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Catherine Remington

1445

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Excerpts from teacher recommendations: “Catherine is an outstanding young woman who uses her outgoing nature to make others feel seen, welcome and included. I had the pleasure of teaching Catherine in English class, Advanced Topics in Composition, at Saint Mary’s Hall, and she has been such a joy in my life and other people’s lives ever since. Catherine is unique because she can be given tasks and people know they can depend on her to complete those tasks to the best of her ability.” “Catherine was in my Algebra 2 class as a sophomore at Saint Mary’s Hall and will be in my AP AB Calculus class as a senior. Catherine is an incredibly hard worker and a joy to have in class. My ideal classroom would be full of students just like Catherine.” I fall into the gray area where my parents cannot simply write a check for my college expenses nor will I qualify for need-based financial aid. My parents are older, and my father is looking forward to a much-deserved retirement after being a classroom teacher for over thirty years. It's a tough spot to be in when I worked so hard in high school. My participation as a leader or a team member ranged from student affairs and clubs to varsity athletics to performing arts. In my first college semester (Fall 2023), I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I hope to become an accountant, and I'm already planning on pursuing a master's degree in accounting in a 4+1 program. I'd like to be able to do that while worrying a little less about how I'm going to pay for it.

Education

University of Colorado Boulder

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Accounting and Related Services
  • Minors:
    • International Business

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Accounting and Related Services
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Accounting

    • Dream career goals:

    • Math Tutor (part-time job)

      Private Families
      2022 – 20242 years
    • Cashier (summer job)

      Andy's Frozen Custard
      2022 – Present2 years
    • Pet-sitter (part-time job)

      Private Families
      2019 – Present5 years
    • Babysitter (part-time job)

      Private Families
      2019 – Present5 years
    • Day Camp Counselor (summer job)

      Saint Mary's Hall Day Camp
      2023 – 2023

    Sports

    Lacrosse

    Varsity
    2022 – 20231 year

    Awards

    • Co-Captain

    Bowling

    Varsity
    2022 – 20231 year

    Awards

    • Captain

    Arts

    • Saint Mary's Hall

      Theatre
      2022 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      San Antonio Food Bank — Food distributor
      2023 – Present

