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Zoey Colston

2825

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

4x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

I value education because members of my family were denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, and had to overcome exclusion. I will face microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome as an underrepresented person in STEM, however, my family’s endurance and accomplishments motivate me to persevere. In college, I am combining my interest in science and medicine with my artistic talent and studying general biology and studio arts. My goal is to obtain diverse exposure to biology and advanced artistic skills to generate illustrations that support and explain STEM and medicine. I plan for a career as a scientific illustrator to create figures and informational learning tools used in journals, textbooks, presentations, animations, and online. While achieving in art and science in high school, I contributed to the success of my community by providing academic assistance to underserved students as a tutor. As a scientific illustrator, I will benefit the community by bridging gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication to target disparities such as healthcare injustice and the achievement gap. I intend to teach science and medicine through art to help people understand difficult biomedical concepts so they can be academically successful and make well-informed decisions. To promote diversity, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.

Education

University of California-San Diego

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Fine and Studio Arts

Bishop O'Dowd High School

High School
2018 - 2022

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Fine and Studio Arts
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Arts

    • Dream career goals:

      Medical and Scientific Illustrator

    • Tutored low-income elementary and middle school students of color for a faith-based non-profit organization. Helped students with homework completion, test preparation, and comprehending class material in person and virtually.

      A Journey to Success
      2018 – 20224 years

    Sports

    Tennis

    Junior Varsity
    2019 – 20201 year

    Martial Arts

    Club
    2012 – 20164 years

    Awards

    • White, yellow, orange, purple and blue belts

    Research

    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other

      UCSF Medical Center — CURE Intern: Shadowed an MD PhD in the Radiation Oncology Department. Observed patient care and consultations. Learned how treatment for cancer patients is determined and administered. Conducted literary research and presented findings to doctors.
      2021 – 2022

    Arts

    • Hayward Area Recreation and Park District, Hayward CA: Jacob Lawrence Painters’ Studio, Drawers’ Studio

      Visual Arts
      2012 – 2016
    • Bishop O’Dowd High School, Oakland, CA

      Visual Arts
      Self-portrait, Colored pencil, 7 in x 7 in, 2020 ,“Reflection“, Acrylic, 9 in x 12 in, 2022,"Amphibious Anatomy“, Acrylic, 5 in x 7 in, 2022,"Flower Child“, Acrylic, 12 in x 12 in, 2022,“In The Eye of the Beholder”, Acrylic, 9 in x 12 in, 2020,Self-portrait, Pencil, 4 in x 6 in, 2019,“Split Complementary”, Acrylic, 8 in x 10 in, 2019,“Leaves of Three”, 3D, Colored pencil and ink, 8 in x 10 in, 2019,“Three Spoons and a Fork”, Pencil, 8.5 in x 11 in, 2020,“Fallin’ Flower”, Acrylic, 9 in x 12 in, 2021
      2018 – 2022
    • California College of the Arts Pre-College Program, San Francisco, CA

