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Devon Woodfine

3735

Bold Points

3x

Finalist

Bio

I emerged from the soil of Americana, but my family seeds were shipped across from the Caribbean waters. Like many immigrants or first-generation Americans, the stories of my family’s journey to America have been a critical aspect of my character and life goals. As a single mother from Waterhouse Jamaica, Minette Johnson, my grandmother, moved to the USA in 1969 with three kids to California. Working in a textile factory while getting her GED and nursing licenses, my grandmother uprooted and supported her children. Even though finances were tight, she helped create an accountant, mathematician, and logistics manager. Growing up around the legacy my grandmother made by investing in her children and grandkids, she instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." Witnessing her sacrifices to provide for me and my family to ensure that we had a better life inspired me to capitalize on my educational pursuits in STEM. I am utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading between medical robots in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. By creating parameters that distinguish and automate performance, the medical community can leverage data to improve treatment regimens and outcomes. The lack of technical experts in the field hinders the foundation of medicine. My dream is to fuse technology to add value to those who are disabled by incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle.

Education

Arizona State University-Tempe

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Computer and Information Sciences, General
  • GPA:
    4

View Park Preparatory Accelerated Charter High School

High School
2012 - 2016
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Computer and Information Sciences, General
    • Security Science and Technology
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Computer Software

    • Dream career goals:

      Cybersecurity/Penetration Tester

    • Process Informatics Intern ● Configured the TIBCO Statistica and Spotfire applications for data analysis.

      Pfizer
      2022 – 2022
    • Software Engineering Intern ● Programmed bots on Python to monitor, resolve, and moderate client activities.

      Brotherhood Crusade YouthSource Center
      2022 – 2022
    • Technology Professional Intern 1 ● Aggregated and analyzed data from manufacturing-related data sources (e.g., batch records, LIMS, historians).

      Delete the Divide- Los Angeles County of Internal Services Department
      2022 – 2022
    • Tech Intern ● Ensured compliance with FedRAMP requirements and guidelines, enabling the organization to meet federal standards and regulations and enhancing its reputation as a trusted provider of secure software solutions

      Hidden Genius- HireLAYouth
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Technical Product Manager Intern ●Utilized MindSphere APIs and cloud infrastructure to collect and analyze real-time sensor data from production equipment, enabling predictive maintenance and reducing unplanned downtime by 20%.

      Siemens
      2023 – 2023
    • Risk Engineer Intern ● Developed and maintained an effective EPSS framework, leveraging historical data and vulnerability analysis to generate accurate exploit prediction scores for various software components.

      Autodesk
      2023 – 2023
    • Youth Advisory Council intern

      SnapFoundation
      2022 – 2022
    • Data Engineering Intern ● Created visual models of user engagement via PowerBi ● Authored clear and concise technical documentation, user guides, and FAQs for data science products and services,

      LaunchMaps
      2021 – 2021
    • Research Assistant

      Mathematicians of the African Diaspora
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Student Assistant

      Maximizing Engineering Potential
      2017 – 2017
    • Summer VISTA Associate

      AmeriCorps
      2017 – 2017
    • E-Commerce UI & Python Web Developer Intern

      Circular Fashions Los Angeles
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Pilot Manufacturing Engineering Intern ● Designed and dimensioned CAD model fixtures for the assembly of implants and delivery systems. ● Updated MES Workflow and SOP for DFM/DFA/DOE, CAD models and drawings GD&T on Windchill

      Edwards Lifesciences
      2021 – 2021

    Sports

    Badminton

    Junior Varsity
    2020 – 20222 years

    Awards

    • Team Regional Championship

    Rugby

    Varsity
    2019 – 20234 years

    Awards

    • MVP 4 years in high school

    Soccer

    Intramural
    2008 – 20091 year

    Research

    • Medicine

      California State University Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation — Design Engineer & Software Engineer
      2022 – 2023
    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other

      Google Computer Science and Research Mentor Program — Lead Engineer
      2023 – 2023
    • Plasma and High-Temperature Physics

      McNair Scholars — Research Assistant
      2018 – 2019
    • Aerospace, Aeronautical, and Astronautical/Space Engineering

      Research through Inclusive Opportunities — Engineering Research Assitant
      2021 – Present

