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Doreen Amoaful

1785

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Bio

Hello! My name is Doreen and I am a current nursing student at ECPI University, My ultimate goal is to become a DNP, to learn as much as I can to go back to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa to build a training hospital, training future nurses and doctors to improve healthcare and healthcare administration there.

Education

ECPI University

Associate's degree program
2023 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

Virginia Commonwealth University

Bachelor's degree program
2016 - 2021
  • Majors:
    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other
  • Minors:
    • Chemistry

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

    • Patient transporter

      MCV Hospital
      2019 – 20223 years
    • Credentialing Coordinator

      ShiftMed
      2022 – Present2 years

    Sports

    step team

    Club
    2012 – 20164 years

    Awards

    • team captain

    Research

    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other

      VCU department of psychology — Researcher
      2020 – 2021

    Arts

    • Annandale High School

      Acting
      In the heights
      2015 – 2015

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      American Red Heart Association — Volunteer/Intern
      2021 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    MedLuxe Representation Matters Scholarship
    There is a problem, a serious problem that needs solving, and I believe that I am one of many to solve this problem. I first came in contact with this problem when I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate/degree will be all towards solving the problem of inadequate healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now, excited to go as far as I can to finish this journey of nursing school and higher nursing education. Increasing racial diversity in nursing is crucial for several reasons. Firstly, a diverse nursing workforce reflects the diverse patient population it serves. Patients from different racial and ethnic backgrounds may have unique cultural beliefs, health practices, and preferences that impact their healthcare experiences. Having nurses who share similar backgrounds and cultural experiences can lead to better communication, trust, and understanding between patients and healthcare providers, ultimately improving patient outcomes. Secondly, racial diversity in nursing helps to address health disparities and inequities that disproportionately affect minority communities. Research has shown that racial and ethnic minorities often receive lower quality healthcare and experience higher rates of chronic diseases, maternal mortality, and other adverse health outcomes compared to their white counterparts. By diversifying the nursing workforce, we can better address the unique healthcare needs of minority populations and work towards reducing these disparities.
    Black Leaders Scholarship
    One Black leader who has profoundly inspired me is Rosa Parks, whose courage and determination sparked a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement. Rosa Parks' act of defiance on December 1, 1955, when she refused to give up her seat to a white man on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama, ignited a wave of protests and galvanized the fight against racial segregation in the United States. Growing up, I learned about Rosa Parks' bravery and the impact of her actions in school, but it wasn't until later in life that I truly grasped the significance of her legacy and the lessons it holds for all of us. What struck me most about Rosa Parks was not just her refusal to comply with unjust laws, but her unwavering commitment to justice, equality, and dignity for all people. Rosa Parks' act of defiance was not a spur-of-the-moment decision; it was the culmination of years of activism and a deep-seated belief in the inherent worth and dignity of every individual. Her quiet strength and resilience in the face of adversity serve as a powerful reminder that ordinary people can effect extraordinary change through courage and conviction. Rosa Parks' refusal to move to the back of the bus was not just a solitary act of defiance; it was a rallying cry for justice and equality. Her actions sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a coordinated campaign of nonviolent resistance that lasted over a year and ultimately led to the desegregation of public transportation in Montgomery and, later, across the United States. What inspires me most about Rosa Parks is her unwavering commitment to nonviolent resistance and her belief in the power of collective action to bring about social change. Despite facing threats, intimidation, and violence, she remained steadfast in her commitment to the principles of justice and equality, demonstrating that courage is not the absence of fear, but the willingness to stand up for what is right in the face of adversity. Rosa Parks' legacy extends far beyond her singular act of defiance; it serves as a beacon of hope and inspiration for generations to come. Her courage and determination remind us that change is possible, even in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and that each of us has a role to play in creating a more just and equitable world. In my own life, Rosa Parks' example has inspired me to speak out against injustice, to stand up for those who are marginalized and oppressed, and to work towards building a more inclusive and equitable society. Her legacy reminds me that even the smallest acts of resistance can have far-reaching consequences and that the fight for justice and equality is ongoing.
    Mental Health Importance Scholarship
