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Elizabeth Santana-Zavala

2835

Bold Points

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Finalist

Bio

I was 6 yrs old when I went to see a lecture at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on the Constitution, this experience sparked my interest in History and Politics. I am a home scholar, and when not studying or with my family, I volunteer at my local church, serve as a Cadet in The Civil Air Patrol U.S. Airforce Axillary, and at the Presidential Library. This fall, I will be attending a private college as a first generation student to study communications with an emphasis on journalism. With this degree, I plan to become an independent journalist and serve my community.

Education

The Master's University and Seminary

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs, Other

Sonlight Christian School

High School
2014 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs, Other
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Online Media

    • Dream career goals:

    • 2021 – Present3 years

    Sports

    Dancing

    2019 – 2019

    Arts

    • Church Bible Study - GBS Film Productions

      Videography
      2024 – 2024
    • Church Bible Study - GBS Film Productions

      Acting
      2022 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Ronald Reagen Presidental Libray & Museum — Docent
      2022 – Present
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Volunteer
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Civil Air Patrol
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Entrepreneurship

    Janie Mae "Loving You to Wholeness" Scholarship
    As a Civil Air Patrol cadet (CAP), we are taught four core values that we carry with us throughout our lives. Because CAP is the United States Air Force Auxiliary, we echo similar values of the Air Force throughout our organization. One of those being Volunteer Service. I can still remember my first activity in 2019. I got my first opportunity to serve with the Girl Scouts moving boxes. Since then, I've volunteered with many organizations through CAP, including St. Baldrick’s, an organization raising money for children with cancer, and helping set up the Hollywood Christmas Parade. Now, as the squadron commander, I'm learning different ways to serve my subordinates before myself. Another place I have been able to cultivate a love for serving is through my church. Each Sunday evening, I take care of a group of girls by playing games with them, having small groups, and singing while their parents take a break and listen to the service. Each summer, through my church, we host a free summer day camp open to the entire community. I have had the privilege of serving with the crafts portion of the camp for more than five years now. Combining my experience in both CAP and church has allowed me to volunteer as a docent at The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum (RRPL&M). Each Monday, I give up my afternoons answering any questions a visitor may have and giving tours. One of my other responsibilities is greeting guests from all over the world who come to visit, making sure they leave with a great impression. For the longest time, I knew I wanted my job to involve serving the public, although it wasn’t clear how I wanted to do that until my later junior year in high school. I decided to get even more involved in my community and learn about journalism. Along with another friend, I started going to protests and town halls. She filmed on her phone while I asked questions to anyone who would talk to us. I didn't care if I supported one side or the other; I just wanted to learn. Additionally, I was able to learn firsthand from professionals about different issues. This helped open me up to new ideas and challenge my opinions. I know that if I hadn’t been involved in the Civil Air Patrol, church, or at the RRPL&M, fostering my love for serving others, I wouldn’t have developed my drive for independent journalism. Undertaking that job is daunting because, like my experience with volunteering, many of the hours can be long and uncomfortable. In the future, when I'm faced with not wanting to get up, I'll recall the same truths taught by CAP and a bible verse that got me out of bed: “In all things I have shown you that by working hard in this way we must help the weak and remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he himself said, 'It is more blessed to give than to receive.’” This fall, I will be attending a private college to study communications with an emphasis on journalism. Upon graduating, I will use my skills and newfound knowledge to achieve my lifelong dream of giving back to my community through activism and journalism. I aim to amplify the voices of those often silenced and shed light on overlooked topics to inform and empower my community, driven by a desire to create positive change.
    Priscilla Shireen Luke Scholarship
    As a Civil Air Patrol cadet (CAP), we are taught four core values that we carry with us throughout our lives. Because CAP is the United States Air Force Auxiliary, we echo similar values of the Air Force throughout our organization. One of those being Volunteer Service. I can still remember my first activity in 2019. I got my first opportunity to serve with the Girl Scouts moving boxes. Since then, I've volunteered with many organizations through CAP, including St. Baldrick’s, an organization raising money for children with cancer, and helping set up the Hollywood Christmas Parade. Now, as the squadron commander, I'm learning different ways to serve my subordinates before myself. Another place I have been able to cultivate a love for serving is through my church. Each Sunday evening, I take care of a group of girls by playing games with them, having small groups, and singing while their parents take a break and listen to the service. Each summer, through my church, we host a free summer day camp open to the entire community. I have had the privilege of serving with the crafts portion of the camp for more than five years now. Combining my experience in both CAP and church has allowed me to volunteer as a docent at The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum (RRPL&M). Each Monday, I give up my afternoons answering any questions a visitor may have and giving tours. One of my other responsibilities is greeting guests from all over the world who come to visit, making sure they leave with a great impression. For the longest time, I knew I wanted my job to involve serving the public, although it wasn’t clear how I wanted to do that until my later junior year in high school. I decided to get even more involved in my community and learn about journalism. Along with another