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Berline Civil

2395

Bold Points

12x

Nominee

5x

Finalist

Bio

My life goal is to become both successful and impactful in the lives of others. I am driven to succeed as a neurosurgeon, software developer, or entrepreneur. I am persistent, even in the face of challenge and defeat. My passion is to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams.

Education

University of Central Florida

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Biology, General

University of Central Florida

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027
  • Majors:
    • Computer Science

Atlanta Technical College

High School
2020 - 2023
  • Majors:
    • Neuroscience
  • Minors:
    • Orthopedic Surgery of the Spine Residency Program

Atlantic Technical Center and Technical High School

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations
    • Neurobiology and Neurosciences
    • Computer Programming
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

    • Dream career goals:

      Help others who are ill feel better

      Sports

      Volleyball

      Club
      2017 – 20181 year

      Arts

      • Independent and Hackathons

        Computer Art
        N/A
        2019 – Present

      Public services

      • Advocacy

        Brace Cadet — Brace Cadet
        2021 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Urban League of Broward County — Helper
        2018 – Present
      • Volunteering

        Oracle — Front end developer
        2019 – 2020
      • Volunteering

        Rock Island Elementary and William Dandy — Assisted in helping kids
        2019 – 2020

      Future Interests

      Volunteering

      Rev. and Mrs. E B Dunbar Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      STEAM Generator Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Harvest Achievement Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income. This helps me stay accountable.
      William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
      My passion comes from wanting to make a lasting impact on the world and improve the lives of others around me. I've found a strong interest in both computer science and medicine. I decided to explore both fields to determine which was the best fit for me. Being exposed to the medical and technology field early on gave me an idea of what I wanted to be. I spent the past few years working with Oracle professionals to strengthen my front-end and back-end development skills. Over the past few years, I've built several websites for clients that they found astonishing. I also created several apps. The very first app I created was directed to help teens who were suffering from anxiety and depression. The goal of my app was to decrease the drastically increasing number of teens who committed suicide. This award-winning app was the winner for my congressional district in 2020. In addition, I created another app called MavenSearch, which aimed to help teens connect with local business sponsors to find service hours. This app was designed to help teens struggling to find service hours when the pandemic started. In addition, I regularly compete in community hackathons to solve everyday problems. I decided to switch gears by enrolling in the nursing program at my school, hesitant to leave behind my world of computer science. I had no idea how challenging nursing would be; nothing could have prepared me for the rigor. Failing after hours of studying felt like an unending cycle. My clinical experience showed a need for healthcare workers and allowed me to connect with patients from all walks of life. This was the key factor that kept me going. My clinical experience has encouraged me to pursue Biology as one of my majors. However, I did not feel complete. After an entire year of pursuing solely nursing, I realized how much I missed being involved in computer science. My coaches, professors, mentors, friends, and parents encouraged me to pursue Computer Science. I had to make a tough decision: pursue biology and go on to medical school or computer science. I realized that I could have the best of both worlds by starting a business suited to make profound innovations within the medical field using my computer knowledge. I want to use my computer science and medical science knowledge to create innovative technology that can assist healthcare workers with everyday tasks. As a result, I have decided to pursue a double major in Biology and Computer Science. My main goal for choosing these majors and minors is to earn a sustainable living doing what I love and to encourage other minorities to chase after their dreams. I plan to utilize my college education to further my skills and knowledge to propel myself into my career as a doctor, biomedical engineer, computer programmer, or entrepreneur. I plan to use my education to assist me in becoming a well-rounded individual who is well-adapted to the demands of the future generation. Many times, it's hard to take advantage of certain opportunities simply because I don't have the funding, which has served as the biggest barrier to my success. This opportunity will help me reach my next level of success as a first-generation, low-income student by helping me find the financial means to reach my goals.
      Rose Ifebigh Memorial Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Oftentimes, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrants, first-generation, and low-income.