    In today's fast-paced world, the significance of mental health cannot be overstated. Mental well-being encompasses our emotional, psychological, and social health, influencing how we think, feel, and act in our daily lives. As someone who has experienced firsthand the impact of mental health challenges, I firmly believe in the importance of prioritizing mental wellness and actively engaging in activities that promote psychological resilience and balance. For me, one such activity is music composition, which serves as a powerful outlet for self-expression, emotional processing, and personal growth. Maintaining good mental health is crucial for overall well-being and quality of life. Mental health affects every aspect of our existence, from our relationships and work performance to our physical health and ability to cope with stress. When our mental health is neglected, it can lead to a range of adverse outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and even suicidal thoughts. Recognizing the significance of mental health, I have made a conscious effort to prioritize self-care practices that nurture my emotional and psychological well-being. One of the most effective ways I maintain my personal mental wellness is through music composition. For me, music has always been a source of solace, comfort, and inspiration. When I sit down to write music, I enter a state of flow where my thoughts and emotions flow freely, unencumbered by the pressures and distractions of everyday life. Through music, I am able to express complex emotions, confront inner conflicts, and find meaning in my experiences. Whether I'm feeling joyful, sad, or contemplative, music provides a channel for me to process and make sense of my feelings in a constructive and cathartic way. Moreover, music composition serves as a form of self-care and stress relief, allowing me to unwind and recharge after a long day. Engaging in creative activities like writing music has been shown to reduce cortisol levels, lower heart rate, and promote relaxation, all of which are essential for managing stress and anxiety. When I immerse myself in the process of composing music, I feel a sense of calm and tranquility wash over me, helping me to regain perspective and restore balance to my mind and body. Furthermore, music composition fosters a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment, boosting my self-esteem and confidence in my abilities. As I bring my musical ideas to life and witness the beauty of my creations unfolding before me, I feel a profound sense of pride and satisfaction. This sense of achievement carries over into other areas of my life, empowering me to tackle challenges with resilience and determination. In conclusion, mental health is a vital component of overall well-being, and it is essential to prioritize self-care practices that nurture our emotional and psychological health. For me, music composition serves as a powerful tool for maintaining personal mental wellness, providing a creative outlet for self-expression, stress relief, and emotional processing. By actively engaging in activities that promote mental wellness, we can cultivate resilience, enhance our quality of life, and thrive in the face of life's challenges.
    Eric Maurice Brandon Memorial Scholarship
    There is a problem, a serious problem that needs solving, and I believe that I am one of many to solve this problem. I first came in contact with this problem when I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate/degree will be all towards solving the problem of inadequate healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now, excited to go as far as I can to finish this journey of nursing school and higher nursing education.
    Nancy B. Shirley Memorial Nursing Scholarship
    There is a problem, a serious problem that needs solving, and I believe that I am one of many to solve this problem. I first came in contact with this problem when I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now, excited to finish this journey of nursing school. As a young woman hailing from Ghana, my journey towards pursuing a career in nursing has been deeply influenced by my personal experiences and the healthcare disparities prevalent in my home country and across Africa. From a young age, I witnessed firsthand the challenges faced by individuals and families in accessing quality healthcare services, particularly in rural and underserved communities. These experiences ignited within me a strong sense of empathy and a desire to make a tangible difference in the lives of others through healthcare. Nursing, with its emphasis on compassion, holistic care, and advocacy, resonated with me as the ideal profession through which I could contribute meaningfully to addressing these healthcare inequities.My desire to become a nurse and pursue the highest level of education in the nursing field, culminating in obtaining a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree, stems from a profound commitment to addressing healthcare disparities and improving access to quality healthcare services in Ghana and other African countries. Growing up in Ghana, I witnessed the pervasive challenges faced by individuals and communities in accessing essential healthcare, particularly in rural and underserved areas. These experiences ignited within me a passion for healthcare advocacy and a deep-seated desire to contribute meaningfully to healthcare systems' improvement. As a nurse, I recognize the pivotal role that advanced education and leadership play in driving positive change within healthcare systems. By pursuing a RN degree, I aim to equip myself with the knowledge, skills, and leadership capabilities necessary to effect systemic change and advocate for health equity on a broader scale. Through advanced coursework, research, and clinical experiences, I aspire to develop innovative strategies for addressing healthcare challenges and implementing evidence-based practices that prioritize patient-centered care and promote positive health outcomes. My ultimate goal is to return to Ghana and leverage my expertise and leadership skills to enhance healthcare delivery, develop sustainable healthcare infrastructures, and empower local healthcare professionals. Additionally, I am committed to extending