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Emma Zach

4535

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

I'm an undergraduate student at American University in Washington D.C. I'm a part of the Sakura Scholars program at AU, so I'm also enrolled in Ritsumiekan University in Kyoto, Japan. I will be attending RU my sophomore and junior year, and then coming back to D.C. my senior year. I'm interested in working for the Department of State or working for an international organization relating to Asian Affairs.

Education

American University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • International/Globalization Studies

Palatine High School

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • International Relations and National Security Studies
    • History and Political Science
    • International/Globalization Studies
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Government Relations

    • Dream career goals:

    • Nanny

      Private Household
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Lifeguarding

      Peppertree Pool
      2020 – Present4 years

    Sports

    Cross-Country Running

    Varsity
    2019 – 20234 years

    Awards

    • state alternate

    Cross-Country Running

    Varsity
    2019 – 20234 years

    Awards

    • state alternate
    • state runner

    indoor track and Feild

    2019 – 20223 years

    Awards

    • all conference

    Arts

    • Holy Family Catholic Church

      Theatre
      Passion Play
      Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Eagle-Thon — Fiscal Team Member
      2023 – 2024
    • Volunteering

      Holy Family Catholic Church — I help lead classes every Sunday at my church for teens
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Best Buddies — Board Member
      2019 – Present
    • Volunteering

