For DonorsFor Applicants
user profile avatar

Caitlyn Wilcox

2315

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Bio

I am an adventurous, compassionate, and outgoing woman. I struggle with ADHD, depression, anxiety, and ASD (autism spectrum disorder). I spent the last year of my life working on my mental health and finding coping skills that could help me for the rest of my life. I was sent to a wilderness treatment center and was forced to learn to love myself. I do many outdoor activities like canyoneering, mountain bike racing, and paddle boarding. I want to impact this world by helping people with their animals. I want to study Veterinary sciences because I love animals. I have a cat, a gecko, and a dog. I want to be able to help people know what is wrong with their best friends and make the world a better place.

Education

Wasatch High

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Majors of interest:

    • Agriculture/Veterinary Preparatory Programs
    • Zoology/Animal Biology
    • Agricultural/Animal/Plant/Veterinary Science and Related Fields, Other
    • Veterinary Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
    • Veterinary Administrative Services
    • Veterinary/Animal Health Technologies/Technicians
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Veterinary

    • Dream career goals:

      Owner and head vet

    • ICU manager

      Discover ranch for girls
      2022 – 20231 year

    Sports

    mountain bike racing

    Junior Varsity
    2019 – 20223 years

    Arts

    • stage crew
      2018 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Utah National forestry — Organizer
      2021 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Elizabeth Schalk Memorial Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    William Griggs Memorial Scholarship for Science and Math
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Joieful Connections Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Another Way Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Brian J Boley Memorial Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Trever David Clark Memorial Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Wellness Warriors Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Mind, Body, & Soul Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Your Health Journey Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Holt Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Jorian Kuran Harris (Shugg) Helping Heart Foundation Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working to help others through animals.
    Will Johnson Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.
    Richard Neumann Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me. I had to learn how to slow down and be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I have gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working as a vet and helping others through animals.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me. I had to learn how to slow down and be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I have gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working as a vet and helping others through animals.
    Carole H. Beveridge Memorial Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I have gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me go toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward working as a vet and helping others through animals.
    Team Crosby Forever Veterinary Medicine Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would bite me. I had to learn how to slow down and be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I have gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working as a vet and helping others through animals.
    Dylan's Journey Memorial Scholarship
    I have always had a special bond with animals, but it wasn’t until recently that a hard journey helped me understand why. On April 19th, 2022, I was stripped of my life and sent to a wilderness therapy program in the middle of nowhere, two hours away from any civilization. I had no phone, no friends, and no family. It was just me and five other girls, three staff, and the backpacks we carried on our backs. This 3-month journey, which turned into a year-long journey of treatment, was the start of a life-changing experience for me. The year prior to being sent to the wilderness, I was struggling. I had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety and was heading toward suicide. If my parents had not intervened when they had, I would not be alive today. While in treatment, I finally discovered why I had been struggling. I received another diagnosis of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. For me, this explained the many social challenges I’ve experienced throughout my life - my inability to keep friends and feelings of social rejection. The diagnosis also brought to light a reason for my different anxieties and my inability to understand certain things. Because Autism looks much different in girls than it does in boys, it typically goes undiagnosed. Girls tend to hide it much better because girls can mask and act like everyone else to fit in. So the fact I was sent to wilderness therapy ended up being a huge blessing that brought a lot of clarity to my life. ASD has also made my educational path harder. I have had challenges adapting to change, I’ve had a hard time paying attention, and I’ve struggled with executive functioning skills that many take for granted. Since being diagnosed, I’ve learned new skills and have been able to overcome these challenges so I can prioritize more effectively and become a strong student. Because of my autism, I relate better to animals than to humans. I have always loved animals and currently have a dog, a cat, two guinea pigs, a turtle, a fish, and a gecko. My ASD has given me special abilities with animals that have helped me read animal body language better than others and understand what animals need. In treatment, I had the opportunity to participate in equine therapy. Not only did this help me with learning to do hard work, but it helped me create relationships with animals where I had to set boundaries. The horse I was working with would often bite me and be stubborn. I had to learn how to slow down and really be present for the relationship to progress. I was able to parallel these animal interactions to my relationships with my family and friends. Working with horses in treatment helped me to learn social principles that I was able to apply to my social relationships with people, which ultimately saved my life. Now that I gained the skills to overcome many of the challenges that come with ASD, I have been able to focus on my future. I have decided to go to Utah State University to leverage these special abilities in veterinary science. I want to be able to help others like me with ASD to get help and find meaning through working with animals. My goal is to open a clinic of my own (something about how it serves others with ASD). This scholarship will help me take my first steps toward my educational goals to put me on the path toward my dream of working helping others through animals.