my impact beyond Ghana's borders by collaborating with healthcare organizations and policymakers across Africa to address common healthcare challenges and promote cross-cultural understanding and cooperation. By striving for excellence in my nursing career and pursuing advanced education, I am confident that I can make a significant and lasting impact on healthcare systems and contribute to the well-being of individuals and communities throughout Africa. In essence, my drive to become an RN and pursue a DNP degree is driven by a profound sense of purpose and a genuine desire to contribute to the advancement of healthcare in Africa. By combining my passion for nursing with a commitment to lifelong learning and leadership, I am determined to play a meaningful role in shaping the future of healthcare delivery on the continent, leaving a lasting impact on the lives of individuals, families, and communities across Africa.
    Deborah Stevens Pediatric Nursing Scholarship
    There is a problem, a serious problem that needs solving, and I believe that I am one of many to solve this problem. I first came in contact with this problem when I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. Growing up in a close-knit family where I was surrounded by younger siblings and cousins, I’ve developed a nurturing and caring nature from a young age. My experiences volunteering at local children's hospitals and pediatric clinics further ignited my passion for working with young patients. I find immense joy in brightening a child's day, whether through playful interactions, comforting words, or gentle care. I understand the importance of providing holistic support not only to the child but also to their families, guiding them through challenging times with empathy and understanding. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now, excited to finish this journey of nursing school.
    Dr. Ifeoma Ezebuiro Ezeobele Africans in Nursing Scholarship
    There is a problem, a serious problem that needs solving, and I believe that I am one of many to solve this problem. I first came in contact with this problem when I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare-wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had at the facility and to my shock and surprise, he replied “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in high school and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now waiting to start this new journey of nursing school.
    Catrina Celestine Aquilino Memorial Scholarship
    My overall goal and what drove me to start a career in nursing was a result of a problem that needs solving. When I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now waiting to start this new journey of nursing school. Nursing is all about problem solving, not just studying information to memorize, but using the information learned to tackle real problems regarding patients. And that’s how I plan on tackling this course load, studying like someone’s life depends on it, because in actuality it does.
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    My overall goal and what drove me to start a career in nursing was a result of a problem that needs solving. When I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now waiting to start this new journey of nursing school. Nursing is all about problem solving, not just studying information to memorize, but using the information learned to tackle real problems regarding patients. And that’s how I plan on tackling this course load, studying like someone’s life depends on it, because in actuality it does.
    Wieland Nurse Appreciation Scholarship
    My overall goal and what drove me to start a career in nursing was a result of a problem that needs solving. When I was about 12, my family and I traveled to my hometown of Ghana, West Africa, specifically Bolgatanga, a small town with about 6,000 people in total. As well known, Africa isn’t where it needs to be healthcare wise, or where it needs to be as compared to America’s healthcare. And this was even more evident as my family and I went to visit my uncle who happens to be a doctor at one of the major hospitals in Bolga, when we got to the hospital, we were met with a long line that wrapped around the building twice, it seemed as if these individuals were waiting for someone, or something, As we entered the hospital we were met with a bunch of doctors and nurses running around trying to figure something out. We approached the front desk and the woman behind the desk led us to my uncle’s office. There he explained to us that the people waiting outside were waiting for kidney treatment. Even at that young age, I had always been interested in medicine so I knew that if you had kidney issues it was usually treated with dialysis. I also knew that dialysis usually takes up to four hours per individual. I asked my uncle how many machines they had and to my surprise, he replied with “one”. I would have to say that that moment was a transformative moment for me because it was from that moment that I decided that I wanted to enter the healthcare field to learn as much as I could to go back and help my family and my country by building a training hospital where not only doctors, but nurses and other healthcare professionals can learn about up to date technological advancements in medicine, that America is so fortunate to have. My whole nursing course preparation and when I finally pass my NCLEX and receive my nursing certificate will be all towards solving the problem of poor healthcare in my country. This is what has been my drive through completing my classes in highschool and overcoming the obstacles through college and receiving my degree, and now waiting to start this new journey of nursing school. Nursing is all about problem solving, not just studying information to memorize, but using the information learned to tackle real problems regarding patients. And that’s how I plan on tackling this course load, studying like someone’s life depends on it, because in actuality it does.