      Visual Arts
      2022 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Community Pathways Volunteer, University of California, San Diego — Participate in community service that includes assembling learning kits for local students and preparing food to serve to interim shelter residents.
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Alameda County Community Food Bank — Package fresh produce and prepare emergency food boxes for distribution throughout neighborhoods in service of community members in need.
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Mercy Retirement & Care Center — Connected with elders through leading and participating in games, having conversations, and spending quality time.
      2019 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      A Journey to Success — Tutored low-income elementary and middle school students of color for a faith-based non-profit organization. Helped students with homework completion, test preparation, and comprehending class material in person and virtually.
      2018 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      Center of Hope Community Church Children's Ministry — Assisted in facilitating activities including games and arts and crafts. Helped with preparing children for presentations and performances. Aided in conducting community events such as school supply giveaways and holiday celebrations.
      2019 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Kim Moon Bae Underrepresented Students Scholarship
    I am pursuing higher education because my lineage is rooted in slavery. My fourth great-grandmother was a slave who learned to read and write, reflecting my pursuit of higher education. She was a midwife and administered medicine; perhaps this is where my interest in health sciences stems from. My great-grandparents became landowners and established businesses, and my grandmother was one of the first African Americans to teach at Mills College in Oakland. Furthering my education is especially important to me because my family was denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregation, and had to overcome exclusion. I am inherently resilient, perseverant, and encouraged by the strength of my ancestors whose accomplishments inspire me and I hope to follow in the footsteps of my parents and surmount obstacles as an underrepresented minority. Education inequity is a societal challenge that disproportionately affects low-income communities of color leaving them riddled with underfunded schools that lack resources. The historical exclusion of people of color from higher education created an achievement gap between underprivileged groups and their wealthier counterparts. I was compelled to combat inequality in education after attending both public and private schools and experiencing the disparities between these institutions. I began tutoring in ninth grade assisting underserved elementary and middle school students of color with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class materials. I continued to tutor virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic when educational disparities were magnified and I remained dedicated to helping students throughout high school. Tutoring enabled me to invest in my community by helping youth be academically successful, instilling the importance of knowledge to one’s future, and encouraging students to strive for higher education. Educational accomplishments and qualifications are cornerstones of sound decision-making, increased employment opportunities, and higher incomes, which all contribute to the prosperity of a community. Overcoming educational inequalities and making education accessible to everyone is necessary for the well-being of communities and their ability to progress. I am determined to increase my knowledge and skills to establish a career in which I can continue combating disparities. I am currently combining my scientific knowledge and artistic talent, majoring in visual arts and studying biology to work across both disciplines and create illustrations that support and explain STEM. My goal is to be a scientific illustrator who addresses racial disparities in knowledge while bridging gaps in science, medicine, and healthcare communication. I plan to target social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand biomedical concepts. For example, to address inequity in healthcare, I will create illustrations that educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. One of the best ways to serve communities of color is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. As a scientific illustrator, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations to reflect the richness of our society. As an African American, I will include underrepresented people in this unique field by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while encouraging the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color.
    Christian ‘Myles’ Pratt Foundation Fine Arts Scholarship
    I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember because art is more than an interest; it is a talent, a creative outlet, a form of expression, and a passion. I am fortunate to have parents who are determined to nurture my artistic talent and who placed me in a community center art class at the age of nine. It was in this class that I was formally introduced to new drawing and painting media and techniques, as well as color theory. Over the years, I developed and enhanced my artistic skills by practicing at home. In high school, I continued my training through art courses and in addition to my pieces being displayed in my school and at the annual art show, one of my paintings was selected to represent my school in the 2020 Lillian Black Children’s Art Council Art Exhibit. While I was unable to access my school’s art studio during the pandemic, my parents motivated me to continue producing my art at home and to begin projects such as restoring paintings for friends and drawing logos for small businesses. They also encouraged me to use my art as a way to manage the mental challenges I experienced during the isolation of the pandemic so that I could express feelings that were difficult to verbalize. Because my parents pushed me to pursue my craft, last summer I completed a pre-college program at the California College of Arts where I enhanced my portfolio with pieces that pull both from the imagination and observed subjects, such as still life and figure drawing. My artistic skill is different because it is inspired by biological sciences which I was also immersed in at a young age. Growing up, I admired illustrations in science and medical books and I used specialized coloring books in anatomy, biology, zoology, and botany to practice drawing structures that intrigued me. Through my exposure to science I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My STEAM activities fueled my passion to combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge. It was my mother who introduced me to scientific illustration, a career in which I can create artistic renditions that teach, depict, and explain biomedical concepts. To continue improving my art skills and pursue my career goal, I am majoring in Studio Arts and studying biology to work across both disciplines and create illustrations that support and explain STEM. This will provide me with a strong foundation in artistic technique, scientific knowledge, and visual biomedical communication to prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. My goal is to bridge gaps in scientific, medical, and healthcare communication to target social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand difficult biomedical concepts. For example, to address inequity in healthcare, I will create illustrations that educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. One of the best ways to use my artistic skills is to cultivate diversity, equity, and inclusion. As a scientific illustrator, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    Diane Amendt Memorial Scholarship for the Arts
    I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember because art is more than an interest; it is a talent, a creative outlet, a form of expression, and a passion. I am fortunate to have parents who were determined to nurture my artistic talent and who placed me in a community center art class at the age of nine. It was in this class that I was formally introduced to new drawing and painting media and techniques, as well as color theory. Over the years, I developed and enhanced my artistic skills by practicing at home. In high school, I continued my training through art courses and besides my pieces being displayed in my school and at the annual art show, one of my paintings was selected to represent my school in the 2020 Lillian Black Children’s Art Council Art Exhibit. While I was unable to access my school’s art studio during the pandemic, my parents motivated me to continue producing my art at home and to begin projects such as restoring paintings for friends and drawing logos for small businesses. They also encouraged me to use my art as a way to manage the mental challenges I experienced during the isolation of the pandemic so that I could express feelings that were difficult to verbalize. Because my parents pushed me to pursue my craft, last summer I completed a pre-college program at the California College of Arts where I enhanced my portfolio with pieces that pull both from the imagination and observed subjects, such as still life and figure drawing. My art is inspired by biological sciences which I was also immersed in at a young age. Growing up, I admired illustrations in science and medical books and I used specialized coloring books in anatomy, biology, zoology, and botany to practice drawing structures that intrigued me. Through my exposure to science I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My STEAM activities fueled my passion to combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge. It was my mother who introduced me to scientific illustration, a career in which I can create artistic renditions that teach, depict, and explain biomedical concepts. To continue improving my art skills and pursue my career goal, I am majoring in Studio Arts and studying biology to work across both disciplines and create illustrations that support and explain STEM. This will provide me with a strong foundation in artistic technique, scientific knowledge, and visual biomedical communication to prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. I plan to make a positive impact on the world by using my art to address racial disparities in knowledge and bridging gaps in science, medicine, and healthcare communication. I am determined to target social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand difficult biomedical concepts. For example, to address inequity in healthcare, I will create illustrations that educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. My parents instilled in me that I have the strength to do anything I set my mind to and taught me that I am full of the perseverance of the people from whom I descend. I hope to follow in their footsteps and surmount obstacles to achieve my educational and career goals.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember because art is more than an interest; it is a talent, a creative outlet, and a form of expression. I was formally introduced to art at the age of nine when I learned various media, techniques, and color theory. My artwork is inspired by my other interest, biological sciences. Growing up, I admired illustrations in science and medical books and I used specialized coloring books in anatomy, biology, zoology, and botany to practice drawing structures that intrigued me. I also gained experience working in a laboratory where I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My STEAM activities, which include advanced placement science courses and pre-college art programs, fueled my passion to combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge. Currently in college, I am majoring in visual arts and studying biology to work across both disciplines and create illustrations that support and explain STEM. This will provide me with a strong foundation in artistic technique, scientific knowledge, and visual biomedical communication to prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. I strive to be a scientific illustrator and create artistic renditions that teach, depict, and explain biomedical concepts. I plan to make a positive impact on the world by using my art to address racial disparities in knowledge and bridging gaps in science, medicine, and healthcare communication. I am determined to target social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand difficult biomedical concepts. For example, to address inequity in healthcare, I will create illustrations that educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. One of the best ways to impact the world is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. As a scientific illustrator, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    Connie Konatsotis Scholarship
