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Hannah Haggerty

1205

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Bio

Pushing for social change Interest in forensic psychology and social work as well as clinical psychology.

Education

Husson University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Psychology, General
  • Minors:
    • Behavioral Sciences
  • GPA:
    3.3

Marshwood High School

High School
2019 - 2023
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Clinical, Counseling and Applied Psychology
    • Psychology, General
    • Criminal Justice and Corrections, General
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Test scores:

    • 1100
      SAT

    Career

    • Dream career field:

      Civic & Social Organization

    • Dream career goals:

    • Server

      Nostimo Greek
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    Taekwondo

    Club
    2015 – Present9 years

    Awards

    • Black belt

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      York Hospital — Food service
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Philanthropy

    Mental Health Empowerment Scholarship
    Mental health holds profound significance for me as a student due to both personal experiences and a deep-seated commitment to promoting well-being within my community. As someone who has grappled with their own mental health struggles, I understand firsthand the impact that these challenges can have on an individual's academic performance, interpersonal relationships, and overall quality of life. Consequently, advocating for mental health awareness and support has become a central focus of my personal and academic endeavors. In my role as a psychology major, I recognize the importance of fostering a culture of empathy, understanding, and support for individuals facing mental health challenges. This begins with promoting open dialogue and reducing the stigma surrounding mental illness within my school community. By sharing my own experiences and encouraging others to do the same, I strive to create a safe and inclusive environment where my friends feel empowered to seek help without fear of judgment or shame. As someone whom friends often turn to for support during difficult times, I endeavor to approach these conversations with compassion, active listening, and a non-judgmental attitude. Drawing upon my intuitive understanding of mental health issues and my academic background in psychology, I aim to provide guidance, resources, and encouragement to those in need. Whether it's offering a listening ear, suggesting coping strategies, or connecting individuals with professional support services, I am committed to doing whatever I can to help alleviate their distress and promote healing. Within my academic pursuits, I advocate for mental health by integrating psychological principles and perspectives into my coursework and projects. By critically examining the intersection of mental health with various disciplines, such as sociology, biology, and public health, I seek to deepen my understanding of the multifaceted nature of mental illness and its impact on individuals and society. Through research papers, presentations, and classroom discussions, I strive to raise awareness of prevalent mental health issues, challenge misconceptions, and foster meaningful dialogue among my peers and instructors. Outside of the classroom, I actively participate in mental health advocacy initiatives and awareness campaigns within my community. Whether it's organizing mental health awareness events, participating in fundraising efforts for mental health organizations, or volunteering at local crisis hotlines, I am dedicated to promoting mental wellness and supporting those affected by mental illness. In my interactions with family members, friends, and acquaintances, I emphasize the importance of self-care, self-compassion, and seeking professional help when needed. By sharing my own journey of seeking therapy and medication for my mental health concerns, I aim to reduce stigma, normalize help-seeking behaviors, and empower others to prioritize their emotional well-being. In essence, mental health advocacy is not just a passion but a personal and professional calling for me. By leveraging my experiences, knowledge, and skills, I strive to create a more supportive, empathetic, and mentally healthy community where individuals feel valued, understood, and empowered to thrive.
    A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