    Arts

    • Honors Ochestra

      Music
      2008 – 2012

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Brotherhood Crusade — Ambassador
      2015 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Sean Carroll's Mindscape Big Picture Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients lacking access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My first concept for a new medical device is substituting the cornea with a biocompatible artificial cornea called the ACC-short for Artificial-Cornea-on-a-Chip. It will be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and sensitivity change. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read the tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. Besides focusing on researching and developing novel medicals, I want my medical device startup to establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases like Keratoconus, and visual and physical impairments.
    AI Innovators Undergraduate Scholarship
    The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten by using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior than humanly possible. As AI will slowly phase out low-skilled jobs, future employment opportunities will require solid automation/robotic/programming literacy, and complimentary tech skills will have an overwhelming advantage when applying for employment in nearly all industries. Some benefits minorities and low-income students can derive from exploring robotics today are introducing programming effectively to students, providing valuable skills in future employment, teaching problem-solving and creativity, learning core science and mathematical concepts, and debunking common misconceptions about STEAM. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. This project allowed me to secure two manufacturing internships with Edwards Lifesciences and Pfizer as a Pilot Manufacturing Engineering Intern and Process Informatics Intern. I helped upgrade older manufacturing sites to accommodate AI-enabled equipment necessitates a meticulous approach that aligns with Chicago-style economic considerations. One viable strategy involves phased modernization. Companies can strategically identify key areas within their existing manufacturing infrastructure that would benefit most from AI integration. By prioritizing high-impact zones, businesses can manage costs effectively and minimize disruptions to ongoing operations (Chicago et al. 2022). From an economic standpoint, this phased approach allows for a gradual capital investment, reducing the immediate financial burden on companies while still reaping the economic benefits of enhanced efficiency and productivity. Besides that, I also made a framework to form partnerships that offered an economically viable pathway for upgrading older manufacturing sites to handle AI-enabled equipment for small independent manufacturers. Engaging in strategic alliances with AI technology providers and experts allowed these companies to access specialized knowledge and resources, facilitating a smoother transition to AI integration (Chicago et al. 2022). This collaborative approach aligns with economic principles by optimizing resource allocation—companies can leverage external expertise without committing excessive internal resources. Moreover, joint ventures and collaborations can create opportunities for cost-sharing, potentially lowering the overall economic impact of upgrading to AI-enabled equipment (Smith et al. 2021). Currently, I am exploring the integration of natural language processing with augmented reality (AR) to enhance human-computer interactions. Imagine a system that can understand and respond to spoken language while overlaying contextual information in real time through AR devices. This could revolutionize how we access and interact with information in our surroundings and allowing for automation to be live butler in our daily lives.
    Eli Motherhood Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Business student with a specialization Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients lacking access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I am utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things (IoT), intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their heart rate, glucose level, stress, and other physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients’ optimal, sub-optimal, and overperformance, medical professionals can leverage round-the-clock data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes through exploratory data analysis. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse my interest in technology to add value to those who are sick and disabled. By incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities and chronic illnesses, they will regain their independence. Studying Computer Information Systems has shown me that it’s a tool to create equity in old structures and remold problems for the betterment of society. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Science Fiction Becomes Science Fact Scholarship
    I've always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. Bothered by this, my grandmother worked with me to find opportunities for young kids to cultivate STEM interests in underrepresented kids. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. As a Computer Information Systems major, It is thrilling to discover the unknown and develop strategies to use it to add value to society and people efficiently. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. Increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups can resolve rising existential threats through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. My dream is to fuse my interest in technology to add value to those who are sick and disabled. By incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities and chronic illnesses, they will regain their independence. Studying Computer Information Systems has shown me that it’s a tool to create equity in old structures and remold problems for the betterment of society.
    West Family Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients lacking access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I am utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but also create decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale.
    Hyacinth Malcolm Memorial Scholarship
    Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Hyacinth Malcolm Memorial Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. I would enter a state of equilibrium. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like the Malcolm Family have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I am one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. It would also be a reminder that my disability does not define me or limit my potential and that I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world with the right tools and support. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2020 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Abu Omar Halal Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients lacking access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central.
    Harriett Russell Carr Memorial Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients lacking access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved Black STEM influencers and leaders.
    First-Gen Futures Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My journey with my Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. Empowered through the support of the Cal Poly Pomona community and my family, I have been able to receive over 35 scholarships and awards from organizations such as Intel, Chevron, Google, AT&T, Scholarship America, United Negro College Fund, NAACP, Cal Poly Pomona, and the CSU Chancellors office to name a few. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Elevate Women in Technology Scholarship
    The intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and artistic expression poses profound questions about the future of the creative economy, labor, and cultural representation. As we navigate this uncharted territory, it's imperative to consider how AI-generated art can become a catalyst for societal improvement, ensuring inclusivity and challenging historical biases. Serving as a beacon for the democratization of artistic narratives is a tangible benefit. AI, drawing from diverse datasets, has the potential to break away from conventional norms and offer a platform for marginalized voices. For instance, projects like Google's "Magenta" have explored AI-generated music, pushing the boundaries of what we consider culturally significant. By incorporating a wide range of influences, AI art can challenge historical imbalances in representation, fostering a more inclusive and accurate cultural landscape. However, the journey towards responsible AI art creation is fraught with challenges. Biases in training data can perpetuate existing inequalities. For instance, if historical art datasets predominantly feature works from specific demographics, AI models may inadvertently favor those styles or themes. Addressing this requires meticulous curation of datasets, transparency in the origins of the source data, moderation to protect against toxic images, an ongoing commitment to diversity, and the development of algorithms that actively counteract biases. The collaboration between human artists and AI introduces a paradigm shift in interdisciplinary partnerships. The creative collaboration between the artist's intuition and the machine's data-driven capabilities births novel art forms that can be likened to scientists using their theoretical knowledge with Excel's computational capabilities. The AI-driven artwork "Edmond de Belamy" by Obvious is a testament to this collaboration, raising questions about authorship and the role of AI as a creative collaborator rather than a mere tool. As AI art evolves, it becomes a bridge between cultures. It has the potential to transcend linguistic and societal barriers, fostering a global dialogue. Imagine AI-generated art that combines influences from various cultures, creating a universal language that speaks to shared human experiences. This not only enriches our cultural tapestry but also promotes cross-cultural understanding. This is now a societal experiment with the power to reshape cultural narratives. By addressing biases, fostering collaborations, and envisioning a future where AI art is a force for inclusivity, we pave the way for a more interconnected and culturally diverse world. The choices we make in this nascent field will determine whether AI becomes a tool for perpetuating inequalities or a catalyst for positive societal transformation.
    Priscilla Shireen Luke Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale.
    Golden State First Gen Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (AI) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. Studying Computer Information Systems has shown me that it’s a tool to create equity in old structures and remold problems for the betterment of society. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I will be able to finish up my educational endeavors. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    STEM & Medicine Passion Essay
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (AI) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I am utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things (IoT), intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their heart rate, glucose level, stress, and other physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients’ optimal, sub-optimal, and overperformance, medical professionals can leverage round-the-clock data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes through exploratory data analysis. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse my interest in technology to add value to those who are sick and disabled. By incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities and chronic illnesses, they will regain their independence. Studying Computer Information Systems will show me that it’s a tool to create equity in old structures and remold problems for the betterment of society. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Arthur and Elana Panos Scholarship
    Over the summer, I worked as a Software Engineering intern at Edward Lifesciences. While working I had difficulties with my vision. I visited the Optometrist and was diagnosed with Keratoconus, a degenerative disease that slowly erodes my corneas and causes them to protrude in the shape of a cone. Frightened at my diagnosis, I pushed back my procedure. After talking to my mom and mentor, I decided to complete the first round of surgery on my left eye. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Because of my family, mentors, and peers, I have been able to continue my academic and professional dreams. Without a community behind me, I would not be here to share this story. Being awarded the Amazon Future Engineer scholarship will not only help me see but continue my vision of being an engineer who improves accessibility and inclusion for the disabled with tech. At the time when my physical vision had deterred my spiritual vision had become pitch black. Battling Keratoconus caused me immense anger and sorrow that I never felt before. At the pinnacle of my ability to cope, my mother staged an intervention with our pastor to help guide me during this time. Reluctant to hear or even consider the potential for spiritual growth and what living with "legal blindness" means, it took connecting with Christian-based blind and low-vision societies that served as a community for people with my conditions. Seeing how some grew up without sight or lost their sight in different stages of their lives, helped me gain perspective of my condition. When we worked on collecting assistive devices for blind communities in the Caribbean I was able to leverage my engineering and software skills to customize these devices to provide a better experience for them. By connecting with the word through this group I begin to understand the story of humanity in a different light—one that transcends physical limitations and embraces the strength of the holy spirit. In those moments of darkness, I discovered the importance of faith as a guiding force. The story of spiritual enlightenment often involves traversing through the shadows of doubt, and I found solace in the stories of biblical figures who faced adversity with unwavering faith. One such figure, Job, became a beacon of inspiration for me. Job's resilience in the face of immense suffering served as a testament to the transformative power of faith—a power that could illuminate even the darkest corners of our lives. Reluctantly, I opened myself to the possibility of spiritual growth, seeking connection within Christian-based blind and low-vision societies. These communities became a refuge—a place where individuals, like myself, navigated the challenges of living with visual impairments. Witnessing the diverse experiences of those who either grew up without sight or lost them at various stages provided me with invaluable perspective. It was in these moments that my spiritual vision began to evolve, shedding the pitch-black cloak that had enveloped it. Engaging with these communities not only broadened my understanding of the human experience but also ignited a passion within me to make a tangible difference. Collaborating on initiatives to collect assistive devices for blind communities in the Caribbean allowed me to merge my engineering and software skills with a profound sense of purpose. Customizing these devices to enhance the daily lives of those facing visual challenges became a testament to the transformative power of technology when wielded with empathy and understanding.
    Revolutionizing Robotics and Computer Sciences Scholarship
    It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (AI) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with my Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. After graduating with my Bachelor's degree, I’ll work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at the California Institute of Technology. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. Currently, I am researching and developing smart medical innovations that reduce the cost of treatment, increase positive outcomes for patients, and improve accessibility for the disabled. The burden of my disability has been made manageable through technological innovations and solutions that uplift the disabled. With my experience dealing with the limitations of technology and healthcare, I’ll set myself apart from other engineers in the medical device field by designing and building human-centered technology solutions for the disabled and chronically ill. I also advocate for disability rights in Southern California by engaging in political activism. Through lobbying politicians like Assemblyman Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Assemblywomen Heather Hutt, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, Mayor Karen Bass, and Governor Gavin Newsom, I have worked with the American Council for the Blind Los Angeles chapter to push political legislation that improves employee disability rights, workman comp expansions, expanding certification/training of students with physical disabilities, creating resources for professional development, and provide tuition assistance programs for minorities with disabilities entering early career pathways.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    The foundation that has guided, consoled, and supported me has always been my mother, “Miss Lee.” With my battles with depression, Keratoconus, ADHD, and self-doubt impacting my scholastic and professional journeys, my mother’s indomitable will and fortitude have served as a place. While the strongest form of Tungsten is susceptible to temperatures of 3420 °C, my mother remains solid and formidable no matter what heat she encounters. Growing up in a low-income, single-parent, and immigrant household, my mother worked multiple jobs while taking care of my family and me. Witnessing her sacrifices to provide for me and ensure that I had a better life to capitalize on my educational pursuits inspired me to care about the goals she was unfortunately unable to continue. Aspiring to be a Computer Scientist, my mother dropped out of college due to the high cost of school and not receiving support to continue her education. Even with that roadblock, she pursued several jobs that aligned closely with her Computer Science dreams. One of these was a Telecommunications Engineer at AT&T, IT with DHL, and a Manufacturing Technician with Storm LLC. The exposure to technology at a young age through my mother's jobs and her hobbies helped me see the opportunities a career in technology allows to those who pursue it. This inspired me to combine skills in problem-solving and technology to solve healthcare issues as a Mechanical Engineer. A linear path in life is not always feasible when external factors serve as deterrents to set you off course from your destination. My life transformed when I was diagnosed with Keratoconus, and my mother suffered a work-related injury. As my vision worsened and my mother’s efforts became futile, I was thrust upon to become the primary caretaker in my household. Seeing the Goliath-like woman I call mom suffer heavily from her injuries has deeply impacted my view of the poor assistive technology available to those with disabilities and chronic illnesses. I'm utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things, intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients’ performance, medical professionals can leverage data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse technology to add value to those who are disabled by incorporating accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle. After graduating with my Bachelor's degree, I'll work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at CalTech. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. Increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups can resolve rising existential threats through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I'm grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." It's my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Healing Self and Community Scholarship
    I would create "Mindful Moment" stations and spread them across the world. These stations would be scattered around cities, parks, and public spaces, offering futuristic pods equipped with biofeedback sensors, VR relaxation experiences, and interactive AI therapy sessions. It's like stepping into a serene, high-tech sanctuary for your mind. The best part? It's free for everyone! Funding could come from a mix of public and private partnerships, turning mental health support into a community-driven movement. Imagine taking a break from your day, stepping into a pod, and emerging feeling refreshed and ready to tackle whatever life throws at you! The "Mindful Moments" initiative would prioritize accessibility for BIPOC communities by strategically placing stations in neighborhoods that may have been historically underserved. Partnerships with local community organizations and leaders would ensure cultural competence and representation in the virtual therapy content and resources offered. Additionally, the initiative would actively involve BIPOC mental health professionals, creating a diverse network of counselors to better understand and address the unique challenges faced by these communities. The goal is to create a safe and welcoming space where individuals from all backgrounds can find support that resonates with their experiences, fostering a sense of inclusivity and empowerment.
    Cybersecurity & The Latinx Community Scholarship
    The modern world runs on the Internet, and the Internet cannot exist without its underlying infrastructure. As a future cybersecurity professional I want to set up, manage, and maintain that infrastructure by enacting security and trust protocols that protect the most vulnerable from bad actors. Having been impacted by third-party actors stealing my identity and utilizing this information to ruin my credit and other illicit activities, I have a vendetta to reduce threat responses and ensure Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC) with industry standards for companies that have customer data. The ever-evolving nature of cyber threats and the challenge of staying one step ahead in the digital arms race are particularly enticing. Currently, I am a Risk Engineer at Autodesk, working on examining threat responses and incidents linked to Autodesk products. The goal is to fortify security measures and proactively address vulnerabilities that could impact clients and Autodesk. End users, including security analysts, IT administrators, architects, managers, and engineers, were the focal point. Their objective is to identify patterns, trends, and areas for improvement in threat response strategies, particularly in prioritizing the most prevalent threats. At the core of the project's technical objectives is the creation of a method for prioritizing threats based on likelihood risk and inherent risk. This intricate approach involves the application of advanced statistical concepts to quantify and qualify risks effectively. The end result is a method finely tuned to assist architects, managers, and engineers in resolving the most impactful and relevant incidents, thereby fortifying the security posture for clients and Autodesk. Once I have finished my undergraduate degree I want to work on a Cybersecurity team as a Penetration Tester for RedHat, CrowdStrike, or Okta. Evaluating the performance of networks, conducting assessments, enforcing company-wide corrective assessments, and developing white papers on new research I have conducted is my dream once I graduate. As for post-graduation education, I'd likely lean towards continuous learning rather than a traditional academic path. Certifications and specialized courses would be my go-to, ensuring I stay abreast of the latest developments and emerging technologies in the cybersecurity landscape. It's all about staying sharp and adaptable in the dynamic world of digital security. Currently, I am practicing for my CompTIA Security +, CSX Cybersecurity Fundamentals Certificate, and Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP) for my Co-Op. I have come to enjoy the emphasis on individual learning that is based on modular learning objectives. My formal education in college has provided a rudimentary foundation for cybersecurity while my internships, independent projects, and hackathons have been the bulk of my learning experience as a rising Cybersecurity professional. Therefore, I see little need for graduate education when getting practical experience trumps academic research.
    Minority/Women in STEM Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems (CIS) degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I'll improve patient outcomes and improve patient experiences. Studying CIS has shown me how to remediate problems for the betterment of society. Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Joshua’s Home Remodeling Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden and return me to equilibrium. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like this fund have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I'm one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. My disability does not limit my potential but it's invigorated me to build an equitable society. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I will be able to finish up my educational endeavors. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Joshua’s Home Remodeling Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems (CIS) degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I'll improve patient outcomes and improve patient experiences. Studying CIS has shown me how to remediate problems for the betterment of society. Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Joshua’s Home Remodeling Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden and return me to equilibrium. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like this fund have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I'm one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. My disability does not limit my potential but it's invigorated me to build an equitable society. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I will be able to finish up my educational endeavors. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Hilliard L. "Tack" Gibbs Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Information Systems (CIS) degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I'm using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It's thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As a scientist, I've fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I'll improve patient outcomes and improve patient experiences. Studying CIS has shown me how to remediate problems for the betterment of society. Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Hilliard L. "Tack" Gibbs Jr. Memorial Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden and return me to equilibrium. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like this fund have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I'm one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. My disability does not limit my potential but it's invigorated me to build an equitable society. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Richard P. Mullen Memorial Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical Engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I'm using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It's thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I've fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I'll improve patient outcomes and improve patient experiences. Studying Mechanical Engineering has shown me how to remold problems for the betterment of society. Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Richard P. Mullen Memorial Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me and return me to equilibrium. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like this fund have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I'm one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. My disability does not limit my potential but it's invigorated me to build an equitable society. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Anthony McPherson Memorial Automotive Scholarship
    Drinking and driving, is a perilous combination that has left a trail of devastation in its wake. The effects of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) are profound and extend far beyond the immediate consequences of legal repercussions. Not only do DUI incidents result in loss of life and property damage, but they also cast a long shadow on the emotional and psychological well-being of those involved. To tackle this menace, innovative strategies are imperative, going beyond conventional methods. One such approach involves leveraging technology to develop smart car systems that detect alcohol levels and immobilize the vehicle if the driver is intoxicated. Traditional preventative measures, such as awareness campaigns and strict law enforcement, have proven effective to some extent. However, a paradigm shift is required to address the root of the issue. Introducing mandatory educational programs in schools that vividly depict the real-life consequences of DUI incidents could instill a sense of responsibility and awareness in the younger generation. Creating a curriculum that incorporates virtual reality experiences, simulating the aftermath of a DUI accident, can provide a visceral understanding of the potential consequences, fostering a culture of responsible decision-making from an early age. Community engagement will serve as a critical aspect often overlooked in the discourse on DUI prevention. Establishing local support groups for individuals struggling with alcohol addiction can provide a network of understanding and assistance. These groups can organize events and activities that promote a sober lifestyle, creating a sense of camaraderie and reinforcing the idea that there are alternatives to alcohol-fueled socializing. By creating a strong community fabric, these initiatives aim to address the deeper social factors contributing to the prevalence of DUI incidents. Besides these novel strategies, integrating advanced monitoring technology into vehicles could revolutionize DUI prevention. Imagine a world where cars are equipped with biometric sensors that continuously assess the driver's physical state. If alcohol is detected, the vehicle could automatically switch to a self-driving mode or restrict the ignition, preventing the intoxicated individual from taking control. This technological intervention not only adds an extra layer of safety but also aligns with the ongoing developments in autonomous vehicle technology. The war on combating the effects of DUI requires a multifaceted approach that extends beyond traditional methods. Embracing innovative strategies, such as immersive educational programs, community engagement, and smart car technologies, holds the potential to reshape societal attitudes toward drinking and driving. By addressing the issue at its core and fostering a culture of responsibility, we can hope to mitigate the devastating effects of DUI incidents and pave the way for safer roads and communities.