    Future Interests

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Eras Tour Farewell Fan Scholarship
    When tickets for the Eras tour first went on sale in the United States, I was crushed after trying for hours to get tickets and then failing. Not only was I unable to get tickets directly from Ticketmaster, but the mark-up on ticket prices from resellers made the cost of the tickets out of reach for me. Many of my school classmates were able to get tickets so that’s all the conversation was about at school for weeks. My mom said to wait until the international locations were announced, and we’d see if any of those were feasible. I think she was just saying that to put a smile on my face because I was so sad. Many months later, tickets for the international locations went on sale, and we were lucky enough to get tickets to the concert in Lyon, France. The cost of the tickets plus our travel expenses was less than what a comparable seat alone would have cost in the United States. We anxiously counted down the days until June. We planned our sparkly outfits and made friendship bracelets by the dozen. My mom took that activity way too seriously and invested hours in fashioning beautiful bracelets from plastic kindergarten beads. The day of the concert arrived, cold and rainy. With great disappointment, we covered our beautiful outfits with rain coats and headed out to take the city tram to the stadium. The tram was jam-packed wall-to-wall with excited Swifties, and the bracelet-sharing had already started in earnest. At the stadium we grabbed a glass of champagne from a food truck – where else but in France! – and joined the crowd to wait for the doors to open. Our seats were perfect, and we sang along to every song. It was a night I’ll never forget. I loved every minute of it, even the drizzling rain, the unexpectedly cold temperature, the hour-long wait to get the tram back to the city center. It was all worth it to see Taylor Swift in the most amazing city. What changed in my life wasn’t because of a song from the Eras tour; it was because of the tour itself. Without the European leg of the tour and its affordable tickets, my mom and I wouldn’t have taken this trip. All my life, my mom has taken me to classes, practices, events. She was my chauffeur and my source of funds. This trip to see the Eras tour in Lyon was different. On this trip, she was my friend.
    Social Anxiety Step Forward Scholarship
    Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. I could never be as perfect as I wanted to be. This, coupled with the exponentially increase difficulty of my academic demands at my college-prep school, were too much for me to handle. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me, so I walked away. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. This all sounds like my life to this point was an easy journey. All I had to do was quit dancing twenty hours per week and focus on my school work, and everything came up roses. Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have a mental health diagnosis (anxiety) and have successfully learned to manage it after some really rough periods of time in high school. My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. Success is not final because there is always room for growth and improvement. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself.
    A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too.
    Learner Math Lover Scholarship
    Math has always come easily to me. I have always liked the rules-based nature of math and that there is always a right answer. I definitely have a quantitative nature, and I am applying it to my accounting degree plan. Accounting is governed by a lot of rules and principles, but at the end of the day, it's all math. Math provides a structured way to solve problems. I find satisfaction in working through a problem and arriving at a solution. Math is built on logical principles and offers a sense of certainty and order. The logical structure can be very appealing. Math has practical applications in a wide range of fields, from science and engineering to economics and art. Math can be intellectually stimulating and challenging. I enjoy the mental exercise that comes with solving complex mathematical problems. Math is a field of continuous discovery. There are always new problems to solve and new areas to explore, which can be exciting for those who are curious and enjoy learning. Math is the foundation of many other sciences. People who love physics, chemistry, computer science, and other disciplines often have a deep appreciation for the role math plays in these fields. Positive experiences with math teachers and educational programs can also foster a love for the subject. Encouragement and support in learning math can make a big difference. Many people derive personal satisfaction and a sense of achievement from understanding and mastering mathematical concepts. I am one of those.
    Eleanor Anderson-Miles Foundation Scholarship
    Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. I could never be as perfect as I wanted to be. This, coupled with the exponentially increase difficulty of my academic demands at my college-prep school, were too much for me to handle. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me, so I walked away. However, I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. Over time, I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first year in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am now able to maintain balance in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. This all sounds like my life to this point was an easy journey. All I had to do was quit dancing twenty hours per week and focus on my school work, and everything came up roses. Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have a mental health diagnosis (anxiety) and have successfully learned to manage it after some really rough periods of time in high school. My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself.
    James T. Godwin Memorial Scholarship
    Winner
