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Audrey Dupuis

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Bio

Hi! I'm Audrey Dupuis, a senior Singer/Songwriter at Interlochen Arts Academy. Recently, I’ve been performing original songs at Kresge Auditorium, Traverse City Opera House, Tiny Room Studios, and Hotel Cafe. I also have been setting up songwriting gigs at art openings and on the campus mall for my Interlochen peers. Collaborating with artists is my favorite part of being a musician and I hope to continue that through my artistic career. I believe in women being heard in the music industry and advocating for equality in the arts, inspiring my younger cohorts at Interlochen to continue this fight. I am also an extremely hard-working and successful student as well as an active member of my community. I participate in every community service opportunity I can find including, but not limited to, a contemporary music assistant at Interlochen Arts Academy, an MSVMA volunteer, and a volunteer music director at Brewers School for the Performing Arts.I appreciate your consideration!

Education

Interlochen Arts Academy

High School
2022 - 2024

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Master's degree program

  • Majors of interest:

    • Music
    • Visual and Performing Arts, General
    • Visual and Performing Arts, Other
    • Arts, Entertainment, and Media Management
    -
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Music

    • Dream career goals:

      Stable, successful, fulfilling career in Music

    • Performance Organization Manager

      Interlochen Arts Academy
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Live Music Performer

      Gas Alley Bar
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Dance Captain/Teacher

      Brewers School for the Performing Arts
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Teaching Assistant

      Gennesee County Student Theatre Showcase
      2017 – 20203 years
    • Teaching assistant

      Broadway Bound
      2017 – Present7 years

    Sports

    Dance

    Varsity
    2015 - 20205 years

    Awards

    • Access Broadway Platinum Award
    • Access Broadway High Gold Award
    • Turn It Around High Platinum Award
    • Turn It Around Platinum Award
    • Turn It Around High Gold Award

    Arts

    • Interlochen Arts Academy

      Music
      Patrice Rushen Concert, Traverse City Opera House Concert, Hotel Cafe, Tiny Room Studios
      2022 – Present
    • Clio Cast and Crew

      Acting
      Pippi Longstocking
      2015 – 2015
    • Flint Community Players

      Theatre
      Leap of Faith, Gypsy, Mamma Mia
      2017 – 2019
    • Take it from the Top

      Theatre
      13 the Musical , Shrek the Musical, All Shook Up, Frozen , Into The Woods
      2016 – 2019
    • Theatre Connection

      Acting
      Little Women
      2022 – 2022
    • Brewers School for the Performing Arts

