matter who's against me, I’ll always be able to carry the strength I never thought I had to overcome situations both big and small. Coming from experience, I carry the motive to transform difficult situations into stimulation. No matter what I experience and how much it hurts, I will always be able to calm my storm, whether I have others to grab onto or not.
    Fallen "Freaks" Scholarship
    To begin with, many women of color are not involved in the Criminology Career path, I am fortunate to have witnessed the American nation’s first Black First Lady, along with the first Black female Vice President. I have looked passed the misperceptions and have instead sought motive and possibility by researching women of color, such as Laphonza Butler and Carol Moseley Braun. I continue to notice that it is not easy finding women of color as an aspiration in a career path, so in response to this hidden issue, as a Black woman, I aim to become head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Department at the least. As these Black women were my proof of the opportunity to be taken seriously in a career, I want to be that motive for people who look and share the same experiences as me as well. I also plan to establish programs that acknowledge the consequences of being a double minority and support aspiring young ladies of color in the career path of Criminology/Criminal Justice. Furthermore, my passion for becoming an FBI Criminal Profiler was strengthened when I became a victim of domestic abuse as a 16-year-old Junior in high school. I found myself fighting for justice to get back what I felt emotionally and physically. However, even through this unfortunate experience, God enabled me to realize what He expects of me and how I can utilize the abuse I went through to appear to the vulnerability of other victims and their families. Being a victim of violence furthered my desire to seek justice for other victims since I was not able to experience it myself. Since my Freshman year of high school, my goal has been to major in Criminology with a minor in Psychology. These major focuses will help me be more experienced in the career I strive to pursue. No matter how long it takes and how unrealistic it sounds because of my race and gender, I want to become the head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation department. Additionally, I aspire to become a Criminal Profiler as I find myself wanting to learn how a criminal’s mind functions to commit a crime. Coming into high school, I was attached to Criminal Minds more than anyone I knew was. Most of my friends were hooked on becoming nurses and doctors so they were attached to Grey’s Anatomy, but something about studying the minds of serial killers fascinated me. My family thought it was odd that I would watch serial killer documentaries, but my focus was not strictly on the serial killer terrorizing their victim. Instead, it was focused on the reason behind why they committed the crimes they did as well as the chase and process law enforcement used to catch them. Similarly, I once wanted to know why my abuser placed his anger from situations I was not a part of onto me. In conclusion, I yearn to be one of the few Black female criminal profilers with the aspiration to lead an FBI department. Studying criminal behavior allows me to understand the intellectual motivations behind violent actions. My career choice is rooted in my desire to view things from a different mindset and leverage the advantage of analyzing a person’s thought process to apprehend them. My high ambitions are underscored by my realization that I possess a deeper purpose that is driving my aspiration to attend and graduate from college.