    As a freshman in college majoring in psychology, I am driven by a passion for understanding human behavior and a deep-seated desire to make a positive impact on society. My journey in psychology began with a fascination for the complexities of the human mind and has since evolved into a commitment to addressing societal issues, particularly those related to family violence within the court system. Growing up, I was exposed to the harsh realities of family violence through personal experiences and encounters within my community. Witnessing the devastating effects of domestic abuse on individuals and families ignited within me a sense of empathy and a determination to advocate for change. As I progress in my academic journey, I am keenly focused on preparing myself for a career as a psychologist specializing in family violence within the court system. My goal is to work collaboratively with legal professionals, social workers, and other stakeholders to provide support and intervention for victims of domestic abuse, as well as to hold perpetrators accountable for their actions. To achieve this, I am actively seeking out opportunities to gain practical experience and specialized training in areas such as trauma-informed care, forensic psychology, and crisis intervention. I am eager to engage in internships, research projects, and volunteer work that will allow me to apply my knowledge and skills in real-world settings, particularly within the context of the court system. I plan to take on an internship next summer where I can have hands on experience with people in crisis. I have a certification to be a Victim Advocate and I have also taken senior level crisis intervention classes so I have background knowledge. I wish to go out in the field and work with people who need my guidance in order to gain experience. In addition to my academic pursuits, I am committed to raising awareness about the prevalence of family violence and mental health, advocating for policy changes that prioritize the safety and well-being of victims. Through community outreach, educational initiatives, and collaboration with advocacy organizations, I hope to contribute to a culture of accountability and support for survivors of domestic abuse. Ultimately, my goal is to make a meaningful difference in the lives of individuals and families affected by family violence, while also working towards systemic change within the court system. By combining my passion for psychology with a dedication to social justice, I am confident that I can contribute to creating a safer and more equitable society for all.
    Operation 11 Tyler Schaeffer Memorial Scholarship
    I am a high school senior who will be attending Husson University in the fall with a dual major in Psychology and Criminal Justice with a minor in Cultural and Behavioral Studies. I will be getting both a B.S. in Psychology and a B.S. in Criminal Justice after five years. To get ahead, I have taken multiple college classes through the University of Maine’s system. I have taken Introduction to Psychology which would be the first class I’d have to take in college for my major, I have taken an Abuse, Trauma, and Recovery social work course which assists victims, and I have taken Introduction to Victim Advocacy which I have recently finished and expect to receive a Victim Advocate certification from the National Advocate Credentialing Program (NACP). I have taken AP Language and Literature and AP Statistics as well as AP Government and Politics. All of these classes set me up for moving faster throughout college as they all cover required classes. I am very passionate about my school work and future. I do not see myself changing my major or drastically changing my career either. The dual major program at Husson sets me up with jobs in my career field, as the school works on building a connection between students and federal agencies such as the FBI, CIA, county jails, and police departments all over the state of Maine. After I complete my undergraduate degree, I will have earned the State of Maine Mental Health Rehabilitation Technician-Community level certification (MHRT-C). Not only will I have this, but I will be able to use the connections I have with federal agencies and can be hired almost immediately by them. I plan to work for one of these agencies and get a masters in forensic psychology. I hope to be in a master’s program that has a family violence concentration. After this, I hope to earn a doctorate in forensic psychology. I am not 100% sure which career I wish to pursue, however, I want to be a human behavioral expert working in the courts. I have narrowed it down to either a forensic child custody evaluator or a child forensic psychologist. These careers would involve working with children and the law. I want to work in busy, city courts serving as a consultant and offering my professional opinions. I want to work primarily with children involving violence and sexual assault as well as juvenile rights. Ideally, I would like to perform evaluations on children who are in abusive situations. I want to work primarily in New York City at the Kings County Family Court. This is one of the busiest welfare court systems and I think that I can reach a large audience through them. I wish to tackle as many cases as I can and help the most vulnerable. I have been accepted into CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice for my undergraduate degree but I have decided to choose Husson’s unique program. I do, however, think I might pursue my master's and doctorate at John Jay as it is in New York City which may help with internships and offer involvement with the Kings County Family Court. Overall, I wish to provide professional advice on issues related to child custody and safety. I want to focus on either reuniting families if need be or finding safer options for the child. I want to support children and advocate for their safety rather than the desires of the parents. I wish to help children have a brighter future and protect their rights.