      Dance
      You're a Good Man Charlie Brown, High school Musical
      2021 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      MSVMAVolunteer
      2022 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      Brewers School for the Performing Arts Teaching assistant
      2021 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. Music and social justice have always been where my heart lies. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. I also have outwardly supported queer and trans rights and protection throughout middle and high school. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to interact with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I can speak about issues that I find relevant in today's political climate as well as make people feel heard and seen through my words. Being a queer woman in the music industry is not easy. Queerness is not as accepted in the music industry as people might think. I have been asked multiple times to stop being so open about my sexuality so I can play at people's venues. I also have been asked to stop openly advocating for trans rights because it will “taint my image” and “bring in less of an audience”. However, despite all of this hatred and small-mindedness, I have managed to raise $200 toward preventing queer youth suicide through my shows and online. I will continue to advocate for queer rights and the protection of queer youth because every single child deserves to know that they are worthy of love and deserve to live a long, happy life. My mother and stepfather are teachers and will not contribute financially to my university. They are responsible for my step-sister and are helping her attend the University of Michigan for a Pre-Med Program. As I have mentioned, I work gigs and frequently pick up jobs at my mom's school but unfortunately, I don’t have a steady income as an artist yet as I have not been able to secure a sync placement in TV/film so royalties aren’t coming in, and I’m not yet old enough to be a studio musician or writer. I will have to take out at least $100,000 in loans for college if I cannot secure as many scholarships as possible, even with financial aid as a good music school is very expensive. It is all worth it though as I believe with all of this combined I will have more than enough experience to create a stable career for myself out of college. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship will allow me to achieve my goals and continue supporting queer youth through my art and platform.
    Dimon A. Williams Memorial Scholarship
    At just eleven years old, my world was rocked by the devastating news of my mother's diagnosis of breast cancer. Aged forty-two, she embarked on a grueling battle against this relentless disease, enduring aggressive surgical procedures and ongoing radiation therapy. Yet, her resilience never wavered. Three months post-treatment, another blow struck as she faced melanoma, igniting yet another round of surgeries. Amidst this whirlwind, I witnessed my mother, once a vibrant force of music and joy, lose her melody. No longer did her songs fill our home, and the silence left in their wake was deafening. Music, once our shared refuge, became a distant memory, a poignant reminder of what cancer had stolen. Before her diagnosis, my mother navigated the challenges of single parenthood following my parents' divorce, all while working full-time at the Michigan Department of Education. Despite the overwhelming odds stacked against her, she refused to surrender to despair. Her unwavering commitment to her children, her career, and her own well-being was nothing short of remarkable. She epitomized strength in the face of adversity, a beacon of resilience that continues to guide me. Throughout her battle, my mother's unwavering dedication to her values resonated deeply within me. Despite the financial hardships we faced, she ensured I never missed a voice lesson and somehow managed to scrape together enough money to buy my first guitar as my Christmas gift that year. Her ability to maintain grace amidst chaos taught me invaluable lessons in resilience and perseverance, shaping the core of my character. As her battle raged on, I faced a pivotal decision in my journey. Despite the emotional turmoil of leaving my mother's side, I pursued my passion for music, earning acceptance into the prestigious singer/songwriter program at Interlochen Arts Academy. This meant leaving home for my junior and senior years of high school, a decision fraught with uncertainty and guilt. Yet, my mother's unwavering encouragement provided the strength I needed to forge ahead, even in her absence. Her belief in my dreams became my guiding light, illuminating a path of growth and self-discovery. Despite the physical distance between us, my mother's presence remained steadfast. Her unwavering support fueled my determination, reminding me of the importance of seizing opportunities for growth and personal development. With each visit home, I witnessed her reclaiming her music, a testament to her indomitable spirit. She refused to miss a single one of my concerts or performances, making the three-hour drive to sit with her mask on in the audience. Her resilience became my inspiration, a reminder that adversity cannot extinguish the flame of passion and hope. My mother's journey with cancer has profoundly shaped my perspective, infusing my life with courage, resilience, and an unwavering commitment to my dreams. Her strength in the face of adversity serves as a constant reminder that no obstacle is insurmountable. Throughout my songwriting studies at Interlochen, she has frequently served as my muse. Her spirit is in every lyric, melody, and harmony I write. As I embark on my path, her love and support remain my guiding force, propelling me toward a future filled with possibility and purpose. In conclusion, my mother's battle with cancer has transformed me in profound ways, shaping my values, priorities, and aspirations. She is the most influential person in my life and her unwavering courage and resilience have instilled within me a deep-seated determination to overcome life's challenges with grace and fortitude. As I carry forward her legacy of strength and perseverance, I am forever grateful for the profound impact she has had on shaping the person I am today.