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Emily Oehler

3475

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Bio

At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. This experience cemented my goal to obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine.

Education

Baylor University

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

Hyde Park High School

High School
2019 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Nursing Science

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Nursing Science
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medical Practice

    • Dream career goals:

      Charge Nurse

    • Emergency Room Shadow

      St. Joseph's Medical Center
      2023 – 2023
    • Caregiver

      Brookdale Assisted Living
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Mail filer

      Cornerstone Home Lending
      2020 – 2020
    • Baby Sitter

      Self
      2017 – 20203 years

    Sports

    Tennis

    Varsity
    2019 – Present5 years

    Research

    • homelessness

      School — Undergraduate Researcher
      2020 – 2020

    Arts

    • School

      Painting
      School Art Shows
      2019 – 2020

    Public services

    • Advocacy

      I'm OK Walks to End Epilepsy — Volunteer
      2018 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Independent — Wrap Christmas gifts for sick children and their families.
      2019 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      St. Joseph's Hospital — Shadower
      2019 – 2019
    • Volunteering

      Independent — Volunteer
      2017 – Present

    Future Interests

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Romeo Nursing Scholarship
    As an epileptic who regularly finds themselves surrounded by nurses, I know nurses make a positive impact on people's lives by providing essential healthcare and support. Nursing, overall, is a rewarding profession, allowing for personal and professional growth. And the profession continues to grow, making it a field with abundant job prospects and advancements. Nursing's positive impact is felt through the provision of holistic care, emotional support, patient education, advocacy, health promotion, and contributions to healthcare leadership and research. As an epileptic who has spent weeks in the hospital, I know nurses are at the forefront of patient care, providing essential medical attention, administering medications, monitoring vital signs, and ensuring patients' comfort. Their expertise and compassion contribute to positive health outcomes and improved quality of life for patients. Nurses don't only address patients' physical needs but also provide emotional support. During my hospital stays, they’ve listened to my concerns, offered guidance, and provided comfort during difficult times. The emotional connection has a profound impact on my, as well as other patients', well-being and recovery. Additionally, nurses are vital in educating patients and their families about their conditions, treatment plans, and self-care practices. By providing clear instructions and empowering patients to manage their health, nurses promote better understanding and adherence to medical recommendations. Nurses advocate for their patients' rights, ensuring they receive appropriate care and resources. They communicate patient needs to the healthcare team, participate in care planning, and address any concerns or barriers that may affect patient outcomes. Furthermore, nurses are involved in preventive care, promoting healthy lifestyles, and disease prevention. Through patient education, community outreach, and health screenings, nurses contribute to the well-being of individuals and communities. And nurses often take on leadership roles, contributing to healthcare policy development, quality improvement initiatives, and research. Their insights and expertise help shape healthcare practices and policies, benefiting patient care on a broader scale. Nursing is a rewarding profession in that they provide vital healthcare services, support patients and their families during challenging times, and play a crucial role in promoting health and well-being. Nurses often develop deep connections and relationships with their patients, witnessing their recovery, improvement, and in many cases, saving lives. The ability to help others and provide comfort during vulnerable moments can be incredibly fulfilling. Additionally, nursing offers a sense of fulfillment through its emphasis on compassionate care. Nurses have the chance to provide emotional support, alleviate pain, and advocate for the needs of their patients. There’s a growing need for healthcare services due to aging populations, an increase in chronic illnesses, and advancements in medical technology. This translates into a greater need for qualified nurses across various healthcare settings. Additionally, nursing shortages persist in many regions. As hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities strive to meet patient needs, they actively seek skilled and dedicated nurses to fill positions. Because nurses positively impact people’s lives, are rewarded through the relationships they develop with their patients, and will always be needed, I’m pursuing a nursing career. My experiences with nurses through my epilepsy diagnosis and attempts to control the disease have strengthened my desire to become a nurse and reciprocate the support I’ve received.
    Bold Memories Scholarship
    September 7th, 2020; the day my grandfather passed away. Within the last year of my grandfather’s life, his battle with diabetes had prevailed. In his third to last hospital visit, a nurse noticed a dark spot developing on his heel. Believing the spot was inconsequential, the nurse applied medication and placed my grandfather’s foot in a sock. When my ailing grandfather was released from the hospital, my mother and I arrived at his home to take care of him. I barged into his house to find him lying in bed, watching television, with a sock on his left foot was oozing blood. Immediately, I gloved up, stripped his foot from the soggy fabric, and unveiled a golf ball sized hole in the back of his heel. As I turned towards my mother and grandmother, I was struck by their absence; I recognized my grandfather’s fate rested in my hands. Each day for two weeks, I cleansed the wound, allowed the wound to oxidize, and bandaged his foot. I would leave his leg elevated, for I recognized the wound was a result of poor circulation. Fourteen days later, my grandfather was admitted to the hospital and his leg was amputated. I was told by numerous doctors that had I not attentively cared for my grandfather’s foot, wet gangrene would have developed, proceeded to the bloodstream, and killed my grandfather instantly. This experience made me recognize I was the only person capable of taking care of my grandfather. I noticed my instinctive ability to take charge of unfamiliar situations, as well as my ability to calm the fears of the people around me. Though my grandfather passed away months after this event, I feel as if he prepared me for the unforeseen challenges that often occur in the medical field.