    Taylor Swift ‘1989’ Fan Scholarship
    Swift’s 1989 album was her first official pop album and the songs mostly remained upbeat and happy. However, her song “Clean” took a different approach. Clean was a slower-paced song where Swift explored the process of healing and moving on from a traumatic experience. This song can often be used to discuss a relationship in which a couple is always arguing, however, it does have a much deeper meaning to some. Swift has not explicitly come out to say that she wrote Clean about sexual assault, however, it can be interpreted this way. Years after Clean’s release, a radio DJ Swift was taking pictures with and reached under her skirt and grabbed her butt. The DJ was fired from his job and he sued Swift claiming he never touched her inappropriately despite there being a video of him doing so. Swift sued him for $1 and ended up winning the trial and explained that her counter-suing was to empower other victims of sexual assault. In her documentary Miss. Americana, she discussed the case and how difficult it was due to some not believing her despite the video evidence. She expressed how she couldn’t imagine doing this without support and without the financial means she had. Due to this, Swift pledged to donate to organizations that helped fund legal costs for sexual assault survivors who chose to defend themselves. In a concert, after she won the case, she performed the song Clean saying: “A year ago I was not playing in a stadium in Tampa, I was in a courtroom in Denver, Colorado…this is the day the jury sided in my favor and said that they believed me.” She begins the song and it can be concluded Clean has a deeper meaning to her now. Many survivors say Clean is an empowering song that encourages them to speak out and find support. The chorus, "Rain came pouring down when I was drowning, that's when I could finally breathe, and by morning gone was any trace of you, I think I am finally clean," suggests that the process of healing from trauma is gradual and ongoing, but eventually, the survivor can reach a point where they feel whole again. Through this song, Swift has created an outlet and a safe place for those who may feel alone. Clean is arguably the deepest song Taylor Swift has written and resonates with many. For me, this song is very special. I am also a survivor of sexual assault. I listened to 1989 constantly when it was first released, however I hadn’t listened to it in a while. I rediscovered the song Clean about two years ago while scrolling on TikTok. Someone was discussing how important the song was to the community of sexual assault survivors, and I listened to the song to see if it resonated with me. It did. At the time, I was recovering after someone close to me had sexually assaulted me multiple times. I especially love how Clean narrates the path of healing from trauma. Swift discusses the conflicting emotions and the roller coaster of a journey one must go through. I still listen to Clean to this day, however, it always makes me teary-eyed. I listen to it to overcome my emotions and grasp onto something during my panic attacks. Taylor Swift’s music is special to all of her fans and everyone has an explanation as to why. Clean is the song that is the most special to me, and is the main reason why I look up to Swift.
    Jake Thomas Williams Memorial Scholarship
    To an outsider’s eye, I may have seemed as if I were a happy-go-lucky child during my elementary years. However, I was severely depressed and struggled with Trichotillomania, which is a hair-pulling disorder. I was extremely depressed as a child, and I spent many nights crying alone in my room. Sometimes, I would be in the kitchen alone, holding my father’s chef knife to my chest, trying to convince myself to end my life. My parents had no idea I was depressed and thought about suicide, however, my mother would talk openly about how people who killed themselves were selfish and cowardly. This was very damaging as a child because it made me feel as if my pain wasn’t valid and that I would be shunned rather than taken seriously if I were to open up about my struggles. My neighbor was twenty-two when he took his own life. I was sixteen at the time and my family was close to his family. We had barbecues together and he taught me how to play baseball. His sister was a year younger than me and she was always at my house in the summer playing tag or capture the flag. My neighbor’s suicide triggered many issues from my past. I could relate to where he was coming from because I have such a strong connection to suicide. I cried every night for a solid two weeks after his death and I attended the wake and the celebration of life service his family had for him. It was then that I truly realized my mother’s attitude towards suicide, like others, was toxic and potentially dangerous for people who are struggling. Certainly, I had never adopted this viewpoint that my mother had, but I had never stopped and thought about how insensitive it was. I began to wonder if my neighbor, before he killed himself, had been told by someone that ending his life