      A Man Helping Women Helping Women Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Oftentimes, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrants, first-generation, and low-income.
      Christina Taylese Singh Memorial Scholarship
      My passion comes from wanting to make a lasting impact on the world and improve the lives of others around me. I've found a strong interest in both computer science and medicine. I decided to explore both fields to figure out which one was the best fit for me. Being exposed to the medical and technology field early on gave me an idea of what I wanted to be. I spent the past few years working with Oracle professionals to strengthen my front-end and back-end development skills. Over the past few years, I've built several websites for clients that they found astonishing. I also created several apps. The very first app I created was directed to help teens who were suffering from anxiety and depression. The goal of my app was to decrease the drastically increasing number of teens who committed suicide. This award-winning app was the winner for my congressional district in 2020. In addition, I went on to create another app called MavenSearch, which aimed to help teens connect with local business sponsors to find service hours. This app was designed to help teens who were struggling to find service hours when the pandemic first started. In addition, I regularly compete in community hackathons to solve everyday problems. I decided to switch gears by enrolling in the nursing program at my school, hesitant to leave behind my world of computer science. I had no idea just how challenging nursing would be; nothing could have ever prepared me for the rigor. Failing after hours of studying felt like an unending cycle. My clinical experience showed that there was a need for healthcare workers and gave me the opportunity to connect with patients from all walks of life. This was the key factor that kept me going. My clinical experience has encouraged me to pursue Biology as one of my majors. However, I did not feel complete. After spending an entire year pursuing solely nursing, I realized how much I missed being involved in Computer Science. My coaches, professors, mentors, friends, and parents encouraged me to pursue Computer Science. I had to make a tough choice of deciding whether to pursue Biology and go on to medical school or pursue Computer Science. I realized that I could have the best of both worlds by starting a business that is suited to make profound innovations within the medical field by using my computer knowledge. I want to use my knowledge in the computer science field along with my medical science to create innovative technology that can assist healthcare workers with everyday tasks. As a result, I have decided to pursue a double major in Biology and Computer Science. My main goal for choosing these majors and minors is to earn a sustainable living doing what I love and to encourage other minorities to chase after their dreams. I plan to utilize my college education to further my skills and knowledge to propel myself into my career as a doctor, biomedical engineer, computer programmer, or entrepreneur. I plan to use my education to assist me in becoming a well-rounded individual who is well-adapted to the demands of the future generation.
      TEAM ROX Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Redefining Victory Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income. Success is an everlasting process that requires resilience and commitment. My parent's commitment to giving me a brighter future where I can be free to study and become whatever I want without fear of starving, living in poverty, or being caught up in gang violence is success to them. The steady persistence of building our way from zero is a success. My drive to be significant in my community and break the barriers as a minority is my biggest success so far. It is frightening going places my family has never been able to in their lifetime. It is frightening going down avenues where I find myself to be the "only". Yet it is such an amazing yet humbling experience. Many times, it's hard to take advantage of certain opportunities simply because I don't have the funding, which has served as the biggest barrier to my success. This opportunity will help me reach my next level of success as a first-generation, low-income student by helping me find the financial means to reach my goals.
      Women in STEM Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Cheryl Twilley Outreach Memorial Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Minority Women in LAS Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Goobie-Ramlal Education Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      William Griggs Memorial Scholarship for Science and Math