      AP resource room at Palatine High School — Tutoring
      2022 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    TEAM ROX Scholarship
    Throughout my experiences in the education system, I’ve observed the impact that education can have on people when educators adapt their teaching methods to best fit individual student’s needs. My elementary school provided me with a safe space to explore my passions and be a kid. I have ADHD and my unique style of thinking pulled me into alternate realities I created within my mind. My teachers helped me understand the topics and lessons by teaching them in multiple different ways and helped me utilize my differences rather than have it hinder me. My time at my elementary school allowed me to build a foundation for the stepping stones of my education. At my High School, I received the opportunity to be involved with the special education program. Best Buddies is a program at my school that promotes inclusion and friendships with people with physical and developmental disabilities and I am honored to be a board member for this organization. Palatine High School also offers a program where you can become a gym leader for a special education PE class. I have been able to do this program for the past two years. I’ve loved learning about ways to make education more accessible to people with different abilities. Palatine High School also helped me figure out my passion for history and global affairs through the social studies courses I’ve taken like AP Human Geography, AP World History, and AP U.S. History. I’ve also gotten the opportunity to explore how our patriarchal society has affected both men and women with my research project in AP Lang last year. This has furthered my passion for gender equality, specifically focusing on education as a tool to make long-lasting change. This summer I went to Malaysia for three weeks to visit my uncle. My uncle works in the State Department as the Chargé d'affaires. During my stay, I toured the U.S. embassy, along with attending work events and social gatherings with my uncle. I met so many wonderful diplomats and Foreign Service officers. I learned about the daily life of a foreign service member and fell in love with Malaysian culture, food, and traditions. One of the work events I attended was an education initiative sponsored by the U.S. called YSEALI. It promotes education to young change-makers in Southeast Asian countries. It was amazing to see such bright young minds from all over Asia in one room sharing their passions, and cultures, all connected by the desire to learn and positively impact their communities. This trip helped further my interest in the world of diplomacy and deepened my desire to learn about different people and cultures around the world. Using my passion for history, travel, and learning about other cultures I want to go into the foreign service to promote equitable education for all throughout the world, specifically for young girls. I learned from my AP Human Geography class and my own research on how equitable access to education can not only positively impact so many young girls, but also launch the country into greater economic prosperity, therefore benefiting the entire society. I am currently enrolled at American University in Washington, D.C., and Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan. I will spend my freshman and senior year in the U.S., and then my sophomore and junior year in Japan. Using this unique college experience to my advantage, I hope to gain even more international experience after college and help promote equitable education in and around Asia.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    My dream for the future isn't to be successful, famous, or have a family; I don't care if I'm rich, beautiful, or a CEO of a major company. My dream is to be happy, I want to be satisfied by the life I created for myself and be surrounded by people who love me.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    When I sat down to write my Christmas wish list in 1st grade, only one thing was on my mind: a fish. I desperately wanted a pet, and after losing hope that I would ever have a dog or a cat, I turned to the next best thing; a fish. My parents surprised me with a reddish-brown beta fish on Christmas morning. I was ecstatic, jumping around and thanking my parents. “What will you name him?”, my mother asked. “George Washington Sea” I replied with no hesitation. While this may be an unusual name for a seven-year-old to name her fish, my parents were not surprised. I was obsessed with the U.S. presidents. By seven years old, I could name every single president and their nickname, just by seeing a picture of them. My love for presidents cultivated into a lifelong love of history, geography, foreign cultures, and social studies. I've gone through many phases of my life where I become obsessed by one topic to the next, and this is a reflection of my ADHD. I wasn't formally diagnosed until sixth grade, partly because my ADHD never really held me back academically or socially. I think it benefits me, allowing me to see the world differently than other people. My neurodivergent thinking allows me to be pulled into my own world when I read, hear, or watch my special interests. My love for history combined with my love for travel has led me to pursue international relations as my major. My intended career is the Foreign service, because I want to help others abroad, while serving the interests of the United States. My uncle, Michael Newbill, is the Deputy Chief Ambassador in Malaysia. I had the amazing opportunity to visit him and his family for three weeks last summer. I saved up all of my lifeguarding money, bought a ticket, and flew across the world for the adventure of a lifetime. While I was in Malaysia, I shadowed my Uncle, learning how a U.S. embassy works, and the life of a foreign service officer. I also nannied my little cousins. I tried new foods, explored museums, toured temples, and immersed myself in another culture. I asked hundreds of questions to everyone around me, soaking up knowledge like a sponge. I researched the history of Malaysia; how the country formed, and discovered how the nation’s past impacts the government’s decisions in the present. One of my favorite moments from my trip was attending a work gala with my uncle in Sarawak, Borneo. It was for a U.S initiative called YSEALI, or Youth South Asian Learning Initiative. The initiative looks for bright young minds in the Southeast Asian region, who could be potential change-makers for their country. The members go to workshops and conferences, where they brainstorm potential solutions to issues around the world. They also have the opportunity to study in the U.S. for a year. I loved getting to know all of the bright, energetic young people who were a part of the program and was inspired by their drive to create a better future. One of my aspirations is to help sponsor an education initiative if I join the foreign service, because I care deeply about educational equity around the world, specifically increasing the worldwide rates that young women get a substantial secondary education.