was selfish and cowardly. This made me truly reflect on my upbringing and people’s harsh and ignorant comments on the topic of suicide. I never wanted to be one of those people, and I certainly did not want anyone else’s opinions to be shaped by the ignorance of unsympathetic others. I became a lot more vocal about suicide prevention and mental health afterward. Years, later, my cousin became a survivor of suicide. Thankfully, she was able to seek help after her attempt, and her tendency to self-harm was brought to light. She spent months in and out of many institutions and I stayed by her side the entire time. I helped her during her moves from institution to institution and wrote her letters when I couldn’t visit. Due to people close to me struggling with their mental health, I have chosen to pursue social work by majoring in psychology and criminal justice. I plan to receive my doctorate in psychology, and a possible master's in social work if need be. I plan to attend Husson University if I am granted enough financial aid and scholarships and they set me up with federal agencies after graduation. I plan to work with children who are in tough situations and are struggling with their mental health. I want them to never feel alone, I want their feelings to be acknowledged. I want to educate them as well so that they know they aren’t alone in their struggles. Although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help some never did.
    Andrew Perez Mental Illness/Suicidal Awareness Education Scholarship
    To an outsider’s eye, I may have seemed as if I were a happy-go-lucky child during my elementary years. However, I was severely depressed and had a hair-pulling disorder called Trichotillomania. I suffered a lot of the time due to people’s attitudes toward me. My parents were not helpful. They shunned me for my hair-pulling, making snide comments about it, humiliating me in public for everyone to see and hear, and drawing attention to my lack of eyelashes and eyebrows. Saying I wouldn’t be pretty if I were to keep pulling my hair. My parents weren’t the only ones, my classmates made fun of me as well. My parents had no idea I was depressed and thought about suicide, however, when the topic of suicide came up, my mother would say people who kill themselves are selfish. This was very damaging as a child because it made me feel as if I was depriving my friends and family of a better version of myself and that I was a terrible person. Over the years, I became less depressed and eventually found happiness. I started doing Taekwondo when I was ten years old and the instructors taught me a lot about self-discipline. They often praised me for my good efforts and I enjoyed the positive attention. I started playing lacrosse and running cross country which helped as well and it occupied my time. My hair-pulling was a lot harder to recover from, but I was able to do so because of people’s negative reactions to my lack of hair on my eyelashes and eyebrows. I was able to use sports as an out and I also rely on my therapist, TikTok, and friends as well. I suggested I go to therapy when I was a teen after I was sexually assaulted. The therapist discussed my mental health and it was nice to have someone listen and validate my feelings. TikTok has helped me as well, as I follow influencers who speak about their mental health issues and I listen to other people’s stories that make me feel less alone. My friends and I talk about our struggle with anxiety and depression, and we compare coping mechanisms. One of my friends folds a piece of paper over and over again during a panic attack and I have picked up this habit as well. I also draw designs on a piece of paper in school when I get anxious or at home when I hear an argument between my brother and my parents. I write in a journal if I feel an anxiety attack coming, something one of my other friends did when she was depressed. I don’t openly discuss my mental health with all my friends, however, a few who don’t know about my struggles have come to me for help when they are struggling. I am often able to understand how they are feeling when they cannot put it into words which makes people feel like they can talk to me, and it makes me feel good that I am someone they trust. My mental illnesses/disorders and society’s treatment of them have made me pursue psychology. I want to help children who feel alone learn about their mental issues. I want them to be acknowledged, supported, and validated. I never want a child to feel the way I felt growing up, and although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help I never did.
    Another Way Scholarship