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. All this being said, helping people through music is something that was inspired by my siblings. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to connect with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I will touch on this in more detail later, but this connection, making people feel understood, is what keeps me on my path. I partake in many extracurricular activities, I am part of the Songwriters Tour Group which traveled to LA and played at Hotel Cafe and Tiny Room Studios. I am part of a Sketch Comedy group, I organize gigs for the songwriters at Interlochen, I volunteer as a contemporary music assistant, and I volunteer as an instructor/music director at Broadway Bounds summer theater camp every year to teach the next generation of creatives. I also attended GRAMMYCamplast summer, run by the Grammy Foundation, where we learned all about the business and how to co-write, run a band, and negotiate fair deals. These experiences have brought me the opportunity to connect with so many wonderful people and hear their stories. As an artist, work is interesting but very fulfilling. One of the best parts of my job as an artist is being able to talk to so many different people about their lives. I love being able to connect on such a personal level with people through my music. I often work gigs that I book myself, such as performing at bars and restaurants for a fair of about $150 each. I also volunteer at many different places, including MSVMA (for choir festivals), Interlochen Arts Academy (Managing gigs for singer-songwriters, organizing community events for contemporary musicians, and running peer-to-peer songwriting sessions), and my dad's bar (for larger events with music), as well as volunteering during the summer at Imlay City High School teaching acting, singing, dance, and songwriting to the next generation of artists in the local area. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship would provide me with the funding that I need to achieve my dreams and continue my mission of helping people heal through music.
    Let Your Light Shine Scholarship
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. All this being said, helping people through music is something that was inspired by my siblings. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to connect with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I will touch on this in more detail later, but this connection, making people feel understood, is what keeps me on my path. I partake in many extracurricular activities, I am part of the Songwriters Tour Group which traveled to LA and played at Hotel Cafe and Tiny Room Studios. I am part of a Sketch Comedy group, I organize gigs for the songwriters at Interlochen, I volunteer as a contemporary music assistant, and I volunteer as an instructor/music director at Broadway Bounds summer theater camp every year to teach the next generation of creatives. I also attended GRAMMYCamplast summer, run by the Grammy Foundation, where we learned all about the business and how to co-write, run a band, and negotiate fair deals. These experiences have brought me the opportunity to connect with so many wonderful people and hear their stories. As an artist, work is interesting but very fulfilling. One of the best parts of my job as an artist is being able to talk to so many different people about their lives. I love being able to connect on such a personal level with people through my music. I often work gigs that I book myself, such as performing at bars and restaurants for a fair of about $150 each. I also volunteer at many different places, including MSVMA (for choir festivals), Interlochen Arts Academy (Managing gigs for singer-songwriters, organizing community events for contemporary musicians, and running peer-to-peer songwriting sessions), and my dad's bar (for larger events with music), as well as volunteering during the summer at Imlay City High School teaching acting, singing, dance, and songwriting to the next generation of artists in the local area. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship would provide me with the funding that I need to achieve my dreams and continue my mission of helping people heal through music.
    Wolverine Ambition Scholarship
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. All this being said, helping people through music is something that was inspired by my siblings. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to connect with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I will touch on this in more detail later, but this connection, making people feel understood, is what keeps me on my path. I partake in many extracurricular activities, I am part of the Songwriters Tour Group which traveled to LA and played at Hotel Cafe and Tiny Room Studios. I am part of a Sketch Comedy group, I organize gigs for the songwriters at Interlochen, I volunteer as a contemporary music assistant, and I volunteer as an instructor/music director at Broadway Bounds summer theater camp every year to teach the next generation of creatives. I also attended GRAMMYCamplast summer, run by the Grammy Foundation, where we learned all about the business and how to co-write, run a band, and negotiate fair deals. These experiences have brought me the opportunity to connect with so many wonderful people and hear their stories. As an artist, work is interesting but very fulfilling. One of the best parts of my job as an artist is being able to talk to so many different people about their lives. I love being able to connect on such a personal level with people through my music. I often work gigs that I book myself, such as performing at bars and restaurants for a fair of about $150 each. I also volunteer at many different places, including MSVMA (for choir festivals), Interlochen Arts Academy (Managing gigs for singer-songwriters, organizing community events for contemporary musicians, and running peer-to-peer songwriting sessions), and my dad's bar (for larger events with music), as well as volunteering during the summer at Imlay City High School teaching acting, singing, dance, and songwriting to the next generation of artists in the local area. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship would provide me with the funding that I need to achieve my dreams and continue my mission of helping people heal through music.
