For DonorsFor Applicants
user profile avatar

Joshua Thornton

1175

Bold Points

4x

Finalist

Bio

Aspiring chef/entrepreneur, self-taught and creative in the kitchen. Cancer survivor and son of an award-winning mac and cheese connoisseur. I dream of becoming a chef known for his abstract and extraordinary dishes. senior in high school and a member of the American Culinary Federation. I want to learn and connect with other future chefs and culinary veterans. Chef | Culinary | Food | Cooking | Junior Chef | Dining | Artificial Intelligence | ACF | #childhoodcancer #cancersurvivor Interests: Culinary arts Debate Sports Gaming Travel

Education

Western Guilford High School

High School
2020 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Cooking and Related Culinary Arts, General
    • Hospitality Administration/Management
    • Agricultural and Food Products Processing
    • Culinary, Entertainment, and Personal Services, Other
    • Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations
    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
    • Agricultural Business and Management
    • Accounting and Computer Science
    • Visual and Performing Arts, Other
    • Visual and Performing Arts, General
    • Fine and Studio Arts
    • Arts, Entertainment, and Media Management
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Food & Beverages

    • Dream career goals:

      Chef, entrepreneur, artist

    • Back of House team leader

      Chick-fil-a
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Inventory specialist

      Lucky Dog Volleyball
      2022 – 2022

    Sports

    none

    2020 – 20233 years

    Research

    • AP seminar

      Western Guilford high school
      2020 – 2023

    Arts

    • Weaver Academy of Performing Arts

      Culinary
      2022 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Mac And Cheese Ministry — Cook/Volunteer
      2015 – 2017