    My maternal grandfather, Allen Sisk, grew up on a farm in rural West Virginia. He enlisted in the Navy in 1957 and found his calling as a heavy equipment operator in the Seabees. PaPa was so proud of his service, often telling stories of his adventures as a young man in Japan and Guam and on other Pacific islands. One of his favorite tales involved three young sailors crowded together on a motor bike and a sternly-worded lecture about decorum and inappropriate shenanigans from the shore patrol. I believe he would have made the Navy his career had he been able to stay in Japan, but life works out differently and he returned home and met my grandmother. PaPa gave me two very special gifts: his talent for skeet shooting and the importance he placed on education. As a young boy, PaPa traipsed through the woods, shotgun in hand, with his older brothers to provide meat for the family dinner table. Money was always scare in a family with eight children. After his service in the Navy, he turned his shooting skills toward recreation and began to shoot skeet competitively. He was very good even into his senior years and so proud of his accomplishments. Sometime during the 1980’s, a fellow Izaak Walton gun club member became convinced that the key to my grandfather’s success was his shotgun and not PaPa’s years of practice and dedication. The Texan badgered PaPa incessantly to buy his gun, but my grandfather would not sell, not for any amount of money. His refusal only cemented the want-to-be champion shooter’s opinion that the gun was responsible for PaPa’s success. Eventually, the Texan gave up and drifted away. Years later when I began to display some talent in skeet shooting, my grandfather was bursting with pride in me. Every time we talked on the phone, he asked if I’d been shooting. It was a connection we shared even though we lived 1,600 miles apart. PaPa passed away in October 2023. He left his prized shotgun to me. I will always treasure it. The other gift PaPa gave to me was an appreciation for education. He would have like to have worked with computers, which were in their infancy when he was discharged from the Navy Reserves in 1963. However, there was no money for college, and my grandfather found work utilizing the skills he’d learned in the Navy. He made sure my mother and my aunt went to college, though, and he never failed to ask me about my grades and my other school activities. As an accounting major, I know the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my accounting degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know yet if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. I think PaPa would be pleased by the choices I’m making, and I know he would have bragged to all his friends about my Dean’s List recognition. I’m sad that he is no longer here to see me walk across the stage with my diploma in hand in a few years, but his words of wisdom about the value of education will stay with me forever.
    Ginny Biada Memorial Scholarship
    Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. At the time, I did not understand how incredibly expensive this pursuit was. I had to buy new handmade custom pointe shoes every few weeks and did hours of lessons six days a week. The cost of a ballet tutu can range from hundreds of dollars to over a thousand. My mom felt that she could whip up a similar tutu as the ones being bought from professionals. My mom did not lack for confidence as she had never sewn more than a loose button or a ripped hem at this point. You Tube and costuming message boards became her sources of truth. This gift started out as a way to save money, but it turned into a hobby and passion project for my mom. With hard work and practice, I had my own custom tutus. My mom worked with me on colors, lace, rhinestones and other sparkly decorations, all in hopes of making me the perfect tutu. Having my mother spend so much time and effort to make me a costume in which I felt beautiful when I took the stage was one of the greatest gifts I could ever ask for. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me, but I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. Over time, I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 credit hours and working several part-time jobs. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve results. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant – just like my mom.
    Ethel Hayes Destigmatization of Mental Health Scholarship
    Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. I could never be as perfect as I wanted to be. This, coupled with the exponentially increase difficulty of my academic demands at my college-prep school, were too much for me to handle. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me, so I walked away. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. If another three hours of study will only gain me two more points and I already have an A, I am better off diverting my time and energy in a different direction. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. This all sounds like my life to this point was an easy journey. All I had to do was quit dancing twenty hours per week and focus on my school work, and everything came up roses. Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have a mental health diagnosis (anxiety) and have successfully learned to manage it after some really rough periods of time in high school. My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. Success is not final because there is always room for growth and improvement. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself.
    Combined Worlds Scholarship
    I love to travel, and I have been fortunate to do quite a bit with my family. I have a necklace that has little silver washers on it. Like the washers in sink faucets. Each one is engraved with a country and the year from a visit. The necklace helps me remember all of the wonderful places that I’ve been and the amazing and meaningful experiences that I’ve had. A meaningful travel experience isn’t just one that recalls a sunny day on a favorite beach or a walking tour to sample local delicacies. A meaningful experience stays with you and colors future experiences. My father loves Merida, Mexico, a city of almost a million people and the capital of the state of Yucatan. He, my mother and I rented a house for a week in the colonial center of the city several years ago. When we travel, we like to just “be” in a location so we can really get a feel for a place and experience a glimpse of the life the locals lead. In Merida, many of the people are poor, and they try to earn a living by peddling souvenirs, clothing and flowers to tourists. They even try to tug at tourists’ heart strings by having their young children sell the items. The children approach diners seated outside at restaurants. This happened to me a number of times while I was in Merida, and it left me feeling conflicted. On one hand, I felt guilty for resenting the interruption of my dinner while on the other hand, I knew these hard-working people were just trying to make a living. I bought a few roses, but was I really making a difference? I often think about these children and the struggles and worries their parents must have. My mother and I went to Grand Case, Saint Martin last summer. The island is split between French Saint Martin and Dutch Sint Maarten. Hurricane Irma devastated much of the island in 2017. The Dutch part of the island, home of the international airport, has largely been rebuilt. The more rural French side still shows destruction everywhere you look. According to several taxi drivers, the French government hasn’t sufficiently funded repairs, and people are having to make do with damaged homes, smashed cars and business permanently shuttered. What is amazing is that life goes on for the people of Saint Martin in the midst of all that destruction. They’re rebuilding as best they can, and it’s easy to see the new reinforced roofs made of brightly colored corrugated metal. Some of the best French restaurants in the Caribbean are side by side with weather-worn structures on the streets of Grand Case. My visit to Saint Martin was my first up-close exposure to significant hurricane damage, and the images will remain with me always. I have a new appreciation for the overwhelming power of Mother Nature.