    Michael Valdivia Scholarship
    Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. I have learned to manage my anxiety and depression from Keratconeu by altering my diet and engaging in physical therapy that helps mitigate the impacts of disability. When I understood the scope of my disability and learned how to live with a sense of normalcy, it became much easier for me to get a grip on my anxiety and depression. Now, it's been nearly two years since my last bout with an anxiety attack, and my spells of depression last for short bursts. Rather than being a continuous assault on my psyche, it transformed into a muscle that I have learned to work out to reduce wear and tear on my body. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (AI) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of minority students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the underrepresented communities on a global scale.
    Dustan Biegler Memorial Scholarship
    In my field reliability, efficiency, maintenance, and safety are critical to ensuring finalized products are usable for Mechanical Drafter/Designer; thankfully I have a strong emphasis on education, whether formal or informal my ability to work on keeping a plethora of aircraft operational would hinder the function of these aero vehicles without my education. As I complete my education in Mechanical Drafter/Designer, I strive to reshape the education system by helping guide younger students into trades and vocational skills like Mechanical Drafter/Designer to show that scholarship and research are not the only methods to represent pedagogy, practical pedagogy exposes students to real-world applications of providing critical services that for decades have suffered a skilled labor shortage due to the stigmas of blue collared work; now with deeper discussions and reflections of the debt ratio achieving higher education has trades have seen a reemergence for pursuits in lieu of a formal degree. I’ll lead the paradigm shift in reinstating vocational education for K-12 students and junior college students who wish to seek the progressive outcomes education provides but need a more specialized education instead of a wide breadth of education that does not align with their passions, talent, and lacks the opportunity for making them competitive in industry; while education should provide enlightenment it is naive and a true lack of foresight to continue to support an education system that imposes a high barrier of entry and rewards you with excessive debt and low wage job opportunities with decreasing career advancement. Education became key to mean when I witnessed the builders, designers, planners, visionaries, and architects of our society fight to provide services for the continued prosperity of our lives. Having worked in aviation and trades since leaving high school, I’ve seen the unsung work blue-collar workers have contributed to construction, aviation, and medical technology. With their sacrifices reinforcing the foundations that permit us to live a comfortable life, I saw how critical the shortage of skilled laborers will deter innovation and growth in a world strife of new emerging threats like overpopulation, global warming, and pollution. These professionals are not acknowledged, heralded, or respected for the sacrifices they make to provide the comforts we experience. While many do not possess a four-year university education, they are educated in practical skills that are critical to operating a functioning society. This inspired me while working at Edwards Lifesciences to go back to school to pursue my Mechanical Drafter/Designer degree at Cal Poly Pomona. In order to advance to a level of expertise I’ve seen my managers, and employers reach securing a formal education will be key to achieving my objectives. The definition of education has changed in the last few decades. We shifted from recognizing skills and practical-based education to favoring theoretical and complex education. This favoritism towards the latter has caused an overcorrection that has destroyed the appreciation for trade and vocational education. People began to see working in factories, plants, and construction sites as. 30 years ago junior and high school students took classes like shop, mechanics, home economics, and other vocational skills. With those skills, they could go on to an apprenticeship or trade program to secure a respectable career that could afford a single-family house or car, and take care of a family. However, in the last few decades, we decided that trades and vocational education were too menial, dirty, and low-level for students across America. Unfortunately, I did not rush into college like others, I spent years in various trades gaining practical skills that have helped me tremendously in comparison to students who pursued a formal education.
    Excelsior Cyber Security Scholarship
    It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in cybersecurity and reducing the emergence of bad actors that exploit the most vulnerable populations digitally. As a former Risk Engineer intern at Autodesk Cybersecurity team, I learned about ever-growing risks and exploits that threaten to harm people by stealing secured information to abuse for nefarious means. I worked to audit, test, and ensure compliance with GRC, FedRAMP, ISO2, and other industry protocols for Autodesk's internal/external services. By holding responsible systems at Autodesk are secure and only accessible to people with the correct authorization and accessibility, I helped reduce the risk of sensitive information being accessed by third-party bad actors. Now, I am working to continue to grow my skillset by completing the CompTIA Security + and AWS certifications to understand the security limitations of cloud computing. One of the aspects I find particularly intriguing about cybersecurity is its dynamic nature. The field is in a perpetual state of flux, with new threats emerging regularly. This constant evolution drives me to stay proactive and continuously update my skills. Beyond certifications, I actively engage with cybersecurity communities and forums, exchanging insights with experts and enthusiasts alike. This collaborative approach not only broadens my knowledge base but also fosters a sense of shared responsibility in safeguarding the digital realm. As a non-traditional student, I bring a unique perspective to the field. My journey as an engineer has equipped me with a diverse skill set, allowing me to approach cybersecurity challenges with a multidimensional mindset. This blend of experiences, coupled with my passion for innovation, empowers me to think beyond conventional solutions and explore novel approaches to fortifying digital infrastructure. Looking ahead, my goal is not just personal advancement but also to contribute to the education and mentorship of aspiring cybersecurity professionals. I am exploring opportunities to engage with local communities, schools, and organizations to share my knowledge and experiences. By demystifying the complexities of cybersecurity, I aim to inspire the next generation of defenders who will play a crucial role in securing our digital future. my journey in cybersecurity is driven by a fervent desire to explore the unknown, protect vulnerable populations, and contribute positively to society. Through my experiences, ongoing education, and community engagement, I am not only shaping my own path but also aspiring to be a catalyst for positive change in the ever-evolving landscape of cybersecurity.
    McClendon Leadership Award
    I crafted my leadership philosophy from witnessing my uncle Gmichael Smith, former President Barack Hussein Obama, Democratic Assemblyman Reggie-Jones Sawyer, and learning about political activist Marcus Garvey. They all shared in common a strong religious upbringing that defined their leadership. These qualities define effective leadership by inspiring their team, delegating tasks, holding themselves accountable to their followers, and seeking continuous improvement. An organization and group depend on the group's optimism to navigate problems and bring the mission to fruition. As the President of the National Society of Black Engineers at Cal Poly Pomona, I have worked to inspire potential members and continuing members to the benefits of joining our group for their professional, personal, and academic ambitions. The lessons I witnessed and were taught by my uncle’s work as a Pastor in our South Central Los Angeles community to be patient and proactive with identifying and meeting the needs of those you serve have been critical in my recruitment and retention efforts in NSBE. By listening to members’ interests and working to create opportunities that align with their goals, I have created an environment that helps students progress into the person they wish to be through steadfast development. By supporting them with trial and error of exploration of career paths in industry and higher education, non-judgemental support has effectively encouraged student engagement and dedication to my organization. The continued growth of my NSBE chapter required increasing scalability to match the increased interest in our club. By recruiting my people to hold official positions with leadership, I identified tasks to assign to new leaders to have ownership over from assignment to completion. By understanding the weaknesses and strengths of student leaders, I assign tasks based on their skill set, ability to develop through the assigned task, and previous experience level. Having worked with Assemblyman Reggie-Jones Sawyer through multiple community initiatives in South Central Los Angeles, I learned that even well-intentioned tasks are only feasible when the right people are assigned to bring them to a conclusion. As a leader evaluating your team's bandwidth in tackling goals to the mission requires honest gauging of their performance and assigning tasks that will efficiently utilize their talents. Even the most straightforward and most helpful task can run into problems if a leader lacks judgment in how they delegate tasks and to whom. Holding the second highest position within NSBE, I serve as the face of my organization through my actions. In both a positive and negative way, my ability or inability to perform will be what is connected to NSBE internally and externally. Like former President Obama, I follow his tenants of upholding my position as eclipsing my ego and the impact of my position spanning generations. The position of VP will be passed once my tenure is done, and by honoring those who served before me and those who will serve after me, I hold myself accountable to not disgrace the position by seeking critiques from my fellow student leaders in my organization and our members. Stagnation should never be embraced, as the collective inertia of a group will not allow for the betterment of its members and mission. Leadership is a process of judging effective, practical, and feasible methods in governing on a micro and macro level. Challenges of today and tomorrow will constantly change, requiring adaptive leadership. By galvanizing future leaders, allocating tailored duties to the most capable, being accountable for implemented decisions, and tirelessly advancing the group to its most excellent form, a leader that fits this mold can make the impossible reality.
    Reasons To Be - In Memory of Jimmy Watts
    Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that promote growth.
    Slater Miller Memorial Fund
    In my field reliability, efficiency, maintenance, and safety are critical to ensuring finalized products are usable for Mechanical Engineering (ME); thankfully I have a strong emphasis on education, whether formal or informal my ability to work on keeping a plethora of aircraft operational would hinder the function of these aero vehicles without my education. As I complete my education in ME, I strive to reshape the education system by helping guide younger students into trades and vocational skills like ME to show that scholarship and research are not the only methods to represent pedagogy, practical pedagogy exposes students to real-world applications of providing critical services that for decades have suffered a skilled labor shortage due to the stigmas of blue collared work; now with deeper discussions and reflections of the debt ratio achieving higher education has trades have seen a reemergence for pursuits in lieu of a formal degree. I’ll lead the paradigm shift in reinstating vocational education for K-12 students and junior college students who wish to seek the progressive outcomes education provides but need a more specialized education instead of a wide breadth of education that does not align with their passions, talent, and lacks the opportunity for making them competitive in industry; while education should provide enlightenment it is naive and a true lack of foresight to continue to support an education system that imposes a high barrier of entry and rewards you with excessive debt and low wage job opportunities with decreasing career advancement. Education became key to mean when I witnessed the builders, designers, planners, visionaries, and architects of our society fight to provide services for the continued prosperity of our lives. Having worked in aviation and trades since leaving high school, I’ve seen the unsung work blue-collar workers have contributed to construction, aviation, and waste management. With their sacrifices reinforcing the foundations that permit us to live a comfortable life, I saw how critical the shortage of skilled laborers will deter innovation and growth in a world strife of new emerging threats like overpopulation, global warming, and pollution. These professionals are not acknowledged, heralded, or respected for the sacrifices they make to provide the comforts we experience. While many do not possess a four-year university education, they are educated in practical skills that are critical to operating a functioning society. Inspired, I entered a trade program for ME in order to advance to a level of expertise I’ve seen my managers, and employers reach securing a vocational education. This will be key to achieving my objectives for recruiting students for trade programs. The definition of education has changed in the last few decades. We shifted from recognizing skills and practical-based education to favoring theoretical and complex education. This favoritism towards the latter has caused an overcorrection that has destroyed the appreciation for trade and vocational education. People began to see working in factories, plants, and construction sites as. 30 years ago junior and high school students took classes like shop, mechanics, home economics, and other vocational skills. With those skills, they could go on to an apprenticeship or trade program to secure a respectable career that could afford a single-family house or car, and take care of a family. However, in the last few decades, we decided that trades and vocational education were too menial, dirty, and low-level for students across America. Now we have millions of students rushing to enter colleges with no clue of what they want to study but willing to incur obscene amounts of debt in hopes of moving up the socioeconomic ladder or maintaining their position in life.
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for Black Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) students. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale.
    Envision Scholarship Award
    Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Envision Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. I would enter a state of equilibrium. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like the NSBE and Ardolf-Rutter Family have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I am one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. It would also be a reminder that my disability does not define me or limit my potential and that I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world with the right tools and support. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. The lack of engineers in the medical device field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse my interest in technology to add value to those who are sick and disabled. By incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities and chronic illnesses, they will regain their independence. Studying Mechanical Engineering has shown me that it’s a tool to create equity in old structures and remold problems for the betterment of society. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Maida Brkanovic Memorial Scholarship
    As a single father from Belize City, Belize, Bob Findley, my grandfather, moved to the USA in 1969 with three kids in California. Working in a textile factory while getting his GED and nursing licenses, my grandfather uprooted and supported his three children through college and as young adults. Even though finances were tight, he helped create an accountant, mathematician/professor, and logistics manager. Growing up around the legacy my grandfather made by investing in his children and grandkids, he instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." Witnessing his sacrifices to provide for me, my mother, and the rest of my family to ensure that we had a better life inspired me to capitalize on my educational pursuits in Engineering. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the Latino community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Computer Science degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients without access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. My journey with Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. The recruitment and retention of Latino students in STEM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of SHPE, we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Latino STEM majors as incoming freshmen and transfer students. I initiated the Restoring Energy and Action for Community Hope (REACH) initiative to bridge the gap between Latino STEM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of Latino students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Latino students will perform better in school and have the confidence to pursue academically rigorous careers in STEM. The pandemic made it easier to engage with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions. The outreach program consisted of Hackathons, mentored projects, exposure to new emerging technological fields, and panels of professional and collegiate students discussing their experiences as Latino STEM majors/professionals. On a macro level, the education system in America can best attract and engage youth in science and technology by supporting tech initiatives for the young and partnering with companies/institutions to get internships or research opportunities for K-12 students. Data has shown Latino students are unaware of STEM careers and lack the skills necessary to soar. This has been linked to discriminatory policies in education and hiring policies that create spaces that are not inclusive of Latino talent. Therefore, ensuring Latino students are aware of learning arithmetic, logic, natural sciences, physical sciences, and more through school and after-school programs will improve the engineering industry's future outcomes. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for Latino STEM students.
    Hector L. Minott Sr. Future Doctor Scholarship
    In 2019 my mother's health deteriorated from Sacriodosis and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and care for my mom. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders made me blind to my own health. I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted life. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even at my lowest, suffering from depression, self-doubt, and contemplating living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors.
    Craig Huffman Memorial Scholarship
    In my field reliability, efficiency, maintenance, and safety are critical to ensuring finalized products are usable for Aviation Maintenance; thankfully I have a strong emphasis on education, whether formal or informal my ability to work on keeping a plethora of aircraft operational would hinder the function of these aero vehicles without my education. As I complete my education in Aviation Maintenance, I strive to reshape the education system by helping guide younger students into Aviation programs to show that scholarship and research are not the only methods to represent pedagogy. Practical pedagogy exposes students to real-world applications of providing critical services that for decades have suffered a skilled labor shortage due to the stigmas of blue-collared work; now with deeper discussions and reflections of the debt ratio achieving higher education trades have seen a reemergence for pursuits in lieu of a formal degree. I will lead the paradigm shift in reinstating vocational education for K-12 students and junior college students who wish to seek the progressive outcomes education provides but need a more specialized education instead of a wide breadth of education that does not align with their passions, talent, and lacks the opportunity for making them competitive in industry; while education should provide enlightenment it is naive and a true lack of foresight to continue to support an education system that imposes a high barrier of entry and rewards you with excessive debt and low wage job opportunities with decreasing career advancement. Education became key to mean when I witnessed the builders, designers, planners, visionaries, and architects of our society fight to provide services for the continued prosperity of our lives. Having worked in aviation and trades since leaving high school, I have seen the unsung work blue-collar workers have contributed to aviation. With their sacrifices reinforcing the foundations that permit us to live a comfortable life, I saw how critical the shortage of skilled laborers will deter innovation and growth in a world strife of new emerging threats like overpopulation, global warming, and pollution. These professionals are not acknowledged, heralded, or respected for the sacrifices they make to provide the comforts we experience. While many do not possess a four-year university education, they are educated in practical skills that are critical to operating a functioning society. This inspired me while working at Delta Airlines, and to go back to school to pursue my Aviation Mechanics degree at West Los Angeles. In order to advance to a level of expertise I’ve seen my managers, and employers reach securing a formal education will be key to achieving my objectives. The definition of education has changed in the last few decades. We shifted from recognizing skills and practical-based education to favoring theoretical and complex education. This favoritism towards the latter has caused an overcorrection that has destroyed the appreciation for trade and vocational education. People began to see working in factories, plants, and construction sites as. 30 years ago junior and high school students took classes like shop, mechanics, home economics, and other vocational skills. With those skills, they could go on to an apprenticeship or trade program to secure a respectable career that could afford a single-family house or car, and take care of a family. However, in the last few decades, we decided that trades and vocational education were too menial, dirty, and low-level for students across America. Now we have millions of students rushing to enter colleges with no clue of what they want to study but willing to incur obscene amounts of debt in hopes of moving up the socioeconomic ladder or maintaining their position in life.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale. The recruitment and retention of Black students in STEM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of NSBE, we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Black STEM majors as incoming freshmen and transfer students. I initiated the Restoring Energy and Action for Community Hope (REACH) initiative to bridge the gap between black STEM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of black students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Black students will perform better in school and have the confidence to pursue academically rigorous careers in STEM. The pandemic made it easier to engage with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions. The outreach program consisted of Hackathons, mentored projects, exposure to new emerging technological fields, and panels of professional and collegiate students discussing their experiences as a Black STEM major/professional. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for Black STEM students
    Cuervo Rincon Scholarship of Excellence for Latinas
    Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Rev. and Mrs. E B Dunbar Scholarship
    Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Chadwick D. McNab Memorial Scholarship
    As a builder of the future, I use engineering to transform society for the better. I was a Process Informatics Intern for Pfizer’s Manufacturing Intelligence team this summer. My main project involved setting up a data warehouse for the South American division of Pfizer’s Paxlovid drug. One day, I noticed that several older GitHub repositories had no explicit licensing information. That makes them impossible to reuse in open-source projects for different business units, so I researched how to add these licenses. I had already taken up maintainership of a program that generates licenses, but I needed the list of which projects were missing or had expired licenses. I had 150 repositories that needed to be imported from a CSV file. I opened PyCharm and wrote a script that used the Python library Pandas to automate the importation of all the repositories, identify the files in the root directory, and accurately match filenames against user inputs from APIs. This simple task was crucial to passing regulatory standards in several South American countries to provide patients with this life-saving drug. During an intern speaker series, we had a patient who was one of the first participants in clinical trials of Paxlovid named Yesenia to speak about her time with Paxlovid. As a middle-aged woman in Argentina with a chronic illness, she caught COVID-19 and was at high risk when she caught COVID-19. Fearful of suffering long COVID while needing a ventilator to breathe or dying, she resolved to join the clinical trials to show Paxlovid would provide positive patient outcomes. After Paxlovid, she returned to her former self with no symptoms and appreciated Pfizer and its employees' work to provide this treatment to millions globally. Knowing that the work I was doing created actual change in the lives of so many reassured my goal of using technology to make changes and improve the world My passion for technology and problem-solving inspired my desire to become a data engineer who tackles constructs pipelines of automated data to source data autonomously. It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement continuous improvement/development principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Catrina Celestine Aquilino Memorial Scholarship
    The currency of youth is seeking opportunities to discover the unknown. As an entrepreneur and businessman, I want to leverage my passion for technology and problem-solving to address the limitations of healthcare in the USA. Through my medical startup, Williamson Industries I want to create a revolutionary patient-centered, and cost-effective medical device company that will aid the disabled in getting necessary assistive devices that will help them live accessible lives. Developing smart medical innovations utilizing machine learning and AI to reduce the cost of treatment, increase positive outcomes for patients, and improve accessibility for the disabled. My first concept for a new medical device is substituting the cornea with a biocompatible artificial cornea called the ACC-short for Artificial-Cornea-on-a-Chip. It will be a composite material of silicone and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and sensitivity change. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. Besides focusing on researching and developing novel medicals, I want my medical device startup to establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases like Keratoconus, and visual and physical impairments. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. Visible and invisible disabilities can negatively impact the quality of life for those who lack the resources to ensure a decent life. Assistive technologies allow people tools to gain functionality in society by solving a limitation unique to each person with a disability. Across America, a lack of coherent urban planning allows for a diverse landscape depending on which part of the country you reside. To integrate an underserved population into society, the barrier-free design includes people with visual, auditory, physical, and mental disabilities in the brainstorming of urban development to allow them equal enjoyment of public spaces those with disabilities enjoy. This new strategy will allow a new era of creativity when increasing access for the disabled to collaborate and build together.
