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Beverly N

1675

Bold Points

1x

Finalist

Bio

My passion rests in technology participation and the capacity to develop and innovate, and I plan to use my experience to further my studies at Michigan State University. I want to use my natural curiosity and love for equity-driven research to find, dissect, and develop technological advancements so that I can participate in the positive changes that will come. Because of my ambition, achievements, and future ambitions, I am an excellent candidate for a scholarship. Allowing me to serve my community and be engaged in the constructive changes that are occurring and will occur in the future will be made possible by helping to fund my academic aspirations.

Education

Michigan State University

Bachelor's degree program
2021 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Industrial Engineering
  • Minors:
    • Political Science and Government

Okemos High School

High School
2018 - 2021

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Majors of interest:

  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Mechanical or Industrial Engineering

    • Dream career goals:

      Improve society

    • Crew Trainer

      McDonald's
      2018 – Present6 years

    Sports

    dance

    Junior Varsity
    2016 – Present8 years

    Basketball

    Junior Varsity
    2017 – 20203 years

    Awards

    • Best team captain

    Research

    • American Government and Politics (United States)

      Okemos High School — Research Intern
      2020 – 2021

    Public services

    • Advocacy

      Independent — Protest, post information and resources online and write articles about it
      2019 – Present
    • Public Service (Politics)