    I had anger issues as a child and was unable to communicate adequately as I yelled and stomped. I was also depressed and thought about suicide. I spent many nights crying alone in my room. Sometimes, I would be in the kitchen alone, holding my father’s chef knife to my chest, trying to convince myself to end my life. I was officially diagnosed in my teens with Trichotillomania, something that I had been struggling with since I was seven. Trichotillomania is a hair pull disorder that can be hereditary, something the doctors couldn’t have known I would inherit. It can also occur due to stress and anxiety. However, because of the lack of help, I received from the therapists, I was left to deal with my issues on my own. My parents didn’t provide me with any emotional support. They were always shunning me for my hair-pulling, making snide comments about it when I was unable to “quit”. They would humiliate me in public, saying I wouldn’t be pretty if I were to keep pulling my hair. My parents would also film me crying and stomping when I was younger, threatening to show my teachers. When I finally learned how to use my words instead of stomping and yelling, my parents didn’t praise me for my growth, rather they disregarded and mocked me, or invalidated my feelings, saying I was perfectly fine. My parents had no idea I thought about suicide, but whenever the topic came up, my mother would say people who hurt themselves or kill themselves are selfish and cruel. This was very damaging as a child because it made me feel that my suffering and my pain were somehow my fault. It made me feel as if I was depriving my friends and family of a better version of myself and that I was a terrible person. Over the years, I grew out of my depression and managed to control my anger. I was motivated because of my parents' negative comments and negative reinforcement. I somehow overcame my depression as I grew older. I was also able to decrease my hair-pulling as well due to my parents' negative remarks. When I was a teen, I went back to therapy for some other issues. Those therapy sessions delved into my past and there I was diagnosed with Trichotillomania. There, the actions of my parents and the therapists before were scrutinized. I learned a lot about myself, my childhood, and the world. My parents, in a way, helped me, but not most healthily or efficiently. My parents and my upbringing as a whole made me pursue psychology and social work. I want to help children who feel alone learn about their mental issues. I want them to be acknowledged, supported, and validated. I want to be the therapist who can help the child by recognizing the signs and pushing for more serious help. I want to be the person who a child can rely on and trust. A person that anyone can come to if they are feeling uncertain. I never want a child to feel the way I felt growing up, and although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help I never did.
    Elizabeth Schalk Memorial Scholarship
    I had anger issues as a child and was unable to communicate adequately as I yelled and stomped. I was also depressed and thought about suicide. I spent many nights crying alone in my room. Sometimes, I would be in the kitchen alone, holding my father’s chef knife to my chest, trying to convince myself to end my life. I was officially diagnosed in my teens with Trichotillomania, something that I had been struggling with since I was seven. Trichotillomania is a hair pull disorder that can be hereditary, something the doctors couldn’t have known I would inherit. It can also occur due to stress and anxiety. However, because of the lack of help I received from the therapists, I was left to deal with my issues on my own. My parents didn’t provide me with any emotional support. They were always shunning me for my hair-pulling, making snide comments about it when I was unable to “quit”. They would humiliate me in public, saying I wouldn’t be pretty if I were to keep pulling my hair. My parents would also film me crying and stomping when I was younger, threatening to show my teachers. When I finally learned how to use my words instead of stomping and yelling, my parents didn’t praise me for my growth, rather they disregarded and mocked me, or invalidated my feelings, saying I was perfectly fine. My parents had no idea I thought about suicide, but whenever the topic came up, my mother would say people who hurt themselves or kill themselves are selfish and cruel. This was very damaging as a child because it made me feel that my suffering and my pain were somehow my faults. It made me feel as if I was depriving my friends and family of a better version of myself and that I was a terrible person. Over the years, I grew out of my depression and managed to control my anger. I was motivated because of my parents' negative comments and negative reinforcement. I somehow overcame my depression as I grew older. I was also able to decrease my hair-pulling as well due to my parents' negative remarks. When I was sixteen, my neighbor who was nine years older than me took his own life. It greatly impacted me because I was able to not only sympathize but empathize and relate to where he was coming from. I realized that my mother’s viewpoint on suicide was toxic and potentially dangerous for people who are depressed. My neighbor’s death made me wonder if someone had told him he was weak and selfish if he killed himself. It made me wonder that if someone had, did that contribute to his suicide? When I was a teen, I went back to therapy for some other issues. Those therapy sessions delved into my past and there I was diagnosed with Trichotillomania. There, the actions of my parents and the therapists before were scrutinized. I learned a lot about myself, my childhood, and the world. My parents, in a way, helped me, but not most healthily or efficiently. This is why I want to go into psychology and social work. I want to help children who feel alone learn about their mental issues. I want them to be acknowledged, supported, and validated. I never want a child to feel the way I felt growing up, and although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help I never did.