    Dounya Discala Scholarship
    Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. Empowered through the support of the Cal Poly Pomona community and my family, I have been able to receive over 35 scholarships and awards from organizations such as Intel, Chevron, Google, AT&T, Scholarship America, United Negro College Fund, NAACP, Cal Poly Pomona, and the CSU Chancellors office to name a few. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for minority and underrepresented STEM students. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    DRIVE an IMPACT Today Scholarship
    Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a constant state of constant but winning the DRIVE an IMPACT Today Scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. I would enter a state of equilibrium. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like Bold.org and LanceSoft have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I am one of the few lucky and honored to be even recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. It would also be a reminder that my disability does not define me or limit my potential and that I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world with the right tools and support. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. The recruitment and retention of Black students in STEM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of NSBE, we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Black STEM majors as incoming freshmen and transfer students. I initiated the Restoring Energy and Action for Community Hope (REACH) initiative to bridge the gap between black STEM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of black students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Black students will perform better in school and have the confidence to pursue academically rigorous careers in STEM. The pandemic made it easier to engage with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions.
    Social Change Fund United Scholarship
    In the vibrant tapestry of my utopian vision for optimal mental health in the Black community, I envision a world where the shadows of stigma dissipate, making way for conversations that are both healing and transformative. As a college student deeply entrenched in the pulse of my community, I've embarked on an unconventional journey, weaving the threads of art, dialogue, and education to redefine the narrative surrounding mental health. Through Street Art Therapy projects and community-driven workshops, I'm fostering spaces where vulnerability is not a sign of weakness but a courageous step toward well-being. Beyond the confines of academia, my commitment to mental health advocacy extends into the post-college realm. Armed with the tools of education and empathy, I see myself working directly within the community, collaborating with local organizations to establish sustainable mental health programs. Whether through mentorship initiatives, school-based interventions, or grassroots campaigns, my goal is to cultivate an ecosystem where mental well-being is not a luxury but a fundamental right. Looking further ahead, I envision my impact reaching a national scale. I see myself leveraging my experiences and insights to influence policy discussions that address the systemic factors contributing to mental health disparities. Through partnerships with organizations dedicated to social justice, I aim to bridge the gap between mental health care and broader advocacy initiatives, recognizing that dismantling structural inequalities is integral to fostering lasting change. The heart of my vision lies in the interconnectedness of mental health care and social justice. I believe that by destigmatizing mental health, we empower individuals to navigate their unique challenges while simultaneously dismantling the barriers that perpetuate systemic injustices. Through the ripple effect of awareness and advocacy, I envision a society where mental well-being is not a privilege reserved for a few but a cornerstone of social justice for communities of color. In the heart of South Central LA, where the beat of the community aligns with the pulse of our collective resilience, I find myself at the forefront of a movement called REACH—Revolutionizing Empathy and Advocacy for Community Health. Locally, we've sown seeds of change through workshops and mentorship programs, creating spaces where young Black people can embrace their mental health journeys without fear. Street Art Therapy, with its vibrant strokes echoing stories of strength, has become our medium for healing. Taking REACH to a national stage has been both a challenge and a triumph. The Mentorship Program, a beacon of guidance, has recruited advocates from diverse backgrounds, cultivating a network of support that transcends geographical boundaries. The "Minds Unleashed" campaign, our digital symphony of empowerment, has resonated far beyond city limits, sparking conversations that redefine masculinity and mental well-being. But it's not just about local impact or national recognition—it's about policy change. REACH has become a force in shaping the dialogue around mental health at the highest levels. Through partnerships and advocacy, we've influenced funding allocations, pushing for resources where they're needed most. My role in this journey is not just as a leader but as a storyteller, amplifying the narratives of resilience, vulnerability, and triumph within our community. In this utopia, my journey is not just a personal endeavor but a catalyst for meaningful change. It's about nurturing a cultural shift where mental health is regarded with the same importance as physical health, and where communities of color are not just recipients of care but active participants in shaping the narrative of their own well-being. Through unconventional means and steadfast dedication, I aspire to contribute to a world where optimal mental health is not a distant ideal but a tangible reality for the Black community and beyond.
    Barbie Dream House Scholarship
    In the heart of South Central Los Angeles, where the beats of reggae mingle with the rhythm of the streets, stands my Barbie Dream House—a testament to my Jamaican roots and the vibrant tapestry of the community that raised me. Picture this: a façade that echoes the lively colors of the Caribbean, kissed by the sun of Southern California. The Dream House stands not just as a home but as a symbol of unity, embracing the rich cultural blend of my Jamaican heritage and the diverse spirit of South Central LA. As you step through the front door, you're greeted by the sounds of reggae playing softly in the background. The living room is a mini concert hall, a tribute to the music that runs in my veins. A small stage beckons, inviting impromptu performances and lively jam sessions that echo the soul of the community. Moving into the kitchen, the aroma of jerk chicken and tacos wafts through the air. It's a culinary fusion, a celebration of the diverse flavors that make up South Central LA. The dining area becomes a meeting place, where neighbors gather to share stories and savor the rich cultural tapestry that defines our community. Each room in the Dream House tells a story—be it the vibrant colors inspired by Jamaican landscapes or the murals that pay homage to the resilience of South Central LA. It's a living, breathing testament to the strength that comes from embracing our roots and building a future that harmonizes with the diversity around us. In my scholarship essay, I'd paint a picture of how this Dream House is more than just a physical space; it's a reflection of the values ingrained in me by my Jamaican heritage and the lessons learned on the streets of South Central LA. It's a sanctuary where dreams are nurtured, where every voice is heard, and where differences are not just accepted but celebrated. So, come take a stroll through my Dream House, where the heartbeat of reggae meets the pulse of South Central, and let's build a future that's as colorful and harmonious as the community that inspired it.
    Chris Jackson Computer Science Education Scholarship
    I've always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. Bothered by this, my grandmother worked with me to find opportunities for young kids cultivating STEM interests in underrepresented kids. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. As a Computer Science major, I'll research and develop smart medical innovations utilizing machine learning and AI to reduce the cost of treatment, increase positive outcomes for patients, and improve accessibility for the disabled. The journey with my disability has been made manageable through technological innovations and solutions that uplift the disabled. After getting my bachelor's degree, I'll work on designing new software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society. By creating Internet of Things (IoT) smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I'm also working on a novel hearing aid made from exotic materials like silicone and recyclable plastics that will be mass-produced for patients who cannot afford more expensive options. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2020 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for minority STEM students. I'm paying forward the support I received by making it my mission to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." It's my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and developing strategies to efficiently add value to society; as an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped creating the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices to improve outcomes, reduce financial burdens, and challenge myself as an innovator to advance my problem-solving skills in a discipline that requires diverse perspectives throughout the ideation process, envisioning this journey as the realization of my dream version of the future self
    Dr. Alexanderia K. Lane Memorial Scholarship
    Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community and helps. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through others helping me transform into a steward in my community. Now I reinvest this assistance in bettering outcomes for minority and women STEM students. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, rising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. As a Computer Science major, I will research and develop smart medical innovations utilizing machine learning and AI to reduce the cost of treatment, increase positive outcomes for patients, and improve accessibility for the disabled. The journey with my disability has been made manageable through technological innovations and solutions that uplift the disabled. After getting my bachelor's degree, I will work on designing new software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society. By creating internet of things (IoT) smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I am also working on a novel hearing aid made from exotic materials like silicone and recyclable plastics that will be mass-produced for patients who cannot afford more expensive options.
    Book Lovers Scholarship
    "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho: This enchanting novel tells the story of Santiago, a shepherd boy, and his quest for his Personal Legend. As a college student, I've drawn inspiration from Santiago's journey. The book's message about following one's dreams and embracing the unknown has encouraged me to step out of my comfort zone, explore new horizons, and set ambitious personal goals. I used to fear the implications of trying new things and failing but like Santiago facing the hurdles as he went down his journey, it gave me the courage to try new experiences without letting potential failure deter me from my goals. As most teenagers and young adults can relate to, chasing your dreams is often a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and allowing yourself to be paralyzed by fear will block your ability to achieve those goals. In my life as an eternal student, this book has been more than just a source of entertainment; it has been a mentor, guiding me through the complexities of personal growth, professional development, and academic excellence. It has taught me that dreams are worth pursuing, innovation is essential, clear communication is key, and justice and empathy should be at the core of my actions. These lessons are not only shaping my college experience but also providing me with valuable tools to navigate the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead on my educational journey. As I turn the pages of my textbooks and continue to explore the world of knowledge, I do so with the wisdom and inspiration imparted by these literary companions firmly in my heart and mind.
    Bold.org x Forever 21 Scholarship + Giveaway
    cjwilliamson98
    Barbara Cain Literary Scholarship
    In the dimly lit corners of my college dorm room, where textbooks sprawl across my desk and the soft glow of my laptop screen serves as my beacon of knowledge, books have become my steadfast companions. As a college student, I've embarked on a journey of discovery, and these literary companions have significantly shaped my personal, professional, and academic life. Let me share with you the profound impact that a few remarkable books have had on my path. "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho: This enchanting novel tells the story of Santiago, a shepherd boy, and his quest for his Personal Legend. As a college student, I've drawn inspiration from Santiago's journey. The book's message about following one's dreams and embracing the unknown has encouraged me to step out of my comfort zone, explore new horizons, and set ambitious personal goals. In the realm of professional development, "The Lean Startup" by Eric Ries has been a guiding light. Eric Ries's insights into iterative development and validated learning have resonated with me as I navigate the challenges of academic and career growth. This book has shown me the value of adaptability and innovation, which I know will be crucial in my future professional endeavors. "The Elements of Style" by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White has been indispensable to me as an aspiring academic. Its timeless guidance on effective communication and writing clarity has not only improved my academic writing but also enhanced my ability to convey ideas clearly in all aspects of my college life, from essays to presentations. My days in high school AP English, "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee has left a lasting impact on my personal values and sense of justice. I've been reminded of the importance of empathy, social justice, and standing up for what is right, even when it's challenging. These themes resonate deeply with me, influencing my personal beliefs and encouraging me to be an advocate for justice in both my academic and future professional pursuits. In my life as a eternal student, these books have been more than just sources of entertainment; they've been mentors, guiding me through the complexities of personal growth, professional development, and academic excellence. They've taught me that dreams are worth pursuing, innovation is essential, clear communication is key, and justice and empathy should be at the core of my actions. These lessons are not only shaping my college experience but also providing me with valuable tools to navigate the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead on my educational journey. As I turn the pages of my textbooks and continue to explore the world of knowledge, I do so with the wisdom and inspiration imparted by these literary companions firmly in my heart and mind.
    Barbara J. DeVaney Memorial Scholarship Fund
    Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Barbara J. DeVaney Memorial Scholarship Fund would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. I would enter a state of equilibrium. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like the Bold.Org and the Estate of Barbara J. Devaney have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I am one of the few lucky and honored to be recognized not only to continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. It would also be a reminder that my disability does not define me or limit my potential and that I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world with the right tools and support. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As an Afro-Latina, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center, my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce benevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past.
    Miguel Mendez Social Justice Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a good education inspired me to pursue a Mechanical engineering degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce benevolent forces, I am using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. The recruitment and retention of Black students in STEM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of NSBE, we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Black STEM majors as incoming freshmen and transfer students. I initiated the Restoring Energy and Action for Community Hope (REACH) initiative to bridge the gap between black STEM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of black students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Black students will perform better in school and have the confidence to pursue academically rigorous careers in STEM. The pandemic made it easier to engage with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions. The outreach program consisted of Hackathons, mentored projects, exposure to new emerging technological fields, and panels of professional and collegiate students discussing their experiences as a Black STEM major/professional. On a macro level, the education system in America can best attract and engage youth in science and technology by supporting tech initiatives for the young and partnering with companies/institutions to get internships or research opportunities for K-12 students. Data has shown Black students are unaware of STEM careers and lack the skills necessary to soar. This has been linked to discriminatory policies in education and hiring policies that create spaces that are not inclusive of Black talent. Therefore, ensuring Black students are aware of learning arithmetic, logic, natural sciences, physical sciences, and more through school and after-school programs will improve the engineering industry's future outcomes. Success in your endeavors is impossible without a community behind you. Paying forward the recognition of my potential and investment in my ambitions is why I work to improve my community. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for Black STEM students. I joined the Los Angeles chapters of the NAACP and Urban League to form the Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA) initiative by racing around these historic minority lead organizations that have a legacy of fighting for social justice and the rights of those with the most needs. The objective of my initiative is to prepare younger Millennials and Gen Z to usurp power systems from political figures that pass legislation that is detrimental to future generations. By providing resources such as professional development in resume reviews, mock interviews, and networking with Fortune 500 companies the program has helped increase young minority students into key leadership positions in the business world.
    Sola Family Scholarship
    The foundation that has guided, consoled, and supported me has always been my mother, “Miss Lee.” With my battles with depression, Keratoconus, ADHD, and self-doubt impacting my scholastic and professional journeys, my mother’s indomitable will and fortitude have served as a place. While the strongest form of Tungsten is susceptible to temperatures of 3420 °C, my mother remains solid and formidable no matter what heat she encounters. Growing up in a low-income, single-parent, and immigrant household, my mother worked multiple jobs while taking care of my family and me. Witnessing her sacrifices to provide for me and ensure that I had a better life to capitalize on my educational pursuits inspired me to care about the goals she was unfortunately unable to continue. Aspiring to be a Computer Scientist, my mother dropped out of college due to the high cost of school and not receiving support to continue her education. Even with that roadblock, she pursued several jobs that aligned closely with her Computer Science dreams. One of these was a Telecommunications Engineer at AT&T, IT with DHL, and a Manufacturing Technician with Storm LLC. The exposure to technology at a young age through my mother's jobs and her hobbies helped me see the opportunities a career in technology allows to those who pursue it. This inspired me to combine skills in problem-solving and technology to solve healthcare issues as a Mechanical Engineer. A linear path in life is not always feasible when external factors serve as deterrents to set you off course from your destination. My life transformed when I was diagnosed with Keratoconus, and my mother suffered a work-related injury. As my vision worsened and my mother’s efforts became futile, I was thrust upon me to become the primary caretaker in my household. Seeing the Goliath-like woman I call mom suffer heavily from her injuries has deeply impacted my view of the poor assistive technology available to those with disabilities and chronic illnesses. I'm utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things, intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients’ performance, medical professionals can leverage data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse technology to add value to those who are disabled by incorporating accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle. After graduating with my Bachelor's degree, I'll work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at CalTech. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I'm paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity. Increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups can resolve rising existential threats through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I'm grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." It's my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center, my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. I'm utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things (IoT), intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their heart rate, glucose level, stress, and other physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients’ optimal, sub-optimal, and overperformance, medical professionals can leverage round-the-clock data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes through exploratory data analysis. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse my interest in technology to add value to those who are sick and disabled. Incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities After graduating, I'll work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at the California Institute of Technology. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. Increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups can resolve rising existential threats through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful to my community, peers, family, and organizations for recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bears fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that had fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors.
    Will Johnson Scholarship
    Like many disabled students pursuing higher education, my journey has been like a pendulum. Shifting from positive and negative situations, never in a state of constant but winning the Health Products For You Beyond Scholarship scholarship would be a tremendous honor and a significant help in achieving my educational and career goals. I would enter a state of equilibrium. This financial stimulant will relieve an economic burden on me. The cost of college blocks millions of my peers from excelling in college but organizations like Health Products For You have proactively worked to recognize and invest in reducing this hurdle. I am one of the few lucky and honored to be even recognized to not only continue but to eventually give back to the next generation of students with ambitions of higher education. It would also be a reminder that my disability does not define me or limit my potential and that with the right tools and support, I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that have fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with my Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. I am utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things, intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patients performance, medical professionals can leverage round-the-clock data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse technology to add value to the disabled by incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle.
    Mohamed Magdi Taha Memorial Scholarship
    As a first-generation student, education has been the holy grail that I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a well-education inspired me to pursue my degree to combine theory with practical applications in developing affordable medical devices for patients who lack access to proper healthcare. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces, I'm using my edification as the foundation for a new home built with pillars of hope, communication, compromise, equality, liberty, and progressive thought for succeeding generations to be uninhibited from the chains of the past. I’d like to share a lesson my first mentor instilled in me back in high school and that I carry through my endeavors. “Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits.” As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) ambitions, I relate to the hurdles young Black students go through to pursue their aspirations. This inspired me to advocate for a better ecosystem for Black STEAM students to succeed in their journey to becoming professionals in industry or academia. Without a doubt, my character has profoundly been shaped through being a steward in my community and bettering outcomes for Black STEAM students The recruitment and retention of Black students in STEAM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of NSBE, we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Black STEAM majors as incoming students. I initiated the REACH initiative to bridge the gap between Black STEAM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of Black students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Black students will perform better and have better academic outcomes. The pandemic made it easier to engage with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions. The outreach program consisted of Hackathons, mentored projects, exposure to new emerging technological fields, and panels of professional and collegiate students discussing their experiences as a Black STEAM major/professional The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism by lobbying politicians such as Maxine Waters and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central LA uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community can flourish
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    From building models of solar panels for urban environments, designing centrifuges to be used in lab testing, and working on developing new low-cost thermostats for low-income families in South Central Los Angeles, mechanical engineering has been the outlet I use to uplift my community. By blending design principles I have admired and learned from through coursework, internships, and volunteer opportunities, I am dedicating my career to making the next product that will combat medical disparities, waste, access to clean water, and renewable energy. Tech has lacked a comprehensive approach when addressing societal issues due to the lack of representation of black, brown, indigenous, LGBTQIA, and other identities being larger missing in the product lifecycle. My time as a leader, member, and advocate in minority organizations fighting for better opportunities has helped me learn about the needs of underrepresented communities and employ an inclusive mindset when I work on designing products. For example, including accessibility features for individuals with physical, mental, and sensory disabilities. Working on multilingual access for technical drawings for clients that may not speak English. My credo is to design tools, and technology that will not ignore the unseen but incorporate their voices in the process of creating better experiences.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    Education has been the holy grail I grew up coveting for the prestige, network, personal advancement, and discovery of new innovations. The systematic barriers that hindered the black community from accessing the fruits of a well-education inspired me to combine technology to address the educational disparity prominent in minority communities in South Central Los Angeles. Through education, I hope to institute a paradigm shift that will fix the malady of inequities on a societal, economic, political, and spiritual level for minorities, immigrants, women, and the disabled. Education is a force to repel destruction and hate by ameliorating the consciousness of a community to harness intelligence to reduce malevolent forces. The recruitment and retention of Black students in STEM are severely lacking at the K-12 level. In my two years serving as the President of my college’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), we have always had issues recruiting and retaining Black STEM majors as incoming freshmen and transfer students. I initiated the REACH initiative to bridge the gap between black STEM majors from underrepresented Title I schools in SoCal to improve the capability of black students in core math and science classes. With a strong foundation in fundamental science and mathematical concepts, Black students will perform better in school and have the confidence to pursue academically rigorous careers in STEM. The pandemic made engaging with students through various digital platforms to host tutoring, workshops, and technical competitions easier. The outreach program consisted of Hackathons, mentored projects, exposure to new emerging technological fields, and panels of professional and collegiate students discussing their experiences as a Black STEM major/professional. On a macro level, the education system in America can best attract and engage youth in science and technology by supporting tech initiatives for the young and partnering with companies/institutions to get internships or research opportunities for K-12 students. Data has shown Black students are unaware of STEM careers and lack the skills necessary to soar. This has been linked to discriminatory policies in education and hiring policies that create spaces that are not inclusive of Black talent. Therefore, ensuring Black students are aware of learning arithmetic, logic, natural sciences, physical sciences, and more through school and after-school programs will improve the engineering industry's future outcomes. The systematic barriers that hinder the Black community from accessing the fruits of a well-educated education inspired my mission to change this for the betterment of Black STEAM students. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Maxine Waters, and Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and political representatives has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students in South Central. I’m utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black students but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as a continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, raising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    I Can and I Will Scholarship