friend, I started going to protests and town halls. She filmed on her phone while I asked questions to anyone who would talk to us. I didn't care if I supported one side or the other; I just wanted to learn. Additionally, I was able to learn firsthand from professionals about different issues. This helped open me up to new ideas and challenge my opinions. I know that if I hadn’t been involved in the Civil Air Patrol, church, or at the RRPL&M, fostering my love for serving others, I wouldn’t have developed my drive for independent journalism. Undertaking that job is daunting because, like my experience with volunteering, many of the hours can be long and uncomfortable. In the future, when I'm faced with not wanting to get up, I'll recall the same truths taught by CAP and a bible verse that got me out of bed: “In all things I have shown you that by working hard in this way we must help the weak and remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he himself said, 'It is more blessed to give than to receive.’” This fall, I will be attending a private college to study communications with an emphasis on journalism. Upon graduating, I will use my skills and newfound knowledge to achieve my lifelong dream of giving back to my community through activism and journalism. I aim to amplify the voices of those often silenced and shed light on overlooked topics to inform and empower my community, driven by a desire to create positive change.
    Lori Nethaway Memorial Scholarship
    Since 3rd grade, I have been homeschooled, which has allowed me to challenge myself in different ways than regular students. While other students may be stuck in a classroom, I have learned firsthand in the real world and gained much-needed experience. Much of this experience is gained through town halls and volunteer service. During my junior year of high school, I decided to get more involved in my community and learn about journalism. Along with another friend, I started going to protests and town halls. She filmed on her phone, while I asked questions to anyone who would talk to us. I didn't care if I supported one side or the other; I just wanted to learn. Additionally, I was able to learn firsthand from professionals about different issues. This helped open myself up to new ideas and challenge my opinions. Now in my senior year, I continue to do this and post my videos online, helping keep the public informed on local issues. I currently volunteer as a Docent at the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum and Civil Air Patrol U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. To become a docent, I had to vigorously study to be able to give tours and answer visitors' questions about President Reagan. In Civil Air Patrol, I have had the opportunity to learn about leadership and aerospace. I have been involved in the program for five years and currently serve as the cadet commander of my squadron. Next school year, I will be a first-generation college student. Although this is a significant step for my family and myself, coming from an economically disadvantaged background, that future seems more like a distant dream than reality. I know that this scholarship will allow me to focus on school and relieve the heavy financial burden on my parents. Upon graduating from school, I will use my skills and newfound knowledge to achieve my lifelong dream of giving back to my community through activism and journalism.
    Book Lovers Scholarship
    With the world becoming more diverse in the 21st century, it becomes increasingly important to understand different cultures' struggles. One of the ways someone can do that is through stories. Among the hundreds of books I've read, one that stands out as wonderfully written to understand Hispanic culture is "Esperanza Rising" by Pam Munoz Ryan. The author tactically navigates tough topics in a way that is not only understandable but enjoyable for all ages. "Esperanza Rising" follows a young Mexican girl and her journey from Mexico to the US, working as a farmworker. Set in the Great Depression, you follow Esperanza’s difficult transition from riches to rags and her need to start over in an entirely new place. She navigates the world, dealing with topics like social class, identity, and belonging. Based on the author’s family, she writes in a way that gives the audience insight into a life they don’t live. Additionally, the author truly has a way of transporting you into Esperanza’s world. This is one of the key things I believe you need to have a captivating story. She does this by creating relatable characters and an engaging narrative. One way you might find it relatable is simply the growing pains of life. By the end of the book, you will have felt the emotions of sadness, joy, and hope. Regardless of where you stand politically, what your age is, or your background, there is something in this book for you. Personally, this book allowed me to understand how many of my relatives had to struggle coming from Mexico. Although my family’s story is different from the book, it still has the same elements of struggle that all immigrants face when moving for a better life. I first received it as a gift from a family member and read it aloud to my younger siblings. By the end, we felt the growing pains of Esperanza. We felt the sorrow and joy she felt and the hope for the future. As a Mexican, I appreciate that the author chose the name Esperanza for the main character. The word “Esperanza” means hope, the thing that each person carries within themselves when looking towards the future, whether it's a new chapter of life or moving to a new country for a better life.
    Rev. Ethel K. Grinkley Memorial Scholarship
    God has a way of putting the right people into our lives. They can be mentors guiding us through our walk with Christ, someone who takes a chance on us, or educators teaching us valuable things to help us in life. I've been extremely fortunate to have such individuals who have instilled in me the principles of love, faith, and community service. Before my family began attending church, both of my parents were non-believers who had endured abusive situations. As the oldest child, I witnessed the repercussions of their past. However, God intervened in our lives through a coworker of my mom's. This coworker noticed my mother reading a book by a prosperity gospel author and recognized its potential to mislead her. He could have chosen to walk away, fearing potential repercussions such as anger or retaliation. Yet, guided by Christ's love for His followers, he chose to extend an invitation to church, believing that only the love of Christ could truly fill the void in my mother's life. Thankfully, she accepted his offer, and since then, our family has found