    #Back2SchoolBold Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I knew I wanted to work in the ER. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, and so much more. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. And it inspired me to go back to school. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified.
    Bold Impact Matters Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    Bold Dream Big Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    "If You Believe..." Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. And though I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, I felt useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Deborah's Grace Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Suraj Som Aspiring Educators Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Second Chance Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Lillie Award
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to Africa. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was constantly asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded that my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    Education Matters Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. He’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. He’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. He’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. He’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Sammy Ochoa Memorial Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. He’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, and in recovery. But when I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Caring Chemist Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. He’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, and in recovery. But when I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Darryl Davis "Follow Your Heart" Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the agony caused the right side of my body to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalisation, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. Gos’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, recovery, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I won’t only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to Africa. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    September 7th, 2020; the day my grandfather passed away. Within the last year of my grandfather’s life, his battle with diabetes had prevailed. In his third to last hospital visit, a nurse noticed a dark spot developing on his heel. Believing the spot was inconsequential, the nurse applied medication and slipped my grandfather’s foot into a sock. When my ailing grandfather was released from the hospital, my mother and I arrived at his home to take care of him. I barged into his house to find him lying in bed, watching television, with a sock on his left foot that was oozing blood. Immediately, I gloved up, stripped his foot from the soggy fabric, and unveiled a golf ball sized hole in the back of his heel. As I turned towards my mother and grandmother, I was struck by their absence; I recognized my grandfather’s fate rested in my hands. Each day for two weeks, I cleansed the wound, allowed the wound to oxidize, and bandaged his foot. I would leave his leg elevated, for I recognized the wound was a result of poor circulation. Fourteen days later, my grandfather was admitted to the hospital and his leg was amputated. I was told by numerous doctors that had I not attentively cared for my grandfather’s foot, wet gangrene would have developed, proceeded to the bloodstream, and killed my grandfather instantly. This experience made me recognize I was the only person capable of taking care of my grandfather. I noticed my instinctive ability to take charge of unfamiliar situations, as well as my ability to calm the fears of the people around me. Though my grandfather passed away months after this event, I feel as if he prepared me for the unforeseen challenges that often occur in the medical field.
    Bold Moments No-Essay Scholarship
    In south Austin, Texas, I, along with a team of other students, built and decorated houses for young girls who had been caught in sex trafficking. These houses served as a safe place and an area where they could receive counselling, food, clothing, and a sense of community.
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Pandemic's Box Scholarship
    In 2019, after spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. And the global pandemic has only fuelled my interest. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. And the global pandemic has only illuminated the need of health care in poverty filled communities.
    Taylor Price Financial Literacy for the Future Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Charles R. Ullman & Associates Educational Support Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Hailey Julia "Jesus Changed my Life" Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Carlos F. Garcia Muentes Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. He’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, and in recovery. But when I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    "Your Success" Youssef Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. He’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, and in recovery. But when I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Bubba Wallace Live to Be Different Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified, and I became more ambitious to participate in medical missions. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to Africa. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was constantly asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded that my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    3LAU "Everything" Scholarship
    September 7th, 2020; the day my grandfather passed away. He was sixty six years old, suffering from afib, heart disease, kidney failure, and type two diabetes. Within the last year of my grandfather’s life, his battle with diabetes had overpowered his ability to fight-- he constantly found himself hospitalized and we were reminded how blessed we were for him to be released. In his third to last hospital visit, he was admitted due to his resting heart rate averaging 125 bpm and his blood pressure being so low that doctors couldn’t feel a pulse. While my grandfather’s heart rate and blood pressure began to normalize, a nurse discovered a black mark on his left heel. Not seeing the significance of the spot and believing my grandfather recognized its existence, the nurse applied an orange cream to the darkened area, slipped my grandfather’s foot into a sock, and signed paperwork so my grandfather could be discharged. However, what the nurse didn’t know was that my grandfather had no feeling in his lower extremities. Nor, with my grandfather being 75% blind, could he see the black spot on his heel. This allowed for the darkened tissue to exponentially increase in size. When my grandfather was released from the hospital, my mother and I arrived