    th the right tools and support, I can achieve my goals and make a meaningful impact in the world. Thrust into becoming Head of the Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to CPP on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother. My determination to progress through the burdens that have fallen onto my shoulders had made me blind to my health issues until I was diagnosed with Keratoconus which has negatively impacted my educational and professional goals. Being awarded will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, which brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Biomedical Engineer. Through this aid, I’ll be able to finish up my educational endeavors. As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with my Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. I am utilizing my degree to automate data extraction, transformation, and loading between medical devices in clinical settings to improve the analysis of patient diagnoses. With the robust Internet of Things, intelligent machines will map out patients’ status by observing their physiological functions. By creating parameters that distinguish patient's performance, medical professionals can leverage round-the-clock data to improve treatment regimens and patient outcomes. The lack of engineers in the field hinders the current foundation of medical innovation. My dream is to fuse technology to add value to those who are disabled. By incorporating inclusive and accessible methods in the ideation phase of the product lifecycle for patients with disabilities. After graduating with my Bachelor's degree, I will work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at CalTech. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, raising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for
    Learner Education Women in Mathematics Scholarship
    As the sun sets on the horizon of human knowledge, casting its rays upon the realms of science and art, one universal language stands as a sentinel, guiding us through the enigmas of existence. This language, my dear reader, is none other than mathematics—a celestial dance of patterns and possibilities that orchestrates the symphony of life itself. It is with the fervor of an explorer and the heart of a poet that I set out to unveil the unconventional beauty of math and my profound love for learning its mysteries. Beyond the rigid confines of textbooks and examinations, mathematics reveals its grace in every facet of life. It is the unseen artist that paints fractals in the foliage, the choreographer that maps the flight of a butterfly, and the composer that harmonizes the cosmic symphony of celestial bodies. In the chaotic cacophony of existence, mathematics is the hidden conductor that waltzes with the laws of physics, tangos with the particles of the quantum realm, and sways with the melodies of life's grand design. For me, mathematics is not merely an academic pursuit; it is an endless dance of exploration, where every theorem and equation is a celestial partner awaiting my embrace. It is a dance of discovery, where each step taken unveils new vistas of knowledge, inviting me to delve deeper into its beguiling mysteries. As I sway with the numbers and equations, I find solace in the certainty of their truths amidst the uncertainty of life's unpredictable rhythm. Mathematics, to me, is not a rigid language of absolutes; it is a fluid tapestry of imagination and creativity. In this ever-evolving ballroom of ideas, I find freedom in crafting new steps, in challenging conventions, and in seeking beauty even in the most esoteric theorems. The elegance of a mathematical proof is akin to the grace of a ballet dancer, captivating and enchanting in its simplicity yet brimming with depth and sophistication. My love for learning mathematics transcends the classroom walls. It takes me on an odyssey of the mind, exploring the ethereal landscapes of infinity, the dazzling realms of fractals, and the breathtaking symmetries of group theory. It grants me the power to perceive the world through the lens of abstraction, understanding the harmony between diverse fields and their interconnectedness. Beyond the realm of equations, mathematics nurtures virtues that enrich our lives: patience in the face of challenging problems, resilience in the pursuit of elusive solutions, and humility in acknowledging the vastness of the mathematical landscape yet to be charted. With every step taken in this cosmic dance, I gain a deeper understanding of myself and the universe, forging an unbreakable bond between my soul and the language of creation. To love mathematics is to embrace uncertainty and ambiguity, to find beauty in the asymmetry of life, and to revel in the enigmatic nature of the mathematical unknown. As I stand at the precipice of my academic journey, I am not driven by the pursuit of scholarships or accolades. Instead, I am inspired by the timeless allure of mathematics—the infinite potential it holds. My passion is not confined to rigid formulae or cold calculations, but it flows through the rhythm of my heart and the dance of my soul. This unconventional ode is a testament to the profound importance of mathematics in understanding the world and the boundless love I have for unraveling its enthralling mysteries. With every sway and every step, I am guided by the belief that mathematics is not a subject to be mastered, but a lifelong companion in the waltz of life.
    Healthy Eating Scholarship
    In the heart of South Central Los Angeles, my journey with food has been a wild rollercoaster, filled with tantalizing tastes, emotional indulgences, and transformative revelations. I stumbled upon the mesmerizing world of flavors at a tender age, and it became my escape, my solace. But little did I know that this culinary affair would leave me grappling with weight issues, casting a shadow on my self-confidence and zest for life. For years, I found myself in a tug-of-war with my cravings, helplessly drawn to the convenience of fast food and the alluring aroma of decadent desserts. Each bite was a temporary high, a fleeting moment of pleasure followed by a pang of guilt. As the numbers on the scale climbed higher, so did my insecurities. The world felt like a stage, and I was playing the role of a captive audience, silently judging my own performance. But amidst the chaos, a quiet voice within me whispered a different narrative. It urged me to embrace a path less traveled, to redefine my relationship with food and, in turn, with myself. It was a call to embark on a journey of rediscovery and self-empowerment, a journey towards embracing healthy eating habits with a dash of unconventional zest. Rather than succumbing to the tyranny of strict diets, I sought the wisdom of balance and moderation. I savored the rich tapestry of flavors from around the globe, exploring the culinary wonders that graced my multicultural neighborhood. I discovered the art of mindful eating - savoring every morsel, relishing the sensations, and truly appreciating the nourishment that each meal bestowed upon me. In the process, I realized that healthy eating wasn't about deprivation; it was a vibrant celebration of life. It was about nurturing my body and soul with a symphony of colorful, nutrient-packed ingredients - nature's precious gifts to us. From the vibrant greens of leafy vegetables to the scarlet allure of ripe berries, each hue represented vitality, a burst of life, and a promise of well-being. In this gastronomic journey, I encountered unexpected allies - superfoods. Spirulina and chia seeds danced their way into my smoothies, infusing me with energy and vitality. Quinoa and avocado became my trusted companions, fueling my days with essential nutrients and the courage to embrace change. Yet, my transformation was not just physical. As I began to nourish my body with love, I witnessed a blossoming of my spirit. A newfound clarity swept through my mind like a gentle breeze, sparking creativity and heightening focus. My days became imbued with positivity, as if a rainbow of emotions painted my canvas. And as I reflect upon this unconventional odyssey, I see not just a tale of a person who overcame weight issues, but a soul who found liberation through food. My journey taught me that every choice, every bite, holds the power to shape our lives. Food is not just fuel for our bodies, but a gateway to self-discovery and transformation. So, dear reader, join me on this path less traveled, where the journey to healthy eating is not a mere destination but a tapestry of flavors, colors, and emotions. Together, we shall paint our lives with the vibrant brushstrokes of nourishment, and in this culinary adventure, we shall find the true essence of our being.
    Your Health Journey Scholarship
    Mweight struggles were a significant part of my life's journey. From a young age, I found comfort in food, and it became a coping mechanism for various challenges I faced. Living in an environment with limited access to healthy food options and recreational facilities, it was challenging to maintain a balanced lifestyle. Fast food joints dotted the neighborhood, and the allure of their convenience and taste was hard to resist. As a result, I gradually started gaining weight, and it affected my self-esteem and confidence. The weight issue wasn't just physical; it took a toll on my emotional well-being as well. I often felt judged and faced body shaming from peers, which further compounded my struggles. I wanted to break free from this cycle of negative self-perception and reclaim my life. Frustrated with traditional dieting and exercise routines, I decided to take an unconventional approach to tackle my weight problem. I realized that my journey had to be deeply personal and rooted in self-discovery. Instead of focusing solely on losing pounds, I embarked on a holistic self-improvement journey. I started practicing "emotional purging" - a process of acknowledging and confronting the emotional issues that led me to overeat in the first place. By understanding and addressing the underlying emotional triggers, I began to find healthier ways to cope with stress and anxiety. I also embraced my cultural heritage and its cuisine in a new light. Instead of viewing the flavorful dishes of my community as unhealthy, I explored ways to modify recipes and create healthier versions of my favorite foods. This not only helped me maintain a connection to my roots but also empowered me to make healthier choices without sacrificing the tastes I loved. Additionally, I delved into unconventional forms of physical activity that resonated with my passions and interests. I discovered joy in dance and martial arts, finding them more fulfilling than traditional gym workouts. Through these activities, I not only burned calories but also cultivated a sense of discipline and self-expression. To support my journey, I sought the guidance of mentors and joined support groups that shared similar struggles. Connecting with others on a similar path reminded me that I was not alone, and we could empower each other to embrace our uniqueness and achieve our goals. Over time, I learned that my weight struggles were not something to be ashamed of but a part of my unique story. By taking an unconventional path, I found the strength to confront my challenges head-on and discover my true potential beyond the numbers on a scale. Today, I am not defined by my weight but by the resilience and wisdom I gained on this unconventional health journey. It was never about conforming to societal norms but about finding my own path to happiness and well-being. My experiences have shaped me into a more compassionate and self-aware person, ready to embrace the unconventional aspects of life and face any challenge with courage and determination.
    Mind, Body, & Soul Scholarship
    As I embark on the mystical voyage that is college, my heart brims with excitement akin to an explorer setting sail for uncharted territories. College is not just a mere institution; it is an ethereal landscape where dreams take flight, where the kaleidoscope of knowledge unfurls, and where the very essence of existence shimmers with infinite possibilities. What excites me the most about college is the boundless freedom to craft my own narrative. It is a realm where the canvas of my imagination is no longer constrained by the lines of a curriculum but open to the strokes of my aspirations. College is the cauldron of inspiration, where ideas percolate, and innovations spark into existence, unfettered by the norms of conventionality. Moreover, college is a tapestry woven with diverse threads of human connection. It is a sanctuary of cultural exchange, where perspectives from around the world converge to form a beautiful mosaic of understanding. In the hallowed halls of academia, I look forward to engaging in conversations that transcend disciplines, bridging the gap between the arts, sciences, and humanities, and nurturing a holistic view of life and knowledge. Yet, within the enchantment of college life lies the crucible of challenges that test the mettle of one's mind, body, and soul. To thrive amidst these trials, I seek balance in nurturing the triad of my being. To maintain a healthy mind, I embrace the magic of curiosity. I view every class, every lecture, and every discussion as an opportunity to expand my intellectual horizons. I find solace in reading beyond textbooks, exploring diverse disciplines, and savoring the wisdom of ancient and contemporary thinkers. Embracing the pursuit of knowledge as a lifelong adventure, I feed my mind with the sustenance of wonder, forever a student of the world. For a healthy body, I dance to the rhythm of movement and nourishment. College life can be sedentary, but I revel in breaking that spell by engaging in physical activities that awaken my senses and rejuvenate my spirit. Be it a morning run in the campus park, a dance class that liberates my soul, or mindful yoga under the starlit sky, I cherish the gift of my body, treating it as the vessel through which my dreams will be realized. Amidst the ebbs and flows of college life, nurturing a healthy soul is the anchor that steadies my voyage. I find solace in the embrace of nature, seeking refuge in its tranquility and finding inspiration in its wild beauty. Taking moments of quiet contemplation, I meditate, connecting with the depths of my being, and cultivating an unyielding resilience to face life's challenges with grace and courage. In the enchanting world of college, I am not just a student, but an alchemist crafting the elixir of life. The pursuit of knowledge intertwines with the weaving of relationships, forming an extraordinary tapestry that colors my existence with vibrancy and purpose. The prospect of college fills me with an unconventional excitement, a dance of eagerness and wonder. It is the untamed wilderness of possibilities, where I relish every step of the journey, cherishing the trials, triumphs, and revelations that shape my metamorphosis. Amidst the enchantment of learning and living, I shall guard the sanctity of my mind, body, and soul, as the key to unlocking the magic of college lies in embracing the harmonious melody of balance and the symphony of self-discovery.
    Learner.com Algebra Scholarship
    As the sun sets on the horizon of human knowledge, casting its rays upon the realms of science and art, one universal language stands as a sentinel, guiding us through the enigmas of existence. This language, my dear reader, is none other than mathematics—a celestial dance of patterns and possibilities that orchestrates the symphony of life itself. It is with the fervor of an explorer and the heart of a poet that I set out to unveil the unconventional beauty of math and my profound love for learning its mysteries. Beyond the rigid confines of textbooks and examinations, mathematics reveals its grace in every facet of life. It is the unseen artist that paints fractals in the foliage, the choreographer that maps the flight of a butterfly, and the composer that harmonizes the cosmic symphony of celestial bodies. In the chaotic cacophony of existence, mathematics is the hidden conductor that waltzes with the laws of physics, tangos with the particles of the quantum realm, and sways with the melodies of life's grand design. For me, mathematics is not merely an academic pursuit; it is an endless dance of exploration, where every theorem and equation is a celestial partner awaiting my embrace. It is a dance of discovery, where each step taken unveils new vistas of knowledge, inviting me to delve deeper into its beguiling mysteries. As I sway with the numbers and equations, I find solace in the certainty of their truths amidst the uncertainty of life's unpredictable rhythm. Mathematics, to me, is not a rigid language of absolutes; it is a fluid tapestry of imagination and creativity. In this ever-evolving ballroom of ideas, I find freedom in crafting new steps, in challenging conventions, and in seeking beauty even in the most esoteric theorems. The elegance of a mathematical proof is akin to the grace of a ballet dancer, captivating and enchanting in its simplicity yet brimming with depth and sophistication. My love for learning mathematics transcends the classroom walls. It takes me on an odyssey of the mind, exploring the ethereal landscapes of infinity, the dazzling realms of fractals, and the breathtaking symmetries of group theory. It grants me the power to perceive the world through the lens of abstraction, understanding the harmony between diverse fields and their interconnectedness. Beyond the realm of equations, mathematics nurtures virtues that enrich our lives: patience in the face of challenging problems, resilience in the pursuit of elusive solutions, and humility in acknowledging the vastness of the mathematical landscape yet to be charted. With every step taken in this cosmic dance, I gain a deeper understanding of myself and the universe, forging an unbreakable bond between my soul and the language of creation. To love mathematics is to embrace uncertainty and ambiguity, to find beauty in the asymmetry of life, and to revel in the enigmatic nature of the mathematical unknown. As I stand at the precipice of my academic journey, I am not driven by the pursuit of scholarships or accolades. Instead, I am inspired by the timeless allure of mathematics—the infinite potential it holds. My passion is not confined to rigid formulae or cold calculations, but it flows through the rhythm of my heart and the dance of my soul. This unconventional ode is a testament to the profound importance of mathematics in understanding the world and the boundless love I have for unraveling its enthralling mysteries. With every sway and every step, I am guided by the belief that mathematics is not a subject to be mastered, but a lifelong companion in the waltz of life.
    Learner Calculus Scholarship
    In the vast landscape of the STEM field, one might argue that calculus is the key that unlocks the hidden secrets of the universe. To appreciate the significance of calculus from an unconventional perspective, let's delve into the metaphor of the "Cosmic Symphony." Imagine the universe as an elaborate symphony, where each celestial body and natural phenomenon is a musical note, and the laws of physics serve as the conductor guiding this grand performance. Just as a symphony comprises intricate melodies and harmonies, the universe is composed of complex interactions and interrelationships between various natural forces and systems. Now, enter calculus as the unique language that allows us to decode this symphonic masterpiece. Traditional mathematics provides the basic notes and rhythms, but it is through calculus that we gain the ability to understand the dynamic evolution and flow of these cosmic melodies. Like a maestro waving their baton, calculus enables us to pinpoint the exact moment when a comet will pass by, to determine the trajectory of a spacecraft exploring distant planets, or even to unravel the mysteries of black holes. Calculus is the mathematical tool that empowers us to observe nature's choreography in real-time. By studying rates of change and accumulation, calculus enables scientists and engineers to design everything from cutting-edge technologies to awe-inspiring architectural marvels. Whether it's predicting the behavior of fluid dynamics in aerodynamics or understanding how the curvature of spacetime influences the motion of celestial bodies, calculus is the bridge that connects abstract theories to the tangible wonders of the universe. Moreover, let's not forget the deep philosophical implications of calculus. Its concept of infinitesimals and limits challenges our very perception of reality and brings to light the idea that even the most fundamental aspects of existence can be infinitely divisible and endlessly interconnected. In this grand symphony of the cosmos, calculus stands as the conductor's baton, granting us the ability to interpret and appreciate the mesmerizing performances of nature. From the microcosmic realm of subatomic particles to the vastness of interstellar space, calculus is the passport that allows us to explore and understand the universal masterpiece in all its complexity and splendor. So, let us embrace this unconventional perspective and celebrate the significance of calculus as the sublime gateway to comprehending the symphony of the universe in the remarkable STEM field. As more complex algorithms are created to replace menial tasks and reduce inefficiency, Calculus will be the lingua franca of the new age.
    SmartAsset College SmartStart Personal Finance Scholarship
    Imagine you want to buy a car, rent an apartment, or get a loan for college. How do you convince the seller, the landlord, or the lender that you are trustworthy and can pay them back? One way is to show them your credit score. Your credit score is like a grade for your financial behavior. It tells them how good you are at using credit, which is money that you borrow and promises to repay. The higher your credit score, the more likely you are to get approved for what you want and get better deals. The lower your credit score, the more likely you are to get rejected or pay more in fees and interest. Your credit score can affect many aspects of your life, from where you live to what you drive to how much you pay for things. That’s why it’s important to understand what a credit score is, how it is calculated, and how you can improve it. In this essay, I'll explain all of these things and give you some tips on how to build a strong credit score while you are young. Credit is a financial tool that allows individuals to borrow money and make purchases based on the promise of repayment in the future. It's measured and represented by a credit score, which indicates an individual's creditworthiness. The most widely used credit scoring system is the FICO score, ranging from 300 to 850. Higher scores indicate a lower risk of defaulting on loans, which translates into better borrowing terms and lower interest rates. Having a good credit score as a young person comes with a multitude of benefits and opportunities. One of the key advantages of good credit is the access it provides to financial opportunities. Whether you're applying for a car loan, renting an apartment, or seeking a loan for college, having good credit increases your chances of approval and enables you to secure better deals. Lenders, landlords, and institutions use your credit score as a measure of your trustworthiness and ability to repay debts. With a higher credit score, you are more likely to qualify for loans with lower interest rates, making education more affordable through student loans, and securing favorable terms on auto loans. Good credit plays a significant role in homeownership. When you're ready to purchase a home, lenders review your credit history to assess your risk as a borrower. A good credit score not only increases your chances of obtaining a mortgage but also allows you to qualify for lower interest rates and more favorable loan terms. On the other hand, a poor credit score may limit your options and force you to accept less favorable loan terms or even prevent you from qualifying for a mortgage altogether. Building and maintaining good credit early on can pave the way for homeownership and financial stability in the future. Your credit history can impact your employment prospects, particularly for positions that require financial responsibility or involve handling company finances. Some employers may check credit reports as part of the hiring process to assess an applicant's trustworthiness and level of financial obligation. A strong credit profile reflects your ability to manage money effectively, instilling confidence in potential employers regarding your reliability and decision-making skills. On the other hand, an adverse credit history may raise concerns about your financial habits, potentially affecting your chances of securing certain job opportunities. Minorities and women face significant challenges in accessing credit for their businesses, which limits their opportunities for growth and success. According to the Federal Reserve’s Small Business Credit Survey, minority-owned businesses were less likely than white-owned businesses to receive all of the credit they applied for in 2020, and more likely to seek credit for covering operating expenses rather than investing or expanding. Similarly, according to the Kauffman Survey of Entrepreneurs, Black, and Hispanic business owners were more likely than white business owners to report being discouraged from applying for loans, and less likely to receive the full amount of funding they requested. Moreover, according to CreditCards.com, people of color were less likely than white Americans to have access to a credit card in 2020, and Black and Latino LGBTQ adults were more likely than their non-LGBTQ counterparts to report having poor or very poor credit3. Some of the main causes of these disparities include discrimination, lack of collateral, lower credit scores, weaker banking relationships, and historical and structural barriers in minority neighborhoods. Beyond financial opportunities and access, good credit has several positive impacts on individuals' lives. Good credit empowers you to save money in the long run. Lenders offer lower interest rates and fees to borrowers with excellent credit scores, resulting in lower monthly payments and significant savings over the life of a loan. For example, when purchasing a car, a good credit score could save you thousands of dollars in interest charges over the loan term. Similarly, renting an apartment with good credit might allow you to negotiate better terms or avoid hefty security deposits With good credit, you have more flexibility and freedom in managing your finances. You can easily qualify for credit cards with favorable rewards programs, enabling you to earn cash back, travel rewards, or other benefits. Additionally, good credit allows you to secure higher credit limits, providing a safety net for unexpected expenses and emergencies. Understanding the importance of good credit is crucial for young people. It opens doors to financial opportunities, improves your chances of homeownership, enhances employment prospects, and provides financial flexibility. Building and maintaining good credit requires responsible financial behavior, such as making payments on time, keeping credit utilization low, and managing debt effectively. By establishing good credit habits early on, young people can set themselves up for a successful and financially secure future. It is important to address and work towards reducing disparities in credit access based on race, age, and gender, ensuring equal opportunities for all individuals to benefit from good credit to uplift generations of people blocked from financial stimulants.
    Freddie L Brown Sr. Scholarship
    It was a cold place that I resided in Bleak storms composed the atmosphere until one day the sun broke through. With sun rays piercing the heavens the storm yielded to the power of the sun As if a subordinate bowing to a master.
    Tim Watabe Doing Hard Things Scholarship