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic, so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. My mom somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house in a different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my passion for culinary arts. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again, I wanted to own a food truck, and she instantly got to work on making it happen. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken and we couldn't afford to fix it. From her, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by homelessness in Greensboro. My mom has always been my pillar. She pushes me and helps me whenever I'm stuck or run out of ideas. She's connected me with people who play huge parts in my development as a chef, including my mentor, Chef Chayil Johnson. She always has the answer when I don't and encourages me to step outside my comfort zone. She's the reason I participated in Skills USA this year. She constantly pushes me to keep moving forward. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer, my mom and I launched our own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. This school year, I graduated from the culinary program at the arts school in my city. I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my kitchen. Through every step of my journey as a chef, my mom has been supportive of everything I do. She's always going 120% to make sure I have the resources and experiences I need to advance my career. I wouldn’t be here without my mom's support and encouragement; her strength and love have been the foundation of my success and a driving force behind my dreams.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. A few years ago, my answer would have been very different. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. It planted a new passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me; it was the creativity and the freedom. From this, a love for food bloomed and has led me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food and how it can heal people. My four-year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, or sometimes on my own, I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Now that I have learned this, I want to become a chef so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University, and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants, chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting, flavorful experience to my customers. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But my eyes were opened by the experience, and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    Thomas Mashig Foundation Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. A few years ago, my answer would have been very different. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Marinating in my hospital bed and watching famous chefs from all over the world prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me and planted a new passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me; it was the creativity and the freedom. From this, a love for food bloomed and led me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food and how it can heal people. My four-year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, or sometimes on my own, I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go, I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it firsthand during my time in the hospital. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Even though people are overwhelmed or tired, that small amount of time spent eating a nice meal can uplift a person, and that makes all the difference. Now that I have learned this, I want to open a restaurant of my own so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. Earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Career Test Scholarship
    My dream of becoming a chef wasn’t always clear. When I was eight, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one to practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams and face a new, much tougher way of life. My fight with cancer was nothing short of rough. I had to go through many tests, surgeries, and treatments. I was stuck in a hospital bed and went through a painful bone marrow transplant, long radiation sessions, and many rounds of chemotherapy. During this tough time, I lost my taste for food but I found comfort in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion of the chefs lit a new spark in me, and I realized how powerful food could be. This new love for cooking gave me hope and motivated me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I had a fresh start and a new outlook on life. I wanted to serve others through cooking. My family and I prepared and served food to people affected by homelessness. Eventually, I started doing this at a local church and sometimes organized with friends on my own. These experiences taught me that food is more than just sustenance; it connects people, offers comfort, and provides hope. I saw firsthand how a simple meal could make a huge difference to someone going through tough times. Throughout my time in high school I’d been relentlessly pursuing my culinary career. By age 16, I had joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked alongside Food Network chefs on the red carpet, and explored the food scenes of LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC. I am deeply committed to realizing my dream in the culinary arts, and every step I take toward it is deliberate. In the summer of 2021, I launched a crowdfunding campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. In my junior year of high school, I applied and was accepted into the culinary program at our city's arts school I participated in my first culinary competition and became a standout student known for motivation and leadership in our kitchen. I spent countless evenings after school preparing for Skills USA, where I placed in the top 5. This was only my second-ever competition. This scholarship will help me afford my education and achieve my goals of becoming disciplined, adaptable, and connected to opportunities that strengthen my culinary career. Going to college means everything to me. It’s a chance to deeply explore my passion for culinary, challenge myself, and make a positive impact on the world. It’s also my opportunity to enhance my culinary skills, learn about diverse styles of cooking, and make my dreams of becoming a chef real. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos.
    David Foster Memorial Scholarship
    My dream of becoming a chef wasn’t always clear. When I was eight, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one at practice, never missed a game, and topped the team’s scoring. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams and face a new, much tougher reality. My fight with cancer was nothing short of rough. I underwent numerous tests, surgeries, and treatments. Stuck in a hospital bed, I lost my taste for food but found solace in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion of the chefs lit a new spark in me, revealing how powerful food could be. This newfound love for cooking gave me hope and motivated me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I have relentlessly pursued my culinary career. By age 16, I had joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked alongside Food Network chefs on the red carpet, and explored the food scenes of LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC. I am deeply committed to realizing my dream in the culinary arts, and every step I take toward it is deliberate. In the summer of 2021, I launched a crowdfunding campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. In my junior year of high school, I applied and was accepted into the culinary program at our city's arts school, where I met Chef Tisdale, my mentor. Chef Tisdale has been pivotal in my culinary journey. During my first year under her guidance, I honed my kitchen skills and, importantly, she helped build my confidence. Encouraged by her, I participated in my first culinary competition, becoming a standout student known for motivation and leadership in our kitchen. Chef Tisdale wrote me a letter of recommendation for college applications. When I faced challenges returning for my senior year due to registration constraints, she advocated for my return to the culinary program. We spent countless evenings after school preparing for Skills USA, where I placed in the top 5. This was only my second-ever competition. Chef Tisdale continues to be my mentor, supporting me whenever I have questions or need her expertise. Her mentorship has been invaluable, and I am deeply grateful for her dedication to my growth as a chef.
    Schmid Memorial Scholarship
    My dream of becoming a chef wasn’t always clear. When I was eight, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one to practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams and face a new, much tougher way of life. My fight with cancer was nothing short of rough. I had to go through many tests, surgeries, and treatments. I was stuck in a hospital bed, and went through a painful bone marrow transplant, long radiation sessions, and many rounds of chemotherapy. During this tough time, I lost my taste for food but I found comfort in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion of the chefs lit a new spark in me, and I realized how powerful food could be. This new love for cooking gave me hope and motivated me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I had a fresh start and a new outlook on life. I wanted to serve others through cooking. My family and I prepared and served food to people affected by homelessness. Eventually, I started doing this at a local church and sometimes organized with friends on my own. These experiences taught me that food is more than just sustenance; it connects people, offers comfort, and provides hope. Attending college will give me the knowledge and skills to make a real difference in my passion for cooking. I dream of opening a restaurant that serves the community. I want it to be a place where people from all walks of life can find comfort in nourishment. Food has the power to bring people together, and I want to use this power to support and inspire the people around me. I’ve been accepted to Johnson & Wales University to study culinary arts. This scholarship will help me afford my education and achieve my goals of becoming disciplined, adaptable, and connected to opportunities that strengthen my culinary career. Going to college means everything to me. It’s a chance to deeply explore my passion for culinary, challenge myself, and make a positive impact on the world. It’s also my opportunity to enhance my culinary skills, learn about diverse styles of cooking, and make my dreams of becoming a chef real. For me, college isn’t just about getting an education; it’s about using my journey of resilience to make a new life for myself, especially after what I've been through. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But my eyes were opened by the experience, and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    My dream of becoming a chef wasn’t always clear. When I was eight, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one to practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams and face a new, much tougher way of life. My fight with cancer was nothing short of rough. I had to go through many tests, surgeries, and treatments. I was stuck in a hospital bed, went through a painful bone marrow transplant, long radiation sessions, and many rounds of chemotherapy. During this tough time, I lost my taste for food but I found comfort in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion the chefs had lit a new spark in me, and I realized how powerful food could be. This new love for cooking gave me hope and motivated me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I had a fresh start and a new outlook on life. I wanted to serve others through cooking. My family and I prepared and served food to people affected by homelessness. Eventually I started doing this at a local church, and sometimes organized with friends on my own. These experiences taught me that food is more than just sustenance; it connects people, offers comfort, and provides hope. I saw firsthand how a simple meal could make a huge difference to someone going through tough times. Attending college will give me the knowledge and skills to make a real difference with my passion for cooking. I dream of opening a restaurant that serves the community. I want it to be a place where people from all walks of life can find comfort in nourishment. Food has the power to bring people together, and I want to use this power to support and inspire the people around me. I’ve been accepted to Johnson & Wales University to study culinary arts. This scholarship will help me afford my education and achieve my goals of becoming disciplined, adaptable and connected to opportunities that strengthen my culinary career. Going to college means everything to me. It’s a chance to deeply explore my passion for culinary, challenge myself, and make a positive impact on the world. It’s also my opportunity to enhance my culinary skills, learn about diverse styles of cooking, and make my dreams of becoming a chef real. For me, college isn’t just about getting an education; it’s about using my journey of resilience to make a new life for myself, especially after what I've been through. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But my eyes were opened by the experience, and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    Walters Family Oak Grove High School Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. A few years ago, my answer would have been very different. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I just lay in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. It planted a new passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me; it was the creativity and the freedom. From this, a love for food bloomed and has walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food and how it can heal people. My four-year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, or sometimes on my own, I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Now that I have learned this,I want to become a chef so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University, and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants, chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting, flavorful experience to my customers. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But my eyes were opened by the experience, and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    North Star Dreamers Memorial Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. A few years ago, my answer would have been very different. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just lay in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. Marinating in my hospital bed and watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. From this, a love for food bloomed and walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food and how it can heal people. My four-year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, or sometimes on my own, I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go, I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it firsthand during my time in the hospital. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Even though people are overwhelmed or tired, that small amount of time spent eating a nice meal can uplift a person, and that makes all the difference. Now that I have learned this, I want to open a restaurant of my own so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University, and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree.
    Redefining Victory Scholarship