    I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember because art is more than an interest; it is a talent, a creative outlet, a form of expression, and a passion. I was formally introduced to art at nine in classes where I learned various media, techniques, and color theory. Interestingly, my artistic skill is inspired by my other passion, biological sciences, because I was immersed in science at a young age. Growing up, I admired the illustrations in my family’s collection of science and medical books, and I used specialized coloring books in anatomy, biology, zoology, and botany to practice drawing structures that intrigued me. I assisted my mother with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs and flagging structures on cadavers. I also gained experience working with bacteria and human cells in her laboratory where I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My involvement in STEAM activities, including advanced placement science courses and pre-college art programs, fueled my passion to combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge and shaped my aspiration to become a scientific illustrator. I am currently majoring in visual arts (studio) and studying biology to work across both disciplines and create illustrations that support and explain STEM. I look forward to enhancing my STEAM education through independent biological research and courses in figure drawing that will increase my understanding of the proportions of the human form for illustration. My undergraduate education will provide me with a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. As a scientific Illustrator, I hope to make an impact on the world by addressing racial disparities in knowledge and bridging gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. I am determined to target social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand difficult biomedical concepts. For example, to address inequity in healthcare, I will create artistic renditions to educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. One of the greatest ways to impact the world is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. I intend to address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. As an African American, I hope to highlight scientific illustration as a career so that it is more known to people of color. I will work to include underrepresented people in this unique field by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, to expand my commitment to narrowing the achievement gap, I will collaborate with schools and organizations to provide access to art and science education in marginalized communities while encouraging interest in youth of color.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    As a current first-year, I am majoring in general biology and also studying studio arts to combine my interest in science with my artistic talent. My goal is to work across both disciplines and create illustrations in collaboration with researchers that support and explain STEM and medicine. I intend to enhance my undergraduate education through independent biological research, laboratory internships, and courses that will advance my art skills, such as graphic design and figure drawing to increase my understanding of the human body for illustration. My undergraduate STEAM education will provide a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine as I pursue a career as a scientific illustrator. In my pursuit of higher education, I am determined to increase my knowledge and enhance my skills in order to serve my community. After experiencing the disparities between underfunded public schools and wealthy private schools, I was compelled to combat inequality in education. I began tutoring in ninth grade assisting underserved elementary and middle school students with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class materials so that they were successful in school. I continued to tutor virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic when educational disparities were magnified. Tutoring online allowed me to continue providing academic assistance, but also encouragement, mentorship, and a positive relationship for my tutees during quarantine and I remained dedicated to helping students throughout my high school career. Overall, tutoring enabled me to contribute to my community by promoting higher education and instilling the importance of knowledge to one’s future in youth. I invested in my community through tutoring by helping youth improve in school and encouraging students to strive for higher academic achievement. My community service has inspired me to address racial disparities in science knowledge by bridging gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. As a scientific illustrator, I will create artistic renditions using animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with other biomedical professionals. I intend to target prominent social inequities that predominantly affect minority communities by helping people understand difficult biomedical concepts. To address inequity in healthcare, I will educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. My efforts can alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system due to unethical medical treatment that has been historically experienced by people of color. The historical exclusion of people of color from higher education has created an achievement gap between underprivileged groups and their wealthier counterparts. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. One of the best ways to serve communities of color is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. As an African American, I hope to highlight scientific illustration as a career so that it is more known to people of color. I will work to include underrepresented people in this unique field by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, to expand my commitment to narrowing the achievement gap, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while encouraging interest in science and art in youth of color.
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    Education is important to me because members of my family were denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, and had to overcome exclusion. My family’s endurance and accomplishments despite oppression motivate me to achieve my educational goals. I was immersed in science at a young age. I assisted my mother with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class and I gained hands-on experience in her laboratory. I have also been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember and through my exposure to science I discovered that a microscope can capture artistic images of biological structures. As a current first-year, I am majoring in general biology and also studying studio arts to combine my interest in science with my artistic talent. My goal is to work across both disciplines and create illustrations in collaboration with researchers that support and explain STEM and medicine. I intend to enhance my undergraduate education through independent biological research, laboratory internships, and courses that will advance my art skills, such as graphic design and figure drawing to increase my understanding of the human body for illustration. My undergraduate STEAM education will provide me with a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine as I pursue a career as a scientific illustrator. The COVID-19 pandemic generated an education crisis in which schools were closed, impacting many aspects of student life. The negative effects of the pandemic worsened people’s mental health and were particularly severe for teenagers. The pandemic added layers of difficulty to my high school and social life. Academically, it was harder to stay engaged and motivated while learning virtually and the strictly online environment hindered my ability to make in-person connections with peers and friends. The social isolation affected my mental health; the loneliness caused me emotional challenges such as anxiety and depression. The disruption of my mental stability was an unimaginable obstacle that threatened my personal progression, but with family and medical support, I have been able to manage the challenges caused by the pandemic. Because my peers were also negatively affected by the pandemic, I realized the need to address the emotional distress we experienced. Upon returning to school in person, I co-founded and led a club dedicated to spreading awareness about the importance of prioritizing mental health in teens. The overall mission of this club was to create a safe space where students could discuss the mental challenges they faced, learn mindfulness techniques, connect to mental health resources, and seek the help and advice of their peers. Leading a mental health-focused student club was an experience that developed my leadership skills and equipped me with mental health strategies. I learned how to organize a group of people around a specific topic and facilitate meaningful discussions. I realized that leading requires respect for different perspectives, openness to diverse ideas, and a willingness to put others first. Currently in college, I am using these skills in group settings and I am further developing them as a participant in student organizations on campus. What I learned from the obstacles I faced during the pandemic will help me during college and beyond as I face adversities as an African American in STEM. I will have to overcome hardships such as microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome. The challenges I experienced throughout the pandemic have made me more attuned to recognizing and understanding mental health challenges, more knowledgeable about methods to fortify and improve my mental state, and more willing to seek professional help.​
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    I recall a time in my elementary school when I was waiting my turn to use a Chromebook for online lessons. We had to alternate laptops between groups because there were not enough for each student. As a public school student, I was accustomed to limited supplies and worn-down equipment. However, what happened next was unexpected. Out of the corner of my eye I noticed a small, dark object scurry across my keyboard. I was surprised to discover that a cockroach had taken its place where my hands once were. It was not until I entered a private school that I realized significant differences in the condition and availability of resources between the public and private school systems. At my private middle school, every student received their own personal iPads and Macbooks were readily available on campus. There was a wider variety of classes and after-school activities to participate in including STEM, yoga, music, robotics, and improv, none of which were provided at my public school. The playground equipment was new and plentiful and even the school lunches were healthier. Education inequity is a societal issue that disproportionately affects low-income communities leaving them with underfunded schools that lack resources compared to affluent communities. Smaller budgets create schools with large student-to-teacher ratios and few electives and extracurricular programs. When teachers cannot efficiently meet each student's needs, it inhibits their success in school. Having fewer electives and extracurriculars prevents students from developing new skills and talents that are beneficial for discovering career paths. When parents lack higher education, children may not have the academic support they require or may not be exposed to a wide variety of inspirational professionals who look like them. After experiencing the disparities between underfunded and wealthy institutions, I was compelled to combat inequality in education. I began tutoring in ninth grade assisting underserved elementary and middle school students with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class materials so that they were successful in school. I continued to tutor virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic when educational disparities were magnified and I remained dedicated to helping students throughout my high school career. Tutoring online allowed me not only to continue providing academic assistance, but also encouragement, mentorship, and a positive relationship with my tutees during quarantine. Overall, tutoring enabled me to contribute to my community by promoting higher education and instilling the importance of knowledge to one’s future in youth. I invested in my community through tutoring by helping youth improve in school and encouraging students to strive for higher academic achievement. Educational accomplishments and qualifications are cornerstones of sound decision-making, increased employment opportunities, and higher incomes, which all contribute to the prosperity of a community. The historical exclusion of people of color from higher education has created an achievement gap between underprivileged groups and their wealthier counterparts. Overcoming educational inequalities and making education accessible to everyone is necessary for the well-being of communities and their ability to progress. Equity in education creates a system that recognizes and meets the needs of all students no matter their family background, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, gender, or learning capability. A fair chance means a level playing field in which people are not hindered by their differences and can obtain equal access to the support and resources needed to achieve their goals.
    Ginny Biada Memorial Scholarship