    Elevate Mental Health Awareness Scholarship
    Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. I could never be as perfect as I wanted to be. This, coupled with the exponentially increase difficulty of my academic demands at my college-prep school, were too much for me to handle. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me, so I walked away. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. If another three hours of study will only gain me two more points and I already have an A, I am better off diverting my time and energy in a different direction. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. This all sounds like my life to this point was an easy journey. All I had to do was quit dancing twenty hours per week and focus on my school work, and everything came up roses. Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have a mental health diagnosis (anxiety) and have successfully learned to manage it after some really rough periods of time in high school. My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. Success is not final because there is always room for growth and improvement. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself.
    Top Watch Newsletter Movie Fanatics Scholarship
    Despite receiving mixed reviews from critics, "Me Before You" is a move that I could watch over and over again. "Me Before You" is a romantic drama film released in 2016. The movie is based on the novel of the same name by Jojo Moyes and stars Emilia Clarke as Louisa Clark and Sam Claflin as Will Traynor. The story follows Louisa Clark, a quirky and cheerful young woman who takes a job as a caregiver for Will Traynor, a wealthy and successful businessman who became paralyzed from the neck down after a motorcycle accident two years prior. Will is initially bitter and withdrawn, struggling to find meaning in his life after his injury. Despite their differences, Louisa and Will gradually form a close bond as she tries to bring joy and adventure back into his life. As their relationship deepens, Louisa discovers that Will has made the decision to end his life through assisted suicide in Switzerland, believing that his disability has robbed him of any meaningful quality of life. This revelation challenges Louisa to confront her own beliefs and values, and she becomes determined to show Will that life is still worth living. The film explores themes of love, sacrifice, and the importance of seizing the opportunities life presents, even in the face of adversity as well as the ethical dilemmas surrounding assisted suicide. The film's poignant portrayal of its characters has made it one of my all-time favorites for quite a few reasons. The movie explores deep themes such as love, disability, and assisted suicide. It makes you think about what is really important in life and what makes life worth living. The main characters in the film, Louisa and Will, are well-developed and relatable, allowing viewers to empathize with their struggles and journeys as they navigate their unlikely romance. The movie raises important questions about quality of life, autonomy, and the right to choose one's own path, particularly in the context of disability. In addition to the thought-provoking story line, the film features beautiful cinematography and memorable music that enhance the emotional impact of the story. “Me Before You” is definitely not a light-hearted rom-com, but it is the story of a love that is bigger than either individual. It’s heart-warming and sad at the same time, tapping into all of your emotions. Watching this movie over and over for the rest of my life would remind me that loving someone else is the greatest gift you can give and receive.
    Redefining Victory Scholarship
    My name is Catherine Remington. I’d like to tell you a little about myself – how I got to where I am and where I intend to go. I’m currently a first-year student in the Honors College at the University of Texas at San Antonio. I am transferring to the Leeds School of Business Honors Program at the University of Colorado – Boulder in the Fall 2024 semester. My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. Success is not final because there is always room for growth and improvement. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself. Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. If another three hours of study will only gain me two more points and I already have an A, I am better off diverting my time and energy in a different direction. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. My mother works in finance. Her first job after college was as a staff accountant, and she’s worked in many different aspects of accounting, auditing and finance. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know yet if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Academic Liberty & Free Speech Scholarship
    First of all, free speech plays a crucial role in the intellectual and personal development of American college students by fostering critical thinking, encouraging diversity of thought and promoting campus and civic involvement. Exposing students to a wide range of ideas, even those they may find disagreeable or challenging, prompts them to develop critical thinking skills in order to evaluate and analyze perspectives. Students develop the capacity to think independently, question assumptions, and form their own educated opinions. Free speech is essential for intellectual growth and the development of an informed citizenry. Secondly, college campuses are microcosms of society, populated by individuals from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and beliefs. Protecting and encouraging free speech ensures that all voices, regardless of ideology or perspective, have the opportunity to be heard. Exposure to a variety of viewpoints engenders empathy and tolerance among students, preparing them to navigate an adult world with respect and open-mindedness. Free speech is essential for the intellectual and personal development of American college students. Free speech is intrinsically linked to civic participation. Encouraging students to express their opinions and participate in public discourse fills them with a sense of civic responsibility and empowerment. By advocating for causes they believe in and engaging in constructive dialogue with their peers, students develop the skills and confidence necessary to enact positive change in their communities and beyond. They learn to follow-up their words with actions. In this way, free speech not only enriches the intellectual lives of college students but also prepares them to be active and informed participants in a democratic society. Because free speech is a cornerstone of our democracy, protecting free speech as a fundamental right is essential for maintaining a healthy democracy and promoting diversity, equity and inclusion. Without the ability to freely express ideas, challenge authority, and engage in open dialogue, society risks