    If I were asked this question a few years ago, the answer would be very different from what it is today. When I was younger, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one to practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams to face an unpredictable opponent. My treatment was nothing short of rough. I had to go through many tests, surgeries, and treatments. I was stuck in a hospital bed and went through a painful bone marrow transplant, long radiation sessions, and many rounds of chemotherapy. I lost my taste for food, but I found comfort in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion of chefs like Guy Fieri lit a new spark in me, and I realized how powerful food could be. This new love for cooking gave me hope and guided me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I had a fresh start and a new outlook on life. I wanted to serve others through cooking. My family and I prepared and served food to people affected by homelessness. Eventually, I started doing this at a local church and sometimes organized with friends on my own. I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. These experiences taught me that food is more than just sustenance; it connects people, offers comfort, and provides hope. I saw firsthand how a simple meal could make a huge difference to someone going through tough times. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. I dream of opening a restaurant that serves the community. I want it to be a place where people from all walks of life can find comfort in nourishment. Food has the power to bring people together, and I want to use this power to support and inspire the people around me. When I can do that, that’s when I’ll consider myself successful. I’ve been accepted to Johnson & Wales University to study culinary arts. This scholarship will help me afford my education and achieve my goals of becoming disciplined, adaptable, and connected to opportunities that strengthen my culinary career. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But my eyes were opened by the experience, and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    Henry Bynum, Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. A few years ago, my answer would have been very different. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. Marinating in my hospital bed and watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me; it was the creativity and the freedom. From this, a love for food bloomed and walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food and how it can heal people. My four-year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, or sometimes on my own, I do this because I love helping others. But I also know that everyone is different, and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go, I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it firsthand during my time in the hospital. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Now that I have learned this, I want to open a restaurant of my own so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. Earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University, and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree.
    Hines Scholarship
    My dream of becoming a chef wasn’t always clear. When I was eight, my passion was soccer. I was always the first one to practice, never missed a game, and was the top scorer on the team. I dreamed of playing in the FIFA World Cup one day. But life changed suddenly when I was diagnosed with biphenotypic leukemia, a rare kind of cancer, just as my friends were heading off to middle school. This diagnosis forced me to pause my soccer dreams and face a new, much tougher way of life. My fight with cancer was nothing short of rough. I had to go through many tests, surgeries, and treatments. I was stuck in a hospital bed, went through a painful bone marrow transplant, long radiation sessions, and many rounds of chemotherapy. During this tough time, I lost my taste for food but I found comfort in watching the Food Network. The creativity and passion of chefs like Guy Fieri lit a new spark in me, and I realized how powerful food could be. This new love for cooking gave me hope and guided me through my recovery. After my four-year battle with cancer, I had a fresh start and a new outlook on life. I wanted to serve others through cooking. My family and I prepared and served food to people affected by homelessness. Eventually I started doing this at a local church, and sometimes organized with friends on my own. These experiences taught me that food is more than just sustenance; it connects people, offers comfort, and provides hope. I saw firsthand how a simple meal could make a huge difference to someone going through tough times. Attending college will give me the knowledge and skills to make a real difference with my passion for cooking. I dream of opening a restaurant that serves the community. I want it to be a place where people from all walks of life can find comfort in nourishment. Food has the power to bring people together, and I want to use this power to support and inspire the people around me. I’ve been accepted to Johnson & Wales University to study culinary arts. This scholarship will help me afford my education and achieve my goals of becoming disciplined, adaptable and connected to opportunities that strengthen my culinary career. Going to college means everything to me. It’s a chance to deeply explore my passion for culinary, challenge myself, and make a positive impact on the world. It’s also my opportunity to enhance my culinary skills, learn about diverse styles of cooking, and make my dreams of becoming a chef real. For me, college isn’t just about getting an education; it’s about using my journey of resilience to make a new life for myself, especially after what I've been through.
    Rev. and Mrs. E B Dunbar Scholarship
    Why I Want to Become a Chef A few years ago, I would have never imagined wanting to be a chef. My family and I spent time together in the kitchen, but my true passion was soccer. I was dedicated, attending every practice and game, and dreaming of playing in the FIFA World Cup. However, my life took an unexpected turn when I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare type of cancer. My soccer dreams were put on hold as I faced a whirlwind of tests, surgeries, and treatments. Confined to a hospital bed, I found solace in watching the Food Network, where chefs created intricate dishes. This sparked a new passion in me and opened my eyes to the healing power of food. During my battle with cancer, my family faced significant challenges. My mom lost her job, and we relied on hospital-provided housing and financial assistance. Despite the hardships, my mom worked hard to rebuild our lives after my three-year hospital stay. The financial burden of my illness has made pursuing my dream of becoming a chef challenging. I have applied for over 95 scholarships to afford tuition. Although the financial strain is significant, I am determined to overcome it. My experience with cancer gave me a fresh start and a new perspective on life. I want to use my love for cooking to serve others. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness, sometimes with my family or church, and other times on my own. I believe that food can provide comfort and bring people together, offering more than just nourishment. Becoming a chef is about more than my passion for cooking. I want to offer comfort and support to people from all walks of life. Food has the power to uplift and make a difference in someone's life, even amid chaos and struggle. My ultimate goal is to open my own restaurant, where I can give back to my community and be a pillar of support through good food. Earning this scholarship would bring me closer to achieving this dream and allow me to serve others in a meaningful way.
    Treye Knorr Memorial Scholarship
    I want to become a Chef. This was not always my dream career. If this was a few years ago, my answer would be very different from what it is today. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice. I never missed a game. I was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World cup. But, something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. From this, a love for food bloomed and has walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food, and how it can heal people. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me, it was the creativity and the freedom. My four year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, and sometimes on my own. I do this because I love helping others but I also know that everyone is different and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it first hand during my time in the hospital. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life, just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Even though people are overwhelmed, or tired, that small amount of time spent eating a nice meal can uplift a person, and that means all the difference. Now that I have learned this. I want to open a restaurant of my own, so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support by way of good food. Earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal. Yes, my leukemia took years away from one of the most important periods in my life. But, my eyes were opened by the experience and I was able to see through a different lens that set me on the path I’m pursuing now.
    John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
    I want to become a Chef. This was not always my dream career. If this was a few years ago, my answer would be very different from what it is today. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice. I never missed a game. I was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World Cup. But, something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Watching chefs create intricate dishes captivated me, especially Guy Fieri's show. This newfound passion for food grew during my four-year battle with cancer. I realized it wasn't just about tasting the food but about the creativity and freedom it offered. My experience with cancer gave me a fresh start and a new purpose: to serve people through cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to those affected by homelessness, whether with my family, a church, or on my own. It's more than just handing out meals; it's about connecting with people, offering advice, a prayer, or a listening ear. My time in the hospital showed me that food is a powerful way to connect and comfort people. I want to become a chef not just for the love of cooking but to provide comfort to people in their times of need. Food has the power to uplift and bring joy, even in the toughest times. My goal is to open a restaurant that supports my community, providing comfort through delicious meals. Earning this scholarship would help me pursue my degree at Johnson & Wales University. I want to learn from master chefs and apply that knowledge to lead my own kitchen, preparing comfort foods that offer an exciting, flavorful experience to my customers. Though leukemia took years from my life, it opened my eyes to a new path. This scholarship would bring me closer to my dream of becoming a chef and serving my community through the power of food.
    Janie Mae "Loving You to Wholeness" Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. This was not always my dream career. If this was a few years ago, the answer would be very different from what it is today. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot, but I was in love with soccer. I was the first one to every practice. I never missed a game. I was the top scorer on the team. I watched professionals play every chance I got, trying to mimic their moves in hopes of improving. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World cup. But, something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was forced to put a hold on my soccer “career.” I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. From this, a love for food bloomed and has walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of food, and how it can heal people. Over time, I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me, it was the creativity and the freedom. My four year battle with cancer gave me a fresh start. The life I had before was gone, and a new one had just begun. I want to use it as an opportunity to serve people through my cooking. In my community, I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, and sometimes on my own. I do this because I love helping others but I also know that everyone is different and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it firsthand during my time in the hospital. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life, just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Even though people are overwhelmed, or tired, that small amount of time spent eating a nice meal can uplift a person, and that means all the difference. Now that I have learned this. I want to open a restaurant of my own, so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support by way of good food. Earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal. +
    Sola Family Scholarship
    My parents divorced when I was seven years old. My father left. My older sister and I stayed with my mother. To cope with the loss of our family unit, she began making homemade mac and cheese for hungry people in our community. To cope with my father’s absence, I lent my small hands to stirring, chopping, shredding, and carefully loading warm bubbling pans into the backseat of our trusty little red Hyundai. This became our way of sharing love and affection with those who needed it. Deep down, we needed those things too. Every week, we drove downtown and traded bowls of elbow noodles and endless cheese pulls for stories of aimless travel, war tours, self-discovery, and recovery from addiction. It’s pretty much always been the three of us. My mom, my sister, and I. My mom has always been our number one source of support, and even though her job as a single mother was difficult, she always went above and beyond when it meant the most. Our lives changed forever in January of 2017. It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister moved into the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While she managed our new life, I fought to stay alive. My mom somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, and work–until she lost her job. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. I didn’t have an appetite, but I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. This sparked a new love for food that kept me optimistic. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck and she instantly got to work on making it happen. After three years, I was finally in remission. My mom connected with an organization that found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, and a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it… …Until we found out it was broken beyond repair. This was devastating. We couldn’t afford to get it fixed. We were hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver, I continued on my culinary path, taking steps forward. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched a campaign and raised $5,000 to train at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year, I applied and got accepted to the high school culinary program in my city. I’ve been accepted to both of my top culinary schools. I wouldn’t be here without my mom.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree. This was not always my dream career. If I was asked this question 7 years ago, the answer would be very different from what it is today. My family and I often spent time together in the kitchen. I’d help with dinner sometimes, maybe grate some cheese or stir a pot., but I was in love with soccer. I wanted nothing more than to one day play in the FIFA World cup, but. Something happened that shifted the trajectory of my life forever. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart. I found comfort in it. From this, a love for food bloomed and has walked me down a culinary path that showed me the power of good food, and how it can unite people. Over time I learned that the reward of tasting was not what captivated me, it was the creativity and the freedom. In my community I often prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness. With my family, a church, and sometimes on my own. I do this because I love helping others but I also know that everyone is different and I need to learn how to relate to people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. I've seen it first hand during my time in the hospital. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I see that people all over the world are constantly going through something. I recognize that not every struggle is physical. I want to be the person who can give people from all walks of life, just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful. Even though people are overwhelmed, or tired, that small amount of time spent eating a nice meal can uplift a person, and that means all the difference. Now that I have learned this. I want to open a restaurant of my own, so I can give to my community and be a pillar of support by way of good food. Earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    Macaroni and cheese taught me that life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. It marked the beginning of my journey toward a career in the Culinary Arts. My parents divorced when I was nine years old. My father left. I stayed with my mother. To cope with the loss of our family unit, she began making homemade mac and cheese for hungry people in our community. To cope with my father’s absence, I lent my small hands to stirring, chopping, shredding, and carefully loading warm bubbling pans into the backseat of our trusty little red Hyundai. This became our way of sharing love and affection with those who needed it. Deep down, we needed those things too. Every week, we drove downtown and traded bowls of elbow noodles and endless cheese pulls for stories of aimless travel, war tours, self-discovery, and recovery from addiction. We didn’t judge people for their journey. In turn, they didn’t judge us for ours. I learned that the level of comfort food provides may not feel the same to a millionaire as it does to a person fallen on hard times. Then the lesson became even more personal. I got cancer. A rare kind. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I lived in the hospital, isolated from the outside world. I couldn’t eat for weeks and didn't look forward to family meals anymore. I didn’t have a taste for food. I just laid in bed watching the Food Network. Seeing chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes distracted me from the reality of my situation. I escaped into their methods, their creativity…their freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my curiosity turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. My ideas turned into passion. Cancer changed the way I could enjoy food, but food gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. I want to bring my real life experiences to leading my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. A culinary arts education will give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food, can help me continue serving my community in amazing ways.