    Neil Margeson Sound Scholarship
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. All this being said, helping people through music is something that was inspired by my siblings. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to connect with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I will touch on this in more detail later, but this connection, making people feel understood, is what keeps me on my path. I partake in many extracurricular activities, I am part of the Songwriters Tour Group which traveled to LA and played at Hotel Cafe and Tiny Room Studios. I am part of a Sketch Comedy group, I organize gigs for the songwriters at Interlochen, I volunteer as a contemporary music assistant, and I volunteer as an instructor/music director at Broadway Bounds summer theater camp every year to teach the next generation of creatives. I also attended GRAMMYCamplast summer, run by the Grammy Foundation, where we learned all about the business and how to co-write, run a band, and negotiate fair deals. These experiences have brought me the opportunity to connect with so many wonderful people and hear their stories. As an artist, work is interesting but very fulfilling. One of the best parts of my job as an artist is being able to talk to so many different people about their lives. I love being able to connect on such a personal level with people through my music. I often work gigs that I book myself, such as performing at bars and restaurants for a fair of about $150 each. I also volunteer at many different places, including MSVMA (for choir festivals), Interlochen Arts Academy (Managing gigs for singer-songwriters, organizing community events for contemporary musicians, and running peer-to-peer songwriting sessions), and my dad's bar (for larger events with music), as well as volunteering during the summer at Imlay City High School teaching acting, singing, dance, and songwriting to the next generation of artists in the local area. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship would provide me with the funding that I need to achieve my dreams and continue my mission of helping people heal through music.
    Frank Vail Music Memorial Scholarship
    I have always known that music is how I will help people. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. All this being said, helping people through music is something that was inspired by my siblings. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to connect with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I will touch on this in more detail later, but this connection, making people feel understood, is what keeps me on my path. I partake in many extracurricular activities, I am part of the Songwriters Tour Group which traveled to LA and played at Hotel Cafe and Tiny Room Studios. I am part of a Sketch Comedy group, I organize gigs for the songwriters at Interlochen, I volunteer as a contemporary music assistant, and I volunteer as an instructor/music director at Broadway Bounds summer theater camp every year to teach the next generation of creatives. I also attended GRAMMYCamplast summer, run by the Grammy Foundation, where we learned all about the business and how to co-write, run a band, and negotiate fair deals. These experiences have brought me the opportunity to connect with so many wonderful people and hear their stories. As an artist, work is interesting but very fulfilling. One of the best parts of my job as an artist is being able to talk to so many different people about their lives. I love being able to connect on such a personal level with people through my music. I often work gigs that I book myself, such as performing at bars and restaurants for a fair of about $150 each. I also volunteer at many different places, including MSVMA (for choir festivals), Interlochen Arts Academy (Managing gigs for singer-songwriters, organizing community events for contemporary musicians, and running peer-to-peer songwriting sessions), and my dad's bar (for larger events with music), as well as volunteering during the summer at Imlay City High School teaching acting, singing, dance, and songwriting to the next generation of artists in the local area. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship would provide me with the funding that I need to achieve my dreams and continue my mission of helping people heal through music.
    Hopke Foundation Scholarship
    I have always known that songwriting is how I will help people. Music and social justice have always been where my heart lies. When I was younger, my mom would bring me to Barnes and Noble and I would sing and dance on the children's stage, attracting a crowd of curious parents whom I was more than happy to entertain. I also have outwardly supported queer and trans rights and protection throughout middle and high school. I have been writing music since the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to express my feelings and connect with others. I have found that my music has allowed me to interact with people in a way that I had never experienced before. I can speak about issues that I find relevant in today's political climate as well as make people feel heard and seen through my words. Being a queer woman in the music industry is not easy. Queerness is not as accepted in the music industry as people might think. I