    The biggest influence in my life is my mother, an African American woman in science who conducts biological research and teaches at the college level. My mother immersed me in science at a young age. I assisted her with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs and flagging structures on cadavers. I also gained experience working with bacteria and human cells in her laboratory where, incidentally, I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My mother not only exposed me to science, but she also nurtured my artistic talent. I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember. Growing up, I admired the illustrations in my mother’s collection of science and medical books and she provided me with specialized coloring books in anatomy, biology, zoology, and botany to practice drawing structures that intrigued me. My mother motivated me to choose a career path in scientific illustration in which I can combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge. I will face adversities as a member of an underrepresented group in STEM. I will have to overcome microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome. I hope to follow in the footsteps of my mother and surmount obstacles as a minority in science. Her commitment to the academic success of students of color compelled me to serve my community by combating educational inequality through tutoring. Throughout high school, I assisted low-income elementary and middle students of color with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class material. My career goal is to use my STEM education to address racial disparities in science knowledge by bridging gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. As a scientific illustrator, I will benefit low-income minority communities so that more people can understand difficult biomedical concepts. I intend to target social inequities that predominantly affect people of color by creating artistic renditions that support and explain STEM and medicine. To address healthcare injustice, I will educate people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. My mother’s dedication to increasing the number of underrepresented people in STEM and medicine has shaped my aspiration to cultivate diversity, equity, and inclusion in scientific illustration. First and foremost, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. As an African American, I hope to highlight scientific illustration as a career so that it is more known to people of color. I will work to include underrepresented people in this unique field by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, to expand my commitment to narrowing the achievement gap, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while encouraging the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color.
    She Rose in STEAM Scholarship
    My career goal is to be a scientific illustrator and bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. I will uniquely serve minority communities by targeting inequities that predominantly affect people of color. Inequities in health care are the systemic differences in the quality of health of people from different groups of the population. These differences do not occur naturally, but are results of human behavior. Racial disparities in health care are prominent social issues that disproportionately affect African Americans. It is a common misconception that African Americans are more prone to health issues because of their race. Due to implicit bias, doctors may not prioritize the care of African Americans and may provide low quality treatment. This malpractice leads to a higher death rate in African Americans and at a younger age compared to their white counterparts. Unethical occurrences such as the Tuskegee experiment and the treatment of Henrietta Lacks have discouraged African Americans from seeking out healthcare because of how they have been mistreated by doctors. Because of historic disparity, discrimination, and maltreatment in medicine, African Americans have developed a warranted distrust of the healthcare system. This has been recently apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic where we have seen hesitancy in the African American community to receive the COVID-19 vaccine due to distrust and fear of medical discrimination. As a result, African Americans have experienced higher rates of COVID-19-related hospitalization and death compared to other groups. Inequity in health care endangers African Americans and the people around them, which is why steps must be taken to make African Americans feel more comfortable in medical settings. The greatest approach to decreasing discrimination and distrust is educating communities of color. As a scientific illustrator, I will teach science and medicine through art so that people are more knowledgeable and therefore able to recognize discriminatory tactics in medical treatment. Through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online, I will address inequity in healthcare by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. I strive to improve the lives of those who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare because of unethical medical experiences by helping them understand difficult biomedical concepts so they are empowered and can make well-informed healthcare decisions. I was immersed in science at a young age. I assisted my mother with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class and I also cultured bacteria and used microscopes to visualize human cells in her laboratory. I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember and through my exposure to science I discovered that a microscope can be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. As a current first-year at the University of California, San Diego, I am majoring in general biology to acquire diverse knowledge and skills in multiple areas within the biological sciences. I am passionate about combining my interest in science with my artistic talent, therefore, in addition to majoring in biology, I am studying studio arts. My goal is to work across both disciplines and create illustrations in collaboration with researchers that support and explain STEM and medicine. My undergraduate STEAM education will provide me with a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. I am determined to pursue my desired career as a scientific illustrator and work towards improving the health of minorities.
    Samuel L. Goodman Educational Scholarship
    Pursuing higher education is important to me because members of my family were denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, and had to overcome exclusion from educational institutions. I will face microaggressions, lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome as an African American in STEM; however, my family’s endurance and accomplishments despite oppression motivate me to persevere to achieve my higher education goals so that I can obtain the career I desire as a scientific illustrator. I was immersed in science at a young age. I assisted my mother with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs, and flagging structures on cadavers. As a current first-year in college, I am majoring in general biology to acquire diverse knowledge and skills in multiple areas within the biological sciences. I have also been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember and I am passionate about combining my interest in science and medicine with my artistic talent. In addition to majoring in biology, I am studying studio arts to work across both disciplines and create illustrations in collaboration with researchers that support and explain STEM and medicine. My goal is to enhance my undergraduate education through independent biological research, laboratory internships, and courses that will advance my art skills, such as graphic design and figure drawing to increase my understanding of the human body. This will allow me to obtain a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare for a graduate program in art applied to science. Serving my community has always been important to me and throughout high school, I invested in the success of my community by tutoring underserved youth. As a scientific illustrator, I will uniquely serve the world, especially low-income minority communities, by bridging gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication to help people understand difficult biomedical concepts. My career goal is to target social injustice that predominantly affects people of color. To address medical discrimination, I will use illustrations to inform people about how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the academic achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. I will also collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide art and science education for underprivileged youth. One of the best ways to serve communities is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. To include underrepresented people, I will create opportunities in scientific illustration such as internships, and advocate for increased employment of minorities and women. Additionally, I intend to address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. My undergraduate education will enable me to pursue my passion and become a scientific illustrator so that I can make changes that will benefit groups that are marginalized by society.
    Cliff T. Wofford STEM Scholarship
    I value education because my lineage is rooted in slavery and members of my family were denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, and had to overcome exclusion. I will face microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome as an underrepresented person in STEM, however, my family’s endurance and accomplishments despite oppression motivate me to persevere to achieve my education and career goals. I was immersed in science at a young age. As a current first-year in college, I am majoring in general biology to acquire diverse knowledge and skills in multiple areas within biological sciences. I have also been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember and I am passionate about combining my interest in science and medicine with my artistic talent. In addition to majoring in biology, I am studying studio arts to work across both disciplines and create illustrations in collaboration with researchers that support and explain STEM and medicine. I look forward to enhancing my undergraduate education through independent biological research, laboratory internships, and courses that will increase my understanding of the human body and the proportions of the human form for illustration. My undergraduate education will provide me with a strong foundation in visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine so that I can pursue my desired career as a scientific illustrator. As a scientific illustrator, I will bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication so that more people can understand difficult biomedical concepts. Serving my community has always been important to me and throughout high school, I invested in the success of my community by tutoring underserved youth of color. As a scientific illustrator, I will uniquely serve the world, especially low-income minority communities, by targeting prominent social inequities that predominantly affect people of color. To address medical discrimination, I will inform people about how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. To narrow the achievement gap, I will use art to teach science and medicine and make my scientific illustrations easily accessible through figures displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. I will also collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide art and science education for underserved youth. One of the best ways to serve communities is by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion. To include underrepresented people, I will create opportunities in scientific illustration such as internships, and advocate for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, I intend to address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing the representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. My undergraduate education will enable me to pursue my passion and become a scientific illustrator so that I can make changes that will benefit groups that are marginalized by society.
    Bold Science Matters Scholarship
    My interest in biological research was piqued while viewing HeLa cells through a microscope and learning the circumstances in which these cells were unethically obtained from Henrietta Lacks in 1951. Henrietta was a poor 31-years-old African American woman who unknowingly made the greatest scientific contribution when her cells became the most important scientific breakthrough. Henrietta was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cervical cancer. Her tissues were biopsied without her knowledge or consent and shared with a researcher who was attempting to grow cells in a laboratory environment outside of the body. Henrietta’s cancer cells continuously grew robustly and became the first immortalized human cell line. Since Henrietta’s death in 1951, the power of HeLa cells has been harnessed in scientific research that has advanced medicine. These cells are an extremely important tool that allows research without experimentation on humans. Many areas of scientific research have benefited from HeLa cells which have given rise to new fields of study and multibillion-dollar businesses. There is an outstanding number of studies that HeLa cells have made possible such as the effects of zero gravity in outer space, the prevention of HIV infection, and cancer treatments. In 1952, studies with HeLa cells led to the polio vaccine, and today they are currently used in COVID-19 research. HeLa cells are my favorite scientific discovery because they are responsible for so much biological understanding and many medical breakthroughs. They have been used in an outstanding amount of research and have provided much of our understanding of basic cell physiology and disease pathology. They have also been used in the research and development of every type of medicine stronger than aspirin. This is a testament to the lasting contribution of Henrietta’s cells as microscopic tools for scientific discoveries that have and will always benefit mankind.