      My passion comes from wanting to make a lasting impact on the world and improve the lives of others around me. I've found a strong interest in both computer science and medicine. I decided to explore both fields to determine the best fit for me. Being exposed to the medical and technology field early on gave me an idea of what I wanted to be. I spent the past few years working with Oracle professionals to strengthen my front-end and back-end development skills. Over the past few years, I've built several websites for clients that they found astonishing. I also created several apps. The very first app I created was directed to help teens who were suffering from anxiety and depression. The goal of my app was to decrease the drastically increasing number of teens who committed suicide. This award-winning app was the winner for my congressional district in 2020. In addition, I created another app called MavenSearch, which aimed to help teens connect with local business sponsors to find service hours. This app was designed to help teens who were struggling to find service hours when the pandemic first started. In addition, I regularly compete in community hackathons to solve everyday problems. I enrolled in the nursing program at my school, hesitant to leave behind my world of computer science. My clinical rotations demonstrated the need for healthcare workers and a better system to allow for the efficiency of both the healthcare workers and the patients receiving care. I realized that I could have the best of both worlds by starting a business that is suited to make profound innovations within the medical field by using my computer knowledge. I want to use my knowledge in the computer science field along with my medical science to create innovative technology that can assist healthcare workers with everyday tasks. I want to minor in Computer Science as a programmer as my backup plan if I no longer find interest in the medical field. I want to minor in business so I can one day launch my own business with the products I create. My main goal for choosing these majors and minors is to earn a sustainable living doing what I love and to encourage other minorities to chase after their dreams. I plan to utilize my college education to further my skills and knowledge to propel myself into my career as a doctor, biomedical engineer, computer programmer, or entrepreneur. I plan to use my education to assist me in becoming a well-rounded individual who is well-adapted to the demands of the future generation.
      Chadwick D. McNab Memorial Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Maggie's Way- International Woman’s Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I could create an app that would help teens and win the Congressional App Challenge, which granted me the opportunity to present my app in Congress. In college, I often find myself as the only black student in a couple of my higher-division classes required for my computer science major, which I see as an honor. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams despite being immigrant, first-generation, and low-income.
      Rev. and Mrs. E B Dunbar Scholarship
      My mom and I were on a plane getting ready to head to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity, but no one ever tells you that sometimes you have to start from nothing to build your way up; that was the case for me. I hated my first couple of months in school. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. Each night, my mom reviewed the fundamental grammar rules, and slowly, I became more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my persistence, I became one of the top students in my 2nd grade ELA class. My mom taught me that I can achieve anything with hard work, which became a huge stepping stone. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to earn eight high school credits and take technical certification exams like the Microsoft Bundle certifications. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions to everyday problems. I wanted to address the mental health crisis in my age group, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens, to prevent drastically high suicide numbers. The process of creating an app with no prior knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith. Often times, I wanted to give up. Again, with hard work and persistence, I was able to not only create an app that would help teens but also win the Congressional App Challenge. I want my success story to inspire other minorities to chase after their wildest dreams.
      Scholarship Institute’s Annual Women’s Leadership Scholarship
      In 11th and 12th grade, I became a Brace Cadet because I wanted to help my fellow peers become ready for college. Many students in my school were unknowledge of the opportunities they had after high school since many of them were first-generation students, like me. I made it my mission to provide them with the necessary resources so that they were aware of their options and had a way to navigate the transition to college. I worked closely with my Brace Advisor and guidance counselor to ensure I could address any issues in the student body because students are more likely to listen to a fellow peer compared to an adult on campus. I took notes of important deadlines, college events on campus, and resources to share with the students. I created informative PowerPoints and interactive tasks to get the scholars engaged in planning for their future. In addition, I met with the scholars weekly to encourage them and keep them on track. As a result of this program I started on campus, many students took action by researching the colleges of their dream despite their financial circumstances, applying for scholarships, signing up to take AP and Dual Enrollment classes, creating an FSA ID to apply for FAFSA, and applying for colleges through Common App or QuestBridge. The students left feedback letting me know how much they truly benefitted from my program. This position significantly transformed me out of my shell into a bold, compassionate leader. I was now able to make eye contact, confidently speak in front of an audience, and lead several organizations and clubs successfully such as First Priority, Women of Tomorrow (WOT), and the National Achievers Society (NAS). As president of WOT, I work with my