    Big Heart Scholarship
    Last year I helped create the Wellness Committee, a club at my school that advocates for the social, emotional, and physical well-being of the students at our school. My role in the club focuses on the emotional side, and I helped convince the district to hire two new crisis counselors at our school and create an app that would make it easier and more accessible for students to have a meeting with their counselor. I also shared stress management tips with underclassmen before finals week in the winter. Our club also organized "share a smile day", where students write encouraging messages to their friends, and then we deliver them the next week. We were invited to a Wellness forum by our district last year, where we went to the district building and shared our ideas with other schools, and heard theirs. We also analyzed district-wide surveys about wellness topics to see where we needed to improve. Our club’s largest event is Wellness Week, where students could sign up for workshops during their lunch periods all week. Amongst other workshops, we brought in the culinary department to host an “Eat Good, Feel Good” workshop, Illuminate Therapy, a local business, to talk about stress and anxiety, and a Student Panel to present information from Committee members. It was a huge success, and we were able to bring in Ben and Jerry's ice cream this year on the last day of the week to encourage people to go outside and eat ice cream with their friends. We also got local therapy dogs to come to our school so students could pet them outside too. My goal is to help students who were just like me as an underclassman. I have generalized anxiety and panic disorder, and when I was a freshman, I was too afraid to ask for help. I was ashamed to talk about it with others and felt very alone. I want to break the stigma around mental health and encourage people to advocate for themselves. I recently spoke at one of the workshops this year, during a student panel. I shared my story with a room full of strangers, telling them about when you should ask for help, and tips on how to deal with stress and anxiety. Looking out into the crowd, I hoped that my story would touch at least one person there. I'm thankful that I can leave high school with peace of mind knowing that Wellness Committee will continue to help future students.
    Kiaan Patel Scholarship
    When I sat down to write my Christmas wish list in 1st grade, only one thing was on my mind: a fish. I desperately wanted a pet, and after losing hope that I would ever have a dog or a cat, I turned to the next best thing; a fish. My parents surprised me with a reddish-brown beta fish on Christmas morning. I was ecstatic, jumping around and thanking my parents. “What will you name him?”, my mother asked. “George Washington Sea” I replied with no hesitation. While this may be an unusual name for a seven-year-old to name her fish, my parents were not surprised. I was obsessed with the U.S. presidents. By seven years old, I could name every single president and their nickname, just by seeing a picture of them. My love for presidents cultivated into a lifelong love of history, geography, foreign cultures, and social studies. That, combined with my love for travel has led me to pursue international relations as my major. My intended career is the Foreign Service, because I want to help others abroad while serving the interests of the United States. This summer I went to Malaysia for three weeks to visit my uncle. My uncle works in the State Department as the Chargé d'affaires, (second to the ambassador). During the majority of my stay, he was the acting ambassador. I nannied my two younger cousins, along with attending work events and parties with my uncle. I met so many wonderful diplomats and Foreign Service members. I learned about the daily life of a foreign service member and fell in love with Malaysian culture, food, and traditions. I saved up all of my lifeguarding money from the summer before, flew by myself, and left my family at home for the first time. But, it was worth it. This journey helped further my interest in the world of diplomacy and deepened my desire to learn about different people and cultures around the world. One of my favorite moments from my trip was attending a work gala with my uncle in Sarawak, Borneo. It was for a U.S. initiative called YSEALI, or Youth South Asian Learning Initiative. The initiative looks for bright young minds in the Southeast Asian region, who could be potential change-makers for their country. The members go to workshops and conferences, where they brainstorm potential solutions to issues around the world. They also have the opportunity to study in the U.S. for a year. I loved getting to know all of the bright, energetic young people who were a part of the program and was inspired by their drive to create a better future. One of my aspirations is to help sponsor an education initiative if I join the foreign service, because I care deeply about educational equity around the world, specifically increasing the worldwide rates that young women get a substantial secondary education. I believe that educating women is the key to solving many of the problems that plague developing countries. Right now my more immediate plan is to go to a four-year university and major in international relations. This scholarship could help my family and I afford a more expensive university that would give me the connections and education I need to get a job in the Foreign Service.
    Most Improved Student Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. I met Cailean through my decision to be a gym leader in a special education PE class. However, I didn’t know it would lead me to saving my peer in the deep end of a pool during gym class. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. Despite her condition, the next day she was back in the pool (in the shallow end), smiling and laughing. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness of Dravet Syndrome, and I received an award from our district’s superintendent. It was a wave of overwhelming and humbling emotions. Amid all of this, I got a text from Cailean’s mother inviting me to breakfast. We went to Denny’s, Cailean’s favorite restaurant. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in an ocean of anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and gratitude.