    Future Leaders Scholarship
    I feel like my natural drive to push people and help them improve is part of what makes me a leader. I have taken the initiative in running multiple campaigns and I regularly solve problems and social conflicts at work, school, and home. serving as an Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, cooking with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and starting and running my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. Most recently I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I’m honored that I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I handmade pizzas in an authentic Italian restaurant, I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, and hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I am proud that I was confident enough to display my talent and that my food was good enough to serve. By the age of 16, I’d already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I’d also battled cancer and won. I am very serious and passionate about my future in the culinary arts and every step I take toward achieving my dream is intentional. At school, I am the Sous chef of my class and head chef of my group. This year I was able to share my experience and kitchen knowledge with them and assist them in the improvement of their culinary skills. The biggest thing I think makes me a good leader is knowing where I need to improve and attacking those areas head on. I prefer to learn with, and communicate with my peers instead of taking charge over them so they can progress with me instead of just following instructions.
    John Geremia Memorial Trades Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by homelessness in Greensboro. My time in the hospital taught me that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. I’ve already been accepted to my culinary school of choice but my family and I struggling to pay for tuition. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. This scholarship could put me one step closer to my goal.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. We had to move for my treatment which created even more problems. My mom was Always worried about my health, her job, housing, my sister and her schooling, and her own health since she’s living with Mitral valve prolapse. I told her to keep her head high, have faith, and pray. Solutions to our problems came naturally, thank the lord. Since then, I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I’m honored that I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. I’ve already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I am grateful that I’ve been able to continue my journey this far, and I intend to make the most of my second chance at life. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different
    Arthur and Elana Panos Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. We had to move for my treatment which created even more problems. My mom was Always worried about my health, her job, housing, my sister and her schooling, and her own health since she’s living with Mitral valve prolapse. I told her to keep her head high, have faith, and pray. Solutions to our problems came naturally, thank the lord. Since then, I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I’m honored that I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. I’ve already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I am grateful that I’ve been able to continue my journey this far, and I intend to make the most of my second chance at life.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. Then something big happened. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. My love for food became my source of optimism during treatment. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, when my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Even when our food truck dream was shattered, I cooked a rack of lamb to bring us together. These setbacks helped my passion for cooking grow. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef. I want to learn from culinary masters and lead my own kitchen. I aim to be known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity.
    Rod Tucci Memorial Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree.
    Brotherhood Bows Scholarship
    I love cooking. My relationship with cooking in my family, specifically with my mom and my sister is very important to us. We have always been close, no one goes anywhere without the other two. They have both always been my support system and I am that for them as well. We love to cook and eat together, that’s how we bond. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. My mom somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house which was in a completely different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Ever since then, I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA and Pebble Beach food and wine festivals and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. Right now I’m attending the culinary program at Weaver Academy School of Performing Arts. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. At this point, I’ve been accepted to both of my top culinary schools, and I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I wouldn’t be here without my mom. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food, can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone. I plan to go to culinary school to improve my skills so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck of my own.
    Curtis Holloway Memorial Scholarship
    My mom has been there for me at every turn. Anything I need or want to do, she's there ready to back it up. She has not changed when it comes to this, especially in my pursuit of my dream career. She has carried me through some rough times in my life and she continues to do so as I move through my senior year of high school and get ready for college. I used to love Soccer and because of that, my mom did too. She would drive me back and forth for practice and occasionally to a different city for a game. She bought me all of my gear and practice equipment too. We were all in it together. We worked super hard in the progression of my soccer career but in 2017 my life took a devastating turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of an unexpected journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. With support from my mom and sister, I pushed through, keeping my grades up. My mom somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house which was in a completely different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck and she instantly got to work on making it happen. My mom connected with An organization that found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, and a business plan and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. The front shocks needed to be replaced and It would’ve cost more money to fix it than to buy a new one. this was a major setback but I continued on my culinary path, continuously taking steps that help me achieve my dream and my mom helps push me along this path. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. At this point, I’ve been accepted to both of my top culinary schools, and I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I wouldn’t be here without my mom.
    North Carolina Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. in 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They promoted Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, a business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. I have been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and I plan to attend in the Fall. I want to become a chef. My time in culinary school will give me the experience I need, and improve upon my current skill set so that I am equipped to proceed with my career after college. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. Even I recognize it because of my personal experiences. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I recognize that people all over the world are constantly going through something. Trauma, pain, suffering. I want to be the person who can give them just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful, and even though people may go their whole day, or even their whole week miserable, overwhelmed, and tired, that 15 minutes spent eating a delicious burger can mean all the difference. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work, I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, a business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work, I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would help give me the financial support I need to pursue my degree.
    Jessie Koci Future Entrepreneurs Scholarship
    Right now I am planning to attend culinary school in hopes that I can grow my culinary knowledge to the point where I can one day have my own restaurant. If I were asked this question 5 years ago, the answer would be very different from what it is today. like a lot of other boys my age I was interested in video games, and racecars, and I played soccer as well. cooking was a hobby of mine but at that time, I never would've guessed that I'd be pursuing a career in culinary arts. Soccer was my main focus at the time, but Something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. In 2018 I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia. I no longer looked forward to meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. My interest in culinary is what kept me optimistic during my three years hospitalized. I want to be an entrepreneur because of my mom. She relentlessly supports me in everything I do and has been my number 1 motivator through my college application process. From her, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. She struggled to get her business off the ground because of the stipulations and restrictions imposed by the health department in our city. I want to have a successful business of my own so I can make her proud and show her that I was able to take our family recipes and Ideas and turn them into something great. I will be successful because of the endless amount of support I have from my mother and my sister, all the opportunities my battle with cancer has presented me with, All of the things it’s taught me, and the motivation it gave me. I have met so many chefs who are willing to help me and offer their advice when I need it. I have learned that the culinary arts require creativity which I have already but there is always more to learn. I can use my acquired knowledge to elevate the creative ideas I have now. This is why I want to go to culinary school. To me, success means I am able to support myself and my family. Of course, I want a nice house and a fast car but most importantly, I want to serve people. I want my food to comfort and enliven the people who eat it. I want to give people the same joy I feel when eating. When I can do that, that’s when I’ll consider myself successful.
    Della Fleetwood-Sherrod Humanitarian Scholarship
    From a bed in a small, cold hospital room, I embarked on an unexpected culinary journey that transformed my life. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests, and surgeries. In no time I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. While my mom was doing her best to manage our new life, I was doing my best to stay alive. I was tired, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7. I was still required to keep up with school during this time so I’d spend a few hours a day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. There were days when I was exhausted, nauseous, aching, and mentally drained, but I still had to do my work. Through all this, I was able to keep my grades up. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching Food Network on my television. Watching the chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This inspired me and helped me realize my interest in culinary arts which I didn’t know was there. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. When I reached remission, I was inspired to cook all the time. Being in the kitchen became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. We found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, and a business plan and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. We were hurt at the time but my love for food did not waver, I continued on my culinary path. I’m intentional about taking steps that help me achieve my dream. Right now I’m serving with my church as a volunteer. I help prepare and serve meals for people affected by homelessness in my city. I do this because I love helping others but I also think it’s important that I learn how to deal with people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. Even I recognize it because of my personal experiences. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I recognize that people all over the world are constantly going through something. Trauma, pain, suffering. I want to be the person who can give them just a little comfort amid their life’s chaos. Food is powerful, and even though people may go their whole day, or even their whole week miserable, overwhelmed, and tired, that 15 minutes spent eating a delicious burger can mean all the difference
    Joy Of Life Inspire’s AAA Scholarship
    From a bed in a small, cold hospital room, I embarked on an unexpected culinary journey that transformed my life. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests, and surgeries. In no time I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. While my mom was doing her best to manage our new life, I was doing my best to stay alive. I was tired, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7. I was still required to keep up with school during this time so I’d spend a few hours a day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. There were days when I was exhausted, nauseous, aching, and mentally drained, but I still had to do my work. Through all this I was able to keep my grades up. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching Food Network on my television. Watching the chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This inspired me and helped me realize my interest in culinary arts that I didn’t know was there. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. When I reached remission, I was inspired to cook all the time. Being in the kitchen became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. We found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. We were hurt at the time but my love for food did not waver, I continued on my culinary path. I’m intentional about taking steps that help me achieve my dream. Right now I’m serving with my church as a volunteer. I help prepare and serve meals for people affected by homelessness in my city. I do this because I love helping others but I also think it’s important that I learn how to deal with people. It’s more than just giving someone a brown paper bag. Sometimes they need a little advice, maybe a prayer, condolences, or just someone to talk to. Everywhere I go I see that food is the key to the heart. Even I recognize because of my personal experiences. I want to become a chef, but not just because I love cooking. I recognize that people all over the world are constantly going through something. Trauma, pain, suffering. I want to be the person that can give them just a little comfort in the midst of their life’s chaos. Food is powerful, and even though people may go their whole day, or even their whole week miserable, overwhelmed, and tired, that 15 minutes spent eating a delicious burger can mean all the difference.