guidance counselor to organize meetings with the mentors and mentees, connect students at my school with female guest speakers who encourage them to pursue their dreams, keep the mentees in the program updated with important events, and send a daily inspirational post each morning to help them start off their day. As president of First Priority, I make sure to keep the environment inclusive for everyone and ensure that we have the supplies we needed such as Bibles, invite and prayer cards, posters, snacks, and bracelets. I also incorporated a hybrid model so more people could attend and lead the group discussions, prayers, and icebreakers with the assistance of other members. Finally, as secretary of NAS, I go beyond taking notes at each meeting. I participate in and help set up community-led events such as car washes, potlucks, period kits for the homeless, and more. In my free time when I am not actively engaged with my academics or extracurriculars, I like to volunteer in my community. I currently have over 1,100 service hours as a result of my dedication to giving back to my community. I've volunteered at different schools, at pantries, online after school to tutor students in math and Spanish during the pandemic, and many more. Overall, my leadership and service have allowed me to invest in others what was invested in me by granting me the opportunity to help others. This gave my life a whole new meaning outside of my academics. It showed me that stepping out of my comfort zone and introverted nature has the capability to make an impact on humanity. My service and leadership will continue to make a difference in college and beyond by giving me the flexibility to reach countless more lives and use the resources and experiences I have learned to make a positive impact.
      I Can Do Anything Scholarship
      I dream of a bold woman who is not only successful in her career of choice, but significant in the lives of others.
      Humanize LLC Gives In Honor of Shirley Kelley Scholarship
      I was on a plane getting ready to head to America. Little did I know my life was about to transform completely. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home; this new land was foreign to me, and the people spoke a language I had never heard before. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, which was where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All that my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. America is known as the land of opportunity but what no one ever tells you is that sometimes you have to start from scratch to build your way up. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. My mom encouraged me to read for at least two hours daily and use the dictionary for any words I was unfamiliar with. Slowly, I found myself more comfortable speaking English. As a result of my steady persistence, I became one of the top students in my second-grade ELA class. My mom taught me that with hard work, I can achieve anything. This became a huge steppingstone in my later years of education. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In elementary school, this formula encouraged me to learn English. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to take technical certification exams and earn eight high school credits in middle school. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding allowed me to express myself in a new way. It opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions. I noticed a mental health crisis in my age group. I knew friends who suffered from their mental health in silence. I wanted to address this issue, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health, especially among teens because I wanted to prevent the drastically high numbers of teens from committing suicide. The process of creating an app with no prior coding knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith: often, I wanted to give up. With the help of my coach and my computer science teacher, I was able to submit a functional app called Mental Health Coach. Again, with hard work and persistence, I was able to not only create an app that would help teens but also won the Congressional App Challenge, which grants recipients the opportunity to present their app in Congress. This experience inspired me to pursue a field in the medical and computer science field so I can be an example for minorities and immigrants.
      DRIVE an IMPACT Today Scholarship
      Difficult is an understatement to describe my nursing journey. Nursing transformed me from the high schooler who valued her 4.0-grade average above all else into an adult who wants to make a difference in the world through medicine. Failing endlessly for months upon months was frustrating, especially after all the hard work I put into studying. This significantly tested my patience because there were many times I wanted to step foot out the door and quit but I constantly reminded myself of the end goal. I realized that although things did not turn out how I wanted them to initially, I still had to fight with all my might. One of the traits that I adopted from nursing was patience. In addition, nursing tested my capacity to work hard. It is referred to as the hardest technical program on campus for several reasons. For one, a typical night consisted of reading anywhere from sixty to eighty pages, doing case studies, studying drug cards, completing study guides for each chapter assigned, and so much more. On average, my classmates and I received two or three hours of sleep daily. We were