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    Growing up, I lived a fairly comfortable life. To people outside of my immediate family, I was a perfectly happy child. However, I was not. I struggled with anger issues and was unable to communicate adequately throughout my younger years, yelling and stomping. I was severely depressed and thought about suicide. I spent almost every night crying alone in my room and once or twice a week I would stand in the kitchen at night holding my father’s chef knife to my chest, trying to convince myself to end my life. I was officially diagnosed in my teens with Trichotillomania, something that I had been struggling with since I was seven. Trichotillomania is a hair pull disorder that can be hereditary, something the doctors couldn’t have known I would inherit. It can also occur due to stress and anxiety. My depression, anxiety, and Trichotillomania have not been discovered during the few therapy sessions my parents forced me to when I was in elementary school. The only discussion in therapy was about my anger issues. According to a therapist I visited when I was a teenager, my anger as a child should have been a sign of other disorders or issues. The therapists I had seen did not look past my anger to dig deeper. I was never able to receive adequate help for the issues I had growing up and I understand that I was not as cooperative or open as I should have been. I also understand that at such a young age, doctors are wary of diagnosing disorders. I suffered a lot of the time due to people’s attitudes toward me. My parents didn’t provide me with any emotional support. They were always shunning me for my hair-pulling, making snide comments about it when I was unable to “quit”. They would humiliate me in public, saying I wouldn’t be pretty if I were to keep pulling my hair. My classmates made fun of my lack of eyebrows and lashes as well. My parents would film me crying and stomping when I was younger, threatening to show my teachers. When I finally learned how to use my words instead of stomping and yelling, my parents didn’t praise me for my growth, rather they disregarded and mocked me, or invalidated my feelings, saying I was perfectly fine. My parents had no idea I thought about suicide, but whenever the topic came up, my mother would say people who hurt themselves or kill themselves are selfish and cruel. This was very damaging as a child because it made me feel that my suffering and my pain were somehow my faults. It made me feel as if I was depriving my friends and family of a better version of myself and that I was a terrible person. My parents raised me to believe that suicide was for weak and selfish people and that whatever emotion I was feeling was not valid because I lived a “perfectly adequate” life in their eyes. Over the years, I grew out of my depression and managed to control my anger. I was motivated because of my parents' negative comments and negative reinforcement. I somehow overcame depression as I grew older. I was also able to decrease my hair-pulling as well due to my parents' negative remarks. I suggested I go back to therapy after I was sexually assaulted. Those therapy sessions delved into my past and there I was diagnosed with Trichotillomania. There, the actions of my parents and the therapists before were scrutinized. I relied on TikTok, my new therapist, and a friend of mine to help me heal from the views I had picked up. I used TikTok to reach out to individuals who struggled with the same issues as me. I used the app to hear other people’s stories and to feel that my emotions were valid during my dark times. My neighbor who was nine years older than me and had grown up playing t-ball with me, killed himself when I was sixteen. My family and his family were fairly close and we always saw each other around the neighborhood. His suicide triggered many issues from my past. It greatly impacted me because I was able to not only sympathize but empathize and relate to where he was coming from. Having such a strong connection to suicide took a toll on my mental health for the next few months. I cried every night for a solid two weeks after his death and I attended the wake and the celebration of life service his family had for him. I realized that my mother’s viewpoint on suicide was toxic and potentially dangerous for people who are depressed. I never spoke about my thoughts on suicide because I never let my mother’s opinion become mine, but my neighbor’s death made me wonder if someone had told my neighbor he was weak and selfish if he killed himself. It made me wonder if someone had, did that impact that contributes in any way? I didn’t want to be one of those people who said something like this, or one of those people who allowed it to be said and passed along to others. My parents and my upbringing as a whole made me pursue psychology and social work. I want to help children who feel alone learn about their mental issues. I want them to be acknowledged, supported, and validated. I never want a child to feel the way I felt growing up, and although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help I never did. I want to be the therapist who can help the child by recognizing the signs and pushing for more serious help. I want to be the person who a child can rely on and trust. A person that anyone can come to if they are feeling uncertain.