    As a Black, low-income, single-parent household, first-generation American, and first-generation college student, it has been my dream to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering to create inclusive and accessible medical devices. My journey with my Keratoconus, a visual disability that nearly made me blind until I got a cornea implant, exposed me to the limitations of our healthcare system. Adapting to reduced vision, migraines, sensitivity to light, and depression that nearly deterred me from completing my education, I worked with the Disability Resource Center (DRC), my professors, and my family to develop strategies to turn my disability into a strength rather than a hindrance. Utilizing assistive devices like correctly refracted glasses that block light and magnify small prints and recorded lectures to aid in studying helped return my academic success to normal. Empowered through the support of the Cal Poly Pomona community and my family, I have been able to receive over 35 scholarships and awards from organizations such as Intel, Chevron, Google, AT&T, Scholarship America, United Negro College Fund, NAACP, Cal Poly Pomona, and the CSU Chancellors office to name a few. Engineers combine theory and application to resolve daunting challenges that impede the progress of humanity. As a Mechanical Engineering major, I will research and develop smart medical innovations that reduce the cost of treatment, increase positive outcomes for patients, and improve accessibility for the disabled. The burden of my disability has been made manageable through technological innovations and solutions that uplift the disabled. After graduating with my Bachelor's degree, I will work on designing new assistive devices and software applications that allow people suffering from physical and mental disabilities to integrate into society fully as a Ph.D. student at the California Institute of Technology. By creating haptic feedback smart devices that can read the tactile motion, people who are blind or suffer from low vision can read and interact daily. Besides that, I am working on a novel hearing aid made from exotic materials like Silicone, Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, and recyclable plastics that will be mass-produced for patients who cannot afford more expensive options. I am paying forward the aid I received during my battle with Keratoconus by working to decentralize opportunities for underrepresented groups to access opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). As the Vice President of the National Society of Black Engineers, I created and currently maintain a pipeline of minority talent to prepare to work at Fortune 500 companies, conduct research at top research laboratories, and obtain academic positions in competitive private or public university institutions. My mission is to change the global landscape for the betterment of all humanity, as a continued success for humankind is impossible without a community behind you. By increasing the STEM representation of underrepresented groups, raising existential threats can be resolved through diverse frameworks and technical subject matter experts collaborating to combat these challenges. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved STEM influencers and leaders.
    Firstcard-Scholarship for Students
    If you cannot pay in full for what you are buying, do not charge it was passed on to me by my first Engineering Supervisor. My first internship as a Pilot Manufacturing Engineer paid me $24 an hour in Irvine, California for Edwards Lifesciences. The engineer I reported named Charith provided mentorship on how financial literacy and management are critical for workers to learn to ensure they have a thriving future. All my previous employments paid minimum wage but this internship was my first experience making so much money. Having so much money made it tempting to spend on luxury items, trips, and other experiences I was not able to before but with the guidance of older and experienced people I bunkered down on instant gratification. I budgeted out my expenses and put aside the extra funds in my company-sponsored matched 401k plan, Roth IRA, medical savings account, restricted stock units, signing bonus, and Fidelity investment accounts. Even after my internship was finished this strategy helped me improve my savings, carry over some of the benefits, and improved my credit score by 100 points because of my due diligence. The net impact of building my financial foundation early is opening doors for me to access home/auto loans, access to cash rewards, and exclusive deals on flights and hotels. Even as I continue to work part-time with the City of Los Angeles as a Software Engineer and currently as an Operations Leadership Development Program intern for Siemens, I hold on to evaluating my expenses weekly. Accruing large amounts of debt negatively impacts millions of Americans every year. Coming from a low-income and single-parent household, debt made my childhood a struggle. With the constant reminder of the financial struggles and living paycheck to paycheck, I constantly work on living a frugal lifestyle and planning for the long term for myself and my descendants. The generational wealth that I am establishing to pass on to my kids and grandkids has been possible by seeking out financial planning resources, addressing the history of economic exclusion of black families by socioeconomic policies, budgeting, diversifying my investment portfolio, and being patient in growing my economic power. The abysmal state of economic independence many Americans experience today in our society can only be shifted by having dialogues that address poor financial literacy and habits that have been ingrained that are barriers to a prosperous future for many.
    Mark A. Jefferson Teaching Scholarship
    As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my STEM ambitions, I can relate to the hurdles young Black students go through to pursue their aspirations. I'm bettering their chances and eliminating the systematic barriers that prevent black students from achieving a successful future in STEM through education. I'm working as a teacher assistant, volunteer, and mentor with Title I K-12 schools in South Los Angeles to improve Black student's STEM competency in the most underperforming schools. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have hurdles that hinder their community's prosperity. Still, by closing the gap with adequate mentors and teachers who relate to their backgrounds, I have helped improve academic performances, increase recruitment to top-tier universities, and see more Black students adopt STEM majors for careers while in elementary. Opportunities like this that bridge the educational gap for Black students is the main ingredient to ensuring the competency of generations in my community within STEM. My mission is to change this for the betterment of Black students who will become future Black STEM professionals. In my hometown of Southern California, I've engaged in political activism through lobbying politicians such as Assemblyman Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, and Governor Gavin Newsom. Pushing political legislation that provides computers to low-income students, creates resources for tutoring for at-risk students, and provides tuition assistance programs for minorities entering technology career pathways or trades. These legislative wins have helped at-risk Black students in South Central Los Angeles uplift themselves from generational poverty. I leveraged the economic and political might of the Black community through a coalition I founded called Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All (DIASPORA). Leveraging connections with Fortune 500 companies and holding my political representatives accountable for their constituents has significantly changed the academic futures of college-bounded K-12 students. I am grateful for my community, peers, family, and organizations recognizing my potential and investing in me to actualize my lofty goals. I've always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensional travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. When faced with this dilemma, it ignited in me to create opportunities for Black students to nurture their STEM dreams in our community. As a Mechanical Engineering major, I am utilizing my propensity for problem-solving, creativity, and flexibility to not only educate the next generation of Black girls and boys but decentralized opportunities in our community that can grow organic startups, platforms, and services that revitalize the Black community on a global scale. Now I work to decentralize opportunities for underrepresented groups so they can access opportunities. Whenever I reach a roadblock and languish over self-doubt about the systematic barriers in education for Black students, I remember this quote my first mentor told me. "Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits." All the nurturing I received has blossomed me into an individual who weathers a terrible harvest and can bare fruit under any weather condition. It is my time to plant the seeds as a future Educator and Teacher for the next generation of young, talented, hungry, and underserved Black STEM influencers and leaders through education.
    Chris Jackson Computer Science Education Scholarship
    I have always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensional travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheered me up by sharing this quote with me. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." Somewhat easing my mind, I worked with my grandmother to find programs for young kids cultivating STEM interests in underrepresented kids. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to use my Computer Science degree to innovate the medical field. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. Thrust into becoming Head of Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to Cal Poly Pomona on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother while a first-generation college student. I will become a Software Engineer that develops technology that revolutionizes the medical field. My determination to progress through the burdens that have fallen onto my shoulders has made me blind to my health issues. Over the summer, working as a Software Engineering intern with medical device company Edward Lifesciences, I noticed it became more challenging for me to see things from a distance. I visited the Optometrist and was diagnosed with Keratoconus, a degenerative disease that slowly erodes my Corneas and causes them to protrude in the shape of a cone. To prevent the progression, I will need to undergo surgery. I will no longer be able to work part-time to cover living and school expenses, so I would need $10,000 to cover all my bills besides medical costs. Being awarded the Chris Jackson Computer Science Education Scholarship will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, that brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Thanks to mentors, peers, nonprofits, and scholarships, I have continued my academic, professional, and educational objectives. Without a community behind me, I wouldn't be here to share this story. Through this aid and investment, I will get this life-impacting surgery, recover, and then return to school to finish my education.
    Stand and Yell Community Impact Scholarship
    Centuries ago, it was unfathomable to imagine enslaved people, women, indigenous people, and other minorities engaging in political discourse through voting. A common right of every American citizen today has been taken for granted. With misinformation, an agenda to restrict voting rights, and apathy toward our country’s political decorum, the power of voting has been lost to many Americans whose ancestors sacrificed life and limb to provide for them. Voting is not just honoring those who sacrificed to expand voting rights and secure voting ability. Still, it is the only way the ordinary American can directly create change in our country for the better. In 2016 when I was a first-year student at Cal Poly Pomona, I watched the rise of Trump’s political aspirations—seeing him becoming the Republican nominee and eventually defeating Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton to become our 45th President. The unease, fear, and uncertainty I felt as a black man, first-generation American, and first-generation college student motivated me to combat Trump’s MAGA movement and political goals. Before he won the election, I served as a Cleric in my neighborhood in South Central Los Angeles during the primary stages but realizing that my efforts to ensure a smooth voting experience in my community did not go far enough, I began to expand my activism. I joined the Los Angeles chapters of the NAACP, Urban League, and my college’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). I created the DIASPORA initiative by racing around these historic minority lead organizations that have a legacy of fighting for social justice and the rights of those with the most needs. Determined Individuals Aspiring to Succeed Professionally and Open Resources for All. My initiative aims to prepare younger Millennials and Gen Z to usurp power systems from political figures that pass legislation detrimental to future generations. By providing resources such as professional development in resume reviews, mock interviews, networking, community engagement, employment with Fortune 500 companies, and incentives, the program has helped increase young minority students into key leadership positions in the business world. Leveraging these new representatives, we collaborated with them and Assemblyman Reggie Jone-Sawyers, Assemblywomen Karen Bass, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, and Governor Gavin Newsom to push political bills that improve employee rights (), access to housing, resources for mental health, and restrictions on companies influence in societal issues. These legislative wins would not have been possible if we did not leverage our voting power and held our political representatives accountable for their performance. Voting lets you determine the direction of your community and country. By abstaining from voting, you stay silent on injustices that will impact your community and descendants. The positive outcomes voting provides for every American can never be perceived as an individual benefit but a collective improvement that allows the progression of our society for the better of all. I continue to share the need, the history of voting rights, and the impact for good through conferences, workshops, social media, and community gatherings. With my Mechanical Engineering degree, I will build connections with tech disruptors and influencers to develop inclusive tools to fight against oppression and inequality. Technology has improved the quality of life of millions of people. A prosperous society can flourish by the decentralization of resources that can solve climate change, sustainability, food deserts, and other environmental issues.
    Roger Boston Scholarship
    The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior than humanly possible. Utilizing AI, we can create systems that can store and recall large quantities of information, analyze data at incredible speeds, execute various commands simultaneously, recognize patterns, and ponder complex decision-making in fractions of seconds. Implementing AI will lead to rapid advances in crucial sectors that improve living standards and combat various inequalities. As a powerful tool, AI is only now beginning to get serious investment in changing society's daily life. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to use AI in healthcare due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program that used Machine Learning (ML) to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. With great pleasure, that class exposed me to the possibilities engineering can provide to better the world. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. Thrust into becoming Head of Household in 2019 when my mother's health deteriorated from her battle with an autoimmune disease and a work-related injury. I work 20 hours a week, commute five days a week to Cal Poly Pomona on a six-hour round trip on public transportation, and take care of my mother while a first-generation college student. I will become a Software Engineer that develops technology that revolutionizes the medical field. My determination to progress through the burdens that have fallen onto my shoulders has made me blind to my health issues. Over the summer, working as a Pilot Software Engineering intern with medical device company Edward Lifesciences, I noticed it became more challenging for me to see things from a distance. I visited the Optometrist and was diagnosed with Keratoconus, a degenerative disease that slowly erodes my Corneas and causes them to protrude in the shape of a cone. Frightened at my diagnosis, I pushed back my procedure, but after my mother's and mentor's behest, I completed the first round on my left eye to reduce the spread. To stop the progress in my left eye, I need to raise $1500 for surgery and $250 for medicine. Once I have fully recovered, special lenses for contacts and eyeglasses must be made to give me a sense of normality that individually costs $400. During the recovery, I will no longer be able to work part-time to cover living and school expenses, so I would need $10,000 to cover all my bills besides medical costs for three months. Being awarded the Roger Boston Scholarship will save my ability to see. Even when at my lowest, that brought me to depression, self-doubt, and contemplating my reason for living, I never gave up hope that I could become a Software Engineer. Thanks to mentors, peers, nonprofits, and scholarships, I have continued my academic, professional, and educational objectives. Without a community behind me, I would not be here to share this story. Through this aid and investment, I will get this life-impacting surgery, rest while I recover, and then be able to return to school to finish up my education.
    Larry D Parker Sr.’s Legacy Scholarship
    I watched prostate cancer erode my uncle Gmichael Smith to a handicapped state of his former self. Even as he lost mobility in his lower half, this did not topple his righteous and powerful spirit. Returning to Los Angeles, our family rallied together like an elite military unit to accommodate his new circumstances. In the mornings before school, I would assist him in getting out of bed in his wheelchair so he could do his daily exercises. With elastic bands to maneuver his legs, I would help him slowly recover his ability to move his lower body. The juggernaut I looked up to recover to the point he could utilize a walker to move independently and even drive a modified vehicle. While everything looked to be turning positive, his prostate cancer returned and spread violently beyond his legs. He departed this world in 2009 after a two-year battle with prostate cancer. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in Biomedical Engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. The fight for cancer treatment is broken into four stages: detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate the embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and sensitivity changes. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. Besides creating an R&D company for medical devices, I will establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases and disabilities in honor of my uncle. I would like to share a lesson my uncle instilled in me before his passing in 2009. “Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits.” Having seen the impact that not having the proper medical care can negatively affect someone, I will work to create better outcomes for the most vulnerable population.
    Olympians Academy Leadership Wings Scholarship
    An organization and group are dependent on the optimism of their leader to navigate problems and bring the mission to fruition. As the Vice-President of the National Society of Black Engineers at Cal Poly Pomona, I have worked to inspire potential members and continuing members the benefits of joining our group for their professional, personal, and academic ambitions. The lessons I witnessed and were taught by my uncle’s work as a Pastor in our South-Central Los Angeles community to be patient and proactive with identifying and meeting the needs of those you serve have been critical in my recruitment and retention efforts in NSBE. By listening to members’ interests and working to create opportunities that align with their goals, I have created an environment that helps students progress to the person they wish to be through steadfast development. As the face of my organization through my actions, my ability or inability to perform will be what is connected to NSBE internally and externally. Like former President Obama, I follow his tenants of upholding my position as eclipsing my ego and the impact of my position spanning generations. The position of VP will be passed once my tenure is done and by honoring those who served before me and those that will serve after me, I hold myself accountable to not disgrace the position by seeking critiques from my fellow student leaders in my organization and our members. Along with this, having internal checks and balances such as Advisors that supersede the student leader board, transparent elections for all paid members, enforceable conduct rules that I have signed to abide by and be tried on should my conduct be inappropriate for my position I am not given the room to freely do in my position without being accountable for those actions. Unfettered power degrades the capacity of organizations that have the potential for great change. Stagnation should never be embraced as the collective inertia of a group will not allow for the betterment of its members and mission. Marcus Garvey spent his life working to continuously improve the socio-economic situation that people of African descent in America and abroad regardless of the barriers that existed. Developing businesses, education programs, and engaging in political activism, he had a well-rounded approach to never being comfortable with dormancy and inaction. While NSBE has improved our membership, retention, and visibility on campus I have made it my objective to continue to raise the standards on how I assess my performance and the bar at which my team is following our mission to ensure the next generation is ready to shoulder the legacy of NSBE. I have initiated a K-12 outreach program called NSBE REACH. By partnering with Title, I K-12 schools, we host at-risk black students that are low-income, first-generation Americans, first-generation college students, and single-parent households with access to tutoring from college students and training in coding/robotics. The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering reports only 5% of engineers are black, a clear lack of talent is being missed within engineering. I hope to teach black students as early as kindergarten the potential opportunities engineering provides for socio-economic mobility, community activism, and personal growth. Helping improve their competency in science, mathematics, and reading can eliminate the education hurdle many struggles with in pursuing higher education. Improvement does not just happen within our collegiate group but expands into the future generations of students that will potentially join our collegiate chapter. I plan on continuously improving current and future member's potential to become an engineer through legislation, educational support, and company partnerships that enrich students.
    Bold Science Matters Scholarship
    Decades ago infections caused massive deaths to millions of people across the globe While conducting research into staphylococcus bacteria, physician and biologist Alexander Fleming left a petri dish unattended for a month while away. This petri dish contained bacteria and while exposed to the environment developed a mold that was brought in with the wind. It killed the bacteria due to the penciling secreted from the fungus. His unintentional discovery has allowed for millions of people to survive life-threatening infections that were once considered fatal. Developing organic materials that are biocompatible to the human body and can prevent the production of fungi, bacteria, viruses, and fungi is what I hope to contribute to society. Most implants have a shelf-life of ten years due to these organisms slowly developing and eroding the material over time. Like Mr. Fleming, I am working to discover a Pencilin equivalent that will improve the outcomes for millions of people in dire health.
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    As an executive officer for my NSBE chapter and holding the second-highest position on the board, I have worked diligently to ensure my leadership inspired members and other elected officials to their full potential. Our chapter has historically struggled with recruitment and retention of members and transferring power between executive boards for years. When I took on my position as Vice-President, I decided to combat these problems by reaching out to members and listening to their feedback about how our chapter has operated in the last couple of years. From alumni to new students entering our school during the pandemic, the common theme was the inconsistency in communication and lack of diversity in career exploration of certain industries or majors. Seeing how self-reflected our members were about our chapter's predicament I worked on establishing robust and relevant strategies for these problems in conjunction with the executive board. By identifying companies that hired a plethora of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) majors and not just focusing on one specific major, a rise in participation occurred during info sessions, company tours, and social events. Finally, I created group chats via Discord, Microsoft Teams, and GroupMe to allow direct access of members to the executive board and our chapter advisors. By having a communication line dedicated solely to our NSBE chapter leaders could engage with members about professional and personal interests and provide information on various opportunities. Along with this I released a weekly newsletter on Outlook, posted multiple times on various social media platforms, and provided surveys with incentives to get further feedback on which avenue of communication best suited our members preferred communication. Using this data, I shifted the focus of communications heavily to the most popular platforms, Instagram, Zoom Outlook, and Discord. With these four being the most popular it became easier to curate content that would pique interest and generate activity between members, executive officers, and our advisors. As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my STEAM ambitions, I can relate to the hurdles young Black students go through when trying to pursue their dreams. I wish to better their chances and eliminate the systematic barriers that prevent more of my fellow brothers and sisters from achieving a successful future in STEAM. I will magnify the opportunities a STEAM education produces for black students for my community service. According to Pew Research, 9% of STEAM professionals are Black. This lack of representation severally impacts the growth of the black community. It can only be solved by creating a pipeline for K-12 Black students to develop strategic goals of educational pursuits in STEAM. I have worked with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles to improve Black students' mathematical and science competency in the most underperforming schools. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have several hurdles that can hinder their community's prosperity, but by closing the gap with adequate mentors who can relate to their backgrounds, they can reach levels of well-off students. Opportunities like this that bridge the educational gap for Black students is the main ingredient to ensuring the competency of generations in my community within the STEAM. My goal is to work to create a better environment for Black students to break generational curses.
    First-Year College Students: Jennie Gilbert Daigre Education Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in Biomedical Engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate the embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) ambitions, I can relate to the hurdles young Black students go through when trying to pursue their dreams. I wish to better their chances and eliminate the systematic barriers that prevent more of my fellow brothers and sisters from achieving a successful future in STEAM. I will magnify the opportunities a STEAM education produces for black students for my community service. According to Pew Research, 9% of STEAM professionals are Black. This lack of representation severally impacts the growth of the black community. It can only be solved by creating a pipeline for K-12 Black students to develop strategic goals of educational pursuits in STEAM. My goal is to work to create a better environment for Black students to break generational curses and excel in pursuing STEAM through partnering with poor-performing schools to provide tutoring. Along with this soliciting Fortune 500 companies to invest in educational pipelines for future innovators.