      Independent — Post critcal information
      2019 – Present
    • Volunteering

      ACTION — Member
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Education Matters Scholarship
    Some of my greatest adversities have become my greatest strengths. There is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual, but also as a citizen in helping others with their hardships. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown in utilizing my experience and education to teach others about global issues. My devotion to serving those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. for educational purposes. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. As a young adult, seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could help. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced when coming to America. Community Service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to help others just as the two women once did for me and my family. The food insecurity that my family and I faced when immigrating to America was not our only obstacle. In the United States, English language learners must test to prove their proficiency, which can be incredibly difficult for immigrants. It took me two years to pass the test, and it was not until eighth grade that I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and myself. Life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself and others in the community. As a result of my educational background, career goals, and my courage gained in combating obstacles, I have built the confidence and ability to successfully pursue my interest and career as a lawyer in college. As a graduate, I plan on attending college in Michigan to study political science or legal studies because my passion lies in political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities among black Americans. Thereafter, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. As I continue to develop my character and define my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society in which I can be proud.
    Act Locally Scholarship
    A problematic issue facing society today is police brutality. Americans saw the true colors of systematic racism with the killing of George Floyd. Americans, for so long, have ignored or neglected the issues black people face. However, for Americans to wake up from the prestige bubble they lived in, it took the murder of George Floyd. Ignorance is becoming a more significant threat to America, as more people are unaware of black people's issues. My family and I have to be vigilant. For instance, by checking in on one another, making sure if a police officer pulls us over, to make them feel comfortable, and never make anyone feel as if we are unintentional in what we are doing in public. After all, black people today are continuously facing waves of racism due to slavery. In 2020, we are supposed to be better than the people before us, but we choose to revive the same problematic aspects of racism. The problems lie because some people are willing to have black people treated the way we are but not willing to have that treatment for themselves, nor are they willing to confront the problem. When we hear racist comments, some do not take the time to recognize and say, "it is wrong." Thus, the continuous cycle leaves some people to believe it is okay to say those racist comments. Therefore, creating racist cops, which, in turn, affects police brutality. Nelson Mandela once stated, "No one is born hating another person because of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate." Considering the injustice and inequality black people face right now in America, it is not enough to not be racist. A person has to be anti-racist, meaning wherever they find racism, whether it is at home, at the dinner table, with friends or family, they find a way to stand up and call the person out. It all begins with starting a conversation about race with friends and family or educating ourselves by reading books such as Dear Martin by Nic Stone, who tells a story of a 17-year-old black student named Justyce who struggles to face the reality of race relations in modern America. Americans have a responsibility to want all lives to matter, not just those they choose to matter. Historically, African Americans have endured substantial amounts of hatred, discrimination, and racism from white people dating backing to slavery. Today, Americans should be working towards ending police brutality because it is not one's race problem anymore; people of all races are impacted by police violence. Police brutality has an enormous impact on mental health in every race and age. Police killings of Black people represent the continued oppression and devaluation of Black lives at a systemic level. Americans should understand that police brutality impacts the mental health of every individual. The persistent stress of the imminent danger and the traumatic effects of police violence in all its forms (physical, emotional, verbal) at a personal (first- or second-hand) and societal level can profoundly impact society's mental health. The hardships that black people face in police brutality affect other parts of the world, as we saw with George Floyd. As a whole, Americans must take the responsibility to stop the endless cycle of racial injustice towards black people because if they do not, everyone ends up having a target on their back. Neutrality in black people's issues makes the person part of the problem because silence is the oppressor's language. As a country, America has a long way to go towards justice for all people, including black people. Through my educational pursuits and extracurricular activities, I have gained the leadership skills necessary to mobilize my compassion in improving the lives of others. Pursuing a career as a lawyer will provide me the structure required to advocate for communities in need profoundly. For that reason, I see myself assisting low-income people in establishing themselves in society after incarceration. From my ability to combat and overcome obstacles, I have the confidence and ambition to successfully pursue my career as a lawyer and eventually run for public office. I aim to create political change built on equity-guided principles which ensure everyone's wellbeing.
    Jameela Jamil x I Weigh Scholarship
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned there is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual but also as a citizen in helping others. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown to utilizing my experience and education to serve others. One of my passions is serving those marginalized by society; this is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. As a result, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced. Community service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to assist others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. In the meantime, as an aspiring lawyer, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. Through developing my character and defining my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    Normandie Cormier Greater is Now Scholarship