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    Last year I helped create the Wellness Committee, a club at my school that advocates for the social, emotional, and physical well-being of the students at our school. My role in the club focuses on the emotional side, and I helped convince the district to hire two new crisis counselors at our school and create an app that would make it easier and more accessible for students to have a meeting with their counselor. I also shared stress management tips with underclassmen before finals week in the winter. Our club also organized "share a smile day", where students write encouraging messages to their friends, and then we deliver them the next week. We were invited to a Wellness forum by our district last year, where we went to the district building and shared our ideas with other schools, and heard theirs. We also analyzed district-wide surveys about wellness topics to see where we needed to improve. Our club’s largest event is Wellness Week, where students could sign up for workshops during their lunch periods all week. Amongst other workshops, we brought in the culinary department to host an “Eat Good, Feel Good” workshop, Illuminate Therapy, a local business, to talk about stress and anxiety, and a Student Panel to present information from Committee members. It was a huge success, and we were able to bring in Ben and Jerry's ice cream this year on the last day of the week to encourage people to go outside and eat ice cream with their friends. We also got local therapy dogs to come to our school so students could pet them outside too. My goal is to help students who were just like me as an underclassman. I have generalized anxiety and panic disorder, and when I was a freshman, I was too afraid to ask for help. I was ashamed to talk about it with others and felt very alone. I want to break the stigma around mental health and encourage people to advocate for themselves. I recently spoke at one of the workshops this year, during a student panel. I shared my story with a room full of strangers, telling them about when you should ask for help, and tips on how to deal with stress and anxiety. Looking out into the crowd, I hoped that my story would touch at least one person there. I'm thankful that I can leave high school with peace of mind knowing that Wellness Committee will continue to help future students.
    Blaine Sandoval Young American Scholarship
    I have a passion for travel, history, helping others, and politics. My dream job is to work in and around Asia as a foregin service officer for the U.S government. Asia is a fascinating region to me, many of the countries are moving up in stages of development, experiencing population growth, globalizing, and entering the global stage for the first time. My Uncle, Michael Newbill, is the Deputy Chief Ambassador in Malaysia at the moment. I had the amazing opportunity to visit him and his family for three weeks last summer. I saved up all of my lifeguarding money, bought a ticket, and flew across the world for the adventure of a lifetime. While I was in Malaysia, I shadowed my Uncle, learning how a U.S embassy works, and the life of a foregin service officer. I also nannied my little cousins. I tried new foods, explored museums, toured temples, and immersed myself in another culture. I asked hundreds of questions to everyone around me, soaking up knowledge like a sponge. I researched the history of Malaysia; how the country formed, and discovered how the roots of the nation impact the government’s decisions in the present. One of my favorite moments from my trip was attending a work gala with my Uncle in Sarawak, Borneo. It was for a U.S initiative called YSEALI, or Youth South Asian Learning Initiative. The initiative looks for bright young minds in the southeast Asian region, who could be potential change makers for their country. The members go to workshops and conferences, where they brainstorm potential solutions to issues around the world. They also have the opportunity to study in the U.S for a year. I loved getting to know all of the bright, energetic young people apart of the program, and was inspired by their drive to create a better future. One of my aspirations is to help sponsor an education initiative if I join the foreign service, because I care deeply about educational equity around the world, specifically increasing the worldwide rates that young women get a substantial secondary education. I want to die knowing I changed the world for the better. Using my passions and knowledge, I feel like a career in the foreign service will allow me to help people to the best of my abilities. My dreams are ambitious, and I put a lot of pressure on myself to be perfect all the time, but I think my drive and passion for these subjects, and my goals in life will help me succeed.
    Tim Watabe Doing Hard Things Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. I met Cailean through my decision to be a gym leader in a special education PE class. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. Despite her condition, the next day she was back in the pool (in the shallow end), smiling and laughing. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness of Dravet Syndrome, and I received an award from our district’s superintendent. It was a wave of overwhelming and humbling emotions. Amid all of this, I got a text from Cailean’s mother inviting me to breakfast. We went to Denny’s, Cailean’s favorite restaurant. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in an ocean of anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and gratitude.
    Another Way Scholarship
    Last year I helped create the Wellness Committee, a club at my school that advocates for the social, emotional, and physical well-being of the students at our school. My role in the club focuses on the emotional side, and I helped convince the district to hire two new crisis counselors at our school, and create an app that would make it easier and more accessible for students to have a meeting with their counselor. I also shared stress management tips with underclassmen before finals week in the winter. We were invited to a Wellness forum by our district last year, where we went to the district building and shared our ideas with other schools, and heard theirs. Our club’s largest event is Wellness Week, where students could sign up for workshops during their lunch periods all week. Amongst other workshops, we brought in the culinary department to host an “Eat Good, Feel Good” workshop, Illuminate Therapy, a local business, to talk about stress and anxiety, and a Student Panel to present information from Committee members. My goal is to help students who were just like me as an underclassmen. I have generalized anxiety and panic disorder, and when I was a freshman, I was too afraid to ask for help. I want to break the stigma around mental health and encourage people to advocate for themselves. I recently spoke at one of the workshops this year, during a student panel. I shared my story to a room full of strangers, telling them about when you should ask for help, and tips on how to deal with stress and anxiety. Looking out into the crowd, I hoped that my story would touch at least one person there. I can leave high school with peace of mind knowing that the Wellness Committee I helped create will continue to help future students.