    Karl Baehr Entrepreneurs Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to develop a medical device company called Williamson Industries. My life transformed when I was diagnosed with Keratoconus and my mother suffered a work-related injury. As my vision worsened and my mother’s efforts to recover became futile, I was thrust upon becoming the primary caretaker in my household. Seeing the Goliath-like woman I call mom suffer heavily from her injuries and my journey navigating a visual impairment has deeply impacted my view of the poor assistive technology available to those with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Utilizing the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally through my medical device startup. researching and developing a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. Next, MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate the embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    The foundation that has guided, consoled, and supported me has always been my mother, “MissLee”. With my battles with depression, Keratoconus, ADHD, and self-doubt impacting my scholastic and professional journeys my mother’s indomitable will and fortitude have served as a place. While the strongest form of Tungsten is susceptible to temperatures of 3420 °C, my mother still stays strong and formidable no matter what heat she encounters. Growing up in a low-income, single-parent, and immigrant household my mother worked multiple jobs while taking care of me and my family. Witnessing the sacrifices, she made to provide for me and ensure that I had a better life to capitalize on my educational pursuits inspired me to care about the goals she was unfortunately not able to continue. Aspiring to be a Computer Scientist my mother dropped out of college due to the high cost of school and not receiving support to continue her education. Even with that roadblock, she pursued several jobs that aligned close to her Computer Science dreams. One of these was a Telecommunications Engineer at AT&T, IT with DHL, and Manufacturing Technician with Storm LLC. The exposure to technology at a young age through my mother's jobs and her hobbies helped me see the opportunities a career in technology allows to those that pursue it. This inspired me to combine skills in problem solving and technology to solve healthcare issues as Mechanical Engineer. A linear path in life is not always feasible when external factors serve as deterrents to set you off course from your destination. My life transformed when I was diagnosed with Keratoconus and my mother suffered a work-related injury. As my vision worsened and my mother’s efforts became futile, I was thrust upon becoming the primary caretaker in my household. Seeing the Goliath-like woman I call mom suffer heavily from her injuries has deeply impacted my view of the poor assistive technology available to those with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Utilizing the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself within the next ten years as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing (R&D) a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled through my medical device startup. Besides doing research and development, I will establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases like Keratoconus, visual, and physical impairments. I would like to share a lesson my mom instilled in me back in high school. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. The support I received through school, local nonprofits, and my medical provider have been crucial to my continued scholastic, professional, and personal success. Unlike many people globally, I’m in a rare situation to be able to properly get the care needed for my disability. Haven seen the impact of not having the proper medical care can negatively affect someone, I’m working to create better outcomes for the most vulnerable population.
    Mental Health Matters Scholarship
    As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEAM) ambitions, I can relate to the hurdles young Black students go through when trying to pursue their dreams. I wish to better their chances and eliminate the systematic barriers that prevent more of my fellow brothers and sisters from achieving a successful future in STEAM. I will magnify the opportunities a STEAM education produces for black students for my community service. According to Pew Research, 9% of STEAM professionals are Black. This lack of representation severally impacts the growth of the black community. It can only be solved by creating a pipeline for K-12 Black students to develop strategic goals of educational pursuits in STEAM. I will also host a conference for Black K-12 students facilitated by the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) to discuss STEAM's impact on a social, economic, and political level for the Black community. As a current officer for my chapter, I've noticed that when we provide programs and activities aimed to connect our members with resources or individuals that they usually do not have access to, we see an increase in overall academic effort. The exposure that develops them academically and introduces them to adapting to corporate and academic spaces like this can help Black students stand out from other applicants for internships, graduate school, and full-time positions. Companies not only want individuals who are technically skilled but have experience in the different areas I mentioned. Educators and industry professionals can also share their experiences in industry and college with younger generations. Besides that, professionals or industry representatives can discuss what skills they are looking for in the workforce, and collegiate members can provide advice on navigating. It can also serve as a resource fair for assistance with applying to colleges, scholarships, assistance examinations, and exposure to participating universities or community colleges. As an active leader in multiple organizations on campus and in my hometown, I've worked with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles to improve Black students' mathematical and science competency in the most underperforming schools. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have several hurdles that can hinder their community's prosperity, but by closing the gap with adequate mentors who can relate to their backgrounds, they can reach levels of well-off students. Opportunities like this that bridge the educational gap for Black students is the main ingredient to ensuring the competency of generations in my community within the STEAM. My goal is to work to create a better environment for Black students to break generational curses. I would like to share a lesson my first mentor told me while dealing with Keratoconus and my mother’s injuries. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. The support I received through school, local nonprofits, and my medical provider have been crucial to my continued success. I'm grateful for the recognition of student's potential and the investment in our ambitions. Without a community behind you, dreams cannot come to fruition. This scholarship provides that chance for me to go from ideation to implementation of my goals and I am truly indebted to be considered for this opportunity. My goal is to leave a legacy of reinvestment in the most helpless and resourceless individuals regardless if they are people with disabilities, a racial minority, women, or LGBTQIA. When resources are distributed equitably the full potential of society is activated to allow the development of the next generation of change agents to solve problems.
    Show your Mettle - Women in STEM Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to study Mechanical Engineering at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona with a specialization in biomedical engineering due to suffering from a rare diseased called Keratoconus. Without the support of local nonprofits and federal programs to provide tools, stipends, and guidance on navigating my Keratoconus journey, I would'nt have gotten acclimated to dealing with my vision independently. Having seen the inefficiencies within our healthcare system and the journey people with visual impairments deal with, I will utilize the engineering process and innovation to improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive cornea transplant. My first concept is substituting the eye's cornea with a biocompatible artificial cornea called the ACC-short for Artificial-Cornea-on-a-Chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate the embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and sensitivity change. They're adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. Substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. Besides doing research and development, I will establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases like visual, and physical impairments. I would like to share a lesson my first mentor instilled in me back in high school. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. The support I received through school, local nonprofits, and my medical provider have been crucial to my continued scholastic, professional, and personal success. Unlike many people globally, I'm in a rare situation to be able to properly get the care needed for my disability. Haven seen the impact not having the proper medical care can negatively affect someone, I will work to create better outcomes for the most vulnerable population.
    Alexis Potts Passion Project Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in Biomedical Engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate the embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. As a Black student who has gone through the struggles of pursuing my Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) ambitions, I can relate to the hurdles young Black students go through when trying to pursue their dreams. I wish to better their chances and eliminate the systematic barriers that prevent more of my fellow brothers and sisters from achieving a successful future in STEAM. I will magnify the opportunities a STEAM education produces for black students for my community service. According to Pew Research, 9% of STEAM professionals are Black. This lack of representation severally impacts the growth of the black community. It can only be solved by creating a pipeline for K-12 Black students to develop strategic goals of educational pursuits in STEAM. My goal is to work to create a better environment for Black students to break generational curses and excel in pursuing STEAM through partnering with poor-performing schools to provide tutoring. Along with this soliciting Fortune 500 companies to invest in educational pipelines for future innovators.
    Supermom Scholarship
    The foundation that has guided, consoled, and supported me has always been my mother, “MissLee”. With my battles with depression, Keratoconus, ADHD, and self-doubt impacting my scholastic and professional journeys my mother’s indomitable will and fortitude have served as a place. While the strongest form of Tungsten is susceptible to temperatures of 3420 °C, my mother still stays strong and formidable no matter what heat she encounters. Growing up in a low-income, single-parent, and immigrant household my mother worked multiple jobs while taking care of me and my family. Witnessing the sacrifices, she made to provide for me and ensure that I had a better life to capitalize on my educational pursuits inspired me to care about the goals she was unfortunately not able to continue. Aspiring to be a Computer Scientist my mother dropped out of college due to the high cost of school and not receiving support to continue her education. Even with that roadblock, she pursued several jobs that aligned close to her Computer Science dreams. One of these was a Telecommunications Engineer at AT&T, IT with DHL, and Manufacturing Technician with Storm LLC. The exposure to technology at a young age through my mother's jobs and her hobbies helped me see the opportunities a career in technology allows to those that pursue it. This inspired me to combine skills in problem solving and technology to solve healthcare issues as Mechanical Engineer. A linear path in life is not always feasible when external factors serve as deterrents to set you off course from your destination. My life transformed when I was diagnosed with Keratoconus and my mother suffered a work-related injury. As my vision worsened and my mother’s efforts became futile, I was thrust upon becoming the primary caretaker in my household. Seeing the Goliath-like woman I call mom suffer heavily from her injuries has deeply impacted my view of the poor assistive technology available to those with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Utilizing the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself within the next ten years as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing (R&D) a noninvasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for the disabled through my medical device startup. Besides doing research and development, I will establish a nonprofit that provides assistive technology resources for those suffering from rare diseases like Keratoconus, visual, and physical impairments. I would like to share a lesson my mom instilled in me back in high school. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. The support I received through school, local nonprofits, and my medical provider have been crucial to my continued scholastic, professional, and personal success. Unlike many people globally, I’m in a rare situation to be able to properly get the care needed for my disability. Haven seen the impact of not having the proper medical care can negatively affect someone, I’m working to create better outcomes for the most vulnerable population.
    Bold Optimist Scholarship
    Growing up around the legacy my grandmother made by investing in her children and grandkids, she instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." have always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheered me up by sharing this quote with me. As an active leader in multiple organizations on my campus and in my hometown, I've worked with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles to improve Black students' mathematical and science competency in the most underperforming schools. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have several hurdles that can hinder their community's prosperity, but by closing the gap with adequate mentors who can relate to their backgrounds, they can reach levels of well-off students. Opportunities like this that bridge the educational gap for Black students is the main ingredient to ensuring the competency of generations in my community within Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM). My goal is to work to create a better environment for Black students to break generational curses. Without a doubt, I've been profoundly impacted by my scholastic, professional, and community achievements. I am grateful for the recognition of my potential and continued investments in my ambitions. I'm living proof that it's not possible to succeed in your endeavors without a community behind you.
    Bold Financial Literacy Scholarship
    My community has troubles with poverty, educational attainment, and financial literacy that has impacted generations. Growing up in a single-parent immigrant household, I have come to loathe the socioeconomic environment that I lived in and have been determined to change my outcomes by learning to properly build my financial prosperity and assets. As a future engineer, I can make a more than sufficient income to raise me further up the economic ladder and build long-term wealth for my family through real estate, crypto, stocks, bonds, and entrepreneurial endeavors. All my sacrifices and hard work I have invested in becoming an engineer would be futile if I am not competent enough to strategize ways to utilize my finances for my wellness and implement a long-term basis.
    Bold Equality Scholarship
    According to Pew Research, 9% of STEAM professionals are Black, this lack of representation severally impacts the growth of the black community and can only be solved by creating a pipeline for K-12 Black students to develop strategic goals of educational pursuits in STEAM. As an NSBE executive officer, I have worked with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles to improve Black students' mathematical and science competency in the most underperforming schools. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have several hurdles that can hinder their community's prosperity, but by closing the gap with adequate mentors who can relate to their backgrounds, they can reach levels of well-off students. I've solicited support from corporations and government agencies to provide tutoring in mathematics, computer science, and science so the proficiency of Black students can rise to levels necessary to enter STEAM. Remote learning sessions with career Black STEAM professionals can help educate Black students on core scientific principles that are poorly I have noticed that when we provide programs and activities that are aimed to connect our members with resources or individuals that they normally do not have access to, we see an increase in overall academic effort. Exposure like this that develops them academically and introduces them to adapting to corporate and academic spaces like this can help Black students stand out from other applicants for internships, graduate school, and full-time positions. Companies not only want individuals who are technically skilled but have experience in the other areas I mentioned. Educators and industry professionals can also be to share their experience in industry and college with younger generations. Besides that, professionals or industry representatives are given the opportunity to discuss what skills they are looking for in the workforce and collegiate members can provide advice on navigating.
    Nina L. Coleman Memorial Scholarship
    My grandmother moved to the USA in 1969 with three kids to California from Kingston, Jamaica. Working in a textile factory while getting her GED and nursing licenses, my grandmother uprooted and supported her three children through college and as young adults. Even though finances were tight, she helped create an accountant, mathematician/professor, and logistics manager. Growing up around the legacy and successes my grandmother made by investing in her children and grandkids, she instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. In 20 years, I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor function issues. I plan on developing and researching medical devices that will aid in improving patient outcomes. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in a dire situation and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and sensitivity change. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. I want to share a lesson my first mentor instilled in me back in high school. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. My history of working to transform my community is why I champion reinvestment in the Caribbean diaspora. Having benefited from a robust network of Caribbean professionals and academics from K-12 to my undergraduate days, I have seen the paradigm shift a proper support system can make in accomplishing one's aspirations.
    Eleven Scholarship
    As an executive officer for the collegiate chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), I have worked diligently to ensure my leadership inspired members and other elected officials to their full potential. Our chapter has historically struggled with recruitment and retention of members and transferring power between executive boards for years. Further exacerbated with the Covid-19 pandemic pushing us into a remote environment for two years. The previous executive board of NSBE collapsed due to multiple personal and professional arisings during the pandemic that inhibited their abilities to care out the NSBE mission. With my previous history of serving as an executive leader of NSBE and other volunteer or leadership experience. I was one of the first persons asked by our advisor to help resurrect the chapter. When I took on my position as Vice-President, I decided to combat these problems by reaching out to members and listening to their feedback about how our chapter has operated in the last couple of years. From alumni to new students entering our school during the pandemic, the common theme was the inconsistency in communication and lack of diversity in career exploration of industries or majors. Seeing how perceptive our members were about our chapter's predicament I worked on establishing robust and relevant strategies for these problems in conjunction with the executive board. By identifying companies that hired a plethora of STEM majors and not just focused on one specific major, participation increased during info sessions, company tours, and social events. Finally, I created a group chat via Discord, Microsoft Teams, and GroupMe to allow direct access of members to the executive board and our chapter advisors. By having a communication line dedicated solely to our NSBE chapter, leaders could engage with members about professional and personal interests. Furthermore, provide information on various opportunities on and off-campus Along with this, I released a weekly newsletter on Outlook, posted multiple times on various social media platforms, and provided surveys with incentives to get further feedback on which avenue of communication best suited our members preferred communication. Using this data, I shifted the focus of communications heavily to the most popular platforms, Instagram, Zoom Outlook, and Discord. With these four being the most popular, it became easier to curate content that would pique interest and generate activity between members, executive officers, and our advisors. These changes have helped see a consistent presence and participation with members of my club. By listening to the needs of students and working to implement a broad strategy that brought them needed resources, we have seen a level of engagement exceeding our pre-covid days. I have learned when running a people-oriented organization like a collegiate club, actively listening to the needs of others and doing your best to provide them with the best experience possible is the correct way to keep them interested.
    First Generation POH Scholarship Fund
    My grandmother moved to the USA in 1969 with three kids to California from Kingston, Jamaica. Working in a textile factory while getting her GED and nursing licenses, my grandmother uprooted and supported her three children through college and as young adults. Even though finances were tight, she helped create an accountant, mathematician/professor, and logistics manager. Growing up around the legacy my grandmother made by investing in her children and grandkids, she instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." I have always been curious about technology and physical sciences as a kid. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensional travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheered me up by sharing this quote with me. Somewhat easing my mind, I worked with my grandmother to find programs for young kids cultivating STEM interest in underrepresented kids. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. I learned more than just how cars are made; it nurtured my work ethic, fostered my self-reliance, and continuously inspired me to improve myself. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor function issues. I plan on developing and researching medical devices that will aid in improving patient outcomes. I want to share a lesson my first mentor instilled in me back in high school. Giving is an act of generosity. Giving is sowing seeds. The seed will produce a great harvest of fruits. My history of working to transform my community is why I champion reinvestment in the Caribbean diaspora. Having benefited from a robust network of Caribbean professionals and academics from K-12 to my undergraduate days, I have seen the paradigm shift a proper support system can make in accomplishing one's aspirations. Leveraging the leadership positions that helped me garner connections with stockholders from Fortune 500 companies such as Boeing, Disney, and Northrop Grumman, I am working to establish a remote mentorship program for Caribbean students to receive guidance in pursuing careers STEAM. Like many first-generation college students and immigrants, they have several hurdles that can hinder their prosperity, but they can succeed in STEAM by closing the gap with adequate mentors who can relate to their backgrounds. Opportunities like this that bridge the educational gap for Caribbean students is the main ingredient to ensuring the competency of generations in the Caribbean by exposing them to STEAM. My goal is to work to create a better environment for Caribbean students to learn and invest back in the Caribbean community.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. I learned more than just how cars are made; it nurtured my work ethic, fostered my self-reliance, and continuously inspired me to improve myself. Unshakeable confidence was imparted to me to strive to gain a seat at the table if I was consistently devoted to my passion and willing to work 110% harder than my peers. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic, and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor function issues. I plan on developing and researching medical devices that will aid in improving patient outcomes. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in a dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Besides doing R&D, I will establish a medical device consulting firm that focuses on helping small medical device companies improve their quality, safety, and production protocols to develop better cost-efficient products. I have this lifetime to serve others, fight global threats and boost human progress. Why not learn the dynamics of this universe, understand the very elements of reality, and use them to create solutions?
    Tanya C. Harper Memorial SAR Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. I learned more than just how cars are made; it nurtured my work ethic, fostered my self-reliance, and continuously inspired me to improve myself. Unshakeable confidence was imparted to me to strive to gain a seat at the table if I was consistently devoted to my passion and willing to work 110% harder than my peers. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic, and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor function issues. I plan on developing and researching medical devices that will aid in improving patient outcomes. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome for patients in a dire situations and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Besides doing R&D, I will establish a medical device consulting firm that focuses on helping small medical device companies improve their quality, safety, and production protocols to develop better cost-efficient products. I have this lifetime to serve others, fight global threats and boost human progress. Why not learn the dynamics of this universe, understand the very elements of reality, and use them to create solutions?
    Act Locally Scholarship
    According to Pew Research Center, only 9% and 8% of the STEAM workforce comprises Black and Hispanic professionals. It is up to educators, community activists, companies, and minority-based STEAM organizations to teach real-world applications of science and math concepts to students in the classroom. Using robotics as a catalyst can motivate students to explore the world of science and technology and increase student awareness about the career opportunities in STEAM. Robots play a significant role in everyday life, from building cars to moving large objects and to defusing bombs. The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten by using Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior than humanly possible. As A.I. will slowly phase out low-skilled jobs, future employment opportunities will require solid automation, robotics, programming literacy, and complimentary tech skills will have an overwhelming advantage when applying for employment in nearly all industries. Some benefits minorities and low-income students can derive from exploring robotics today are introducing programming effectively to students, providing valuable skills in future employment, teaching problem solving and creativity, learning core science and mathematical concepts, and debunking common misconceptions about STEAM. Being a member and holding leadership positions within minority-based engineering organizations, such as the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (S.H.P.E), National Society of Black Engineers (N.S.B.E.), Maximizing Engineering Potential (M.E.P.), and Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers (L.A.C.B.P.E), I will continue to assist their mission of supporting success for underrepresented groups in the STEAM fields. Specifically ensuring K-12 and college-level African-American/Hispanic students of those organizations possess leadership, technical, and professional skills necessary to give them the edge for success in their career pathways. The goal is to help provide relevant programs and activities to connect African-Americans/Hispanics with resources or individuals they cannot access. From personal experience as a leader and executive officer with S.H.P.E., N.S.B.E., M.E.P., and Engineering Council, I have noticed an increase in overall academic effort when providing African-American/Hispanic with the tools they cannot access themselves. For African-American/Hispanic new to college or engineering life, not having some form of guidance to navigate their professional path can be perceived as daunting. I hope to establish an official mentoring or shadowing program that brings industry, community partners, and educators to create an additional educational opportunity for African-American/Hispanic girls in collaboration with the College of Engineering, Cesar E. Chavez Center for Higher Education, African American Student Center, and C.P.P. Alumni Association. Participants can provide valuable experience and insight into the industry through direct observation, workplace etiquette, business operations, management, organizational skills, and teamwork. Besides preparing African-American/Hispanic for the workforce, I would like to launch K-12 African-American/Hispanic girls and educators conference. Sponsored by Historically Black Colleges (H.B.C.U.) and Hispanic Serving Institutes (H.S.I.) college alumni, they share their experience in industry and college with younger generations. The conference’s theme would broaden African-American/Hispanic girls’ and educators’ understanding of the engineering profession and how educators can effectively implement the “E” in STEAM in the classroom. Besides that, professionals or industry representatives provide an opportunity to discuss what skills they are looking for in the workforce, and collegiate members can advise on navigating college. It can also serve as a resource fair for applying for college, scholarships, standardized tests, and exposure to participating universities or community colleges. For first-time learners of programming, it could be too theoretical, but by using programming to control a robot, students can witness the abilities and limitations of robots. They also learn what happens when they make a mistake in their program and the importance of precise instructions when programming. Some robots can also increase the difficulty of their programming interface as the student becomes more competent and comfortable with the concept. Instead of simple visuals or drag-and-drop commands, they are now programming complex functions and instructions. Robots built with sensors, motors, motherboards, microcontrollers, and jumper wires operated through programs can suffer several complications. These malfunctions can help teach African-American/Hispanic students how to brainstorm in a group setting or trial and error for individuals. It encourages them to rethink oriented methods and find different ways to solve the same problem. As problems in life are resolved through different approaches, African-Americans/Hispanics learn that no one method will be universally helpful. For that reason, they expand their creativity and problem solving by dealing with issues that arise when building a robot. As robots get students actively engaged and hands-on in their learning, they further develop their comprehension of core science and mathematics concepts. Mathematics is often the most disliked or most challenging subject for many students. Especially for African-American/Hispanic coming from urban schools, their experience and overall fondness of Mathematics can be nonexistent. With robotics providing an interactive means to learn and practice Mathematics, students learn simple math concepts such as addition and subtraction and more advanced concepts like how proportions affect a robot’s response to its environment. It also exposes them to algebraic thinking and recognizing patterns. Building a robot from scratch allows students to learn about scientific theories such as electromagnetism, photovoltaics, chemical reactions, and coding. Using it to lift objects strengthens their understanding of physics concepts such as force and tensions. Finally, seeing how different materials and commands affect how their robot behaves teaches students the fundamental aspects of science; observation and experimentation. With a history of hearing African-American/Hispanic not being capable of STEAM, being occupied with other activities that are not as lucrative, or showing a general disinterest in the discipline, robots can teach African-American/Hispanic that they are just as capable as their peers from other races and that a career in technology is possible. As the VP and Senator for NSBE, I have shown that when we offer young African-American/Hispanic what it means to be an engineer, they are filled with excitement and curiosity to learn more about STEAM. I have already created a curriculum mirroring high-performing schools in Los Angeles and have shared it with schools during the pandemic.