    Healthy Living Scholarship
    A healthy lifestyle is doing things that make you happy and feel good and encompasses physical and mental well-being. This includes avoiding bad habits like smoking, maintaining a healthy weight according to your BMI, eating at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily, and exercising 30 minutes or more, 5 times a week. A healthy lifestyle is essential for minimizing the risk of disease which means a lot to me because of my family history of cancer; my maternal great-grandparents developed cancer and I lost my maternal grandmother to breast cancer. I have always been taught to eat different colors of fruits and vegetables to get the benefits of different health-promoting phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants. I adhere to the food pyramid to achieve a healthy, balanced diet and I read nutritional labels to understand the foods I am eating so that I support my dietary requirements and make healthy choices. The COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges for me, adding layers of difficulty to my school and social life. The strictly online environment not only hindered my learning but also my ability to make in-person connections with peers and friends which in turn affected my mental health. Mental health is a person’s psychological and social welfare. While it plays a part in how we think, feel, and behave, it also affects how we deal with stress, interact with others, and make decisions. The teenage years are a formative time in which in-person connection is critical for development. However, it has been more difficult to make such connections during the pandemic, impacting my mental health. The social isolation and loneliness I experienced during the pandemic caused me emotional challenges such as anxiety and depression. I have had to address health issues that I, nor my family, ever considered for myself. The disruption of my mental stability by the challenges of the pandemic was an unimaginable setback that threatened my personal progression. Experiencing the emotional distress of the pandemic, I realized the need to address those difficulties. Upon returning to school in person, I co-founded and led a club dedicated to spreading awareness about the importance of prioritizing mental health in teens. The overall mission of this club was to create a safe space where students could share the mental challenges they faced, learn how to maintain mental wellness, connect to mental health resources, and seek the help and advice of their peers. This club was inspired by the characters of Winnie the Pooh. As displayed in their behaviors, each character represents a different mental illness or disorder. For example, Pooh has attention deficit disorder, Piglet experiences anxiety, and Eeyore suffers from depression. As club leader, I was a role model who inspired peers to be the best version of themselves. I led discussions regarding mental health challenges so that members could gain an understanding of how mental illness affects relationships. This helped them feel more comfortable having conversations about mental health and taught them how to discuss sensitive topics in a respectful way. I led mindfulness activities to teach members ways to improve mental health and alleviate stress. I organized artistic activities such as sculpting, painting, drawing and even building structures with legos to encourage my peers to use art as a form of therapy that can promote calmness. My leadership demonstrated the positive connection between art and mental health and set an example to prioritize mental health while in school and other stressful environments. The mental challenges of the pandemic led to my organizing a school club and in turn, helped me develop beneficial coping mechanisms. The challenges I experienced throughout the pandemic have made me more attuned to recognizing and understanding mental health challenges, more knowledgeable about methods to fortify and improve my mental state, and more willing to seek professional help including group therapy.​ During quarantine, exercising became an essential part of my day. While physical activity helps to manage weight and strengthen bones and muscles, it also promotes good mental health, reduces the risk of disease, and improves the ability to do everyday activities. The effect of exercise on mental health is an immediate benefit because it reduces the feelings of depression and anxiety, improves cognition, and helps you sleep better. My daily activity includes yoga, pilates, weight training, and cardio, with a focus on stretching. Beginning my day with exercise helps me maintain a positive attitude and increases my chances of living longer. Overall, maintaining a healthy lifestyle through diet, exercise, and prioritizing my mental health is beneficial both in the short and long term.
    Pet Lover Scholarship
    I have cared for a variety of animals including birds, bugs, fish, turtles, tadpoles, sea snails, and crabs. Currently, I have two cats named Zinga and Zephyr. Zinga is a five years old gray tabby who we adopted from a shelter when she was a kitten. Although she is a scaredy cat, she was named after Queen Nzinga of Africa who fought to keep her people from enslavement. Zephyr was a newborn when we found him abandoned under a car. He is a Snowshoe and suffers from nystagmus, a neurological condition that causes his eyes to move from side to side uncontrollably. Despite this, he is a rambunctious 4-year-old whose name, which means “a gentle breeze”, does not suit him because we later learned that he is more of a whirlwind. I also grew up with a bearded dragon named Zilla. For a long time we figured Zilla was a boy, until one day she layed eggs. Zinga and Zephyr enjoyed watching Zilla scurry across the floor and I would occasionally find one of them resting in her tank with her. Sadly, I recently lost Zilla, after which my family held a burial service along her favorite trail where we would take her on nature walks. I love having pets because they are members of my family. I enjoy their company and do everything I can to protect and nurture them, and ensure their happiness and well-being. My pets have been a source of comfort for me during the COVID-19 pandemic which has posed challenges and added layers of difficulty to my school and social life. The strictly online environment not only hindered my learning but also my ability to make in-person connections with peers and friends which in turn affected my mental health. The social isolation and loneliness I experienced during the pandemic caused me emotional challenges such as anxiety and depression. I have had to address health issues that I, nor my family, ever considered for myself. The disruption of my mental stability by the challenges of the pandemic was an unimaginable setback that threatened my personal progression. The companionship and unconditional love from my pets has been especially helpful and therapeutic during the mentally challenging time of the pandemic. Being able to spend time with them while I was away from friends alleviated my feelings of loneliness. Caring for my pets has instilled in me a compassion towards other animals in my neighborhood. While playing in the backyard, I heard a squeaking noise that turned out to be a baby sparrow whose nest had fallen out of a tree. I took in this lone survivor and cared for it by feeding it liquefied crickets and using a heated, rice-filled sock to simulate its mother’s warmth. This required commitment because it would chirp in the middle of the night to alert me when it was hungry. To make sure this fledgling received proper care, we took it to a wildlife refuge so it could have a chance at life. Being a cat owner has caused me to pay close attention to strays and every day I have fed and given affection to four generations of a family of cats that have needed help. Unwittingly, the food I leave out for stray cats feeds birds, squirrels, and raccoons. The love I developed for my pets has impacted who I am today by influencing my sense of community service. To combat educational inequity that disproportionately affects low-income communities of color, I began tutoring for a faith-based, non-profit community organization in ninth grade, assisting students so they could be academically successful. I helped elementary and middle students with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class material. It was gratifying to me to see students do better in school and feel proud of their own accomplishments. Their parents' acknowledgement of their improvement and increased confidence further assured me that my efforts were worthwhile. I continued to tutor throughout the COVID-19 pandemic during which educational inequities had been magnified in low income communities. Despite difficulties such as the inability to have in-person connections with students and lack of internet access, I remained dedicated to helping students during that time and through the rest of my high school career. I have come to understand that overcoming educational inequality and narrowing the achievement gap is important to my community’s well-being and ability to progress. Educational accomplishments and qualifications are cornerstones of sound decision-making, increased employment opportunities, and higher incomes, which all contribute to the prosperity of a community. Tutoring enabled me to contribute to my community by promoting education and instilling the importance of knowledge to one’s future in youth. I invested in my community through tutoring by helping youth do better in school and encouraging students to strive for higher academic achievement. The organization I tutored for is associated with my church, so my tutees were kids that I also worked with in children’s church. As a youth assistant in the children’s ministry, I led activities like games and arts and crafts, I helped prepare children for presentations, performances, and programs, and I also helped to conduct community events like school supply giveaways and holiday festivals. In addition to serving my community as a volunteer tutor and through my church involvement, I have also volunteered in a retirement home where I spent quality time with senior citizens, talking with them and playing games, so they had a sense of connection. Overall, serving both animals and people is important to me because it allows me to make changes for the better and impact the overall well-being of my community. My value of affirming the dignity of all creation and serving individuals that need help within a community, including animals, stems from me growing up with pets in my life.
    Christian ‘Myles’ Pratt Foundation Fine Arts Scholarship
    My mother instilled in me that I have the strength to do anything I set my mind to and taught me that I am full of the perseverance of the people from whom I descend. I hope to follow in her footsteps and surmount obstacles to achieve my educational and career goals. I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember and my mother has always nurtured my artistic talent. She enrolled me into community center art classes at the age of nine, where I was formally introduced to various media, techniques, and color theory. She supported me as I drew and painted at home and further developed my skills in high school art courses. During the pandemic, my mother encouraged me to use art as a way to manage the isolation due to quarantine. It is because of her commitment to encouraging my talents that I recently completed a pre-college program concentrating in painting and drawing at the California College of Arts. My favorite art style is realism and illustrating accurate and detailed images of people. My artistic skill is different because I pull inspiration from biological sciences. My mother is a molecular biologist who immersed me in science at a young age. I assisted her with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs, and flagging structures on cadavers. I also gained hands-on experience working with bacteria and human cells in her laboratory. She showed me that a microscope is not just a scientific tool, but can also be used to capture artistic images of biological structures. My mother has helped to shape my educational and career aspirations by fueling and supporting my passion for art and science. My exposure to science led me to develop a curiosity for the intricacies of human anatomy and combine my artistic talent with my scientific knowledge to pursue a career in scientific illustration. My mother introduced me to this unique field through detailed drawings in her collection of biology books and the specialized coloring books she gave me that illustrate anatomical, biological, zoological, and botanical structures. If it had not been for my mother, I may not have known that this field existed. This fall, I will pursue a dual major in studio arts and human biology and work across both disciplines to produce innovative art. Through extension courses in anatomy, graphic design, digital media, and figure drawing I will enhance my understanding of the human body and the proportions of the human form for illustration. My undergraduate education will provide me with a strong foundation of scientific knowledge, artistic technique, and visual biomedical communication and prepare me for a graduate program in art as applied to medicine. As a scientific illustrator, I will be innovative by creating artistic renditions that depict, teach, and explain biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. My goal is to bridge gaps in scientific, medical, and healthcare communication and address inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race. Given medical injustice, I strive to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. In other words, I want to help those who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare because of unethical medical experiences understand concepts that are hard to grasp. By teaching science and medicine through art, I hope to increase the medical knowledge of others so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions.