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned that courage grows from the struggles in life. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment and grit have encouraged me to utilize my experience and education to serve others. My determination to help those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. Thus, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who had come to my home when we had first arrived and who had given us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats or gloves. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need because of the food insecurity my family and I had faced. Community service provided me with the opportunity to uncover my courage in light of adversity while giving me the strength to empower others. In addition to the financial instability that my family and I faced, the English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters of my life. After two failed attempts, I finally received my certificate in eighth grade. I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke, and I became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the adversities I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. Learning to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and for myself. Through my difficulties, I have discovered my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities across racial lines. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace. In the meantime, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my fortitude for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. Through courage and commitment to my goals, I aim to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    Maida Brkanovic Memorial Scholarship
    Immigrants are forced to own the inherited weight of their race, even without the lived experience of racism in America. Coming to America at such a young age, I did not know race existed. In Cameroon, everyone is black, which means no Hispanics, Caucasians, Japanese, or Chinese, just one race. I did not know how others viewed my race until I reached fourth grade. In class, we talked about slavery and how Africans were tied up in chains, thrown overboard when they were sick, and forced into labor. As a child, I barely knew the effects of slavery and how my skin color was related to such. The students around me quickly revealed the answer when they stared at me curiously. Along with learning the concept of race, came the cruel understanding of the oppression behind my race. At first, I did not understand why the students were staring at me. However, I soon realized it was because I was black. The students looked at me as if I had the answers to what occurred during slavery, but I did not. At that moment, I felt so isolated, helpless, confused, and even more of an outsider than ever. The way they looked at me, it was as if I was the living embodiment of slavery when, when in reality, I was just a student like everyone else. It was in those moments I realized race does matter in America. Even so, I was just a young girl who immigrated to America with no knowledge of America or even a world outside of Cameroon. From then on, living in America made me feel hurt and betrayed. I began comparing my outsider feeling, the racism I was experiencing, and the aspect of being foreign to what I imagined enslaved Africans felt. Understanding immigrant children's experiences in the context of race is essential to understand their experiences with racism as they are learning about it. Nevertheless, immigrants are bound to encounter negative assumptions and stereotypes when immigrating to America from a third-world country. For instance, usually, when Americans think of Africa, they think of destroyed homes, homelessness, poor starving children, and all the animals in the Lion King. If someone were to go to Africa, they would not see a lion or starved children immediately because those stereotypes do not make up all parts of Africa. As an immigrant, my accent raised endless questions. If I had a penny for every time someone asked my family or me those questions, I could pay for all four years of my undergraduate degree and more. For instance, in eighth grade, my teacher once asked me where I was from, and I said I was from Africa. However, the questions usually do not end there, given my accent was like a sensor for those around me. The questions were as follows, "When did you come here? How long have you lived here?" Furthermore, of course, the famous question, "Is there electricity there?" Those questions showed how insensitive and ignorant many Americans were. Americans conceptualize Africa as a poor developing country full of hungry children, but it is not an accurate representation everywhere. Americans often conclude immigrants left their homeland because it was poorly shaped, but it is not always the case. On the contrary, Africa is such a beautiful continent, full of astonishing cities such as Yaounde, diversities of different languages and social interactions, fantastic recreational centers, and delicious foods such as eru. Eru is a dish prepared with the eponymous wild plant called eru, which is ground or pounded before being stewed with palm oil, spinach, waterleaf. Moreover, Cameroon has more than two hundred languages...Cameroonians commonly speak French and English. These are amazing qualities in which Americans do not realize Cameroon has. Americans assuming or stereotyping the whole continent as a miserable and pitiful place without knowing the world outside their own is an insult to me and where I am from. I felt as if I was living in a bubble all alone while everyone stared at me curiously. The American population's continuous exposure to African misrepresentation creates a limited mindset since it is all they are exposed to. Such a limited mindset formed a misunderstood feeling because Americans did not understand my story, isolated because I was the only one being questioned, and different as if I was so foreign, I did not belong. However, life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to fearlessly and courageously pursue a better life for my family and myself.
    Brandon Zylstra Road Less Traveled Scholarship
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned that courage grows from struggle in life. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment and grit have encouraged me to utilize my experience and education to serve others. My determination to help those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. Thus, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who had come to my home when we had first arrived and who had given us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats or gloves. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need because of the food insecurity my family and I had faced. Community service provided me with the opportunity to uncover my courage in light of adversity while giving me the strength to empower others. In addition to the financial instability that my family and I faced, the English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters of my life. After two failed attempts, I finally received my certificate in eighth grade. I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke, and I became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the adversities I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. Learning to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and for myself. Through my difficulties, I have discovered my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities across racial lines. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace. In the meantime, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my fortitude for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. Through courage and commitment to my goals, I aim to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    Imagine Dragons Origins Scholarship