    Combined Worlds Scholarship
    If I was asked this question 5 years ago, the answer would be very different from what it is today. I hated plane rides and long road trips. Every form of entertainment I liked was viewable or playable on a screen. This wasn't anything abnormal for kids my age but the experience that changed my perspective was. While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with Biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries. In no time I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived in the Ronald McDonald House across the street from the hospital and an hour away from our home. There were times I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I was too frail. I laid in bed watching Food Network for hours on end. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. They soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This helped me realize an interest in culinary arts that I didn’t know I had. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The idea of becoming a chef gave me hope. In 2018, the Make-a-Wish Foundation reached out to my family to ask what I would like for my wish. My favorite show at the time was Diners, Drive ins, and Dives. I wished for a similar experience, but the Wish team went above and beyond what I imagined. I thought I was going to Los Angeles for a small food tour but it was so much more than that. I was invited into professional kitchens all over the city and was a guest on the red carpet at the 2018 LA Food & Wine Festival! This is the point where my life was turned all the way around. I was immersed in a level of cuisine, culture, and community that I didn't even know existed. I met so many chefs who I'm still in contact with today. I plated dishes with famous food network chefs, tasted caviar for the first time, and got to see the Hollywood walk of fame in person. Traveling to LA and being embraced during one of the most difficult times in my life solidified my love for the culinary arts and shed light on the complexities of the world, it's different and diverse pieces, and how food is a universal language of compassion. Now, every flight and every road trip I take inspires me and affirms my dream. Since LA, I’ve applied and been accepted to the culinary program for high school students in my city, joined national culinary organizations, taken my first solo flight to summer training camp at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley and traveled to Puerto Rico, New Orleans, Charleston, St. Croix, and Asheville–tasting what the world has to offer and learning how to give back the love...as a chef.
    Russell Koci Skilled Trade Scholarship
    I am currently studying culinary arts, and I plan on becoming an entrepreneurial chef in the future. I’m on this path because in 2017, While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests, and surgeries. In no time I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived in the Ronald McDonald House, across the street from the hospital which was an hour away from our home. While my mom was doing her best to manage our new life, I was doing my best to stay alive. I was tired, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7. I was still required to keep up with school during this time so I’d spend a few hours a day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. There were days when I was exhausted, nauseous, aching, and mentally drained, but I still had to do my work. Through all this I was able to keep my grades up. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching Food Network on my television. Watching the chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This inspired me and helped me realize my interest in culinary arts that I didn’t know was there. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years, I was finally in remission. An organization that partnered with the hospital found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. The front shocks needed to be replaced and It would’ve cost more money to fix it than to buy a new one. This was devastating. We couldn't afford to continue paying for its storage and we weren’t able to get it fixed so we had to give it back. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. This school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. I will be successful because of all the opportunities my battle with cancer has presented me with. All of the things it’s taught me, and the motivation it gave me. I want to serve people. I want my food to comfort and enliven the people who eat it. I want to give people the same joy I feel when eating. When I am able to do that, that’s when I’ll consider myself successful.
    Dimon A. Williams Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. My mom, somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house that was in a completely different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck and she instantly got to work on making it happen. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years, I was finally in remission. From there I continued on my culinary path. I intentionally take steps that help me get closer to my goal and my mom support me along my journey. From her, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. At this point I’ve been accepted to both of my to top culinary schools, and I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I wouldn’t be here without my mom
    Martha Brooks Culinary Arts Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    David Foster Memorial Scholarship
    I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. This school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. This is where I met my Chef mentor. Chef Tisdale has been an essential piece in my culinary journey. I spent my first year with her developing my skills in the kitchen. She also was adamant about helping me build my confidence, I participated in my first culinary competition while in her class because she encouraged me to do so. She wrote me a letter of recommendation for my college applications and vouched for me to return for culinary 3-4 this year. I’m back with her again this year and we are training for FCCLA and Skills USA. She has helped me grow so much as a chef and I am so grateful that she has taken the time and effort to do so.
    Sharra Rainbolt Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. Through this process there were organizations and families who regularly made it a point to liven things up on the unit by hosting fun activities, celebrating holidays with the patients and cooking dinner. I am so appreciative of these people and their actions because it not only helped me keep my head up, but they had support for the patient parents which my mom really needed. I am healthy now and would like to give back the same way those families and organizations did while I was hospitalized. I love cooking. As I progress through highschool, I am perusing a career in culinary arts. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. I now continue on my culinary path. I’m intentional about taking steps that help me achieve my dream. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. I am inspired to cook all the time. Being in the kitchen became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. I now know that Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. It helped me realize my dream and I want to give the same support to someone else. As a chef, I can do that through food.
    Resilient Scholar Award
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. My mom, somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house that was in a completely different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck and she instantly got to work on making it happen. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years, I was finally in remission. My mom connected with An organization that found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. The front shocks needed to be replaced and It would’ve cost more money to fix it than to buy a new one. This was devastating. We couldn't afford to continue paying for its storage and we weren’t able to get it fixed so we had to give it back. We were hurt, but my love for culinary did not waver, I continued on my culinary path. I continue steps that help me achieve my dream and my helps push me along this path. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. At this point I’ve been accepted to both of my to top culinary schools, and I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I wouldn’t be here without my mom.
    Reginald Kelley Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. I want to learn how to lead my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. My real-life experiences plus a formal culinary education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Overcoming Adversity - Jack Terry Memorial Scholarship
    I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. It’s almost like my life had be halted, and then reset. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, extending out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. Jack Terry’s story is inspiring to me because he came up from rock bottom. He took what was thrown at him and turned it all the way around and I feel like my story is somewhat a reflection of his. I intend to take my culinary journey to new heights and serve my community in some amazing ways. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Chris Ford Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I want to use my food as a hand, reaching out to people from different backgrounds to provide support where they need it the most. Whether it be a mental or physical struggle. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Zamora Borose Goodwill Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. One of the social workers at the hospital noticed my increasing interest, and recommended a movie. Chef, with Jon Favreau as the leading role. Watching the chefs' success story that had been crafted in a way that was unconventional, but beneficial, inspired me. I watched as his creativity carried him in a direction that made it possible for him to pave his own way in the culinary world. This movie moved me to want to do the same. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. Battling cancer was a long and painful process, but my love for food kept me afloat. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I am now attending the culinary program for high schoolers at the performing arts school in my city. I plan to go to culinary school to improve my skills so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck of my own. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Simon Strong Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. To anyone who is now in the position I was, I would tell them to keep their head up and have faith. It sounds generic but in a situation like that there isn’t much you can do to influence the outcome. The positive attitude I had throughout my treatment kept me pushing forward and motivated my mom as well. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Let Your Light Shine Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
    Before I tell you what I want to do, I must tell you why. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. My end goal is to create a business plan that reaches out to people. With my work I can give others the elation I felt at my experience in LA. I want to create a community that supports and is held to a certain standard. I’m working at Chick-fil-A now to figure out how that kind of business structure is built. I’ve recently been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and earning this scholarship would put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Jerzee Foundation Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. Then something big happened. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. My love for food became my source of optimism during treatment. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. These setbacks helped my passion for cooking grow. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef. I want to learn from culinary masters and lead my own kitchen. I aim to be known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. I plan to go to culinary school to improve my skills so I can hopefully own a restaurant or food truck of my own. This scholarship has put me a step closer to that goal.
    Top Watch Newsletter Movie Fanatics Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. One of the social workers at the hospital noticed my increasing interest, and recommended a movie. Chef, with Jon Favreau as the leading role. Watching the chefs' success story that had been crafted in a way that was unconventional, but beneficial, inspired me. I watched as his creativity carried him in a direction that made it possible for him to pave his own way in the culinary world. This movie moved me to want to do the same. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I am now attending the culinary program for high schoolers at the performing arts school in my city. I plan to go to culinary school to improve my skills so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck of my own. Just like Carl Casper.
    Angelia Zeigler Gibbs Book Scholarship
    "Beyond Adversity: Turning the Page" In 2018, I was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer that thrust me into a world of hospitals and treatments. Endless days were spent enduring bone marrow transplants, radiation, and chemotherapy. As my body weakened, so did my spirit. But amidst the struggle, a glimmer of hope emerged from an unexpected source: the Food Network. During countless hours spent in my hospital bed, I found solace in watching chefs craft intricate dishes. Their creativity and passion ignited a spark within me, and soon I found myself immersed in the world of cooking. What began as idle curiosity soon blossomed into a deep-seated passion. Despite my physical limitations, I found joy in experimenting with recipes and imagining ways to enhance flavors. Four years later, I emerged from the shadows of illness, determined to reclaim my life. Cooking became my refuge, a way to express myself and provide comfort to my family during difficult times. Whether it was preparing meals for my mother during her hospital stays or stepping in to host Thanksgiving dinner after a family death, cooking became my way of showing love and support. As I regained my strength, I set my sights on a new goal: becoming a professional chef. I seized every opportunity to hone my skills, from cooking alongside Food Network chefs at prestigious events to launching a crowdfunding campaign to attend culinary school. I immersed myself in the culinary world, joining organizations and seeking out mentors who could guide me on my journey. Today, as I stand on the brink of a new chapter, I am filled with gratitude for the role that cooking has played in my recovery. It has been a source of comfort, a creative outlet, and a pathway to healing. With acceptance to Johnson & Wales University on the horizon, I am eager to pursue my dreams of starting a restaurant and sharing my passion for food with the world. In the face of adversity, I have learned that every challenge presents an opportunity for growth. Through cooking, I have found strength, purpose, and a renewed sense of hope. As I turn the page to this next chapter of my life, I do so with determination, resilience, and an unwavering belief in the power of possibility.