    Bookman 5 Scholarship
    The COVID-19 pandemic posed hardships for me. The strictly online environment not only hindered my learning but also my ability to make in-person connections which in turn affected my mental health. The social isolation and loneliness caused me emotional challenges such as anxiety and depression. I have had to address health issues that I never imagined. Experiencing the emotional distress of the pandemic, I realized the need to address those difficulties. Upon returning to school in person, I co-founded and led a club dedicated to spreading awareness about the importance of prioritizing mental health for teens. The overall mission of this club was to create a safe space where students could share the mental challenges they faced, express their mental state through art, maintain mental wellness through using mindfulness techniques, connect to mental health resources, and seek the help and advice of their peers. Managing my mental health is an ongoing process, but I have overcome the challenges of the pandemic by developing leadership skills and coping mechanisms that will benefit me in college. I can use the skills I acquired as a club leader, such as organizing a group and facilitating meaningful discussions, in the student organizations in which I intend to participate. My involvement in a mental health-focused club will be helpful to me as I face adversities as a member of an underrepresented group in STEM. I will have to overcome hardships such as microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome. The hardship of the pandemic has made me more attuned to recognizing and understanding mental health challenges, more knowledgeable about methods to fortify and improve my mental state, and more willing to seek professional help.​ Attending college is important because my lineage is rooted in slavery and members of my family have been denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, or had to overcome exclusion from educational institutions. This fall I will pursue a major in human biology with a minor in studio arts, qualifying me to study art as applied to medicine in a graduate program. This will prepare me for a unique career in scientific illustration in which we rarely see African Americans. As a scientific illustrator I will combine my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to design figures and informational learning tools used in journals, textbooks, presentations, animations, and online. I strive to combat inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue based on race that has disproportionately affected African Americans. To serve people of color who have historically experienced medical injustice, I will simplify science, medical, and healthcare communication. I want to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. By teaching science and medicine through art, I will increase the medical knowledge of others so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. Additionally, I will serve communities of color by cultivating diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of scientific illustration. I want to be a trailblazer who highlights this field and works to include more underrepresented people by creating internships opportunities and advocating for employment of minorities and women. To better the lives of people of color, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. I will also be a role model who strengthens youth of color by collaborating with schools and organizations to provide access to art education and expose students to science.
    Rho Brooks Women in STEM Scholarship
    My goal is to be a scientific illustrator and create artistic renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and scientific researchers. To accomplish my goal, I will pursue a major in human biology and minor in studio arts this fall at UC San Diego. My undergraduate education will provide me with a strong foundation of scientific knowledge, artistic technique, and visual biomedical communication to prepare me to be a top candidate for a graduate program in art as applied to medicine. As a scientific illustrator, I will combine my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to bridge gaps in scientific, medical, and healthcare communication and comprehension. I will address inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and disproportionately affects African Americans. Given historical medical injustice, I strive to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. I want to help those who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare understand biomedical concepts so that they can make well-informed decisions. The biggest influence in my life is my mother, an African American woman in science who conducts biological research and teaches at the college level. My mother immersed me in science at a young age. I assisted her with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs, and flagging structures on cadavers. I also gained hands-on experience working with bacteria and human cells, and performing microscopy in her research laboratory. In addition to my interest in science, I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember as a form of expression, a creative outlet, and a way to relax. My mother has always nurtured my artistic talent by enrolling me into art classes where I have been introduced to various media, techniques, and color theory. My mother has shaped my educational and career aspirations by fueling and supporting my passion for science and art. I will face adversities as a member of an underrepresented group in STEM. I will have to overcome microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome. I hope to follow in the footsteps of my mother and surmount obstacles as a minority in science. Her commitment to the academic success of students of color compelled me to serve my community by combating educational inequality through tutoring. Throughout high school, I assisted low-income elementary and middle students with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class material. I continued to tutor virtually throughout the COVID-19 pandemic as educational inequities became magnified in low income communities. My mother’s dedication to increasing the number of underrepresented people in STEM and medicine has shaped my aspiration to cultivate diversity, equity, and inclusion in scientific illustration. I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. I will be a trailblazer who highlights this unique career so that it is more known to people of color, creates opportunities such as internships, and advocates for increased employment of minorities and women. Finally, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color.
    ProjectGiveBack Scholarship for Black Women
    COVID-19 affects all segments of the population, but the impact of the pandemic is felt differently depending on the status of individuals as members of society. Data shows that people of color have experienced a disproportionate burden of cases and deaths. Black Americans have been particularly vulnerable to contracting and dying from COVID-19 at rates nearly twice as high as their percentage of the population. Different factors may contribute to more Black people being susceptible to infection and death due to COVID-19. Prevalence of other medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity in African Americans increases the risk of severe illness from COVID-19. The type of work the majority of Black Americans perform including jobs that are considered essential and involve public interaction in the service industry, healthcare, and transportation exposes them to the COVID-19 virus. Living in crowded conditions and densely populated areas affects the ability to social distance, makes it hard to avoid getting COVID-19, and contributes to the difficulty of getting treatment. Barriers to medical insurance and healthcare access contribute to the higher rate of illness and death of Black people due to COVID-19. Each of these factors result from structural conditions that were created by poor social policies and unfair economic arrangements, and have been worsened by social inequalities tied to race, class, and access to the health care system. Racism is the overarching factor that not only affects health status, living conditions, and job quality, but discrimination also generates stress which has been linked to medical conditions that have been shown to increase the risk of severe illness from COVID-19. The pandemic has had an unique impact on African Americans and their overrepresentation among COVID-19 cases and number of deaths underscores the fact that they are not having their right to health fulfilled. The disparity in healthcare not only contributes to a higher death rate in African Americans at a younger age compared to their white counterparts, but it also gives rise to medical injustices such as the Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in Black men conducted between 1932 and 1972. Another example of a medical injustice is how Henrietta Lacks, a poor African American woman, had her cervical cancer cells unethically biopsied without her knowledge or consent. It was discovered that her cancer cells, now known as HeLa cells, could grow and divide continuously outside of the body in a laboratory setting. Henrietta’s cells became the first immortalized human cells and have enabled studies without the need for human experimentation. Since her death in 1951, Henrietta’s cells have been cultured and used for countless scientific discoveries and medical advancements such as immunizations, treatments for diseases, and even the COVID-19 vaccine. Additionally, HeLa cells generated a multibillion-dollar cell culture industry, yet despite her great contribution to medical research neither Henrietta nor her family received compensation. Henrietta’s story has significantly influenced me to combat inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and has disproportionately affected African Americans. My goal is to be a scientific illustrator and positively impact the Black community by combining my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. I will create artistic renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and scientific researchers. Unethical medical experiences have discouraged people from seeking healthcare. Today, we see hesitancy in the African American community to receive the COVID-19 vaccine and how this leads to higher rates of hospitalization and death. I strive to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. In other words, I want to help people who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare understand biomedical concepts that are hard to grasp. By teaching science and medicine through art, I will increase the medical knowledge of others which will allow them to make well-informed healthcare decisions. To make a positive impact as a scientific illustrator, I will pursue a major in human biology with a minor in studio arts this fall at UC San Diego. In the art department, I will have the opportunity to collaborate with researchers in other fields, including the sciences, while a human biology major will help me understand physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and the molecular basis of disease as well as provide me experience in biological research. I will enhance my undergraduate education through extension courses in human anatomy, graphic design, digital media, and figure drawing to increase my understanding of the human body and the proportions of the human form for illustration. My degree will provide me with a strong foundation of scientific knowledge, artistic technique, and visual biomedical communication and prepare me to be a top candidate for a graduate program in art as applied to science and medicine. With these skills, I will create illustrations that will help people visualize science and medicine.
    Bold Community Activist Scholarship
    Historical exclusion of people of color from higher education has created an achievement gap between indigent, ethnic minorities, and their wealthy, white counterparts. Low income communities are disproportionately affected and are riddled with underfunded schools that lack resources. Smaller budgets create a large student-to-teacher ratio and leaves few electives and extracurricular programs. Children may not have adequate academic support at home and may not see inspirational professionals who look like them. Equity in education is important because it creates a system that recognizes the needs of all students and meets those needs no matter their family background, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, gender, or learning capability. I was inspired to affect positive change for my community by combating educational inequality through tutoring. In ninth grade, I began assisting low-income students of color so they could be academically successful. I helped elementary and middle students with homework completion, test preparation, and understanding class material. It was gratifying to see students do better in school and feel proud of their own accomplishments. I continued to tutor virtually throughout the COVID-19 pandemic because educational inequities had been magnified in low income communities. I remained dedicated to tutoring throughout high school because I not only provided academic assistance for my tutees, but also encouragement, mentorship, and a positive relationship. Overcoming educational inequality and narrowing the achievement gap is important to my community’s well-being and ability to progress. Educational accomplishments and qualifications are cornerstones of sound decision-making, increased employment opportunities, and higher incomes, which all contribute to the prosperity of a community. Tutoring enabled me to contribute to my community by promoting education and instilling the importance of knowledge to one’s future in youth. I invested in my community through tutoring by helping youth do better in school and encouraging students to strive for higher academic achievement.