at his home to take care of him. When I removed the sock, unveiling the spot, my mother and grandmother flead the premises; I was left to be my grandfather’s caretaker. I closely monitored the spot, taking protos and documenting its progression over the next few weeks. Each day, I cleansed the wound and wrapped his foot in bandages. I would then elevate his leg, recognizing the cause of the wound was due to a lack of circulation. Fourteen days later, my grandfather was admitted to the hospital and his leg was amputated. I was told by numerous doctors that had I not attentively cared for my grandfather’s foot, wet gangrene would have developed, made its way into the bloodstream, and killed my grandfather instantly. They reminded me that it was because of my doing that I extended my grandfather’s life. After having his leg amputated below the knee, undergoing five weeks of rehabilitation, and his leg being amputated for the second time, this time above the knee, my grandfather's death was the result of a heart attack. This experience made me recognize I was the only person capable of taking care of my grandfather. And had I chose not to provide the essential care my grandfather was in need of, his life would have been cut months shorter. And if I had to relive this experience all over again, I would without hesitation for my grandfather is my everything and I would do anything for him.
    Mark Caldwell Memorial STEM/STEAM Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It’s also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Wheezy Creator Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was constantly asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded that my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own life, God’s equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Mahlagha Jaberi Mental Health Awareness for Immigrants Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I froze. I stood screaming for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the agony caused the my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history. She, then, placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure’s taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. He’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God’s called me to serve in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my life, God’s equipped me with the strength I need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain he’ll never forsake me.
    First-Gen in Health & Medicine Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It’s also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Rho Brooks Women in STEM Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I ever imagined. It’s also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand’s placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, in physical therapy, on the hospital floor, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    GRLSWIRL Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to Africa. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was constantly asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded that my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    Elevate Women in Technology Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Mary Jo Huey Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    RushOrderTees Young Entrepreneurs Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Taylor Ibarrondo Memorial Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Misha Brahmbhatt Help Your Community Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. While shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I observed nurses in intensive care, physical therapy, and on the hospital floor. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified. When I was four years old, I felt God call me to Africa. I had never experienced African cultures, and at the time, I didn’t even know where Africa was. I only presumed it was a place full of need and a place God called me to serve. When I spoke of my aspirations to my family, they laughed. I was constantly asked if I knew of the dangers that would come my way. I was mocked, being told I would be working for free and have to marry someone rich in order to maintain a decent lifestyle. And I was shamed, being reminded that my parents wanted grandchildren and it would be selfish of me to move my family to another country. Instead of allowing my family’s remarks to diminish my calling, I felt as if they only made me more passionate. I began sponsoring children in various parts of Africa -- learning of their cultures, hobbies, and their dedication to their families. I also funded their education and the communities’ ability to build wells, schools, and houses. This evoked my recognition in my determination in filling a void God placed in me. And I understood why God chose me to carry out his mission: I’m too persistent to give it up. Once I obtain a nursing degree, I anticipate partnering with a hospital in order to provide medical care to villages across Africa that have little to no access to healthcare. Not only do I want to heal people physically, but also spiritually. I want to teach others the greatness of God and what it means to be saved by him. I want my company to be nomadic, in that it’s capable of being moved to wherever God sees the greatest need.
    A Sani Life Scholarship
    September 7th, 2020; the day my grandfather passed away. Within the last year of my grandfather’s life, his battle with diabetes had prevailed. In his third to last hospital visit, a nurse noticed a dark spot developing on his heel. Believing the spot was inconsequential, the nurse applied medication and slipped my grandfather’s foot into a sock. When my ailing grandfather was released from the hospital, my mother and I arrived at his home to take care of him. I barged into his house to find him lying in bed, watching television, with a sock on his left foot that was oozing blood. Immediately, I gloved up, stripped his foot from the soggy fabric, and unveiled a golf ball sized hole in the back of his heel. As I turned towards my mother and grandmother, I was struck by their absence; I recognized my grandfather’s fate rested in my hands. Each day for two weeks, I cleansed the wound, allowed the wound to oxidize, and bandaged his foot. I would leave his leg elevated, for I recognized the wound was a result of poor circulation. Fourteen days later, my grandfather was admitted to the hospital and his leg was amputated. I was told by numerous doctors that had I not attentively cared for my grandfather’s foot, wet gangrene would have developed, proceeded to the bloodstream, and killed my grandfather instantly. This experience made me recognize I was the only person capable of taking care of my grandfather. I noticed my instinctive ability to take charge of unfamiliar situations, as well as my ability to calm the fears of the people around me. Though my grandfather passed away months after this event, I feel as if he prepared me for the unforeseen challenges that often occur in the medical field.