have been asked multiple times to stop being so open about my sexuality so I can play at people's venues. I also have been asked to stop openly advocating for trans rights because it will “taint my image” and “bring in less of an audience”. However, despite all of this hatred and small-mindedness, I have managed to raise $200 toward preventing queer youth suicide through my shows and online. I will continue to advocate for queer rights and the protection of queer youth because every single child deserves to know that they are worthy of love and deserve to live a long, happy life. My mother and stepfather are teachers and will not contribute financially to my university. They are responsible for my step-sister and are helping her attend the University of Michigan for a Pre-Med Program. As I have mentioned, I work gigs and frequently pick up jobs at my mom's school but unfortunately, I don’t have a steady income as an artist yet as I have not been able to secure a sync placement in TV/film so royalties aren’t coming in, and I’m not yet old enough to be a studio musician or writer. I will have to take out at least $100,000 in loans for college if I cannot secure as many scholarships as possible, even with financial aid as a good music school is very expensive. It is all worth it though as I believe with all of this combined I will have more than enough experience to create a stable career for myself out of college. As I mentioned before, helping people feel seen and heard through my music is my calling, I know it. After I played one of my songs “Ugly Dress” at Kresge Auditorium in our show with Grammy Winning Artist Patrice Rushen, a young girl came up to me teary-eyed and said that she felt the same way. She felt like she wouldn’t be enough no matter how she tried, but when I sang the heartfelt lyrics about feeling ugly and similar sentiments, she could feel heard. She felt less alone and she said that if everybody felt ugly and insufficient then at least we all have something in common. That stuck with me and I use it as motivation for every song and every performance I do now. Reaching people and helping them process, helping them feel less alone is what I have to do for the rest of my life. This scholarship will allow me to achieve my goals and continue supporting queer youth through my art and platform.
    Janice Louise Olach Scholarship
    At just eleven years old, my world was rocked by the devastating news of my mother's diagnosis of breast cancer. Aged forty-two, she embarked on a grueling battle against this relentless disease, enduring aggressive surgical procedures and ongoing radiation therapy. Yet, her resilience never wavered. Three months post-treatment, another blow struck as she faced melanoma, igniting yet another round of surgeries. Amidst this whirlwind, I witnessed my mother, once a vibrant force of music and joy, lose her melody. No longer did her songs fill our home, and the silence left in their wake was deafening. Music, once our shared refuge, became a distant memory, a poignant reminder of what cancer had stolen. Before her diagnosis, my mother navigated the challenges of single parenthood following my parents' divorce, all while working full-time at the Michigan Department of Education. Despite the overwhelming odds stacked against her, she refused to surrender to despair. Her unwavering commitment to her children, her career, and her well-being was nothing short of remarkable. She epitomized strength in the face of adversity, a beacon of resilience that continues to guide me. Throughout her battle, my mother's unwavering dedication to her values resonated deeply within me. Despite the financial hardships we faced, she ensured I never missed a voice lesson and managed to scrape together enough money to buy my first guitar as my Christmas gift that year. Her ability to maintain grace amidst chaos taught me invaluable lessons in resilience and perseverance, shaping the core of my character. As her battle raged on, I faced a pivotal decision in my journey. Despite the emotional turmoil of leaving my mother's side, I pursued my passion for music, earning acceptance into the prestigious singer/songwriter program at Interlochen Arts Academy. This meant leaving home for my junior and senior years of high school, a decision fraught with uncertainty and guilt. Yet, my mother's unwavering encouragement provided the strength I needed to forge ahead, even in her absence. Her belief in my dreams became my guiding light, illuminating a path of growth and self-discovery. Despite the physical distance between us, my mother's presence remained steadfast. Her unwavering support fueled my determination, reminding me of the importance of seizing opportunities for growth and personal development. With each visit home, I witnessed her reclaiming her music, a testament to her indomitable spirit. She refused to miss a single one of my concerts or performances, making the three-hour drive to sit with her mask on in the audience. Her resilience became my inspiration, a reminder that adversity cannot extinguish the flame of passion and hope. My mother's journey with cancer has profoundly shaped my perspective, infusing my life with courage, resilience, and an unwavering commitment to my dreams. Her strength in the face of adversity serves as a constant reminder that no obstacle is insurmountable. Throughout my songwriting studies at Interlochen, she has frequently served as my muse. Her spirit is in every lyric, melody, and harmony I write. As I embark on my path, her love and support remain my guiding force, propelling me toward a future filled with purpose. In conclusion, my mother's battle with cancer has transformed me in profound ways, shaping my values, priorities, and aspirations. Her unwavering courage and resilience have instilled within me a deep-seated determination to overcome life's challenges with grace and fortitude. As I carry forward her legacy of strength and perseverance, I am forever grateful for the profound impact she has had on shaping the person I am today. I will take these lessons with me and create a stronger, more kind community in music.