a home within the body of Christ. Today, I am a baptized member of the same church, actively serving in the children's ministry and choir. Another person whom God perfectly placed in my life is my mom. Like much of the world, my mom has had a rough life. A daughter of unbelieving immigrants, she has always worked hard in life. I have seen her go through hoops to provide for her family when she has nothing to offer for dinner. I watched her as she humbly moved back into her parents' house time and time again. Yet, through it all, she remains steadfast in her faith and hope that God will make all things well in the end. Her resilience inspires me to approach life's challenges with the same unwavering faith and trust in God's plan. In middle school, I joined Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. Despite being introverted, I found supportive mentors within the program who helped me develop public speaking skills and leadership abilities. I've learned about aerospace, volunteer service, and leadership through CAP. Now serving as cadet commander, I'm committed to giving back and nurturing future leaders. I aim to remain involved with this program for life through adulthood. During my junior year of high school, I wanted to get more involved in my community. Alongside a friend, I immersed myself in community activism through journalism, attending protests and town halls. Through firsthand experiences and interactions with professionals, I discovered my passion for journalism and the power of storytelling. With a growing online presence today, I strive to inform and empower my community, driven by a desire to create positive change. Reflecting on my journey, I am reminded of the profound impact of love, faith, and service. These guiding principles, instilled in me by God and nurtured by people he has placed in my life, have shaped my aspirations and fueled my determination to serve others. As I embark on the next chapter of my life, pursuing a degree in communications with a focus on journalism, I am committed to using my voice to shine a light on untold stories and advocate for positive change. It is truly the love I have for my community that I chose to do this.
    Linda Kay Monroe Whelan Memorial Education Scholarship
    Since 3rd grade, I have been homeschooled, which has allowed me to challenge myself in different ways than regular students. While other students may be stuck in a classroom, I have learned firsthand in the real world and gained much-needed experience that will help with my career. Much of this experience is gained through volunteering and stepping out of my comfort zone in the process. Back in middle school, I joined an amazing organization called Civil Air Patrol (CAP), which is the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. When I entered this program, I was very much introverted and hated speaking. Now, having been in the program for 5 years, I have learned how to manage being in front of an audience, give speeches, and conduct classes. But that is not the only thing I have learned; I have also had the opportunity to learn about leadership, aerospace, and volunteer service. On weekends, my squadron actively volunteers within the community at events like St. Baldrick's and food banks. I currently serve as the cadet commander of my squadron, allowing me to give back to the program and lead the community's next group of leaders. Another way I have been able to give back to my community is by serving as a Docent at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum. To become a docent, I had to vigorously study to be able to give tours and answer visitors' questions about President Reagan. At the museum, I am able to meet people from around the world and from different walks of life, often learning many life stories and gaining advice from them. During my junior year of high school, I decided to get even more involved in my community and learn about journalism. Along with another friend, I started going to protests and town halls. She filmed on her phone, while I asked questions to anyone who would talk to us. I didn't care if I supported one side or the other; I just wanted to learn. This taught me the great skill of listening. Additionally, I was able to learn firsthand from professionals about different issues. This helped open myself up to new ideas and challenge my opinions. Now, in my senior year, I have realized my passion for journalism. I continue to post my videos online, helping keep the public informed on local issues. Today, I have forty thousand followers across different platforms. Combining my experiences in CAP and the museum, I have learned how to enjoy serving others, lead, and step out of my comfort zone. If I hadn't faced my fears on my first day of Civil Air Patrol or learned how to deal with new people at the museum, I wouldn't have discovered my passion for journalism. This fall, I will be attending a private college to study communications with an emphasis on journalism. With this degree, I plan to become an independent journalist and serve my community.
    San Marino Woman’s Club Scholarship
    Since 3rd grade, I have been homeschooled, which has allowed me to challenge myself in different ways than regular students. While other students may be stuck in a classroom, I have learned firsthand in the real world and gained much-needed experience. Much of this experience is gained through town halls and volunteer service. During my junior year of high school, I decided to get more involved in my community and learn about journalism. Along with another friend, I started going to protests and town halls. She filmed on her phone, while I asked questions to anyone who would talk to us. I didn't care if I supported one side or the other; I just wanted to learn. This taught me the great skill of listening. Additionally, I was able to learn firsthand from professionals about different issues. This helped open myself up to new ideas and challenge my opinions. Now in my senior year, I continue to do this and post my videos online, helping keep the public informed on local issues. I currently volunteer as a Docent at the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum and Civil Air Patrol U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. To become a docent, I had to vigorously study to be able to give tours and answer visitors' questions about President Reagan. In Civil Air Patrol, I have had the opportunity to learn about leadership and aerospace. I have been involved in the program for five years and currently serve as the cadet commander of my squadron.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    Someone who honors God in how I conduct my work and how I love and show compassion to others in all that I do.