    Jillian Ellis Pathway Scholarship
    It is thrilling to engage in discovering the unknown and develop strategies to efficiently use it to add value to society and people. As an engineer, I have fanatically worshiped developing the next disruption in patient-centered medical devices. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I envision myself as a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor function issues. I plan on developing and researching medical devices that will aid in improving patient outcomes. My first concept is substituting organs such as lungs, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from a disease called the OC-short for organ-on-a-chip. It will help extend the outcome of patients in a dire situation and be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Working together with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles, I will establish a STEM outreach program called REACH. Along with this, I wish to partner with minority-based organizations focused on STEM initiatives, which improve opportunities for Black American recruitment and retention in various tech spaces. Working together with Title I schools in South Central Los Angeles, I will establish a STEM outreach program called REACH to provide a virtual online academy that exposes underrepresented minority K-12 students with engineering principles and science/mathematics tutoring. Working with students to improve their algebra, trigonometry, and calculus competency to help them overcome hurdles preventing minority students' success in STEM education. I have already created a curriculum mirroring high-performing schools in Los Angeles through the assistance of LAUSD retired teachers and the guidance of teachers at these schools.
    Maida Brkanovic Memorial Scholarship
    As a single mother from Waterhouse Jamaica, Minette Johnson, my grandmother moved to the USA in 1969 with three kids to California. Working in a textile factory while getting her GED and nursing licenses, my grandmother uprooted and supported her three children through college and as young adults. Even though finances were tight, she helped create an accountant, mathematician/professor, and logistics manager. Growing up around the legacy my grandmother made by investing in her children and grandkids, she instilled in me several life lessons, but one stood out in particular. "If you cannot change the people around you, change the people around you." As a kid, I have always been curious about technology and physical sciences. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheer me up by sharing this quote with me. Somewhat easing my mind, I worked with my grandmother to find programs and clubs for young kids cultivating STEM interest in underrepresented kids. Most of these programs were costly and a long distance from my home, but after convincing one program of my strong passion through letters of recommendations from my Biology teacher and Pastor, they completely waived the fees. I learned to navigate on the bus and train to leave my neighborhood and travel to Brentwood, California, to access academic tutoring, robotics, coding, engineering design, and 3D printing classes. My time in this program would help me get into Cal Poly Pomona and prepare me for my Mechanical Engineering classes. The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten by using machines to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior. Utilizing Machine Learning (ML) systems such as Neural Networks (NN) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), we can teach complex decision-making to resolve problems. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to use Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning(ML) in healthcare due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built my ML that mapped the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. With great pleasure, that class exposed me to the possibilities engineering can provide to better the world. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I live by the credo of making a long-lasting impact in any endeavor I strive to. I envision myself as a Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor-function issues. Being able to substitute organs such as lunges, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from disease will help extend the outcome of patients in dire situations—called the OC, short for organ-on-chip. It will be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile monitoring system that uses a biosensor to scan and monitors the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) will be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the particular section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. My grandmother's words about changing the people around me taught me about using obstacles to improve yourself and develop strategies to counter them. Any hurdle can be overcome by partnering with others to better not only yourself but the community.
    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    "If you can't change the people around you, change the people around you," my grandmother used to say. As a kid, I have always been curious about technology and physical sciences. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheer me up by sharing this quote with me. Somewhat easing my mind, I worked with my grandmother to find programs and clubs for young kids cultivating STEM interest in underrepresented kids. She supported my scientific thirst and curiosity no matter how outlandish or impossible it seemed. When my grandmother passed in 2012, the essence that made my day ceased to exist. At first, it was hard to go on once she departed, but after counseling and talking to my pastor, I understood that her love and legacy lived on through the passion she nurtured and the hope she gave me in my most vulnerable times. I have used this epiphany to pursue my dream of becoming an engineer. The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten by using AI to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior than humanly possible. Utilizing AI, we can create systems that can store and recall large quantities of information, analyze data at incredible speeds, execute a plethora of commands simultaneously, recognize patterns, and ponder complex decision-making in fractions of seconds. The implementation of AI will lead to rapid advances in crucial sectors that improve living standards and combat various inequalities. As a powerful tool, AI is only now beginning to get serious investment in changing societies' day-to-day lives. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to use AI in healthcare due to my grandmother's sickness and death. When I took my first engineering computation class and built an AI program to map the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. With great pleasure, that class exposed me to the possibilities engineering can provide to better the world. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I live by the credo of making a long-lasting impact in any endeavor I strive to complete. I envision myself as a Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing AI, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor-function issues that use an Artificial Neural Network(ANN). Being able to substitute organs such as lunges, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from disease will help extend the outcome of patients in dire situations—called the OC, short for organ-on-chip. It will be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the particular section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility.
    Pay it Forward Technology Scholarship
    The future of machines will involve incorporating human intelligence in the functions they are designed to operate. Human limitations (physical, sensory, emotional, and intellectual) can be overwritten by using machines to yield better efficiency and autonomous behavior. Utilizing Machine Learning (ML) systems such as Neural Networks (NN) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), we can teach complex decision-making to resolve problems. My passion for solving problems and technology has influenced my decision to use AI and ML in healthcare due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. When I took my first engineering computation class and built my ML that mapped the hemodynamic behavior of an artificial aortic valve, the inner kid in me jumped out throughout the entire process. With great pleasure, that class exposed me to the possibilities engineering can provide to better the world. Using the engineering process and innovation, I will improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, implement agile/lean manufacturing principles, and reduce production costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. I live by the credo of making a long-lasting impact in any endeavor I strive to. I envision myself as a Ph.D. graduate researching and developing a non-invasive microfluidic organ-on-chip device, a mobile diagnostic and testing device, and an exoskeleton for disabled or people suffering from severe motor-function issues. Being able to substitute organs such as lunges, livers, and kidneys that may suffer from disease will help extend the outcome of patients in dire situations—called the OC, short for organ-on-chip. It will be a composite material of polydimethylsiloxane and graphene. Most implants have a shelf life of ten years due to biofilm production deteriorating the biocompatibility of the implant and the host, which risks infections. MDHome is a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. People will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The LifeXtnder is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of LifeXtnder (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the particular section of LifeXtnder to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Besides doing R&D, I will establish a medical device consulting firm that focuses on helping small medical device companies improve their quality, safety, and production protocols to develop better cost-efficient products. I have this lifetime to serve others, fight global threats and boost human progress. Why not learn the dynamics of this universe, understand the very elements of reality and use them to create solutions?
    AMPLIFY Black Entrepreneurs Scholarship
    My passion for solving problems has joined with my love for technology, which has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. Using my knowledge, I seek to improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, and reduce costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. People with mobility disabilities/diseases suffer severely daily. For example, my mother has arthritis in both knees and carpal tunnel in her hands, and my uncle paralyzed from the waist down due to prostate cancer. I have realized that many individuals suffer from some form of movement-related disability. Desiring to help remedy this issue, I built a biomedical device monitoring and exoskeleton company called DW Quantum Medical Solutions. The first product is called MDHome.a mobile diagnostic and monitoring system that allows users to access important information about their bodies whenever and wherever they want. Using biosensor technology and telemedicine, users can scan and monitor the body's physiological functions. After a few minutes of analyzing the results, you can upload the results to the application platform for your physician to review and provide feedback. As people are becoming more frustrated with our healthcare system, many technical solutions are surfacing to alleviate that embitterment and faults of the healthcare system. With an invention and company like MDHome, people will be able to take control of their health and stop spending money on visiting doctors, fulfilling their innate desire to be healthy and happy, but at a level never possible within conventional healthcare. The Life Xander is an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. It would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. They are adjustable to different morphologies and are aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of Life Xander (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the particular section of Life Xander to the body part that's mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Access to funds from the AMPLIFY Black Entrepreneurs Scholarship can assist in progressing both inventions to the next stage of the product life cycle, research, and development. Following FDA regulations, DW Quantum Medical Solutions would be classified as the highest tier of medical device and need extensive trial and error testing before consideration for the market. With financial support, acquiring material to build prototypes for clinical testing and inspection will expedite the process and help terminate both products to market within half a decade. Once both products receive FDA approval after successful clinical trials and manufacturing process created, my goal is to submit an initial patent for both in the USA. With rights exclusive to both product's commercialization, I will begin partnering with hospitals, physical therapists, Veterans Affairs, and medical associations to sell MDHomes and LifeXtnder.
    Lillie Award
    My community has troubles with poverty, educational attainment, and financial literacy that has impacted us for generations. Growing up in a single-parent immigrant household, I have come to loathe the socioeconomic environment that I lived in and have worked to change the outcomes in the community by learning to help build financial prosperity and assets properly. As a future engineer, I can make a more than sufficient income to help the community move further up the economic ladder and build long-term wealth through real estate, crypto, stocks, bonds, and entrepreneurial endeavors. All the sacrifices and hard work I have invested in becoming an engineer would be futile if I am not competent enough to strategize ways to utilize my finances for my wellness and implement a long-term basis of a wealth-maintenance plan. People with mobility disabilities/diseases suffer severely daily. For example, my mother has arthritis in both knees and carpal tunnel in her hands, and my uncle was paralyzed from the waist down due to prostate cancer. I have realized that many individuals suffer from some form of movement-related disability. Desiring to help remedy this issue, I became interested in engineering. My passion for solving problems has joined with my love for technology, which has influenced my decision to specialize in biomedical engineering due to having loved ones suffering and dying from health issues. Using my knowledge, I seek to improve patient outcomes, enhance patient experiences, and reduce costs to help meet the evolving needs of healthcare globally. My goal is to develop an exoskeleton that a disabled individual or an injured person can wear and perform everyday activities. Every exoskeleton would feature biologically inspired multi-functioning microsensors that detect, measure, analyze, and process temperature, proximity, touch, and pressure. The sensors will also contain built-in actuators for automatic calibration and change of sensitivity. Each exoskeleton would adjust to different morphologies and be aware of muscular limitations and reflective markers placed on anatomical landmarks. Specific portions of the exoskeleton (arm, hand, legs) could be 3D printed out for people with limited movement or missing limbs. By placing the particular section of the exoskeleton to the body part that’s mobility is restricted, it can stimulate and enhance tendons to permit mobility. Serving as the VP and Alternate Senator for Cal Poly Pomona's National Society of Black Engineers, I have worked to increase industry/professional engagement with our undergraduate members and created a platform that connects K-12 students to the California State University system. By soliciting Fortune 500 companies (Boeing, Disney, Hensel Phelps, Google) to provide resume reviews, tours of their facilities, mock interviews, and mentorship, our general membership has been recruited into these companies from interns to full-time employees. Along with this, I lead academic tutoring sessions for engineering courses that have high failure rates to pass weekly every Tuesday and Thursday for two hours. My mission as an executive leader within the collegiate chapter is to retain members and recruit them. I work together to establish our REACH program, which partners with Title I schools to provide a virtual online academy that exposes underrepresented minority K-12 students with engineering principles (coding, soldering, circuit boards, drafting) and science/mathematics tutoring. I work with students to improve their algebra, trigonometry, and calculus competency to help them overcome hurdles preventing minority students' success in STEM education. I have created a curriculum mirroring high-performing schools and what these schools cannot provide due to funding issues.
    #Back2SchoolBold Scholarship
    Since 2009, my mother has battled an autoimmune disease and chronic arthritis. As her ability to provide for the both of us steadily diminished as the years went by, I took over her role as head of household by getting employment at a local nonprofit called the Brotherhood Crusade. While finishing up my last two years in high school and transitioning into college, I have been my mom's primary caretaker and helped to cover her medical costs and other household expenses. Forced to commute to school due to room and board being too expensive for our limited financial budget, I travel on public transportation five days a week on a six-hour roundtrip from home to school. Even with all the hurdles impeding the progress to completing an engineering degree, I have never stopped being a top scholar in the Mechanical Engineering department. As Covid impacted my access to tutors and other supplemental resources on campus, I have worked with clubs on campus to locate local community colleges that have assisted me in doing well in my mechanical engineering courses. Problems have always been obstacles that I use to improve and develop strategies to counter. Any hurdle cannot stop my dreams.
    Elevate Women in Technology Scholarship
    With a shortage of professionals possessing technical skills, it is up to educators, community activists, companies, and minority-based Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) organizations to teach real-world applications of science and math concepts to students in the classroom. Using robotics as a catalyst, they can motivate students to explore the world of science and technology and increase student awareness about the career opportunities in S.T.E.A.M. Robots play a significant role in everyday life, from building cars to moving large objects and to defusing bombs. Along with that impact comes the loss of millions of jobs by robots. As robots will replace most remaining jobs, job seekers with solid robotic literacy and complementary tech skills will have an overwhelming advantage when applying for employment in nearly all industries. Some benefits African-American/Hispanic girls can derive from exploring robotics today are introducing programming effectively to students, providing valuable skills in future employment, teaching problem solving and creativity, learning core science and mathematical concepts, and debunking common misconceptions about STEAM. Being a member and holding leadership positions within minority-based engineering organizations, such as the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, National Society of Black Engineers, Maximizing Engineering Potential, and Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers, I will continue to achieve the mission of supporting success for underrepresented groups in the STEAM fields. Specifically ensuring K-12 and college-level African-American/Hispanic girls of those organizations possess leadership, technical, and professional skills necessary to give them the edge for success in their career pathways. My goal is to help provide relevant programs and activities to connect African-American/Hispanic girls with resources or individuals they cannot access. From personal experience as a leader and executive officer with S.H.P.E., N.S.B.E., M.E.P., and Engineering Council, I have noticed an increase in overall academic effort when providing African-American/Hispanic girls with the tools they cannot access themselves. For African-American/Hispanic girls new to college or engineering life, not having some form of guidance to navigate their professional path can be perceived as daunting. I hope to establish an official mentoring or shadowing program that brings industry, community partners, and educators to create an additional educational opportunity for African-American/Hispanic girls in collaboration with the College of Engineering, Cesar E. Chavez Center for Higher Education, African American Student Center, and C.P.P. Alumni Association. Participants can provide valuable experience and insight into the industry through direct observation, workplace etiquette, business operations, management, organizational skills, and teamwork. Besides preparing African-American/Hispanic girls for the workforce, I would like to launch K-12 African-American/Hispanic girls and educators conference. Sponsored by Historically Black Colleges (H.B.C.U.) and Hispanic Serving Institutes (H.S.I.) college alumni, they share their experience in industry and college with younger generations. The conference's theme would broaden African-American/Hispanic girls' and educators' understanding of the engineering profession and how educators can effectively implement the "E" in STEAM in the classroom. Besides that, professionals or industry representatives provide an opportunity to discuss what skills they are looking for in the workforce, and collegiate members can advise on navigating college. It can also serve as a resource fair for applying for college, scholarships, standardized tests, and exposure to participating universities or community colleges. For first-time learners of programming, it could be too theoretical, but by using programming to control a robot, students can witness the abilities and limitations of robots. They also learn what happens when they make a mistake in their program and the importance of precise instructions when programming. Some robots can also increase the difficulty of their programming interface as the student becomes more competent and comfortable with the concept. Instead of simple visuals or drag-and-drop commands, they are now programming complex functions and instructions. Robots are built with sensors, motors, motherboards, microcontrollers, and jumper wires operated through programs. When constructing a robot, several complications can occur that result in malfunctions or errors—exploring robots can teach African-American/Hispanic girls how to brainstorm in a group setting or trial and error for individuals. It encourages them to rethink oriented methods and find different ways to solve the same problem. As problems in life are resolved through a combination of different approaches, African-American/Hispanic girls learn that no one method will be universally helpful. For that reason, they expand their creativity and problem solving by dealing with issues that arise when building a robot. As robots get students actively engaged and hands-on in their learning, they further develop their comprehension of core science and mathematics concepts. Mathematics is often the most disliked or most challenging subject for many students. Especially for African-American/Hispanic girls coming from urban schools, their experience and overall fondness of Mathematics can be nonexistent. With robotics providing an interactive means to learn and practice Mathematics, students learn simple math concepts such as addition and subtraction and more advanced concepts like how proportions affect a robot's response to its environment. It also exposes them to algebraic thinking and recognizing patterns. Building a robot from scratch allows students to learn about scientific theories such as electromagnetism, photovoltaics, chemical reactions, and coding. Using it to lift objects strengthens their understanding of physics concepts such as force and tensions. Finally, seeing how different materials and commands affect how their robot behaves teaches students the fundamental aspects of science; observation and experimentation. Using their results from observing and experimenting with robots, they can alter their program or rebuild a specific portion of the robot to achieve different results. With a history of hearing African-American/Hispanic girls not capable of STEAM, being occupied with other activities that are not as lucrative, or showing a general disinterest in the discipline, robots can teach African-American/Hispanic girls that they are just as capable as their peers from other races and that a career in technology is possible. As the Senator and Communications Chair for the National Society of Black Engineers, I have shown that when we offer young African-American/Hispanic girls what it means to be an engineer, they are filled with excitement and curiosity to learn more about STEAM.
    "Wise Words" Scholarship
    "If you can't change the people around you, change the people around you." As a kid, I have always been curious about technology and physical sciences. From reading Marvel comics with Mr. Fantastic developing cross-dimensionally travel or reading a Webster encyclopedia on the anatomic structure of pterodactyls, my favorite pastime always involved scientific inquiry. Unfortunately, my community lacked the resources to foster my thirst for STEM. My peers also did not share the same interest due to socioeconomic issues that I was too young to comprehend at the time. Bothered by this, my grandmother's words cheer me up by sharing this quote with me. Somewhat easing my mind, I worked with my grandmother to find programs and clubs for young kids cultivating STEM interest in underrepresented kids. Most of these programs were costly and a long distance from my home, but after convincing one program of my strong passion through letters of recommendations from my Biology teacher and Pastor, they completely waived the fees. I learned to navigate on the bus and train to leave my South Central Los Angeles neighborhood and travel to Brentwood, California, to access academic tutoring, robotics, coding, engineering design, and 3D printing classes. My time in this program would help me get into Cal Poly Pomona and prepare me for my Mechanical Engineering classes. My grandmother's words about changing the people around me taught me about networking with people who can help me achieve my aspirations. Your net worth is only as substantial as your network. I make an effort to seek people who can help elevate me, and I can return the favor as well.