    Bold Mentor Scholarship
    Because it is important for community success to overcome educational inequality and narrow the achievement gap, I began tutoring in the ninth grade. I assisted low-income students of color so they could be academically successful. I remained dedicated to tutoring throughout high school, including virtually during the pandemic, because I not only provided academic assistance, but also mentorship and a positive relationship. My role as a tutor blossomed into a mentor as I provided support and guidance for my tutees that faced personal issues such as problems with classmates and difficult relationships at home. First and foremost I listened when the academic conversation became more about social and home topics and then I followed up regarding those topics so students knew they were heard. I also helped students learn the basic life skills I already established as a high school student such as organization and time management. I set an example for how to balance time commitments and social activities with studying and maintaining good grades. Because I tutored for a community organization associated with my church, I was able to develop positive relationships with my tutees as an assistant in the children’s ministry. This enhanced my mentorship allowing me to create a sense of belonging to a small but special group of “my tutees” and to encourage them to live confident and spiritual lives while reaching for knowledge and wisdom. As an incoming college student, I look forward to campus opportunities to continue to impact the well-being of the community and its ability to progress by assisting and mentoring underserved youth. As a future scientific illustrator, I intend to impact diversity in the field by encouraging the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color and mentoring them as they strive for higher education.
    KBK Artworks Scholarship
    Unable to access my school’s art studio during the COVID-19 pandemic, I began art projects at home such as restoring paintings and drawing logos for small businesses. The pandemic added a layer of difficulty to my school life. The strictly online contact hindered my learning and my ability to make in-person connections. The social isolation and loneliness caused me to experience mental health challenges such as stress, anxiety, and depression. Art became a coping mechanism during this mentally trying time of my life and a way for me to express my feelings. The negative effects of the pandemic worsened people’s mental health, and were particularly severe for teenagers of which many showed signs of new or worsening mental health conditions. Quarantine created mental and emotional challenges in teens during a formative time in which in-person connection is critical for development. Experiencing the emotional distress of the pandemic, I realized the need to address these difficulties. Upon returning to school, I co-founded and led a club dedicated to spreading awareness about the importance of prioritizing mental health. In addition to leading discussions regarding mental health challenges, I led creative activities to teach members ways to improve mental health and alleviate stress. This is how I directly helped my school community through my art. I organized artistic activities such as sculpting, painting, drawing and even building structures with legos. I encouraged my peers to use art as a form of therapy that can relieve stress and promote calmness. My leadership demonstrated the positive connection between art and mental health and set an example to prioritize mental health while in school and other stressful environments. I strive to be a scientific illustrator and will pursue a dual major in visual arts and human biology this fall. This will provide me with a strong foundation of artistic technique, scientific knowledge, and visual biomedical communication and prepare me to be a top candidate for a graduate program in art as applied to medicine. As a scientific illustrator, I will create artistic renditions that teach, depict, and explain biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and researchers. I will directly help communities by using my art to bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. Most important to me is targeting inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and disproportionately affects African Americans. My goal is to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. I will use my art to teach science and medicine so that people who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare, due to unethical medical experiences, understand concepts that are hard to grasp and make well-informed healthcare decisions. Additionally, I will indirectly use my art to help communities of color by cultivating more diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of scientific illustration. I will work to include more underrepresented people by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Furthermore, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth. Finally, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    I have been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember. I was formally introduced to art at the age of nine when I learned various media, techniques, and color theory. In high school, my drawing and painting skills were enhanced through coursework that increased my artistic knowledge and fostered my creative expression. In college I will pursue a dual major in visual arts and human biology. This will provide me with a strong foundation of artistic technique, scientific knowledge, and visual biomedical communication and prepare me to be a top candidate for a graduate program in art as applied to medicine. I strive to be a scientific illustrator and create artistic renditions that teach, depict, and explain biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations, and online. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and researchers. I plan to make a positive impact on the world by using my art to bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. Most important to me is targeting inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and disproportionately affects African Americans. My goal is to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. I will use my art to teach science and medicine so that people who have been discouraged from seeking healthcare, due to unethical medical experiences, understand concepts that are hard to grasp and make well-informed healthcare decisions. Additionally, I will make a positive impact on the world by cultivating more diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of scientific illustration. I will work to include more underrepresented people by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for increased employment of minorities and women. Furthermore, I will collaborate with schools and community organizations to provide access to art and science education while being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth. Finally, I will address the problem in which the white male body is the standard in medical images by increasing representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    Surya Education Assistance Scholarship
    My lineage is rooted in slavery. My fourth great-grandmother was a lifetime slave who learned to read and write although it was illegal which reflects my pursuit of higher education. She was a midwife who administered medication to other slaves. Perhaps this is where my interest in health sciences stems from. I descend from her daughter whose children became landowners. My great grandparents established businesses and my grandmother was one of the first African Americans to teach at Mills College in Oakland. I am passionate about receiving my education because African Americans, including members of my family, have been historically denied the ability to attend school, experienced segregated schools, or had to overcome exclusion from educational institutions. I hope to follow in the footsteps of my mother and surmount obstacles as a minority in science to earn multiple degrees and establish a career in science. Despite historical obstacles, my family has achieved great feats proving to me that I can overcome anything and accomplish my academic and career goals. I foresee adversities as a member of an underrepresented group in STEM attending a predominantly white university where it is likely I will be one of few black students in upper division courses and internships. I will have to overcome hardships such as microaggressions, a lack of diversity, and imposter syndrome, however, I am inherently resilient, perseverant, and encouraged by the strength of my ancestors whose accomplishments inspire me to overcome these challenges. This fall I will pursue a dual major in human biology and visual arts at UC San Diego, qualifying me to study art as applied to medicine in a graduate program. I look forward to gaining higher education in human anatomy, physiology and the molecular basis of human disease, as well as illustration, animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design. I will have opportunities to enhance my education through collaboration with biomedical researchers. This will prepare me for a unique career in scientific illustration in which we rarely see African Americans. I am excited to learn how to create artistic renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations and online. I strive to become a scientific illustrator so I can combine my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. Inequity in healthcare is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and has disproportionately affected African Americans. This disparity contributes to higher death rates in African Americans at a younger age compared to their white counterparts. I aspire to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. By teaching science and medicine through art, I will increase the medical knowledge of others so they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. Additionally, my goal is to cultivate more diversity in scientific illustration. I want to be a trailblazer who highlights this unique career and makes it more known to people of color. I will make an effort to include more underrepresented people by creating opportunities such as internships and advocating for employment of minorities and women. Furthermore, I will address the problem in scientific illustration in which the white male body is the standard in medical images. To promote diversity, I will increase representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected. I will also be a role model who strengthens youth of color by collaborating with schools and organizations to provide access to art education and expose students to science.
    Bold Great Minds Scholarship
    Henrietta Lacks was a poor, African American woman whose cervical cancer cells were unethically biopsied without her knowledge or consent. It was discovered that her cancer cells could grow and divide continuously in laboratory settings. These cells, called HeLa, are the first immortalized human cells and have enabled studies without the need for human experimentation. Since her death in 1951, Henrietta’s cells have been cultured and used for countless scientific discoveries and medical advancements such as immunizations, treatments for diseases, and even the COVID-19 vaccine. Additionally, HeLa cells generated a multibillion-dollar cell culture industry, yet despite her great contribution to medical research neither Henrietta nor her family received compensation. I admire Henrietta Lacks because even though life was difficult for her she did not hesitate to help others, so much so that even in death she has helped all of mankind. Henrietta’s story has significantly influenced me to combat inequity in healthcare which is a prominent social issue that is historically based on race and has disproportionately affected African Americans. This disparity contributes to higher death rates in African Americans compared to their white counterparts. I strive to be a scientific illustrator and combine my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to bridge gaps in science, medical, and healthcare communication. I will create artistic renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, presentations and online. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and researchers. I aim to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system due to medical injustice by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. By teaching science and medicine through art, I will increase the medical knowledge of others so that they can make well-informed healthcare decisions.
    Bold Creativity Scholarship