    Mirajur Rahman Perseverance Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger than I imagined. It’s also led me to believe I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. God’s equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God’s equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God’s equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God’s equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. I observed patients in intensive care, physical therapy, and in the emergency room. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Justricia Scholarship for Education
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. After spending a week shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I shadowed intensive care nurses-- learning how powerful medicine is in keeping a patient alive-- physical therapy nurses-- recognizing how long the road of recovery is for some patients-- and floor nurses-- learning the ins and outs of charting and fulfilling immediate patient needs. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I learned something completely different; I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified, strengthening my pursuit to obtain a degree in nursing.
    Bold Activism Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Amplify Continuous Learning Grant
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. After spending a week shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I shadowed intensive care nurses-- learning how powerful medicine is in keeping a patient alive-- physical therapy nurses-- recognizing how long the road of recovery is for some patients-- and floor nurses-- learning the ins and outs of charting and fulfilling immediate patient needs. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I learned something completely different; I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified, strengthening my pursuit to obtain a degree in nursing.
    Prime Mailboxes Women in STEM Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    RJ Mitte Breaking Barriers Scholarship
    In the middle of the kitchen, I remained frozen. My feet sank into the cold, wooden floor. I stood crying, screaming, calling for help as a seizure cultivated in my brain and manifested its way through my arm, into my hand, and to my fingertips. My right hand clenched into a fist and the sheer agony caused the right side of my body to tremble, to shake, and then to convulse. Immediately, I was in my mom’s arms, then in the car, and then in the emergency room. Through the tears that covered my eyes, I saw a nurse escorting my mom and me to a room, where the only thing that resembled color was a painting of a beach that I was unable to discern. Within seconds of being in the room, I was in a hospital gown, lying in a cold hospital bed. A nurse hustled in, asking my mom about my seizure history, and as she did, she placed an IV into my arm. Unable to feel the needle pierce my skin, I begged for another shot, hoping that maybe this time I could regain my tactile sensation. Unable to speak, I wondered if my seizures were returning. My battle with epilepsy has been alarming, yet astonishing. Every seizure, every hospitalization, every MRI, has taught me I’m much stronger, much more heroic, and much more mettlesome than I ever imagined. It has also led me to believe that I serve a greater purpose on this planet than just myself. I discern that if God pulled me through numerous near-death experiences, he has something greater in store for me. As I’ve evolved into the person I am today, I’ve witnessed God forming me into a caretaker. His miraculous hand has placed me into situations in which the lives of others rely on my doings. God has equipped me with a soothing voice that’s able to simmer my mother’s violent panic attacks. God has equipped me with the knowledge to slow the progression of my grandfather’s diabetes, a disease that would ultimately acquire his leg. God has equipped me with the words to bring my fourteen-year-old cousin home after her attempts of running away and living on the streets. God has equipped me with strength to tend to others, and it’s because of this that I dedicate my life to serving the world around me. After spending a week shadowing nurses in a hospital, I’m certain I will dedicate the rest of my life to serving as a medical missionary. As I observed patients in intensive care, I witnessed the burden placed upon doctors and nurses by the family members who were desperately eager to bring their unwell loved ones home. As I observed patients in physical therapy, I witnessed the motivation doctors and nurses have to provide their patients with in order to convince them to keep going. And as I observed patients in the emergency room, I witnessed the organized chaos that fueled the entire hospital. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. These cognizances propelled me to becoming CPR certified and directed me to the path of obtaining a bachelor's degree of science in nursing. When I become a nurse, I will not only heal the people around me, but I will also help the people that have little to no access to healthcare. God has called me to serve in the small villages in Africa as well as in other poverty-filled communities. Through the hardships that have taken place in my own family, God has equipped me with the strength I will need to pursue a life filled with service. He has a greater plan for my life than what I envision. And it’s because of my battle with epilepsy that I’m certain God will never forsake me.
    Simple Studies Scholarship
    At eight months old, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, and subsequently, I grew up in and out of hospitals. I was perpetually the patient and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to be the caretaker. After spending a week shadowing nurses at St. Joseph’s Hospital, I instantly knew I wanted to work in the emergency room. I shadowed intensive care nurses-- learning how powerful medicine is in keeping a patient alive-- physical therapy nurses-- recognizing how long the road of recovery is for some patients-- and floor nurses-- learning the ins and outs of charting and fulfilling immediate patient needs. But when I shadowed emergency room nurses, I learned something completely different; I learned how it feels for adrenaline to summon every sense of your body and how your body operates in “fight or flight” situations. In the emergency room, I was exposed to psych patients, drug overdoses, anxiety attacks, broken bones, failed suicide attempts, strokes, stabbings, paper cuts, and something that hit home: seizures. I felt eager to preserve the health of every patient, yet, useless, for I wasn’t certified to work in the medical field. It’s for this reason that I will obtain a nursing degree and pursue a career in medicine. My hospital experience propelled me to take advanced biology, anatomy, join the medical club at my school, and become certified in CPR. With these classes and certifications, I’ve learned more about the human body and how it functions. Respectively, my desire to join the medical field has amplified, strengthening my pursuit to obtain a degree in nursing.