    Donald Mehall Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. Then something big happened. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. My love for food became my source of optimism during treatment. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, when my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Even when our food truck dream was shattered, I cooked a rack of lamb to bring us together. These setbacks helped my passion for cooking grow. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef. I want to learn from culinary masters and lead my own kitchen. I aim to be known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity.
    Michael Mattera Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. Then something big happened. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. My love for food became my source of optimism during treatment. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, when my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Even when our food truck dream was shattered, I cooked a rack of lamb to bring us together. These setbacks helped my passion for cooking grow. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef. I want to learn from culinary masters and lead my own kitchen. I aim to be known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity.
    Onward and Upward Scholarship
    I love cooking. My family, especially my mom, my sister, and I, have always been close. No one goes anywhere without the other two. They are my support system and I am theirs. We love to cook and eat together; that’s how we bond. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with them. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics of scrambling eggs, steaming rice, and dicing onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there but something happened that changed my relationship with food forever. I got cancer. A rare kind - Biphenotypic Leukemia. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and through lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have an appetite and I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. I watched chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes. I was mesmerized by their methods, creativity… freedom. At first, I had many questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little …” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner in the country fueled a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital, we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out my identity. Cooking became my way of stepping up for my family. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt could not host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone together. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Ever since then, I’ve been working toward this goal. I cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA and Pebble Beach Food And Wine Festival in 2021. I started my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I learn from. Now, I attend the culinary school at Weaver Academy School of Performing Arts. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I helped her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We used the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my hospital experience, I learned that cancer changes the way people enjoy food. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food, can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone. My goal is to improve my skills so that I can one day run my own restaurant
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education and the skills acquired in culinary school to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. I’ve already started on building my culinary career. By the age of 16, I’d already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I’m currently enrolled in the culinary program at the art school in my city, and now taking my next steps by applying to culinary school so I can achieve my dream of becoming a chef.
    Jorian Kuran Harris (Shugg) Helping Heart Foundation Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. I want to learn how to lead my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. My real-life experiences plus a formal culinary or education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone earning this scholarship could put me a few steps closer to my goal.
    Charles Brown Culinary Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, when my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. These setbacks fueled for cooking. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef.
    Spider-Man Showdown Scholarship
    I love the casting for all 3 spidermen. I think Tom Holland is the best Peter Parker, Andrew Garfield is the best Spider-Man, and Tobey Maguire is the happy medium. That being said, Tobey’s Spider-Man is my favorite because I feel like he is the most tenacious. Whenever he’s knocked down he always bounces back. Yes there are instances like this for all 3 Spider-Men but Tobey did it the most and it really resonated with me. I see Spider-Man as an inspiration because he’s a hero but we are constantly reminded that he’s still human and anything he can do we can too. This mindset carried me through some tough times in my life. In 2018, While my friends were getting ready to head off to middle school, I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare kind of cancer. I was swept up in a whirlwind of tests, and surgeries. I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated to stay healthy and alive. I had a bone marrow transplant, long scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived in the Ronald McDonald House, across the street from the hospital which was an hour away from our home. While my mom was doing her best to manage our new life, I was doing my best to survive. I was tired, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7. I was still required to keep up with school during this time so I’d spend a few hours a day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. There were days when I was exhausted, nauseous, aching, and mentally drained, but I still had to do my work. Through all this I was able to keep my grades up. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching Food Network on my television. From this traumatic experience, my love for the culinary arts bloomed. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years, I was finally in remission. An organization that partnered with the hospital found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. The front shocks needed to be replaced and It would’ve cost more money to fix it than to buy a new one. This was devastating. We couldn't afford to continue paying for it and we weren’t able to get it fixed so we had to return it We were hurt, but my love for food did not waver, I continued on my culinary path I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I now am on track to attend Johnson & Wales university in the fall.
    Ginny Biada Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. My mom, somehow managed to juggle my care, my sister, her job, and our house that was in a completely different city. I was small and fragile, constantly in pain. My mom bathed me, fed me, gave me my meds, advocated on my behalf to the doctors, and made my hospital room as comfortable as possible. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. My love for food kept me optimistic as I moved through treatment. I told my mom that when I was healthy again I wanted to own a food truck and she instantly got to work on making it happen. The culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years, I was finally in remission. My mom connected with An organization that found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. I was so excited. We started creating a menu, a business plan, and even came up with a design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. until we found out it was broken. The front shocks needed to be replaced and It would’ve cost more money to fix it than to buy a new one. This was devastating. We couldn't afford to continue paying for its storage and we weren’t able to get it fixed so we had to give it back. We were hurt, but my love for culinary did not waver, I continued on my culinary path. I continue steps that help me achieve my dream and my helps push me along this path. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs who I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America. Last school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program at the arts school in my city. At this point I’ve been accepted to both of my to top culinary schools, and I plan to attend Johnson & Wales University. I wouldn’t be here without my mom
    Jim Maxwell Memorial Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. The doctors told us that there was no direct course of treatment. All we could do was have faith. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was finally in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Cooking has given me the chance to be strong for others and lead in a meaningful way. When I grow up I want to be a chef. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants and on my own food trucks. I want to be known for pushing the boundaries of cooking to serve messy, non-traditional, painfully delicious food–the kind of food that matches life. Food is comfort. I want to use the food I make to make people happy. No matter where they’re from or what they’re going through. I want my restaurant to be more than a w restaurant, a community where people come to enjoy themselves and forget about all their problems. Having been through some traumatic experiences myself, I want to share the hope and faith I had while in the hospital.
    Heather Rylie Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 am, and a team of nervous doctors in suits and masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them suited up and masked. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Surrounded by tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed, fighting for my health. I endured a painful bone marrow transplant, radiation sessions, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. My mother and sister lived at the Ronald McDonald House, far from our original home, as I battled my illness. Every day, my mom made a 45-minute drive to take my sister to school. While my mom managed our new life, I fought to stay alive, tethered to an IV 24/7. Despite the exhaustion, pain, and nausea, I had to keep up with school, spending hours each day with the pediatric oncology unit teacher. I pushed through, keeping my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat, but I could watch Food Network on TV. Watching chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn’t have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. Initially, I had many questions, but soon, they turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. This sparked my hidden passion for culinary arts. Then something big happened. I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. This experience solidified my plan for my future. My love for food became my source of optimism during treatment. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. Culinary arts gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment and a bone marrow transplant, I was in remission. We found a food truck to purchase through an organization partnering with the hospital. We created a menu, a business plan, and a truck design. However, our excitement turned to disappointment when we discovered the truck was broken beyond repair. We had to give it back, unable to afford further expenses. Cooking became our refuge, a way to support my family during tough times. When my mom faced stress and hospitalization, I cooked comforting dinners to reassure her. During the pandemic, when my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't host Thanksgiving, I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Even when our food truck dream was shattered, I cooked a rack of lamb to bring us together. These setbacks helped my passion for cooking grow. Cooking gave me hope during my battle with cancer, and now, I aspire to become a chef. I want to learn from culinary masters and lead my own kitchen. I aim to be known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity.
    Sylvester Taylor "Invictus" Hospitality Scholarship
    My relationship with cooking in my family, specifically with my mom and my sister is very important to us. We have always been close, no one goes anywhere without the other two. They have both always been my support system and I am that for them as well. We love to cook and eat together, that’s how we bond. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. My goal is to use my education to develop a business that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone.
    Advancement of Minorities in Finance Scholarship
    I love cooking. My relationship with cooking in my family, specifically with my mom and my sister is very important to us. We have always been close, no one goes anywhere without the other two. They have both always been my support system and I am that for them as well. We love to cook and eat together, that’s how we bond. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA and Pebble Beach food and wine festivals and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. Right now I’m attending the culinary program at Weaver Academy School of Performing Arts. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food, can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone.
    Joshua’s Home Remodeling Scholarship
    The creativity, the technique, the tools, the history, the diversity, all aspects of the culinary arts are intriguing to me. I love watching people light up with glee as they taste a delicious dish, for the first time. I love how food can bring people together under one roof, in unity with one another. I love the feeling that I get when others are brought a wave of exuberance from eating a dish that I’ve created. Food is what brings me joy. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. We have always been close. We love to cook and eat together, that’s how we bond. I was always excited to try new restaurants and recipes with them. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and just observe. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. Biphenotypic leukemia. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I was glued to the bed, watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. My interest in culinary is what kept me optimistic during my three years hospitalized. From that point, I’ve continued on my culinary journey. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA and Pebble Beach food and wine festivals and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA.Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. Right now I’m attending the culinary program at Weaver Academy School of Performing Arts. and now taking my next steps by applying to culinary school so I can achieve my dream of becoming a chef. I’ve been accepted to both of my top schools (Culinary institute of America and Johnson and Wales) and I’m now looking for scholarships to help support my college career.
    TBC Academic Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I love food. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education and the skills acquired in culinary school to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Marie Jean Baptiste Memorial Scholarship
    Before I can tell you who I want to be, I need to tell you how food has influenced who I am. I’ve always loved food. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs and perfectly steam rice. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was finally in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Cooking has given me the chance to be strong for others and lead in a meaningful way. When I grow up I want to be a chef. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants and on my own food trucks.
    TEAM ROX Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I love food. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. I love cooking with my family. It’s our way of bonding when times are rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education and the skills acquired in culinary school to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. I’m working very hard to establish my future as a chef, taking the time and using my resources to improve my skills. Being good at cooking is only half of being a chef. I believe that Being able to interact with the people eating your food is just as important. I’m working on both my cooking and social skills as I push forward into a culinary career I have Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I now attend and am graduating from the arts school in my city. I’ve been accepted to Johnson & Wales university and plan to attend school there next year.