    Glen E Kaplan Memorial Scholarship
    When I sat down to write my Christmas wish list in 1st grade, only one thing was on my mind: a fish. I desperately wanted a pet, and after losing hope that I would ever have a dog or a cat, I turned to the next best thing; a fish. My parents surprised me with a reddish-brown beta fish on Christmas morning. I was ecstatic, jumping around and thanking my parents. “What will you name him?”, my mother asked. “George Washington Sea” I replied with no hesitation. While this may be an unusual name for a seven year old to name her fish, my parents were not surprised. I was obsessed with the U.S presidents. By seven years old, I could name every single president and their nickname, just by seeing a picture of them. My love for presidents cultivated into a lifelong love of history, geography, foreign cultures, and social studies. That, combined with my love for travel has led me to pursuing international relations as my major. My intended career is the Foreign service, because I want to help others abroad, while serving the interests of the United States. This summer I went to Malaysia for three weeks to visit my uncle. My uncle works in the State Department as the Chargé d'affaires, (second to the ambassador). During the majority of my stay he was acting ambassador. I nannied my two younger cousins, along with attending work events and parties with my uncle. I met so many wonderful diplomats and Foreign Service members. I learned about the daily life of a foreign service member, and fell in love with Malaysian culture, food, and traditions. I saved up all of my lifeguarding money from the summer before, flew by myself, and left my family at home for the first time ever. But, it was worth it. This journey helped further my interest in the world of diplomacy, and deepened my desire to learn about different people and cultures around the world. After graduating college, I plan to further my education by pursuing a masters degree. After that I want to take the Foreign Service test, and continue with a career in the State Department. I would like to travel the world, meet new people from different cultures, and make a positive impact. Especially with equitable education for young girls, finally closing the gap between women and men participating in secondary school abroad. I want to create a program in conjunction with the U.S embassy to encourage higher education in the country that I travel to as a foreign service officer.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    If I could have the power to change the course of history, I would promote access to education for women. If finding the answer to solving economic downturn, overpopulation, and world hunger were in a lock box, the equitable education of females would be the key to unlocking it. When looking at the demographic transition model, it is clear that developing nations have a higher portion of their population classified as “dependent”; mostly children. For example, in a developing stage 2 country such as Nigeria, their fertility rate is around 5.3. The amount of dependent children in Nigeria, who are excluded from the workforce, outnumbers the amount of adults in the country who can pay taxes and work. This imbalance leaves the country’s government unable to provide social services for all the children, which in turn would also affect their budget for things like infrastructure and economic development. Around 87 million Nigerians live in extreme poverty (Brookings). The current female literacy rate in Nigeria is around 61%, one of the lowest rates in Africa (Umar). When women receive education, especially for secondary school, they are more likely to learn about contraception and other forms of birth control. They are also more likely to wait to have children and instead go to college, or aspire to achieve goals in a career. A huge benefit of women receiving an equitable education is the likelihood of them entering the workforce, which doubles the government's supply of labor and taxes. This all leads to the fertility rate dropping, and the potential workforce balancing the dependent population (Rubenstein). The U.S government should promote access to education across the globe. I would gather graphs, statistics, and data to show to government officials of some of the nations with the lowest female education rates, how much it would benefit their nation to invest in education. Furthermore, I would help Congress pass a bill funding a U.S initiative to promote women’s access to education. While there are already so many amazing organizations such as CAMFED, UNICEF, and CAI that are already working to give girls the opportunity to get the education they deserve, the U.S. could always do more. With the hard and soft power of the U.S backing the initiative, our world could have a shot at achieving a higher standard of living in the long run. I want to create an education initiative connected to U.S embassies across the world, that encourages young girls to pursue a higher education. The program could go present information at local schools, distribute books and other educational materials to the public, and raise money to give scholarships to young women trying to pursue a degree in college. We could also present the benefits of women’s education to government officials, sharing the economic, social, and political gains of integration. We could raise awareness about women’s education, through social media campaigns, trying to break cultural stigmas that may hold back young girls who want to go to school. In George Washington’s Farewell Address, one of his points was to not get involved with Foregin Affairs. It would be much to his dismay that the U.S has the most embassies in the world, is more involved with foreign conflicts than any other nation, and is the largest hegemonic power in the world. In the globalized and very connected world that we live in today, the only way that the U.S is reaching its fullest potential for human life, is if the nations that we share this world with are also reaching their full potential; by giving women an equitable education.
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. I met Cailean through my decision to be a gym leader in a special education PE class. However, I didn’t know it would lead me to saving my peer in the deep end of a pool during gym class. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. Despite her condition, the next day she was back in the pool, smiling and laughing. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness of Dravet Syndrome, and I received an award from our district’s superintendent. It was a wave of overwhelming and humbling emotions. Amid all of this, I got a text from Cailean’s mother inviting me to breakfast. We went to Denny’s, Cailean’s favorite restaurant. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in an ocean of anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and gratitude.