    Some of my greatest adversities have become my greatest strengths. There is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual but also as a citizen in helping others with their hardships. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown in utilizing my experience and education to teach others about global issues. My devotion to serving those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. for educational purposes. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence in America. As a result, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. As a young adult, seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could help. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced when coming to America. Community Service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to help others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. The food insecurity that my family and I faced when immigrating to America was not our only obstacle. In the United States, English language learners must test to prove their proficiency, which can be incredibly difficult for immigrants. The English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters in my life because it reminded me how the country I once knew was behind me. It took me two years to pass the test, and it was not until eighth grade that I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and myself. Life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself and others in the community. As a result of my educational background, career goals, and my courage gained in combating obstacles, I have built the confidence and ability to successfully pursue my interest and career as a lawyer in college. As a graduate, I plan on attending college in Michigan to study political science or legal studies because my passion lies in political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities among black Americans. Thereafter, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. In the meantime, as an aspiring lawyer, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. As I continue to develop my character and define my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society in which I can be proud.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship
    Some of my greatest adversities have become my greatest achievements. There is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual but also as a citizen in helping others with their hardships. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown in utilizing my experience and education to teach others about systemic issues. My devotion to serving those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. for educational purposes. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence in America. As a result, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. As a young adult, seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could help. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced when coming to America. Community Service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to help others. Nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. The food insecurity that my family and I faced when immigrating to America was not our only obstacle. Moreover, in the United States, English language learners must test to prove their proficiency, which can be incredibly difficult for immigrants. The English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters in my life because it reminded me how the country I once knew was behind me. It took me two years to pass the test, and it was not until eighth grade that I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and myself. Life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself and others in the community. As a result of my educational background, career goals, and my courage gained in combating obstacles, I have built the confidence and ability to successfully pursue my interest and career as a lawyer in college. Coming from an immigrant background, financial instability has been the reality for my family and me for as long as I can remember. As an upcoming undergraduate student, I am anticipating the debt I will incur, especially given my family’s situation as a single-income household reliant on food stamps. Without looming economic hardship, with the WCEJ Thornton Foundation Low-Income Scholarship, I will be able to pursue my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities across racial lines. l aim to become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. In the meantime, as an aspiring lawyer, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. As I continue to develop my character and define my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I hope to create a future and a society in which I can be proud.
    Impact Scholarship for Black Students
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned there is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual but also as a citizen in helping others. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown to utilizing my experience and education to serve others as an aspiring lawyer. One of my passions is serving those marginalized by society; this is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. Thus, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who had come to my home when we had first arrived and who had given us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats or gloves. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need because of the food insecurity my family and I had faced. Community service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I have faced as a means to assist others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. In addition to the food insecurity that my family and I faced, the English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters of my life. Two years later, I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. Learning to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and me. The Impact Scholarship for Black Students will allow me to follow my dreams and aspirations while granting me tools and resources to navigate the legal system and help me become a civically engaged leader. As an upcoming undergraduate student, I am anticipating the debt I will have to incur, especially given my family’s situation as a single-income household reliant on food stamps. Without looming economic hardship, I will be able to pursue my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and inequitable legal representation across racial lines. My passion for pursuing law derives from the environment in which I was raised. Not being a native to America, my family and I were often taken advantage of or undervalued due to our country of origin, our economic circumstance, or our deficiency in English. As a family attorney or an immigration attorney, I would have the opportunity to assist families in similar circumstances. Having battled and overcome obstacles akin to those of my future clients, I have the courage and drive to successfully pursue my career as a lawyer and eventually run for public office. There, I aim to create political change built on equity-guided principles which ensure everyone's wellbeing. To reach my ambitious goals, I became a dual enrollment student at Okemos High School, where I have had the opportunity to advance my college education and future career as a lawyer. Currently, I am taking Public Policy and American Politics at Lansing Community College (LCC), which has ignited