stagnation, conformity, and the suppression of dissenting voices. Free speech is a foundation for democratic values, allowing that individuals to hold their government accountable, advocate for change, and participate fully in public discourse without fear of imprisonment for questioning the status quo. By protecting the right to free speech, we safeguard the principles of life, liberty, equality and the pursuit of happiness. In my future field of accounting, critical thinking and a safe environment to communicate dissenting ideas are crucial to being able to certify audit results or to publish financial statements. This is analogous to free speech on campus. Students who recognize the importance of fostering an environment where all perspectives are welcomed and respected will be more comfortable questioning their management once they enter the work world. They learn to challenge conventional wisdom and look for proof to support “we’ve always done it this way” as an explanation of why?” Students have the opportunity to advocate for causes they believe in, confront social injustices, and bring about meaningful change. Students who feel empowered to express themselves freely, exchange ideas, and engage in respectful dialogue will uphold the principles of academic freedom and intellectual inquiry. This not only enriches the educational experience but also prepare students to become informed, engaged citizens who are capable of navigating the complexities of an ever-changing world.
    John Young 'Pursue Your Passion' Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28 and already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too.
    TEAM ROX Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. I have fraud alerts set up so that I can know immediately if an erroneous charge hits my account. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28, and he already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job and first paycheck. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item. Shiny objects can be hard for anyone to pass up, but this is a very important lesson to learn. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Lester and Coque Gibson Community Service Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28 and already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too.
    “The Office” Obsessed! Fan Scholarship
    Pam Beesly, brought to life by Jenna Fischer, is one of the central characters in the American version of the television series "The Office." Pam starts off as the receptionist at paper company Dunder Mifflin's Scranton branch, where much of the series takes place. Over the show's run, Pam evolves from a timid and reserved character into a more confident and assertive employee. I see myself in Pam sometimes when I’m in new situations. I definitely would not say that I’m timid, but I do like to take my time and evaluate the lay of the land before I jump in with both feet. Pam's professional journey takes several significant twists. At the beginning of the series, she is a receptionist but later pursues her dream of becoming an artist. After briefly leaving Dunder Mifflin to attend art school, Pam returns to the office as a salesperson. Over the course of several seasons, she takes risks and finds her true calling – which wasn’t what she thought it would be. Throughout the series, Pam becomes more assertive and self-assured. She stands up for herself, pursues her goals, and takes on new challenges with increasing confidence. I am a lot like Pam in this respect. While "The Office" is a fictional comedy series, it draws inspiration from real office environments and incorporates elements of office culture to create an entertaining portrayal of work life. The show portrays various office dynamics, including power struggles, favoritism, and conflicts between coworkers. These aspects are common in many work places and contribute to the humor of the series. The show explores relationships among coworkers, including friendships, romances (Pam had two!), and rivalries. These relationships often mirror those found in real offices, where people spend most of their waking hours together. Although exaggerated for comedic effect, these elements reflect real-life experiences in many work places. I don’t think I’d function well in an office like “The Office” because sales is not the right career choice for me. I do hope that my work place shares some of the same camaraderie and good humor.
    Zendaya Superfan Scholarship
    “Shake It Up” on the Disney Channel was one of my favorite shows to watch when I was younger. I can still sing the theme song. This was my first introduction to Zendaya. One of the most admirable qualities about Zendaya is her ability to seamlessly transition between different mediums of entertainment while maintaining her authenticity. Starting her career as a teenager on "Shake It Up," Zendaya quickly demonstrated her natural talent for acting and dancing. However, she didn't allow herself to be confined by the constraints of child stardom. As she grew older, she took on more complex roles that challenged her as an actress, such as Rue Bennett in the HBO series "Euphoria," a role that earned her an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. At only 24 years old, she was the youngest recipient of the award in that category. She showed the fun side of her personality as a competitor on “Dancing with the Stars.” Zendaya is more than an actress. She is an outspoken advocate for social justice and equality, using her social media platforms to raise awareness about issues such as racial discrimination, LGBTQ+ rights and mental health. She promotes positive change, and she leads by example. For instance, in 2020 she partnered with Michelle Obama to encourage voter registration. She has also tackled bullying and body-shaming and championed Toys for Tots, the American Heart Association and Communities in Schools. Zendaya's commitment to using her influence for good demonstrates her strength of character, integrity and compassion. Whether she's dazzling audiences on screen, advocating for social justice, or inspiring others with her fashion choices, Zendaya continues to be a role model for young girls and young women everywhere.
    Online Learning Innovator Scholarship