    Share Your Poetry Scholarship
    Drowning Deep in the depths of my mind Buried underneath my logic, happiness, and tranquility A storm was brewing, Slowly churning, picking up speed Suddenly It burst through the gates, flooding my mind with waves of despair I had pushed it far underneath the surface, But the deeper I pushed, the more pressure accumulated Until one day, it was too much The waves of sadness, anger, terror, and anxiety overwhelmed the shining waters of the surface A tsunami drowned my senses The world around me drowning in the darkness Everything was swirling, twisting into unfamiliar shapes I gave in, enveloped by the darkness, I floated in the water Weightless, I glode through my nightmares No sense of self, I sank deeper and deeper into the ocean I relived my worst memories My irrational thoughts because rational White became black Light became dark Life became death Suddenly I shot to the surface I gasped for air, shocked by the coldness of reality’s oxygen But nothing about reality was comforting, it was unfamiliar Where am I? What is this? Who am I? Slowly everything came back into focus My name is Emma, I’m crying in a bathroom stall, and I’m supposed to be in math class I brush my fingers against the black, bumpy stall walls, trying to cling onto reality I push my nails into my palms, creating discolored red marks against my skin, hoping the pain would keep me above the surface I stifled a sob, more panic is setting in, my hands are starting to shake again I’m hyperventilating, I’m dizzy, I’m nauseous The waves resurged, pulling me out of the eye of the storm I washed away into my mind, pulled down into the darkness
    Dante Luca Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. I met Cailean through my decision to be a gym leader in a special education PE class. I chose to take it because I have a cousin I love dearly with Down Syndrome: Max. He lights up every room he walks in, bringing laughter and joy. My leadership position for Best Buddies, a club that promotes inclusion and friendship for people with disabilities, influenced my decision as well. However, I didn’t know it would lead me to saving my peer in the deep end of a pool during gym class. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. Despite her condition, the next day she was back in the pool (in the shallow end), smiling and laughing. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness of Dravet Syndrome, and I received an award from our district’s superintendent. It was a wave of overwhelming and humbling emotions. Amid all of this, I got a text from Cailean’s mother inviting me to breakfast. We went to Denny’s, Cailean’s favorite restaurant. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in an ocean of anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and gratitude.
    Maureen "Moe" Graham Memorial Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. I met Cailean through my decision to be a gym leader in a special education PE class. I chose to take it because I have a cousin with Down Syndrome: Max. He lights up every room he walks in, bringing laughter and joy. My leadership position for Best Buddies, a club that promotes inclusion and friendship for people with disabilities, influenced my decision as well. However, I didn’t know it would lead me to saving my peer in the deep end of a pool during gym class. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness about Dravet Syndrome. Amid all of this, I was invited by Cailean’s mother to breakfast. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in the ocean of my anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and clarity.
    Mental Health Importance Scholarship
    I wanted to scream; I wanted to yell, “Help, someone help please!,” but nothing came out of my mouth. For the first time in my life, I understood what it was like to be truly speechless. As she seized, I struggled to keep her head above water while still supporting myself. All I could do was pray someone saw us. Even though the articles written by The Chicago Tribune, and other local news stations say I saved Cailean Walker’s life that day, I feel as though she saved mine. Before I met her, I wasn’t truly living, I was trying to survive in a world drowning me with homework, grades, unrealistic expectations, and the fear of failure. Cailean has a rare form of epilepsy, called Dravet Syndrome, which causes her to have 1-2 seizures a month. Despite her condition, the next day she was back in the pool (in the shallow end), and was her smiling and laughing self again. In the next coming weeks I was busy with interviews, where I promoted the gym leaders class, and increased awareness of Dravet Syndrome, and I received an award from our district’s superintendent. It was a wave of overwhelming and humbling emotions. Amid all of this, I got a text from Cailean’s mother inviting me to breakfast. We went to Denny’s, Cailean’s favorite restaurant. Her mom told me something I will never forget. She said, “Lots of people ask me why I let my daughter do activities that could be dangerous because of her seizures. They say I’m irresponsible, or a bad mother. I used to hide her in our house, away from all the dangers that awaited her. But one night I had a nightmare, I was standing in front of my daughter’s grave, crying, because I never let her live her life. I’m most likely going to outlive Cailean, so I’m trying to give her the best life possible. I don’t plan for the next day with her,” she said while smiling at her daughter. She continued, “Every morning I wake up and I’m thankful for another day with her.” She looked back at me with tears in her eyes and choked out, “Thank you for giving me another day with my Cailean.” At first, I didn’t know what to say. I was stunned that a woman I just met told me something so personal and moving. Eventually, I said, “We should all try to live our lives like Cailean.” I do my best to live like Cailean every day. My whole life I’ve struggled with anxiety and panic attacks. Around the time of the incident, I was sinking deeper and deeper into a vast ocean of fear and stress. Shortly after, I learned how to advocate for myself, swimming my way back up to the surface. I was able to go to therapy, and receive medication to help with the physical symptoms. Every time I get overwhelmed, I tell myself that everyday is a new day, and instead of focusing on what’s wrong with my life, I focus on what brings me joy. This mindset has helped me get through finals, state track meets, and college applications. I also apply this to my relationships with the people that I love, making sure to be in the moment when spending time with them. Cailean revealed a new way of living for me; in the ocean of my anxiety she was a lighthouse illuminating a path of mindfulness and clarity.