separated from our friends and family, especially during the summer when everyone was out traveling while we were studying. Nursing drastically impacted my sleep schedule and forced me to work harder than I ever have, even when I did not get the results I wanted. I lost my 4.0 GPA, my ranking in my high school class drastically continued to drop, and I was rejected by the National Technical Honor Society. These were not the outcomes that I wanted but I could not give up in nursing. I experienced many torturous nights when I was unable to sleep or eat. Depression filled my thoughts constantly; I withdrew from activities and people I loved. My life felt like it had no purpose and I desperately wanted to fade away. Nonetheless, I had a strong support system that encouraged me to continue going despite what I was feeling. My mentors and teachers believed in me, even when I could not. They listened to my cries of frustration and disappointment. They reminded me that I am worthy, despite what my grades in nursing were. Another trait that I now have as a result is resilience. Resilience is defined as the ability to withstand difficult obstacles. It forces you to push through, even when your situation is not favorable. Resilience helps build character by allowing you to stand strong until you reach your final goal. Resilience allowed me to successfully finish nursing despite the blood, sweat, and tears that were shed. My clinical experience showed me that there was a need for healthcare workers and gave me the opportunity to connect with patients from all walks of life. This was another key factor that kept me going. Although my journey in nursing was rough and my dreams of excelling academically were crushed due to the rigor of the course, my journey has strengthened me by sharpening my mind and making me more resilient in the face of adversity.
      Arthur and Elana Panos Scholarship
      I was on a plane heading to America. Once we landed, it felt like a different atmosphere. I desperately wanted to go back home. A few months later, I learned that I lost many relatives and my best friend, whom I never got a chance to say goodbye to, in the Haiti earthquake in 2010. It devastated the capital, Port-au-Prince, which was where I was born and resided before moving to the U.S. All that my five-year-old mind could understand was that I made it out while most of the people back home did not. That became the driving force every time I felt defeated because I could have been one of the 220,000 who lost their lives on that horrific day. What my mom later revealed to me is that she had a prophetic dream. In this dream, the Lord appeared to her and showed her that He would spare us from the earthquake. Tears came down my face when I heard that because I was chosen. This was a hard concept to grasp in the early years of my life. America is known as the land of opportunity but what no one ever tells you is that sometimes you have to start from scratch to build your way up. I felt like a foreigner among my classmates because I was unable to communicate in English. However, I did not let that stop me from learning. As a result of my steady persistence, I became one of the top students in my second-grade ELA class. My mom taught me that with hard work along with faith, I can achieve anything. This became a huge steppingstone in my later years of education. Hard work plus persistence equals success. This was the formula my parents encouraged in me from an early age. Despite the financial hardships I witnessed my parents endure, they always encouraged me to focus on my education because it would become my passport to a brighter future. In elementary school, this formula encouraged me to learn English. In middle school, this formula encouraged me to take technical certification exams and earn eight high school credits in middle school. In high school, this formula allowed me to excel academically, participate in twelve clubs, and volunteer in community-led activities. Particularly, it was what encouraged me to begin coding. Coding allowed me to express myself in a new way. It opened a world of endless possibilities to create solutions. I wanted to address the mental health issue amongst teens, so I decided to take part in the Congressional App Challenge. I spent two months creating an app that would bring awareness about mental health to prevent the drastically high numbers of teens from committing suicide. The process of creating an app with no prior coding knowledge was grueling. Many times, I stumbled upon a code that not only crashed the system but shattered my inner faith: often, I wanted to give up. I had a personal encounter with God that forever changed me. In this dream, I was taken to the beginning of time. I heard God's voice tell me "I am the Lord your God and I fulfill all my promises." This not only propelled my relationship with God, but it reminded me that He was with me every step of the way. Again, with hard work and persistence, I was able to not only create an app that would help teens but also won the Congressional App Challenge, which grants recipients the opportunity to present their app in Congress, a reminder of God's presence in my life.
      Charlie Akers Memorial Scholarship