    Windows 365. Google. Teams. Canvas. Zoom. The use of online tools, whether as a platform to deliver content or as the content itself, has rapidly changed education from preschool to college. Some of these tools have been around for a long time, but the widespread use of them beyond universities was hastened by the COVID pandemic, when all schools shut down for in-person learning. I spent the last two months of my freshman year of high school and almost all of my sophomore year interacting with my teachers and classmates via Zoom. While I was thankful to eventually return to my school campus, the use of online tools as my only educational option for over a year really made me appreciate how valuable they are. As a college freshman, online tools play an even greater part in my education. My assignments and grades are delivered via Canvas. I meet with my professors and classmates over Zoom. I use Dropbox to work on group projects. This is very different from a pre-COVID college education, and in many respects, we are better off for it. One of the most significant advantages of online tools in education is the accessibility they provide. Whether it's accessing online textbooks, interactive tutorials, or virtual laboratories, students can interact with educational content at any time and from any place. Online tools offer opportunities for students to collaborate with classmates and experts from around the world. Just imagine a French class in the US having weekly Zoom conversations with a class of English learners in France. No amount of book learning would accomplish as much as actually getting to practice communicating with native speakers. Online tools encourage teachers to innovate in their classroom practices. From gamified learning platforms that make education fun to immersive virtual reality simulations that bring complex concepts to life, the possibilities are endless. By integrating multimedia elements such as videos, animations, and interactive quizzes into their lessons, educators can increase student engagement. Additionally, online assessment tools provide instant feedback, allowing teachers to gauge student understanding in real-time. Students also appreciate immediate feedback in the form of automatically graded assignments. Teachers can stay updated with the latest classroom management trends, instructional strategies, and technological advancements through the use of online tools. By continuously honing their skills, teachers can create learning experiences that inspire their students to reach their full potential. The flipside of these teaching advancements is that not all teachers will embrace the changes, and some will have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the brave new world. However, once the potential of online tools can be demonstrated, even the most reluctant teacher should be able to see the value. While online tools offer numerous benefits, it's essential to address potential challenges such as privacy concerns, information overload and the substitution of an increasing number of hours in front of a screen at the expense of physical activity. This is a valid concern as the incidence of obesity continues to increase in children and young adults. Additionally, efforts must be made to ensure equitable access to technology and internet connectivity for all students, regardless of their socioeconomic background. The integration of online tools in education represents a paradigm shift, accelerated by the year or two many students and teachers spent learning at home instead of in physical classrooms due to COVID. As we continue to embrace innovation in education, online tools will continue to play a pivotal role in shaping the future of learning for teachers and students of all ages.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. Success is not final because there is always room for growth and improvement. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself. Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. As I move forward through my college career and spread my wings, I rely on my life experiences thus far and my innate drive to be successful to keep my on the path I’ve chosen. Like anyone else, I have experienced my fair share of successes and failures. There have been moments of triumph when I achieved my goals and moments of disappointment when I fell short. In times of success, I have resisted the temptation to become complacent, instead choosing to push myself further and strive for greater heights. I want to be better tomorrow than I am today. That, to me, is success. This scholarship will allow me to worry a little less about how I am going to pay for my future.
    Career Test Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. I have fraud alerts set up so that I can know immediately if an erroneous charge hits my account. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28, and he already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job and first paycheck. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item. Shiny objects can be hard for anyone to pass up, but this is a very important lesson to learn. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Netflix and Scholarships!
    My absolute favorite show on Netflix at the moment is “Young Sheldon,” a prequel of sorts to the cult favorite series, “The Big Bang Theory.” I highly recommend binge-watching all seven seasons. Binge-watching is a favorite activity for many people since the proliferation of online streaming services, of which Netflix is one of the most popular. While it’s not necessary to have watched “The Big Bang Theory” in order to be able to enjoy “Young Sheldon,” there are a number of connections and references made in “Young Sheldon” that make one think, “Aha! That explains a lot!” “Young Sheldon” appeals to all age groups and offers an engaging blend of humor and 1990’s nostalgia At the center of "Young Sheldon" is the main character, Sheldon Cooper. Sheldon's eccentricities, genius-level intellect, and unique perspective on the world make him a captivating character to watch. His exceptional intelligence is in contract to his emotional immaturity. He’s a successful college student in a pre-teen’s body. His family and friends, the supporting cast, are delightful foils to Sheldon’s self-declared superiority. Set in fictional East Texas small town of Medford, "Young Sheldon" offers a nostalgic trip down memory lane for viewers who grew up during the 1990’s. From the fashion choices that are clearly questionable to young viewers today to the pop culture references, the show captures the innocence of “the good old days.” Viewers are reminded of the challenges and joys of growing up in a small town as well as its seasonal obsession with football. One of the show's greatest strengths lies in its portrayal of family dynamics. From Sheldon's complicated relationship with his parents to his interactions with his siblings, "Young Sheldon" explores the ups and downs of family life with sensitivity and humor. Viewers can relate to the struggles and triumphs of the Cooper family, making the show a heartfelt exploration of the bonds that hold families together. Meemaw, the worldly grandmother who lives across the street from the Coopers, offers a good-humored escape from the crowded home that Sheldon shares with his family and the ineffective religious influences of his mother. Missy, Sheldon’s twin sister, displays the emotional intelligence and perceptiveness that Sheldon lacks. While she’s frequently mean to him in ways that siblings are, she also helps him interpret the world when his IQ isn’t enough. As a prequel to "The Big Bang Theory," "Young Sheldon" offers fascinating insights into Sheldon's early interests in science, mathematics, and philosophy. Whether it's Sheldon's experiments at home or his interactions with his teachers and classmates, "Young Sheldon" celebrates the joy of learning and intellectual curiosity. Viewers also get to see how Sheldon struggles to navigate the social aspects of life and come to understand that it’s not always enough to be smart. Paige, a recurring same-age character in several seasons, is actually smarter than Sheldon. This causes him a great deal of angst, and viewers witness Sheldon coming to terms with Paige’s intelligence. She unfortunately veers off the straight and narrow due to family difficulties, and Sheldon comes to appreciate the rules and structure of his family and to appreciate that they are always there for him. Like its predecessor, "The Big Bang Theory," "Young Sheldon" is filled with clean humor and witty dialogue. Whether it's Sheldon's dry observations, his family’s bumbling but well-meaning antics or references to “The Big Bang Theory,” the show delivers solid entertainment in every episode. "Young Sheldon" is a fantastic choice for a long weekend of binge watching!