    Bald Eagle Scholarship
    At just eleven years old, my world was rocked by the devastating news of my mother's diagnosis of breast cancer. Aged forty-two, she embarked on a grueling battle against this relentless disease, enduring aggressive surgical procedures and ongoing radiation therapy. Yet, her resilience never wavered. Three months post-treatment, another blow struck as she faced melanoma, igniting yet another round of surgeries. Amidst this whirlwind, I witnessed my mother, once a vibrant force of music and joy, lose her melody. No longer did her songs fill our home, and the silence left in their wake was deafening. Music, once our shared refuge, became a distant memory, a poignant reminder of what cancer had stolen. Before her diagnosis, my mother navigated the challenges of single parenthood following my parents' divorce, all while working full-time at the Michigan Department of Education. Despite the overwhelming odds stacked against her, she refused to surrender to despair. Her unwavering commitment to her children, her career, and her own well-being was nothing short of remarkable. She epitomized strength in the face of adversity, a beacon of resilience that continues to guide me. Throughout her battle, my mother's unwavering dedication to her values resonated deeply within me. Despite the financial hardships we faced, she ensured I never missed a voice lesson and somehow managed to scrape together enough money to buy my first guitar as my Christmas gift that year. Her ability to maintain grace amidst chaos taught me invaluable lessons in resilience and perseverance, shaping the core of my character. As her battle raged on, I faced a pivotal decision in my journey. Despite the emotional turmoil of leaving my mother's side, I pursued my passion for music, earning acceptance into the prestigious singer/songwriter program at Interlochen Arts Academy. This meant leaving home for my junior and senior years of high school, a decision fraught with uncertainty and guilt. Yet, my mother's unwavering encouragement provided the strength I needed to forge ahead, even in her absence. Her belief in my dreams became my guiding light, illuminating a path of growth and self-discovery. Despite the physical distance between us, my mother's presence remained steadfast. Her unwavering support fueled my determination, reminding me of the importance of seizing opportunities for growth and personal development. With each visit home, I witnessed her reclaiming her music, a testament to her indomitable spirit. She refused to miss a single one of my concerts or performances, making the three-hour drive to sit with her mask on in the audience. Her resilience became my inspiration, a reminder that adversity cannot extinguish the flame of passion and hope. My mother's journey with cancer has profoundly shaped my perspective, infusing my life with courage, resilience, and an unwavering commitment to my dreams. Her strength in the face of adversity serves as a constant reminder that no obstacle is insurmountable. Throughout my songwriting studies at Interlochen, she has frequently served as my muse. Her spirit is in every lyric, melody, and harmony I write. As I embark on my path, her love and support remain my guiding force, propelling me toward a future filled with possibility and purpose. In conclusion, my mother's battle with cancer has transformed me in profound ways, shaping my values, priorities, and aspirations. She is the most influential person in my life and her unwavering courage and resilience have instilled within me a deep-seated determination to overcome life's challenges with grace and fortitude. As I carry forward her legacy of strength and perseverance, I am forever grateful for the profound impact she has had on shaping the person I am today.
    Holli Safley Memorial Music Scholarship
    I've always known that music would be my way to give back to my community, and now that dream is coming true. I am Audrey Dupuis, a singer/songwriter at Interlochen Arts Academy. Even before I went into songwriting, I was always a little musician. Whether that was playing made-up songs for my family to make them smile, or playing a munchkin in The Wizard of Oz. My dream has always been to become a musician and artist who can bring people together and make them feel seen and heard. Community is a huge aspect of my life. At school, I have created a safe space in my dorm room where any of my friends can come if they're overwhelmed and we can just create music together, or sit in silence and feel our emotions for a while. I think it is extremely important that people feel safe and understood when listening to music, so I tried to provide that when they needed it. Recently, I have had the opportunity to play on a multitude of stages (Kresge Auditorium, The Traverse City Opera House, Corson Auditorium, etc.) and reach out using my music to the audience. After every show I've had people approach me and say that my songs touched them, or that they related to them in some way. For example, my song "Golden Child" is about unrealistic expectations placed on an "advanced" child and how that affects them for the rest of their lives, after that show I had women of all ages coming up to me teary-eyed and expressing how my song made them feel less alone in their struggle with perfectionism. It's moments like that that keep me going. A young girl, around middle school age, came up to me after I sang my song "Ugly Dress" and said that she related to the song. Hearing that a child that young could feel ugly was devastating and when she hugged me and told me that "nobody should feel ugly," it showed me how my music impacted people. I want to continue this journey, this mission to help people through my music. I want to pursue a performance degree because growing my expertise in performance will help me reach out to more people, make more connections, and build a bigger community of supported people. I hope that my music can bring people together and continue to help people feel less alone in this big world.
