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Betelihem Gebregergs

1035

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Finalist

Bio

I don't have any goals in life. Because, in my opinion, setting a goal unintentionally limits your options. You forget to push yourself and work tirelessly towards that single goal at all hours of the day and night. I'm not saying this is inaccurate. You, on the other hand, stop exploring things that aren't related to that goal, and life is all about taking risks and discovering new things. Start by simply looking up at your goal; anything beyond that will be invisible to you. Regardless of your intentions, it will confine you to a specific region. Simply put, it limits your ability to see further. I am very passionate about assisting others because I come from a low-income immigrant family. When my parents immigrated to the United States from Eritrea, they knew nothing but hard work and relying on the community for assistance. We placed a high value on our faith, family, and community. I've always felt that our purpose is to help others. I consider myself fortunate to have accomplished so much in my life, and I want to assist others in achieving similar levels of success.

Education

Georgia State University

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Health and Medical Administrative Services

Tucker High School

High School
2018 - 2022

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
    • Health/Medical Preparatory Programs
    • Medical Clinical Sciences/Graduate Medical Studies
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
    • Practical Nursing, Vocational Nursing and Nursing Assistants
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Hospital & Health Care

    • Dream career goals:

      Chief Executive Officer

    • cashier

      publix
      2019 – Present5 years

    Sports

    Soccer

    Varsity
    2017 – Present7 years

    Awards

    • Most Improved Player Award,
    • Most Improved Player Award,
    • Most Versatile Player Award,
    • Most Incredible Shot Award

    Research

    • Engineering Science

      Tucker high school engineering club — climate change statistics
      2019 – 2020

    Arts

    • Art club

      Drawing
      Environment and Human Effects,, Environment and Human Effects,, People’s Unique Qualities
      2018 – 2020

    Public services

    • Public Service (Politics)

      Star — Making flyers and helping at the voting booth
      2020 – 2020
    • Volunteering

      Earth club — Growing food and getting people together
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Maggie's Way- International Woman’s Scholarship
    My family relocated to the US from Eritrea when I was a child. This change came with many obstacles which I conquered with persistence. Though I was relatively young at the time, I often look back to those times and remember how I overcame the difficulties of being immersed in a new culture through perseverance. Back in Eritrea, there was little-to-no expectation for girls to obtain an education; most girls were married at only 12 years old. However, my parents had bigger and better dreams for me than marriage. My mother did not want me to end up like her, with no education at all, and I dreamed of becoming one of the few female dentists to enter the male-dominated field. In pursuit of our dreams, my parents wanted to take us to the land of opportunity: The United States of America. I was just eight years old when my family emigrated from Eritrea. My father received death threats for his decision to raise his family rather than to go to war and eventually had to flee from the country. My mother crumbled under the pressure of raising four young children all by herself and had to make the hard choice of leaving her home in Eritrea. We were one of the few families who managed to escape the brutality of the Eritrean government and its oppressive policies. One of the obstacles I faced in the journey from Eritrea to Sudan was having to walk and drive 428 miles. At some points, we all had to be quiet, or we risked being brutally murdered. I witnessed people on the journey die from thirst and hunger. My mom, to protect us from the death around us, told me they were only asleep. There was a huge language barrier in Sudan, so it was difficult to converse with the people around me. This inability to interact made me isolated and confused. I had no choice but to learn the language quickly. With persistence and constant effort, I was able to learn the language and break down that communication barrier. I was extremely excited when my father told us that the US accepted our paperwork to come as refugees. It was the best day of my life! I was happy and excited to start school in the US, and I reignited my dreams of becoming a dentist. However, I worried that not being able to communicate in English would cause struggles in school and keep me from my goals. My fears melted away as I made connections at my new school. I met amazing teachers who helped me learn to read and write in English in only two months. Their support, combined with my perseverance and language-learning skills that I developed as a child, allowed me to thrive. I knew all the hard work paid off when I was given an award for having all A’s in middle school. This gave me the motivation I needed to work harder in school, and I maintained my straight A’s through high school. For me, my good grades were a constant reminder of the cycle of struggle, hard work, and accomplishment that comes from being an immigrant. When a new refugee student came to my high school, I became their guide and companion. I used my experiences adapting to this new environment to support them, and I paid forward the love and encouragement my teachers and other students showered on me when I first arrived. The challenges I faced in my childhood and as an immigrant helped me realize the necessity of pushing towards your goals.
    Abby's First-Generation College Student Scholarship
    My family relocated to the US from Eritrea when I was a child. This change came with many obstacles which I conquered with persistence. Though I was relatively young at the time, I often look back to those times and remember how I overcame the difficulties of being immersed in a new culture through perseverance. Back in Eritrea, there was little-to-no expectation for girls to obtain an education; most girls were married at only 12 years old. However, my parents had bigger and better dreams for me than marriage. My mother did not want me to end up like her, with no education at all, and I dreamed of becoming one of the few female dentists to enter the male dominated field. In pursuit of our dreams, my parents wanted to take us to the land of opportunity: The United States of America. I was just eight years old when my family emigrated from Eritrea. My father received death threats for his decision to raise his family rather than to go to war and eventually had to flee from the country. My mother crumbled under the pressure of raising four young children all by herself and had to make the hard choice of leaving her home in Eritrea. We were one of the few families who managed to escape the brutality of the Eritrean government and its oppressive policies. One of the obstacles I faced in the journey from Eritrea to Sudan was having to walk and drive 428 miles. At some points, we all had to be quiet, or we risked being brutally murdered. I witnessed people on the journey die from thirst and hunger. My mom, to protect us from the death around us, told me they were only asleep. There was a huge language barrier in Sudan, so it was difficult to converse with the people around me. This inability to interact made me isolated and confused. I had no choice but to learn the language quickly. With persistence and constant effort, I was able to learn the language and break down that communication barrier. I was extremely excited when my father told us that the US accepted our paperwork to come as refugees. It was the best day of my life! I was happy and excited to start school in the US, and I reignited my dreams of becoming a dentist. However, I worried that not being able to communicate in English would cause struggles in school and keep me from my goals. My fears melted away as I made connections at my new school. I met amazing teachers who helped me learn to read and write in English in only two months. Their support, combined with my perseverance and language-learning skills that I developed as a child, allowed me to thrive. I knew all the hard work paid off when I was given an award for having all A’s in middle school. This gave me the motivation I needed to work harder in school, and I maintained my straight A’s through high school. My outstanding grades served as a continual reminder of the sacrifice, hard work, and achievement that comes with being an immigrant. When a new refugee student came to my high school, I became their guide and companion. I used my experiences adapting to this new environment to support them, and I paid forward the love and encouragement my teachers and other students showered on me when I first arrived. The difficulties I endured as a child and as an immigrant taught me the importance of persevering in your pursuit of your goals.