    Building a Better World Scholarship
    Before I can tell you who I want to be, I need to tell you how food has influenced who I am. I’ve always loved food. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. “He probably should have added some…” “This dish could have been better with a little bit of…” Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was finally in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Cooking has given me the chance to be strong for others and lead in a meaningful way. When I grow up I want to be a chef. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants and on my own food trucks. I want to be known for pushing the boundaries of cooking to serve messy, non-traditional, painfully delicious food–the kind of food that matches life. Food is comfort. I want to use the food I make to make people happy. No matter where they’re from or what they’re going through. I want my restaurant to be more than a w restaurant, a community where people come to enjoy themselves and forget about all their problems. Having been through some traumatic experiences myself, I want to share the hope and faith I had while in the hospital.
    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    I am Joshua. I’ve always loved food. As a kid, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen and watch my mother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured I should learn my way around the kitchen just enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, into radiation treatment, and lots of chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I didn’t have a taste for food and couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes mesmerized me. I was hooked on the methods, the creativity…the freedom. At first, I had a lot of questions. Soon, my questions turned into ideas of how I could improve a dish. Marinating in my hospital bed, watching Guy Fieri drive to every diner and drive-in in the country planted a new level of passion in my heart for the culinary arts. I found comfort in it. Each time the doctor said I was healthy enough to leave the hospital, we stayed in the Ronald McDonald House and I made their kitchen my new home. Four years later, I was finally in remission, feeling stronger, back in school, and figuring out who I should become– cooking became my way of stepping up for my family during hard times. When stress sent my mom to the hospital, I made dinners to comfort her and show her that I would be okay until she came home. When my cousin died during the pandemic and my aunt was too sad to host Thanksgiving dinner, I put a meal together to keep our family’s tradition going. When our family’s dream of opening a food business was ruined by a busted food truck, I made a rack of lamb to bring everyone to the table. When I was fighting for my life, cooking gave me something to look forward to. I appreciate that and I want to give this gift to someone else. As a chef, I can. Cooking has given me the chance to be strong for others and lead in a meaningful way. When I grow up I want to be a chef. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants and on my own food trucks. I want to be known for pushing the boundaries of cooking to serve messy, non-traditional, painfully delicious food–the kind of food that matches life.
    Hicks Scholarship Award
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend the Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. My real-life experiences plus a formal business management education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. During my time at UNCG, I plan to learn and use the information I absorb to develop a business plan so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck business of my own.
    Nintendo Super Fan Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. At the time, I owned a Wii. Between constant headaches, hunger, and chemo, I loved playing games with my older sister. On days that I was feeling well we’d spend hours playing super Mario bros 2, super Mario galaxy, Wii sports boxing, and Mario kart. I loved playing all of these but my all time favorite Wii game was sonic colors. Sonic has always been my favorite video game character (sorry Mario). To this day I believe sonic colors to be the best sonic game ever. We’d play a few rounds of co-op and then pass the wii-mote between each other trying to beat each level. I remember we finished the game the day I was discharged from the hospital. Laughing at the funny cutscenes, unnecessary failures, and the “just barely made it by” success is what kept me afloat while battling cancer. I wouldn’t have done it without Sonic Colors.
    William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. This scholarship could help put me one step closer to my goal.
    Spaghetti and Butter Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I love food. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education and the skills acquired in culinary school to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Aserina Hill Memorial Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I love food. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. I would like to start a charity that works toward the improvement of food culture in places where it people are in need of it the most. Hospitals, shelters, retirement homes, and many more. I know that in a time of sorrow and sadness, food saved me and I’d like to do that for other people.
    Mcristle Ross Minority Painter's Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend the Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. I want to learn how to lead my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. My real-life experiences plus a formal culinary or education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Lewis Hollins Memorial Art Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend the Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. I want to learn how to lead my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. My real-life experiences plus a formal culinary or education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    “I Matter” Scholarship
    In my junior year of high school I was accepted to the school of arts in my city where I studied culinary arts. In a class of 24, we were split into groups of three. I was paired with two people who were less experienced in the kitchen. Their grades plummeted at the beginning of the school year and they were at risk of being dropped from the class. After a few class sessions spent in the kitchen I noticed this and I shifted my focus away from my individual grades and toward their culinary improvement. I always let them take over during labs, giving instruction as they prepared dishes only when it was necessary. We spent time studying outside of school. I made it a point to teach them important terms and techniques that are used in the kitchen. When baking bread, I would show them how to properly kneed dough, explain the proofing process and why yeast is needed. While studying mother sauces I demonstrated how to make each one I ensured to cover all aspects so they had a complete understanding of how to properly prepare a dish. There was noticeable progress. As the weeks went by they started doing better in class. Their grades were coming up, they listened more, payed more attention, asked more questions, and gave more answers. When tasked with making specific dishes by our chef, they were able to do it without my help. We had small competitions, almost like chopped, and our team would always come in first. Over the course of 185 days I watched these two people grow as chefs. They went from not being able prepare a salad to plating gourmet meals at home. One of them got a job in a restaurant while the other wants to own a bakery and is pursuing her goal. I’m now in my senior year of high school and in culinary class with one of them. The other decided to change departments and go into construction but we still keep in touch. We’re back on the same team doing our thing in the kitchen. We’re on track to participate in FCCLA and Skills USA this year and we’re both excited. I’m super proud of my friends for being willing to let me teach them and I’m also proud that they took what I gave them and ran with it. I hope to see both of them succeed and I’m glad I am able to be a part of both their journeys.
    STAR Scholarship - Students Taking Alternative Routes
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend the Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. My real-life experiences plus a formal business management education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. I plan to attend JWU to learn and use the information I absorb to develop a business plan so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck business of my own.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    I want to become a chef. I find joy in cooking and in the power of food to bring people to one table, in unity. I found this joy after being diagnosed with a rare cancer. I’ve been cooking with my family since I was 6 years old. In elementary school, I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured I should learn enough to feed myself. I would’ve stopped there. But something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking forever. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I was rushed through a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and lots of chemotherapy. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I was just glued to the bed watching Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs work, I felt excited and inspired. I was drawn to their methods and creativity. My curiosity soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me hope. After three years, I finally reached remission. A local organization found someone willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! I created a menu, business plan, and a cool truck design. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. ...Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to fix it. I was hurt, but I kept cooking. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked for her. During the pandemic, my cousin died. My grieving aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I cooked to continue our family tradition. I realized that illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend the Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I’ve just received my acceptance letters from both of my dream schools. Johnson & Wales university, and The Culinary institute of America. A college education will help me develop the skills I need to pursue my dream. This scholarship will put me closer to my next step.
    Jeanie A. Memorial Scholarship
    It was 4 a.m., and a team of nervous doctors in white suits and blue masks crowded into my tiny, cold hospital room to deliver some news. This was before the pandemic so it was strange to see them dressed that way. My life took an unexpected turn. I was diagnosed with biphenotypic Leukemia, a rare cancer. This marked the beginning of a journey that would lead me to a love of the culinary arts. Swept up in a whirlwind of tests and surgeries, I found myself confined to a hospital bed—isolated from everyone except my mom–to stay healthy and alive. I had a painful bone marrow transplant, scary radiation appointments, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Despite being exhausted, constantly nauseous, in pain, and tethered to an IV 24/7, I was determined to keep up with school. I spent hours each day with the hospital teacher pushing to keep my grades up. For weeks, I couldn't eat. But I could watch Food Network on TV. Seeing chefs create intricate dishes, I felt excited and inspired. Although I didn't have an appetite, I was drawn to their methods and creative freedom. I had lots of questions that soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. I realized I loved the culinary arts. Then, I was offered a Make-A-Wish trip. They pitched ideas like Disneyland and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of food. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area's best chefs. I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, hand-pressed tortillas, and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla for customers in an upscale Latin restaurant. I was a guest chef on the red carpet at the LA Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside chefs from the Food Network. I could see my future clearly. I told my mom that when I recovered, I wanted to own a food truck. The thought of becoming a chef gave me something to look forward to. After three years of treatment, I finally reached remission. A local organization found a man who was willing to sell us his food truck. This was my moment! We started creating a menu, a business plan, and a cool design for the truck. We raised money to buy the truck and were so happy to finally have it. …Until we found out it was broken. Devastating. We couldn't afford to get it fixed. I was hurt, but my love for cooking did not waver. When my mom was later hospitalized, I cooked comforting dinners for her. During the pandemic, my cousin passed away and my aunt couldn't bring herself to host Thanksgiving. I prepared a meal to continue our family tradition. Every setback fueled my passion for cooking. I took deliberate steps toward my dream. I joined the American Culinary Federation to learn from professional chefs, raised $5,000 to attend Culinary Institute of America’s training camp, and applied to the culinary program at a local arts school. I got in, and am on track to finish this year. I appreciate the lessons cancer taught me. Illness and life experiences change the way people can enjoy food. I want to learn how to lead my own kitchen and become known for crafting comforting, non-traditional, and delicious food that mirrors life's complexity. My real-life experiences plus a formal culinary education are exactly what I need to develop my business model and create enjoyable food experiences for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Lemon-Aid Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That is when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. For my Make A Wish trip I ask to go on a restaurant tour around Los Angeles. My decision was heavily inspired by Guy Fiery’s “Diners, drive ins, and dives” This is how I met Mr. James Velarde. Not only did he go above and beyond with planning my trip, he also got me exclusive access to the Los Angeles food and wine festival. While I was there, I experienced what I consider my best food experience ever. I got to meet a ton of food network chefs and cook with them on the red carpet. This trip is what really solidified my love for the culinary arts. Mr. Velarde was generous enough to invite me back the next food and wine festival at Pebble Beach the following year. He paid for our flight, our hotel, and our tickets out of his own pocket. I am very appreciative of Mr. Velarde because he provided me with an experience that since, has been influencing the steps I take to achieve my dream of becoming a chef and owning my own restaurant.
    Anime Enthusiast Scholarship
    Fairy Tail is my favorite anime of all time. I’ve rewatched it twice and it’s the only manga I’ve read. A lot of people dislike it because of “the power of friendship” but I love it. I started watching it at a time that was hard for me. In I was diagnosed with cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. This gave me the time to really immerse myself in the show. I loved watching the individual stories of each character and seeing how even from their diverse backgrounds they consider each other family. A fair amount of people would disagree, but I think that the plot is well written and intriguing as well. Fairy tail is what kept me happy, laughing, and entertained while I was sick. I felt like I was a part of the guild, going on the adventures to different continents, towns, islands dimensions and time periods. Fairy tail is my very first and favorite anime of all time. It helped me at a point of my life that I consider the lowest and for that I am grateful.
    Michael Rudometkin Memorial Scholarship