my interest in the inner workings of government. Being recognized twice on the Presidential List, four times on the Dean's List, and obtaining a total of 52 college credits, I have continuously striven in my education to reach my passions. At LCC, I have joined the Women Inspiring Scholarship through Empowerment (WISE) program. The WISE program is focused on helping women pursue meaningful career goals, creativity, and personal growth in a supportive and nurturing environment. Through WISE, I have evolved and explored leadership experiences through educational opportunities and externships. As a Secretary and group facilitator of Students Against Destructive Decisions at Okemos High School, I have created a safe and nurturing environment for club members. During Wellness Wednesday, a weekly Instagram post, club leaders such as myself build students' confidence and encourage them to improve their lifestyles by sharing tips and guides on how to do so. Outside of the classroom, I have further developed my leadership skills. As a Crew Trainer at McDonald's, I simultaneously provide relevant training to develop new members and provide regular feedback on their performance; the employees I have trained now work independently and lead others during their shifts. Through my educational pursuits and extracurricular activities, I have gained the skills necessary to mobilize my passion for improving the lives of others. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace. In the meantime, I endeavor to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. In the end, I aim to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    Herbert Osei “Dream Big” Writing Scholarship
    Tao Te Ching once voiced that, "With compassion one becomes courageous. Compassion brings triumph when attacked; it brings security when maintained." My compassion for others, developed through my own life experiences, has allowed me to gain further insight into the hardships of others. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown to utilizing my experience and education to serve my community. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who had come to my home when we had first arrived in America and who had given us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats or gloves. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. My passion for pursuing law derives from the environment in which I was raised. Not being a native to America, my family and I were often taken advantage of or undervalued due to our country of origin, our economic circumstance, or our deficiency in English. As a family attorney or an immigration attorney, I would have the opportunity to assist families in similar circumstances. Having battled and overcome obstacles akin to those of my future clients, I have the courage and drive to successfully pursue my career as a lawyer and eventually run for public office. There, I aim to create political change built on equity-guided principles which ensure everyone's wellbeing. To reach my ambitious goals, I became a dual enrollment student at Lansing Community College, where I have had the opportunity to advance my college education and future career as a lawyer. At LCC, I have joined the Women Inspiring Scholarship through Empowerment (WISE) program. The WISE program is focused on helping women pursue meaningful career goals, creativity, and personal growth in a supportive and nurturing environment. Through WISE, I have evolved and explored leadership experiences through educational opportunities and externships. As a WISE Mentee, I am gaining leadership skills which I will use to aid clients in the future. As a Secretary and group facilitator of Students Against Destructive Decisions at Okemos High School, I have created a safe and nurturing environment for club members. During Wellness Wednesday, a weekly Instagram post, club leaders such as myself build students' confidence and encourage them to improve their lifestyles by sharing tips and guides on how to do so. Numerous students have emphasized how much SADD has helped them by creating a space where they can talk about the struggles of school and not feel isolated. Through my educational pursuits and extracurricular activities, I have gained the leadership skills necessary to mobilize my compassion in improving the lives of others. Pursuing a career as a lawyer will provide me the structure required to advocate for communities in need profoundly.
    Future Black Leaders Scholarship
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned that courage grows from the struggle in life. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment and grit have encouraged me to utilize my experience and education to serve others. My determination to serve those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. Thus, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who had come to my home when we had first arrived and who had given us cans of food, meals, and cold-weather necessities. I then realized the impact I could have on my community members and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need. Community service provided me with the opportunity to uncover my courage in the light of adversity while giving me the strength to empower others. In addition to the food insecurity that my family and I faced, the English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters of my life. Two years later, I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the adversities I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. Learning to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and me. As an upcoming undergraduate student, I anticipate the debt I will have to incur, especially given my family’s situation as a single-income household reliant on food stamps. Without looming economic hardship, I will be able to pursue my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities across racial lines. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace. In the meantime, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my fortitude for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    JuJu Foundation Scholarship
    Maya Angelou once voiced, “My mission in life is not merely to survive but thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Although my journey to the U.S seemed like a never-ending rollercoaster, I have learned there is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual but also as a citizen in helping others. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown to utilizing my experience and education to serve others. One of my passions is serving those marginalized by society; this is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence. As a result, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. Seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could aid. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced. Community service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to assist others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. The JuJu Foundation Scholarship will enable me to follow my dreams and aspirations. As an upcoming undergraduate student, I am anticipating the debt I will have to incur, especially given my family’s situation as a single-income household reliant on food stamps. Without looming economic hardship, I will be able to pursue my passion for political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities across racial lines. Upon graduation, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. In the meantime, as an aspiring lawyer, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. Through developing my character and defining my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society of which I can be proud.