      “It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.” This quote by Albert Einstein is what I live by. I entered high school understanding that I would need 40 service hours to graduate and at least 100 service hours to receive Bright Futures. I had no idea how I would be able to accumulate all those hours, especially since I had little involvement in my community from my introverted nature. My coach - who assisted me throughout my transition to high school - challenged me to complete my first 40 service hours the summer before entering 9th grade and I accepted the challenge. I wanted to first start giving back to my middle school teachers who invested their time into helping me further my education. The very first day I went to volunteer, it felt like time went by slowly. My mindset was so focused on obtaining the volunteer hours that I forgot the true purpose of why I was volunteering: to give back to my community. The next morning, I went back with a different attitude: to leave a smile on someone’s face. I assisted the teachers by arranging the desks, organizing closets, and much more. Although it was very exhausting physically, I was relieved to know that I made someone’s day. I continued to volunteer at my former middle school for the next couple of days and was able to obtain the 40 service hours I needed to graduate high school! I was beginning to feel fulfilled helping others and leaving a smile on their face. I began volunteering in several club-sponsored activities such as food drives, car washes, and summer camps to name a few. Throughout my volunteering experiences, I made new friends from different walks of life and learned new life skills. My memorable volunteering experience was volunteering at my former elementary school. I was chosen to assist the robotics team with coming up with a solution to help with the drastic number of pedestrians who lose their life due to railroad accidents. Although we did not get far with that project as a result of the start of Covid, I was happy to see how inspired the elementary students were with my projects. This made me realize that I had people who looked up to me and encouraged me to continue making a positive impact on the lives of others. In addition, I volunteered to give a speech at a pep rally hosted for the elementary students who were getting ready to take their FSA. One of my biggest fears is public speaking but I did not let that stop me from volunteering. Talking to the students helped them with the stress and anxiety they were feeling and helped me become a better public speaker. I used my strength in math, Spanish, and Computer Science to tutor other students who struggled in those areas. All in all, I have accumulated 1,000+ service hours and I am looking to continue volunteering in my community. My mission is to help minorities and low-income students prepare for life after high school because I would not be here if it were not for the help of my parents, teachers, and mentors who invested much time in me. They saw potential in me when I couldn’t and now, it’s my responsibility to give back and help others. As Albert Einstein said, “It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.”
      Jada Martin Scholarship
      In 9th grade, I decided to create an app. I wanted my app to focus on addressing mental health issues amongst teens to help lower the drastically increasing suicide rates. My transition into high school proved to be a challenging one. I was inspired to be the voice for teens who experienced mental health problems like depression and anxiety. I wanted them to know that they had a supportive group of people they could reach, and I wanted my app to be a safe community for teens who desperately need someone. Coding an app when I had no prior knowledge of coding was even more challenging. I saw that as an obstacle to overcome. I reached out for help from my computer science teacher and a Solution Engineer from Oracle who provided me with the resources to successfully code a running app. I worked countless hours on this app and stayed up late at night. Trying to create a functional code was much harder than expected and trying to debug the code took a lot of time and dedication. There were many times when I just wanted to give up on my app and my idea to address mental health because I hit numerous obstacles. There were moments when I had to go back and rewrite a separate set of code completely from scratch. Trying to juggle school, clubs, and creating an app felt impossible at times. I decided to keep going because my end goal was to have a functional app that could help a teen and prevent them from committing suicide. I submitted my app for the Congressional App Challenge knowing that I tried my best and that my best was good enough. I waited several months for the results and one day, I got an email announcing the winners. My app, Mental Health Coach, ended up winning for my district. This gave me a chance to fly to Congress to present my app. This thrilled me because I never traveled out of town, let alone to Congress. My debate teacher worked with me to help me prepare a speech and I worked with my computer science teacher on the technical aspects of my presentation. Unfortunately, my trip was canceled 10 days before because of the pandemic. That shattered me inside because I was excited about going to Congress to present my app. I felt like I was robbed. However, this experience taught me that with hard work and a little patience, I could overcome any obstacle that comes my way. I used my time over the pandemic to strengthen my coding skills. This allowed me to build websites for several clients. In addition, I won first place in many hackathons I competed in. Coding opened up many doors that I would never have imagined. Although I doubted myself when I first began coding, it later became a strong passion of mine. My mission is to empower women to start coding and become innovative!