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    I am Audrey Dupuis, a six-teen-year-old singing-songwriting major at Interlochen Arts Academy who moved 3 and a half hours away from home to pursue my dreams. at the beginning of my sophomore year, I already knew that I wanted out of high school and straight into college. I was impatient, frustrated, academically bored, and creatively burned out. I was the First Chair Bass in Orchestra and the Communications Manager for business within my school's music programs. Despite my small-town success, I wanted more. I wanted to be able to grow as a musician and be challenged, maybe even fail a few times. So, when I saw that one of my theatre camp friends had been accepted into Interlochen Arts Academy, I knew what needed to be done. I discovered it on January 13th and the deadline was January 15th so I immediately got to work. as soon as I got home from school. I started my self-tapes for my Musical Theatre major and recorded my five original songs for Song-Writing. After two days of non-stop recording and discouragement, I hit the submit button. While I waited those two months of anticipation I racked up every extracurricular I could, trying to be the most involved I could be. Just from applying myself, I noticed a change in my demeanor. I started socializing more, I felt more passionate about my art and I started working harder in my academic courses. As I neared April 19th I started saying my goodbyes. My family has always been the most important part of my life, but I was leaving them behind. I felt a part of myself seeping out with every hug from a loved one. But, I knew that when I got that acceptance letter, it would all be worth it. Finally, the day came. I opened my Gmail and turned on my camera. Accepted! To Popular Voice? I was so excited... but I was also so confused. Did this mean I wasn't good enough for Musical Theatre or Songwriting? But I packed up my bags and we sold our house so my mom could afford the already reduced tuition. As I left my front door for the last time, it hit me. This is the end of my childhood. I was about to get what I wanted... so why was I so sad? I was leaving behind the bad parts, but I was also leaving behind the good things for something I didn't choose. I waved goodbye to my home with tears in my eyes and decided it was time to grow up. The car ride was the worst and best part. I felt the growth within me. I felt older and less angry, but I also felt like a little kid again, just wanting to cling to my mom's leg and cry. But, as I pulled up the blue Interlochen sign at the front entrance, it was all worth it. The breaking and retaping of myself. I worked so hard to get to where I am. I scheduled meetings and auditions with the head of Contemporary Music for a major change at the semester switch. I worked extra hours in my House Band to prove myself to everyone. But most of all, I learned that I'm not lazy or angry, I just wasn't where I needed to be. I am still myself, hard-working, social, supportive, and creative, I just polished off the coat of frustration covering my talent. My family is still my biggest support system, they are just a little farther away. I finally allowed myself to grow, and grow up.
    @Carle100 National Scholarship Month Scholarship
    @frankadvice National Scholarship Month TikTok Scholarship
    @normandiealise National Scholarship Month TikTok Scholarship
    Joey Anderson Dance & Theater Scholarship
    When I was eight years old my mother was in a production of Chicago in Clio Cast and Crew with Sandra Brewer. During rehearsal for her song "I Can't Do It Alone," she tore her ACL. I watched from the audience as she was carried to the hospital. She returned to the set a week later to choreograph and help teach music for the show. I was exposed to this kind of strength and community from the age of 3 when I was a Munchkin in The Wizard of Oz. It drove me to continue performing and helping my cast bond. I suppose the biggest reason I stayed in theatre was the community it gave everyone and the rush I got when performing. There were kids I worked with that didn't have a home to go to or didn't have a helping hand to take when things got hard, but when we were on stage together, they had someone to lean on at all times. That is the most beautiful part of my life. Theatre, to me, has been a sanctuary to escape to when life gets too real. It provides me with a comfortable fantasy to lean into to feel free to be myself. In middle school, I was relentlessly picked on for being annoying, "looking like a burn victim" because of my eczema, or for not playing sports. The stage was always somewhere I could be myself without having to deal with the daily harassment from my peers. Everybody always says that theatre kids are so dramatic and petty, but in my experience, it's been nothing short of the opposite. I have only ever been flooded with kindness and acceptance from my casts and I have only ever returned that love. On stage, I feel weightless. It's like my daily hassles have all been lifted off my shoulders and replaced with balloons full of helium, pulling me up to the stage lights. Performing is like walking to me, it comes without a second thought. When I auditioned for Interlochen Arts Academy as a Musical Theatre major, I never thought anything would come of it. I couldn't have been more wrong. I was accepted into an up-and-coming program called Popular Performance. Our first show was on October 19th of 2022 and when I say it was the turning point of my life, I mean it. Being on stage with other musicians that care about the art of performance as much as I do was exhilarating. The choreography, the lights, the music, the acting. It was all so beautiful and refreshing. I knew then that I wanted to spend the rest of my life on stage dancing, singing, performing, and being the savior that my mother was in that rehearsal.