    Fall Favs: A Starbucks Stan Scholarship
    At the risk of sounding like a pumpkin-spiced cliché, I count the days in the fall until Starbucks brings back my favorite autumnal treat. The pumpkin spice latte – with its aromatic blend of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves – has become synonymous with falling temperatures and falling leaves. The mere mention of a pumpkin spice latte makes me thing of crisp autumn mornings and chilly clear nights, which are largely figments of my imagination as I’ve grown up in south Texas. A pumpkin spice latte is more than just a hot drink. It's a caffeine-laced ritual that marks the end of a blistering hot summer and the arrival of fall, ever if the thermometer doesn’t agree. A pumpkin spice latte recalls memories that touch all of the senses. It's the sound of live oak leaves crunching underfoot, the sight of the pumpkin patch at the Methodist church on the corner, the warmth of a favorite old cashmere sweater. You know, the one that has few holes in the left sleeve. Each sip tastes like the best parts of the season and reminds us to slow down and savor the weakening rays of afternoon sunlight as fall transforms into winter. Whether enjoyed alone in quiet solitude or in a boisterous gathering of best friends surrounding a table on the Starbucks patio, a pumpkin spice latte brings out the best in people. It's a reminder of the joy that can be found in simple pleasures and the profound impact they can have on our lives. The seasonal release of the pumpkin spice latte by Starbucks was a stroke of marketing genius in 2003 (https://stories.starbucks.com/stories/2023/hbd-psl-20-fun-facts-about-starbucks-pumpkin-spice-latte/) and has since become firmly entrenched in our collective memory of family and friends. It’s a cultural phenomenon that became a much-anticipated annual tradition for many of us and signals the beginning of the holiday season. Some people view a pumpkin spice latte from Starbucks as a special treat or indulgence, a little bit of luxury during its limited annual availability. A pumpkin spice latte wouldn’t be as special if it were available all the time. The arrival of the pumpkin spice latte at Starbucks every year means the arrival of fall, of Thanksgiving and Christmas, of seeing family and friends for perhaps the first time in months. Consumer demand for everything-pumpkin-spice has grown, and many companies have tried to capitalize on this seasonal trend. While pumpkin spice is ubiquitous and flavors everything from cold breakfast cereal to sandwich cookies every fall, a pumpkin spice latte from Starbucks is beloved. When you live in a perennially warm climate, autumn is a state of mind ushered in by pumpkin spice.
    Nekkanti Accounting Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. I have fraud alerts set up so that I can know immediately if an erroneous charge hits my account. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28, and he already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job and first paycheck. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item. Shiny objects can be hard for anyone to pass up, but this is a very important lesson to learn. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Combined Worlds Scholarship
    I love to travel, and I have been fortunate to do quite a bit with my family. I have a necklace that has little silver washers on it. Like the washers in sink faucets. Each one is engraved with a country and the year from a visit. In my family, it only counts if you spend the night. Just passing through an airport is cheating when it comes to officially visiting a county. The necklace helps me remember all of the wonderful places that I’ve been and the amazing and meaningful experiences that I’ve had. A meaningful travel experience isn’t just one that recalls a sunny day on a favorite beach or a walking tour to sample local delicacies. A meaningful experience stays with you and colors future experiences. My father loves Merida, Mexico, a city of almost a million people and the capital of the state of Yucatan. He, my mother and I rented a house for a week in the colonial center of the city several years ago. When we travel, we like to just “be” in a location so we can really get a feel for a place and experience a glimpse of the life the locals lead. In Merida, many of the people are poor, and they try to earn a living by peddling souvenirs, clothing and flowers to tourists. They even try to tug at tourists’ heart strings by having their young children sell the items. The children approach diners seated outside at restaurants. This happened to me a number of times while I was in Merida, and it left me feeling conflicted. On one hand, I felt guilty for resenting the interruption of my dinner while on the other hand, I knew these hard-working people were just trying to make a living. I bought a few roses, but was I really making a difference? I often think about these children and the struggles and worries their parents must have. My mother and I went to Grand Case, Saint Martin last summer. The island is split between French Saint Martin and Dutch Sint Maarten. Hurricane Irma devastated much of the island in 2017. The Dutch part of the island, home of the international airport, has largely been rebuilt. The more rural French side still shows destruction everywhere you look. According to several taxi drivers, the French government hasn’t sufficiently funded repairs, and people are having to make do with damaged homes, smashed cars and business permanently shuttered. What is amazing is that life goes on for the people of Saint Martin in the midst of all that destruction. They’re rebuilding as best they can, and it’s easy to see the new reinforced roofs made of brightly colored corrugated metal. Some of the best French restaurants in the Caribbean are side by side with weather-worn structures on the streets of Grand Case. My visit to Saint Martin was my first up-close exposure to significant hurricane damage, and the images will remain with me always. I have a new appreciation for the overwhelming power of Mother Nature.