    Brian J Boley Memorial Scholarship
    Growing up, I lived a fairly comfortable life. To people outside of my immediate family, I was a perfectly happy child. However, I was not. I struggled with anger issues and was unable to communicate adequately throughout my younger years, yelling and stomping. I was severely depressed and thought about suicide. I spent almost every night crying alone in my room and once or twice a week I would stand in the kitchen at night holding my father’s chef knife to my chest, trying to convince myself to end my life. I was officially diagnosed in my teens with Trichotillomania, something that I had been struggling with since I was seven. Trichotillomania is a hair pull disorder that can be hereditary, something the doctors couldn’t have known I would inherit. It can also occur due to stress and anxiety. My depression, anxiety, and Trichotillomania have not been discovered during the few therapy sessions my parents forced me to when I was in elementary school. The only discussion in therapy was about my anger issues. According to a therapist I visited when I was a teenager, my anger as a child should have been a sign of other disorders or issues. The therapists I had seen did not look past my anger to dig deeper. I was never able to receive adequate help for the issues I had growing up and I understand that I was not as cooperative as I could have been. I was not as open as I could have been on the issues I was having. I also understand that at such a young age, doctors are wary of diagnosing disorders. However, because of the lack of help, I received from the therapists, I was left to deal with my issues on my own. My parents didn’t provide me with any emotional support. They were always shunning me for my hair-pulling, making snide comments about it when I was unable to “quit”. They would humiliate me in public, saying I wouldn’t be pretty if I were to keep pulling my hair. My parents would also film me crying and stomping when I was younger, threatening to show my teachers. When I finally learned how to use my words instead of stomping and yelling, my parents didn’t praise me for my growth, rather they disregarded and mocked me, or invalidated my feelings, saying I was perfectly fine. Over the years, I grew out of my depression and managed to control my anger. I was motivated because of my parents' negative comments and negative reinforcement. I somehow overcame depression as I grew older. I was also able to decrease my hair-pulling as well due to my parents' negative remarks. I suggested I go back to therapy after I was sexually assaulted. Those therapy sessions delved into my past and there I was diagnosed with Trichotillomania. There, the actions of my parents and the therapists before were scrutinized. This was life-changing, as I learned a lot about myself, my childhood, and the world. My parents, in a way, helped me, but not in the most healthy or efficient way. This is why I want to go into psychology and social work. I want to help children who feel alone learn about their mental issues. I want them to be acknowledged, supported, and validated. I never want a child to feel the way I felt growing up, and although I cannot help every single child in these situations, if I can become a clinical therapist or psychiatrist, I can help a portion of them get the help I never did.
    Grace Lynn Ross Memorial Scholarship
    Due to situations that close friends have endured, and situations my mother has been in herself as a child, I have decided to pursue both psychology and criminal justice as a dual major. Growing up, close family friends of mine experienced abuse and neglect by their mother. My family took the children in on many accounts, providing them food, shelter, and emotional support when needed. The entire experience my family friends had with their mother was horrible and when things escalated the mother's custody was thankfully revoked with the help of the family social worker. My mother experienced abuse as a child as well and was luckily able to be removed from the toxic environment once she was able to receive legal counsel and help from a psychologist in the courts. At the moment, I plan to dual major and receive a B.S. in psychology and a B.S. in criminal justice at Husson University. This specific program has connections with federal agencies such as the FBI and CIA which start recruiting students during their freshman year. After I receive my undergraduate degree, I plan to work for a federal agency while I get my master's in psychology and doctorate. I intend to become a forensic psychologist, primarily working with children and the law. I want to work in the city or in other