    In my everyday life I make it a point to uplift others and share with them any knowledge and experience that I might have. I do this especially through food. A few days ago at work I noticed a man who was asking around for 5 dollars. I gave him the money and he instantly went to the counter and figure out what he could afford with it. I noticed this asked him what he wanted. He told me, and I purchased him a meal. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. One of the social workers at the hospital noticed my increasing interest, and recommended a movie. Chef, with Jon Favreau as the leading role. Watching the chefs' success story that had been crafted in a way that was unconventional, but beneficial, inspired me. I watched as his creativity carried him in a direction that made it possible for him to pave his own way in the culinary world. This movie moved me to want to do the same. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. I currently work with a local church where I help prepare and serve food to people affected by homelessness in my city.
    Frantz Barron Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I was diagnosed with cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in the culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Overcoming Adversity - Jack Terry Memorial Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. From my mother, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food can serve my community in amazing ways. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs.
    Arthur and Elana Panos Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. We had to move for my treatment which created even more problems. My mom was Always worried about my health, her job, housing, my sister and her schooling, and her own health since she’s living with Mitral valve prolapse. I told her to keep her head high, have faith, and pray. Solutions to our problems came naturally, thank the lord. Since then, I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I’m honored that I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. I’ve already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I am grateful that I’ve been able to continue my journey this far, and I intend to make the most of my second chance at life.
    Alma J. Grubbs Education Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I handmade pizzas in an authentic Italian restaurant, I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, and hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I am proud that I was confident enough to display my talent and that my food was good enough to serve. By the age of 16, I’d already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. Right now I am a top student in the culinary program at my performing arts school, in my class, I’m known for motivating, teaching, and leading my team in the kitchen. Up until this point I had never considered teaching, but my chef changed that for me. She put me in positions where I was able to share my knowledge and teach new techniques to my peers. I loved this and because of her I discovered an interest in the educational field. If I am able to achieve my dream of becoming a culinary teacher, I want to be more than just a teacher to my students. I want to be a support system, or someone they can talk to, a mentor, just like my chef was to me.
    STAR Scholarship - Students Taking Alternative Routes
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. My mom also lost her job around this time and she had to rely on government financial assistance and hospital housing assistance. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. Since then, I’ve joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. Last summer I launched my own crowdfunding campaign and raised $5,000 to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I am a top student in the culinary program at my performing arts school, known for motivating, teaching, and leading my team in the kitchen. I am very serious and passionate about my future in the culinary arts and every step I take toward achieving my dream is intentional. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me.
    Strong Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
    I feel like my natural drive to push people and help them improve is part of what makes me a leader. I have taken the initiative in running multiple campaigns and I regularly solve problems and social conflicts at work, school, and home. serving as an Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, cooking with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and starting and running my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. Most recently I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I’m honored that I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I handmade pizzas in an authentic Italian restaurant, I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, and hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I am proud that I was confident enough to display my talent and that my food was good enough to serve. By the age of 16, I’d already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I’d also battled cancer and won. I am very serious and passionate about my future in the culinary arts and every step I take toward achieving my dream is intentional. At school, I am the Sous chef of my class and head chef of my group. This year I was able to share my experience and kitchen knowledge with them and assist them in the improvement of their culinary skills. The biggest thing I think makes me a good leader is knowing where I need to improve and attacking those areas head on. I prefer to learn with, and communicate with my peers instead of taking charge over them so they can progress with me instead of just following instructions.
    Larry Leon Irons Culinary Memorial Scholarship
    I see myself becoming a chef with a restaurant of my own. I used to love cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I’ve always loved food. I'm always excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, steam rice, and dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food. I got cancer. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I handmade pizzas in an authentic Italian restaurant, I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, and hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I am proud that I was confident enough to display my talent and that my food was good enough to serve. Most recently I was invited to serve as "Honored Hero" for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of multiple audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign. I was able to share my experience and help other people find strength in the hope of survival. By the age of 16, I’d joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. Last summer I launched my own crowdfunding campaign and raised $5,000 to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I am a top student in the culinary program at my performing arts school, known for motivating, teaching, and leading my team in the kitchen. I am very serious and passionate about my future in the culinary arts and every step I take toward achieving my dream is intentional.
    Humanize LLC Gives In Honor of Shirley Kelley Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer—a rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. My mom stuck with me through the whole thing. She filled in for absent family members and took full responsibility for my care. As well as my sister who needed equal attention. She did this all by herself. When I was hungry, she cooked for me, and when I was bored she found activities to keep me occupied. She bathed me when I was too weak to do it myself and stayed up late at night with me even when she had work in the morning. We did everything together, and that's how I discovered my love for the culinary arts. My mom and I loved the Food Network, it was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. To this day my mother has been supportive of me and helps push me to achieve my dream. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. This school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program for high school students in Greensboro. I've already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I also am now working in a commercial food kitchen to gain experience. I am very appreciative of my mom and everything she does for my sister and me.
    Stacy T. Mosley Jr. Educational Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They offered me Disneyland, celebrity meet and greets, and amusement parks, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with some of the area’s best chefs. I handmade pizzas in an authentic Italian restaurant, I smoked meat in a barbeque pit, and hand-pressed tortillas and prepared a spicy oxtail quesadilla that was served to customers in an upscale Spanish restaurant. I also was a guest chef on the red carpet at the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival where I prepared and plated dishes alongside famous chefs. I am proud that I was confident enough to display my talent and that my food was good enough to serve. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. Want to be an entrepreneurial chef with my own restaurant, creating memorable food experiences for other people. Stacy T. Mosley Jr. Educational Scholarship will help me continue my culinary education after high school. Please consider supporting my dream.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own, Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers.
    Szilak Family Honorary Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. This school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program for high school students in Greensboro. I also am now working in a commercial food kitchen to gain experience I’m intentional about taking steps that help me achieve my dream. Most recently I was invited to serve as the Honored Hero for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I shared my story of survival in front of live and online audiences and produced digital content to support the national campaign.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. I see myself becoming an entrepreneurial chef with a restaurant of my own. When I was younger, I loved cooking with my family. It was our way of bonding when times were rough. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. Two years ago, I joined the American Culinary Federation to surround myself with professional chefs I can learn from. This scholarship will help get me one step closer to my goal. I am intentional about taking opportunities to push me forward. Last summer I launched my own campaign and raised $5,000 to attend a summer camp at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. This school year I applied and got accepted to the culinary program for high school students in Greensboro. I also am now working in a commercial food kitchen to gain experience.
    Wild Scholarship
    1. I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. 2. I’ve learned that food is powerful. Food kept me optimistic when I was fighting for my life. Cooking inspires me. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants and on my own food trucks. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I am very passionate about my future in culinary arts and I’m intentional about taking steps that help me achieve my dream. By the age of 16, I’d already joined the American Culinary Federation, attended The Los Angeles and Monterey Food and Wine festivals, cooked on the red carpet with Food Network chefs, and tasted my way through the LA, New Orleans, Charleston, Asheville, and Washington, DC food scenes. I want to continue my journey, I know that there is still much more for me to learn and attaining that knowledge is my goal. 3. I already love to draw food. When cultivating new recipes I make detailed pictures of them to envision the perfect version of that dish. With the rise of the Metaverse, more opportunities are being presented in the virtual space. I want to use my culinary knowledge to teach others and use the technology aspect to help people create extravagant culinary art of their own with complete creative freedom.
    Big Picture Scholarship
    I’ve always loved food. When I was younger, I was excited to try new restaurants and recipes with my mom and sister. Sometimes, I would roam into the kitchen to watch my mother or grandmother cook. I picked up on the basics like how to scramble eggs, perfectly steam rice, and evenly dice onions. I figured that was enough to feed myself if I got hungry. I would’ve stopped there. But, something happened that changed my relationship with food and cooking. I got cancer. A rare kind. I lived in the hospital. I underwent a bone marrow transplant, radiation, and chemotherapy. I no longer looked forward to family meals. I couldn’t eat for weeks. I couldn’t do much else either. I just laid in bed watching television. Food Network was always on my tv. Watching chefs prepare delicious-looking, intricate dishes excited and inspired me. One of the social workers at the hospital noticed my increasing interest, and recommended a movie. Chef, with Jon Favreau as the leading role. Watching the chefs' success story that had been crafted in a way that was unconventional, but beneficial, inspired me. I watched as his creativity carried him in a direction that made it possible for him to pave his own way in the culinary world. This movie moved me to want to do the same. Even though I couldn't eat, I was drawn in by the methods the chefs used and the creative freedom they had. At first, I had a lot of questions. Those questions soon turned into thoughts of how I could improve a dish. That's when I first started considering culinary as a serious path for me. Ever since then I’ve been working toward this goal. I have cooked with Food Network Chefs on the red carpet at the LA food and wine festival, and in 2021, I started and ran my own crowdfunding campaign to raise money to attend the summer training program at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley, CA. I want to learn from others who have mastered the art of food and apply that knowledge to leading my own kitchen. I want to be known for preparing comfort foods in my own restaurants. Chopping, seasoning, and mixing ingredients to create dishes that bring an exciting flavorful experience to my customers. I am now attending the culinary program for high schoolers at the performing arts school in my city. I plan to go to culinary school to improve my skills so I can one day own a restaurant or food truck of my own. Just like Carl Casper.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    When I was younger, I loved cooking. Food kept me optimistic while in the hospital fighting cancer. Seeing the powerful impact cooking had on my family and the people around us, inspired me to pursue a career in culinary arts. In 2018, I was offered the chance to go on a Make-A-Wish trip. They suggested Disneyland, and celebrity meet and greets, but I wanted to experience the world of culinary arts. I flew to Los Angeles for a week-long food tour with the area’s best chefs. The experience was amazing, but because I was still immunocompromised, I couldn’t enjoy the full experience. The food I ate had to be hot, no fresh produce, no nuts, fruits, and no fish. This prevented me from being able to grasp the full experience. My mother was also a chef. From her, I learned the importance of entrepreneurship and social responsibility. She owned a business called Mac & Cheese Ministry. I would help her prepare macaroni and sell servings at the local farmers' market. We would use the proceeds to cook meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness in Greensboro. From my time in the hospital, I learned that cancer changes the way people can enjoy food. Food must be prepared and served safely and with constantly changing taste buds in mind. A culinary education will enhance what I've learned through real-life experiences and give me the technical skills and training that, when paired with my desire to make an impact through food, can serve my community in amazing ways. Continuing my Mothers work by providing meals for people affected by hunger and homelessness is in my plans for the future. My goal is to use my education to develop a business model that creates an enjoyable food experience for everyone, especially those of us with the most unique nutrition needs. Giving back to the people who battled cancer, and had strict dietary restrictions, just like me. That is my goal.