    For me art is a talent, form of expression, and creative outlet. I was introduced to various artistic media and techniques at a young age and my skills were enhanced in my high school art courses. Unable to access my school’s art studio during the pandemic, I began art projects at home such as restoring paintings and drawing logos for small businesses. As an artist, I create pieces in my favorite art style, realism, and illustrate accurate and detailed images of people. Additionally, I apply creativity in my life through my hobbies. On a recent trip to the beach I collected seashells that I incorporated into my jewelry making. I also enjoy cooking and using color and placement when plating the same way I use paint on a canvas. My educational goal is to combine my creative talent with my interest in science and major in visual arts and human biology in college and then study art as applied to medicine in graduate school. I am striving for a career in scientific illustration which is a uniquely creative field. My goal is to design figures and informational learning tools used in journals, textbooks, presentations, animations and online that will bridge gaps in science and medical communication. This will involve animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with medical professionals and researchers. I intend to create renditions that teach, explain, and depict biomedical concepts so that they are easier to understand. As a scientific illustrator, I will use my art and creativity to help people grasp concepts so their scientific and medical knowledge is increased and they can make well-informed healthcare decisions.
    Bold Hobbies Scholarship
    My favorite hobby is art, specifically drawing and painting. To me art is a talent, a form of expression, a creative outlet, and a way to relax. I was formally introduced to drawing and painting at the age of nine in a community center class where I learned various media, techniques, and color theory. I develop my skills by practicing my drawing and painting at home and through various courses in school. During the pandemic, I began projects at home such as restoring paintings and drawing logos for small businesses. I focused on my favorite art style, realism, and illustrated accurate and detailed images of people. After returning to campus, I took a self-directed course in which I had full creative liberty and produced personally meaningful pieces. In 2020, my portrait was selected to represent my school in the Lillian Black Children’s Art Council Art Exhibit. I hope to turn this hobby into a career as a scientific illustrator. Another hobby of mine is cooking, in which I produce delicious dishes and apply artistry to their presentation. I enjoy making foods from various cultures and sharing them with family and friends. My favorite part of cooking is being creative with how I plate dishes. I use color and placement in cooking the same way I use paint on a canvas. I primarily cook vegan dishes because of my love for animals. Animal rescue is important to me. Every day for the past few years I have fed and given affection to four generations of a family of stray cats. I have also rescued a baby sparrow whose nest had fallen out of a tree. To make sure this fledgling received proper care, I took it to a wildlife refuge so it could have a chance at life.
    Bold Career Goals Scholarship
    Winner
    My dream for the future is to be a scientific illustrator. To achieve this, I will combine my artistic talent with my interest in science and major in visual arts and human biology as an undergraduate and study art as applied to medicine in graduate school. My goal is to design figures and informational learning tools used in journals, textbooks, presentations, and animations that will bridge gaps in medical and healthcare communication. My educational training will prepare me for a career that involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in collaboration with biomedical professionals and researchers. I intend to create renditions that teach, explain, and depict biomedical concepts so that difficult concepts are easier to understand. I dream of combating inequity in healthcare that has disproportionately affected African Americans by helping people understand concepts so that their medical knowledge is increased and they are able to make well-informed healthcare decisions. I will work to alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions, and how treatments such as vaccines work. I also want to cultivate more diversity in scientific illustration because we rarely see African Americans in this unique field. I dream to make scientific illustration more known to people of color and make an effort to include more underrepresented people in the field. One way I will do this is by being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color. Furthermore, I will address the problem in scientific illustration in which the white male body is the standard in medical images. To promote diversity in scientific illustration I will increase representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    Stephan L. Daniels Lift As We Climb Scholarship
    My career goal is to be a scientific illustrator. To accomplish this, I will pursue a dual major in visual arts and human biology this Fall at UC San Diego. This will prepare me to be a top candidate for a graduate program studying art as applied to medicine to acquire a strong foundation of scientific knowledge, artistic technique, and visual biomedical communication. I am driven to pursue a career in STEM because I was immersed in science at a young age. I assisted my mother with preparing practical exams for her anatomy class by labeling models and preserved organs, and flagging structures on cadavers. I also gained hands-on experience working with bacteria and human cells in her research laboratory. My interest in STEM was piqued while viewing HeLa cells, one of the greatest contributions to medical science, through a microscope and learning the story of Henrietta Lacks and the circumstances under which this African American woman’s cells were unethically obtained. I hope to follow the example of my mother by surmounting obstacles as an underrepresented minority in science. As a participant in the CURE/HERO internship program at the UCSF Medical Center, I shadow an MD-PhD in the Radiation Oncology Department. Through this experience, I observe patient care and consultations, learn how treatment for cancer patients is determined, and conduct literary research that I present to doctors. My passion for science is fueled by hands-on opportunities and in school I take honors and AP courses that reflect this passion. In my classes, I practice experimental design and apply the scientific method to determine if a hypothesis is rejected or fails to be rejected. I also conduct anatomical dissections, tests on plants, and analyses of chemical reactions. From both inside and outside of the classroom, I gain a greater understanding of what it means to be a scientist and the possibility for innovation and discovery that can help mankind. In addition to studying science, I have also been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember because, for me, art is more than an interest; it is a talent and a form of expression. I was introduced to various artistic media and techniques at a young age and in high school my skills have been enhanced through drawing and painting courses. As a scientific illustrator, I will uplift my community by combining my scientific knowledge and artistic talent to bridge gaps in medical and healthcare communication. Scientific illustrators create renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in journals, textbooks, and presentations. This involves animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design in conjunction with collaboration with biomedical professionals and researchers. My goal is to address disparities in healthcare that disproportionately affect communities of color by helping people understand concepts that are hard to grasp, so their medical knowledge is increased and they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. This can alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system due to historical medical injustice by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. Additionally, I will cultivate more diversity in scientific illustration by spreading awareness about this unique field, including more underrepresented people, and being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color. Furthermore, I will address the problem in scientific illustration in which the white male body is the standard in medical images. To promote diversity in scientific illustration I will increase representation of diverse bodies in illustrations so that the richness of our society is reflected.
    Bold Equality Scholarship
    Since ninth grade, I have combated educational inequalities by tutoring students so they can be academically successful. Educational accomplishments and qualifications are cornerstones of sound decision-making, increased employment opportunities, and higher incomes, which foster the well-being and prosperity of a community. Tutoring enables me to promote these opportunities and contribute to my community’s long-term success by instilling the importance of knowledge and education in youth. In the future, I will give back to my community by combining my scientific knowledge and artistic talent as a scientific illustrator. Scientific illustrators create renditions that teach biomedical concepts through figures and informational learning tools displayed in scientific and medical journals, textbooks, and presentations. My goal is to bridge gaps in medical and healthcare communication so that difficult concepts are easier to understand. To accomplish this, I will major in visual arts and human biology for my undergraduate education and study art as applied to medicine in graduate school. I will combat the historical inequity in healthcare that has generated distrust amongst minorities and work to increase diversity in scientific illustration. I intend to address disparities in healthcare that disproportionately affect African Americans by helping people understand hard to grasp concepts, so their medical knowledge is increased and they can make well-informed healthcare decisions. This can alleviate the warranted distrust of the healthcare system by educating people on how the human body functions and how treatments such as vaccines work. Additionally, I will cultivate more diversity in scientific illustration by spreading awareness about this unique field, including more underrepresented people, and being a role model who encourages the development of artistic talent and an interest in science in youth of color. Finally, to promote diversity I will increase the representation of diverse bodies to reflect the richness of our society in medical illustrations.
    Kenyada Me'Chon Thomas Legacy Scholarship
    A prominent social issue is inequity in health care which embodies the systemic differences in the quality of health of people from different groups of the population. These differences do not occur naturally but are results of human behavior. Inequities in health care between social classes are historically based on race and African Americans have been disproportionately affected. It is a common misconception that African Americans are more prone to health issues because of their race. Due to this, doctors may not prioritize the care of African Americans, not order necessary tests, and possibly provide ineffective treatment. This inequity contributes to a higher death rate in African Americans at a younger age compared to their white counterparts. The historical medical injustice experienced by African Americans has resulted in a hesitancy to seek out medical assistance, An example of this is the story of Henrietta Lacks, whose cervical cancer cells were biopsied without her knowledge or consent in 1951 and became the first immortalized human cell line that has been one of the greatest medical contributions to mankind to this day. Henrietta's cells, known as HeLa cells, have been used for advancements in the medical field for decades without her family’s knowledge and have been used for many medical breakthroughs including the development of vaccines and to study the effects of drugs, toxins, and viruses without testing on humans. Despite her great contribution, neither Henrietta nor her family received any compensation. I will influence the inequity in health care that disproportionately affects African Americans in a career as a scientific illustrator. Scientific illustrators bridge gaps in scientific, medical, and healthcare communication; in other words, they make difficult concepts easier to understand through illustration, animation, 3D modeling, and graphic design. I’m going to create images, figures, and informational learning tools that you see in textbooks, scientific and medical journals, presentations, and online. Through art and science, I will combat inequities in healthcare by helping people understand concepts that are hard to grasp so that their medical knowledge is increased. To achieve this, I will combine my artistic talent with my interest in science and pursue a dual major in visual arts and human biology this Fall when I attend UC San Diego. This program will prepare me to be a top candidate for the Master of Arts in Medical and Biological Illustration Program at Johns Hopkins University. In graduate school, I will study art as applied to medicine and acquire a strong foundation of scientific knowledge, artistic technique, and visual communication. Both my undergraduate and graduate studies will establish me as a scientific illustrator and allow me to combat inequities in healthcare by teaching science and medicine through art.