areas where poverty and child endangerment are more prevalent. My goal is to apply my bachelor's in psychology to legal situations and I hope to help reach solutions to problems involving child safety and custody. An issue I want to focus on in my career is the reunification of families where the parent is the offender and has abused their child or children. I wrote a research paper for my college victim advocacy class in which I had to choose an ethical issue related to victimology. I chose to research how the Child Welfare and juvenile court system fails to protect children from their abusive homes and parents and how these two systems are oftentimes unresponsive to children in jeopardy. I focused on how the reunification of the child with their family is not always the best solution after abuse. Although I do want families to be reunited and to receive a second chance in some situations, I do not believe that in every situation reunification is the best solution. So much research and so many events show that reunification can result in continual abuse and can even result in the death of the child. When I enter the legal system from a psychology standpoint, I will be devoting my time to reconstructing the system. I will try to push for laws that require states to reunite families to reconsider. I will try to perform research and make psychoanalysis that supports my argument: reunification cannot be the sole solution, reunification must be more carefully monitored. Using psychology to help reform the legal system is my ultimate goal with my B.S. in Criminal Justice / B.S. in Psychology from Husson University. I have shown my passion for this issue as I have taken three college classes so far pertaining to psychology. I have taken Introduction to Psychology, an Abuse, Trauma, and Recovery course, as well as Introduction to Victim Advocacy which awards me a certificate from NACP making me a Victim Advocate. I do not intend to stop here, I want to make the most amount of positive change as I can by rewriting the system.
    Mark Caldwell Memorial STEM/STEAM Scholarship
    After quitting field hockey my parents decided that I needed something to do in my life. When we drove past a sign advertising taekwondo classes. My parents immediately wanted my brother and me to join. Reluctantly, as a fourth grader who just wanted to relax after years full of playing field hockey, I joined. My brother and I both were surprised when we found out we enjoyed it. We continued classes and advanced in our rank faster than most. Fast forward a few years, I only had about two years until I could get my black belt but my spirit was fading. I was thirteen years old and a moody teenager who had devoted her Saturday mornings to taekwondo at eight o'clock crisp along with Wednesday night classes. I had taken up lacrosse that Spring as well and had practice every day during the school week with occasional games as well. At taekwondo, a lot more pressure was put on me. I was a higher ranking belt which meant I was expected to lead the class and assist the instructors. I was looked up to by lower ranking belts which meant I could never slack off in class. All eyes were on me the moment I stepped into that parking lot. Everyone looked towards me whether they knew it or not. Although this is something that as a teen you should tolerate and accept, I was upset. I was childish and annoyed about how much pressure was put on me. I learned, as my instructor said "to get a straw...and suck it up". This worked for a few months of pushing forward and portraying a disciplined, well respected teen in the taekwondo classroom. Then my life was turned upside down. I found out when I was so close to getting my black belt that I had scoliosis, which is a sideways curvature of my spine. Although it can be treated and passed off as harmless, it wasn't the case for me. The curve of my spine increased and the talk about surgery occurred. The spinal surgery would put me out of physical activity including taekwondo and lacrosse for three months. Although three months doesn't sound too bad, it was to me. Three months of me being behind in taekwondo when I was so close to getting my black belt. Three months of me missing lacrosse, a sport I had come to love. Unfortunately, I had to get the surgery and was put out for months. I was unable to move up in my taekwondo rank during the following months after surgery which put me behind to get my black belt. This felt like the end of the world. After my recovery, I pushed myself to do better. Although I was still healing from my surgery, I moved up in the taekwondo ranks as fast as I could and hurried to get to my black belt. Don't mistaken me "hurrying" as me doing a poor job. I worked hard to be proficient and do well since I would be set back even further if I performed poorly. After working up the strength and skills back, I was able to receive my black belt a year and a half after my surgery. The first time I qualified to test for my black belt, I passed. This is almost unheard of since it takes most people three to five tries on average. Being able to pass on my first try was something I am proud of and I know it was all thanks to the effort I put in to get there.