      Francis “Slip” Madigan Scholarship
      College is a great option for those who desire to enhance their education. In school, we are taught to strive to go to college. It is not until high school that most realize why college is important. Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the U.S. once stated, “An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.” One of the main reasons why college is important to me is because it’s an investment in my future. Doing dual enrollment and AP classes puts me on track for college. College helps equip me to make a difference in this world. Taking the initiative in this opportunity would help transform me into a well-rounded adult. In addition, college would help me gain new skills that would launch and enhance my career as a neurosurgeon. Another reason why college is important to me is that it provides a wealth of knowledge in many different areas of study. More knowledge leads to more innovation. I am willing to gain this knowledge because it would allow me to positively impact the world. Nelson Mandela stated, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Many world leaders, entrepreneurs, and doctors today have made a substantial impact on society. They were able to do this by first acquiring an education from a post-secondary institution. A great example is Oprah Winfrey; although she had a rough childhood growing up, she was determined and set her mind on going to college. Oprah Winfrey was a talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, author, and the first African American self-made billionaire. She has published numerous books and advocated for change in many parts of the world. Oprah is a testament to the fact that you do not have to be rich to be successful. Her story shows that going to college provides you with numerous opportunities to grow and impact the world. Another factor that makes college very important to me is that it would transform me into a better person. College provides valuable memories that last a lifetime. There are many opportunities to take advantage of like study-abroad programs or clubs of interest which would allow me to see the world from a different perspective. These experiences help me have a better transition into adulthood, allowing me to be aware of different nationalities, ideologies, and cultures. The vast classes and options offered at many colleges help one find a path that best suits them. The hands-on training that I’d receive in these institutions would bring a sense of purpose to my career and life. There has been extensive research conducted to prove that college graduates are more likely to be happy in their job experience. College is expensive and coming from a low-income family as an immigrant and first-generation student, I understand that I must work extra hard to get the resources I need to succeed. I am willing to put in the extra effort because I see it as a bright investment in my future. Finally, college is important to me because it would allow me to meet up with the challenging demands of the newer generation. Going to college has always been one of my dream aspirations. I want to make my parents, coaches, and myself proud by pursuing a Ph.D. in Neuroscience. The knowledge and training provided by my college education would allow me to make a substantial impact one day in this world.
      Stand and Yell Community Impact Scholarship
      “It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.” This quote by Albert Einstein is what I live by. I entered high school understanding that I would need 40 service hours to graduate and at least 100 service hours to receive Bright Futures. I had no idea how I would be able to accumulate all those hours, especially since I had little involvement in my community from my introverted nature. My coach - who assisted me throughout my transition to high school - challenged me to complete my first 40 service hours the summer before entering 9th grade and I accepted the challenge. I wanted to first start giving back to my middle school teachers who invested their time into helping me further my education. The very first day I went to volunteer, it felt like time went by slowly. My mindset was so focused on obtaining the volunteer hours that I forgot the true purpose of why I was volunteering: to give back to my community. The next morning, I went back with a different attitude: to leave a smile on someone’s face. I assisted the teachers by arranging the desks, organizing closets, and much more. Although it was very exhausting physically, I was relieved to know that I made someone’s day. I continued to volunteer at my former middle school for the next couple of days and was able to obtain the 40 service hours I needed to graduate high school! I was beginning to feel fulfilled helping others and leaving a smile on their face. I began volunteering in several club-sponsored activities such as food drives, car washes, and summer camps to name a few. Throughout my volunteering experiences, I made new friends from different walks of life and learned new life skills. My memorable volunteering experience was volunteering at my former elementary school. I was chosen to assist the robotics team with coming up with a solution to help with the drastic number of pedestrians who lose their life due to railroad accidents. Although we did not get far with that project as a result of the start of Covid, I was happy to see how inspired the elementary students were with my projects. This