    Bubba Wallace Live to Be Different Scholarship
    Some of my greatest adversities have become my greatest strengths. There is hardly any passion without struggle in life. The difficulties that I have encountered have allowed me to flourish not only as an individual, but also as a citizen in helping others with their hardships. Through the fertile grounds of my challenges, my commitment has grown in utilizing my experience and education to teach others about global issues. My devotion to serving those marginalized by society is not coincidental but rather derives from my own personal struggles. In 2011, my parents and I moved from Cameroon to the U.S. for educational purposes. Because they had come to a country they knew nothing about, my parents could not yet achieve financial independence in America. As a result, we had to rely on community service. Each year, as a member of the National Honor Society at my high school, I participated in the food drive to help families in need. As a young adult, seeing the trucks full of food during the winter NHS food drive, I remembered the two women who came to my home when we first arrived and who gave us cans of food, meals, and cold weather necessities such as hats, gloves, and hand warmers. I then realized the impact I could have on members of my community and how many more families I could help. I loved being part of an event that helped families in need, especially during the brutal winters because of the food insecurity my family and I faced when coming to America. Community Service has inspired me and taught me how to see the world differently by utilizing the difficulties I faced as a means to help others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone just as the two women once did for me and my family. The food insecurity that my family and I faced when immigrating to America was not our only obstacle. In the United States, English language learners must test to prove their proficiency, which can be incredibly difficult for immigrants. The English proficiency test was one of the most challenging encounters in my life because it reminded me how the country I once knew was behind me. It took me two years to pass the test, and it was not until eighth grade that I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the people of the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and myself. Life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself and others in the community. As a result of my educational background, career goals, and my courage gained in combating obstacles, I have built the confidence and ability to successfully pursue my interest and career as a lawyer in college. As a graduate, I plan on attending college in Michigan to study political science or legal studies because my passion lies in political involvement and awareness of such societal realities as systemic racism and health disparities among black Americans. Thereafter, I will become a civil rights lawyer who strives to make a difference in my community and in my workplace in the same way others have made a difference in my life. In the meantime, as an aspiring lawyer, I strive to utilize my innate curiosity and my passion for equity-driven research to identify, dissect, and address systemic issues within our political system. As I continue to develop my character and define my identity, I will apply myself in my education and in aiding my community. In the end, I strive to create a future and a society in which I can be proud.
    Liz's Bee Kind Scholarship
    In 2011, my parents moved from Cameroon to the U.S. for educational purposes. Coming to America, my parents could not yet stand on their own two feet because they were coming into a country they knew nothing about. As a result, we had to rely on community service. In America, middle school exposed me to numerous radical changes. Each year, as a member of the National Honors Society at my high school, I participate in the food drive to help families in need. As a young adult, looking at the trucks full of food during the NHS food drive, I remembered two women coming to my home when we first arrived and gave us cans of food, meals, and winter necessities. I realized the impact I could have on members of my community and hoped many more families would be helped. As a result of the food insecurity my family and I faced when coming to America, I loved being part of an event that helps families in need, especially during the brutal winters. Community Service has taught me the ability to see the world differently by allowing me to see the difficulties I faced as a means to help others. There is nothing more rewarding than helping someone like the two women once did for me. The food insecurity that my family and I faced when immigrating to America was not our only obstacle. In the United States, ESL learners must test to prove their proficiency, which can be incredibly difficult for immigrants. The ESL test was one of the most challenging encounters in my life because it reminded me of how the country I once knew was behind me. It took me two years to pass the test, and it was not until eighth grade that I received my certificate. In those two years, I worked hard to understand how my peers and teachers spoke and became proficient in reading, writing, and speaking. The certificate represented the struggles I had conquered from the language barrier, the social difficulties of making friends, the new environment, and the American community who repeatedly attempted to show me I did not belong. By acknowledging the difficulties I faced as a child, I learned to embrace the hardships of being an immigrant. It fed my ambition, drive, and desire for my education to pursue a better life for my family and me. Life's reality is that there will always be obstacles to face; it is about using life's relentless setbacks to empower yourself and others in the community.
    Brynn Elliott "Tell Me I’m Pretty" Scholarship
    My whole life, my mom has always been an inspiration to me. She sets high standards academically as I strive to achieve them. However, she always reminds me that it is okay to fail or make mistakes, but it is not okay to let it define you or surrender. My mom is my greatest advocate when it comes to my education. As a dual enrollment student, I can sometimes feel powerless and overly stressed out when balancing high school and college. However, because she is always so supportive of me in school, advises me in my education as a student herself, and empowers me to work hard, I am inspired to push through the difficult situations I face. For instance, young adults are often pushed to pursue jobs as doctors, lawyers, or engineers by their parents. I always thought that's what my mom wanted for me, but in the end, she’ll be proud of me with whatever I choose to pursue as long as it enables me to stand on my own two feet. Keeping that in mind, I'm able to attend college without the fear of letting my mom down. I will use the same characteristics my mom demonstrated as a mentor and apply them during my undergraduate in the hopes of becoming a mentor myself. I will seek academic success in college through academic advising, counseling, student organizations, and teachers. Therefore, I will be more prepared and confident for college because I know she supports me in whatever I choose to be.