    Beatrice Diaz Memorial Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. In high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. I have fraud alerts set up so that I can know immediately if an erroneous charge hits my account. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28, and he already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job and first paycheck. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item. Shiny objects can be hard for anyone to pass up, but this is a very important lesson to learn. My mother works in accounting. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. What I know for sure, though, is I want to be able to share my knowledge with young people who may not have the classroom opportunities or family role models that I have. My mother’s employer supports financial literacy in low- income elementary schools by going into the schools and teaching age-appropriate lessons on how to save and how to spend appropriately. This is something I’d like to do one day, too. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Jorian Kuran Harris (Shugg) Helping Heart Foundation Scholarship
    My favorite quote is one often attributed to Winston Churchill but is also one he never actually said: "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts." Nevertheless, this paraphrased quote perfectly summarizes a life lesson that took me a while to learn. Success is not a destination but rather a journey. It is not enough to achieve success once and then sit back in self-congratulations; true success lies in the ability to continue to improve, even if this sometimes means taking one step back in order to move two steps forward. No matter how accomplished I may be, there will always be someone who is smarter, more skilled or more experienced than I. Encountering these people used to discourage me. Now, they challenge me to become a better version of myself. Once upon a time, I wanted to be a professional ballerina. While many little girls have this dream, I actually pursued it in a pre-professional program from second grade into middle school. I wanted to be the best, most perfect ballerina. I took every class I could, auditioned for every role in every production. After winning first place in a regional semi-final of an international ballet competition and being cast in the leading role of Clara in “The Nutcracker” at the tender age of 12, I burned out. I was tired of working so hard and never achieving the impossible level of perfection I set for myself. The pursuit of perfection took the fun out of dancing for me. But I walked away with some lifelong skills: dedication, reliability, goal-setting, determination. The lessons I learned in ballet class weren’t just applicable to ballet. I took those skills and applied them to my education. However, with age comes wisdom, and I’ve learned to temper the pursuit of perfection. I can be successful without being perfect. I can fail without having my soul crushed. I strive for excellence in everything I do and am challenged to work harder when my efforts don’t produce the results I want. In my first semester in the University of Texas at San Antonio Honors College in the fall of 2023, I earned Dean’s List recognition while taking 19 hours of course credit and working at a part-time job. I am able to maintain balance in my life and yet still achieve success by recognizing that every benefit comes at a cost and an “A” is an “A” whether it is a 96 percent or a 99 percent. Success has taken many forms in my life. I was a successful dancer. I am now a successful student, a successful math tutor, a successful time manager, and a successful young adult. I will be a successful accountant. My mother works in finance. Her first job after college was as a staff accountant, and she’s worked in many different aspects of accounting, auditing and finance. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know yet if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. I am excited for what lies ahead.
    Beyond The C.L.O.U.D Scholarship
    How many young adults don’t know how to create a budget, manage credit card debt or see value in saving for retirement? There is a lack of financial literacy in my own peer group as well as in many working adults. Personal financial literacy is a life skill that is rarely taught, and then we collectively scratch our heads and wonder why credit card debt is so high and 401(k) balances are so low. At my high school, I took a course called “Finance.” We covered everything from writing checks to creating a budget to participating in a stock market game. In addition to this course, the financial responsibilities my parents placed on me have prepared me to be financially independent when I graduate. I have had summer jobs and after-school jobs and am expected to save my money to buy the things that I want and to set some aside for unexpected expenses. I have an app on my phone so that I can check my bank balance. I have a debit card that I am expected to use responsibly. I have fraud alerts set up so that I can know immediately if an erroneous charge hits my account. My parents encouraged me to create a budget for my college spending money, which will come from my savings account. I feel confident that I can manage my money now and in the future. I think this makes me different from many people my age. Why? Because I have had the advantage of classroom education and family role models who encourage spending in moderation, careful use of debt and saving for a rainy day. It's really sad that a lot of older adults have to work way beyond retirement age because they never contributed to a retirement account and now can’t afford to stop working. My brother is 28 and has his MBA and a good job. He already has more in his 401(k) account than most people twice his age. He has it because my parents made him starting contributing when he got his first real job and first paycheck. However, if no one had encouraged him to do this, he probably wouldn’t have made that decision on his own. Young people think that they’ll start saving for retirement “tomorrow.” All too often, fifty years go by and “tomorrow” is greeted with an inadequate retirement account. We can’t expect young adults to be financially literate if they’ve never been taught what that means. Spend less than you earn. Save for the future. Don’t incur debt that you can’t afford to pay off. You don’t really need that fancy new car or the latest iPhone. Many young adults sacrifice future financial ease for the immediate gratification of the latest hot item, one that they frequently cannot afford. Shiny objects can be hard for anyone to pass up, but this is a very important lesson to learn. My mother works in finance. Her first job after college was as a staff accountant, and she’s worked in many different aspects of accounting, auditing and finance. I’ve grown up watching the work she does, and it appeals to me. I like the rules-based nature of accounting, and the knowledge and skills that I will learn as I complete my degree will be applicable in so many fields. I don’t know if I want to be an auditor with a Big 4 firm or maybe pursue white collar criminals with the FBI. My accounting degree plan will help me narrow my focus and land the perfect job. I am excited for what lies ahead.