made me realize that I had people who looked up to me and encouraged me to continue making a positive impact on the lives of others. In addition, I volunteered to give a speech at a pep rally hosted for the elementary students who were getting ready to take their FSA. One of my biggest fears is public speaking but I did not let that stop me from volunteering. Talking to the students helped them with the stress and anxiety they were feeling and helped me become a better public speaker. I used my strength in math, Spanish, and Computer Science to tutor other students who struggled in those areas. All in all, I have accumulated 1,000+ service hours and I am looking to continue volunteering in my community. My mission is to help minorities and low-income students prepare for life after high school because I would not be here if it was not for the help of my parents, teachers, and mentors who invested much time in me. They saw potential in me when I couldn’t and now, it’s my responsibility to give back and help others. Because like Albert Einstein said, “It is every man’s obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it.”
      Femi Chebaís Scholarship
      My dream is to live up to my fullest potential by pursuing a field in either the medical, business, or computer science industry. In addition, I want to inspire low-income minorities like me that they can become anything they want to be if they set their mind to it and invest in their education.
      Bold Goals Scholarship
      Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the U.S. once stated, “An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.” One of the main reasons why college is important to me is because it’s an investment in my future. Taking initiative of this opportunity would help transform me into a well-rounded adult. In addition, college would help me gain new skills that would launch and enhance my career as a neurosurgeon. Many world leaders, entrepreneurs, and doctors today have made a substantial impact on society. They were able to do this by first acquiring education from a post-secondary institution. A great example is Oprah Winfrey; although she had a rough childhood growing up, she was determined and set her mind on going to college. Oprah Winfrey was a talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, author, and the first African American self-made billionaire. She has published numerous books and advocated for change in many parts of the world. Oprah is a testament to the fact that you do not have to be rich to be successful. Her story shows that going to college provides you with numerous opportunities to grow and impact the world. College is important to me because it would allow me to meet up with the challenging demands of the newer generation. Going to college has always been one of my dream aspirations. I want to make my parents, coaches, and myself proud by pursuing a Ph.D. in Neuroscience. The knowledge and training provided by my college education would allow me to make a substantial impact one day in this world.
      Bold Study Strategies Scholarship
      Getting straight A's is one but maintaining straight A's is even harder. I've spent countless hours exploring different study techniques to help me achieve my academic success over the years. These study techniques vary depending on the subject and the rigor. For example, in all my math classes, I tried to first memorize the formulas and then understand why and how we apply them to different scenarios. I studied most efficiently by testing and applying the knowledge through various math exercises. In my history classes, watching documentaries on a certain period after reading the chapters helps me connect the ideas. I struggled when it came to my science classes. I realize that reading and taking notes wasn't enough for me to grasp the material. I took it a step further and taught the material to my classmates. This allowed me to explore the topics deeper, which in turn made me feel more confident. Now as a nursing student in the college section of my high school, the techniques that once helped me throughout middle and high school require me to get out of my comfort zone. I go to bed at 11 or 12 and wake up at 3. I find that I'm able to study better with a fresh mind. Writing rationales about the questions I got wrong helps me identify where I made the mistake and what I can do differently next time. In addition, applying the Pomodoro method helps me break down my study sessions into smaller portions without being burnt out because they say the best way to eat an elephant is to eat it piece by piece.
      Bold Persistence Scholarship
      One time I used persistence to overcome an obstacle was when I was creating an app in 9th grade. I wanted my app to be focused on addressing mental health issues amongst teens to help lower the drastically increasing suicide rates. My transition into high school proved to be a challenging one. Coding an app when I had no prior knowledge of coding was even more challenging. I saw that as an obstacle to overcome. I reached out for help from my computer science teacher and a Solution Engineer who provided me with the resources to successfully code a running app. I worked countless hours on this app and stayed up late at night. Ultimately, I submitted my app for the Congressional App Challenge and ended up winning for my district. This gave me a chance to fly to Congress to present my app. I learned that with hard work and a little patience, I could overcome any obstacle that comes my way.